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Masters Degrees (Microbiome)

We have 5 Masters Degrees (Microbiome)

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Our Microbiome in Health & Disease MSc provides students with a unique background in all aspects of both analysis of microbiome and determining the role of microbiome in pathology with experience in both computational and experimental techniques. Read more

Our Microbiome in Health & Disease MSc provides students with a unique background in all aspects of both analysis of microbiome and determining the role of microbiome in pathology with experience in both computational and experimental techniques.

Designed and delivered by the newly established Centre for Host-Microbiome Interactions (CHMI) at King’s, the course brings together teaching on a varied course incorporating systems biology and bioinformatics with molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and physiology.

Key benefits

  • Deep understanding of microbial communities and their impact on host health and disease.
  • Focus on translation in clinical, agricultural and environmental challenges.
  • Opportunity to undertake research in collaboration with industrial partners.

In the post-human genome project world, our health is dependent on more than our genes. High throughput sequencing reveals the amazing complexity and extent of the microbial communities that reside within or upon us. We are also beginning to understand just how dynamic the interactions between the host and members of communities are. Interactions are diverse, and variations observed between individuals depend on a multitude of microbial and host factors, including diet and inflammatory status. More importantly, it is becoming clear that different disease states are linked to significant changes in the make-up of these communities. Scientists who understand the computational analysis of the huge data sets for microbial communities, and who are also able to interpret findings in the context of human and microbial health, will be in demand across this emerging field in academia and in industry.

Description

The MSc Microbiome in Health & Disease will provide you with a deep understanding of microbial communities and their diversity, and the impact of these communities on host health and disease. You will be exposed to the concepts and techniques involved in profiling and analysing large omics data sets associated with characterising and investigating microbial communities.

You will learn to analyse omics data sets, such as genome, transcriptome, metabolome and metagenome data, and how to integrate these data to develop a holistic understanding of the interactions between host and microbial communities in both health and disease states.

You will also learn how these skills apply in industry and have the opportunity to undertake research in collaboration with industrial partners. You will study the intersection between microbiome and engineering and learn how to identify and develop innovative products in different microbiome fields, applying learning from computational, multiomics analysis and basic biology, through advanced synthetic biology tools, and integrative analysis and modelling, to design new engineered therapeutic microbial communities and optimize their effectiveness in clinical, agricultural and environmental challenges.

You will also undertake a 10,000 word supervised dissertation on a subject within the field of microbiome in health and disease.

Course purpose

The course aims to develop students' knowledge of the microbial communities that reside within or upon us, and how they impact our health and disease processes.

It is designed for students who wish to improve their background knowledge and skills prior to applying for a PhD studentship, and also for students who wish to enhance their knowledge and skill set for analysing and interpreting the large, multiple omics data sets that are involved in microbiome research.

Course format and assessment

The MSc Microbiome in Health & Disease consists of 4 taught modules (two covering microbiology, microbial diversity and host-microbiome interactions, and two covering computational analysis of microbiome, and systems and synthetic biology), followed by a lab-based research project. The taught component will run from September until January, with the research component running from February until August.

Teaching comprises conventional lectures, tutorials and computational workshops, supported by example sessions, project work and independent learning via reading material and online courses. During the computational modules, you will be provided with data sets to analyse for written and oral projects.

After completing the taught component, you will undertake a lab-based research project for which you will provide a proposal and subsequent dissertation and presentation under the guidance of a supervisor.

Teaching

The typical hours you will spend as you progress through your studies are as follows:

Lectures, seminars & feedback: 214 hours

Self-study: 1586 hours

Contact time is based on 24 academic weeks and self-study time is based on 31 academic weeks.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

You may typically expect assessment by a combination of coursework (76%) and examinations (24%).

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.



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The Centre for Digestive and Gut Health at Imperial College London has developed this unique MRes stream course, which provides core training in microbiology, nutrition, hepatology and microbial signalling, as well as analytical technologies. Read more

Course Overview

The Centre for Digestive and Gut Health at Imperial College London has developed this unique MRes stream course, which provides core training in microbiology, nutrition, hepatology and microbial signalling, as well as analytical technologies. Students will learn about multidisciplinary approaches to systemic understanding of the gut microbiome and developing new targets for disease prevention and treatment.

This course exposes students to the latest developments in the field through two mini-research projects of 20 weeks' lab time, supplemented by lectures and journal clubs. The MRes course provides specific Gut Health teaching in microbiology, nutrition, microbial signaling and liver and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as analytical technology teaching aligned with the MRes in Biomedical Research. In addition to structured teaching, the MRes year consists of two 5-month laboratory research attachments.

Course Objectives

Students will gain experience in applying technologically advanced approaches to biomedical questions. Individuals who successfully complete the course will have developed the ability to:
• Perform novel laboratory based research and exercise critical scientific thought in the interpretation of results
• Undertake two research projects in line with the multidisciplinary culture of the Centre
• Demonstrate practical and intellectual dexterity in the research project elements
• Develop an appreciation of cutting edge technologies discovering host-microbial communication and current understanding of this association in human health and disease by attending the taught course elements
• Be able to interpret and present scientific data
• Be able to interrogate relevant scientific literature and develop research plans
• Be able to write a grant application, through the taught grant-writing exercise
• Be able to write and defend research reports through writing, poster presentations and seminars
• Exercise a range of transferable skills by taking a minimum number of short courses taught through the Graduate School

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For more information about the Centre for Digestive and Gut Health, please visit http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/centrefordigestiveandguthealth/

For more course information, please contact Dr. Jia Li (see the contact details above)

For online application, please visit https://apply.embark.com/grad/imperial/

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This one-year full-time course provides a broad training to prepare students for a career in biomedical research. The emphasis is on a research-orientated approach and comprises both theoretical and practical elements. Read more
This one-year full-time course provides a broad training to prepare students for a career in biomedical research.

The emphasis is on a research-orientated approach and comprises both theoretical and practical elements.

You will acquire an understanding of modern molecular and cell science in world class biomedical research laboratories through both theory and practical exposure, and will demonstrate practical dexterity in both commonly employed and more advanced practical techniques.

In addition to the main biomedical research stream, run by the Department of Surgery and Cancer, this course also offers research opportunities in specialised streams, run by various departments in the Faculty of Medicine. These are:

Biomedical Research
Bacterial Pathogenesis and Infection (Department of Medicine)
Personalised Healthcare (Department of Surgery and Cancer)
Respiratory and Cardiovascular Science (National Heart and Lung Institute)
Microbiome in Health and Disease (MHD)
Epidemiology, Evolution and Control of Infectious Diseases (EECID)
Anaesthetics, Pain Medicine and Intensive Care (APMIC)

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The MSc in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at UCC is a one-year taught masters course commencing in September. Bioinformatics is a fast-growing field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. Read more
The MSc in Bioinformatics and Computational Biology at UCC is a one-year taught masters course commencing in September. Bioinformatics is a fast-growing field at the intersection of biology, mathematics and computer science. It seeks to create, advance and apply computer/software-based solutions to solve formal and practical problems arising from the management and analysis of very large biological data sets. Applications include genome sequence analysis such as the human genome, the human microbiome, analysis of genetic variation within populations and analysis of gene expression patterns.

As part of the MSc course, you will carry out a three month research project in a research group in UCC or in an external university, research institute or industry. The programming and data handling skills that you will develop, along with your exposure to an interdisciplinary research environment, will be very attractive to employers. Graduates from the MSc will have a variety of career options including working in a research group in a university or research institute, industrial research, or pursuing a PhD.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr33/

Course Detail

This MSc course will provide theoretical education along with practical training to students who already have a BSc in a biological/life science, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering or a related degree.

The course has four different streams for biology, mathematics, statistics and computer science graduates. Graduates of related disciplines, such as engineering, physics, medicine, will be enrolled in the most appropriate stream. This allows graduates from different backgrounds to increase their knowledge and skills in areas in which they have not previously studied, with particular emphasis on hands-on expertise relevant to bioinformatics:

- Data analysis: basic statistical concepts, probability, multivariate analysis methods
- Programming/computing: hands-on Linux skills, basic computing skills and databases, computer system organisation, analysis of simple data structures and algorithms, programming concepts and practice, web applications programming
- Bioinformatics: homology searches, sequence alignment, motifs, phylogenetics, protein folding and structure prediction
- Systems biology: genome sequencing projects and genome analysis, functional genomics, metabolome modelling, regulatory networks, interactome, enzymes and pathways
- Mathematical modelling and simulation: use of discrete mathematics for bioinformatics such as graphs and trees, simulation of biosystems
- Research skills: individual research project, involving a placement within the university or in external research institutes, universities or industry.

Format

Full-time students must complete 12 taught modules and undertake a research project. Part-time students complete about six taught modules in each academic year and undertake the project in the second academic year. Each taught module consists of approximately 20 one-hour lectures (roughly two lectures per week over one academic term), as well as approximately 10 hours of practicals or tutorials (roughly one one-hour practical or tutorial per week over one academic term), although the exact amount of lectures, practicals and tutorials varies between individual modules.

Assessment

There are exams for most of the taught modules in May of each of the two academic years, while certain modules may also have a continuous assessment element. The research project starts in June and finishes towards the end of September. Part-time students will carry out their research project during the summer of their second academic year.

Careers

Graduates of this course offer a unique set of interdisciplinary skills making them highly attractive to employers at universities, research centres and in industry. Many research institutes have dedicated bioinformatics groups, while many 'wet biology' research groups employ bioinformaticians to help with data analyses and other bioinformatics problems. Industries employing bioinformaticians include the pharmaceutical industry, agricultural and biotechnology companies. For biology graduates returning to 'wet lab' biology after completing the MSc course, your newly acquired skills will be extremely useful. Non-biology graduates seeking non-biology positions will also find that having acquired interdisciplinary skills is of great benefit in getting a job.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The course will enable biomedical & clinical students (including research midwives and nurses) to develop an academic and contemporary understanding of the biological and environmental influences that impact on pregnancy and the lifelong physical and mental wellbeing health of women and their infants. Read more

The course will enable biomedical & clinical students (including research midwives and nurses) to develop an academic and contemporary understanding of the biological and environmental influences that impact on pregnancy and the lifelong physical and mental wellbeing health of women and their infants

Students will gain insight and knowledge of how translation of basic science and clinical observation can lead to cutting edge research studies into new diagnostic and treatments both in the UK and in low resource settings globally. .

Students will develop scientific and clinical practical research skills, including statistics, so that they can confidently critically evaluate others research design and results, and apply these to their own research. They will also be given the necessary research knowledge and skills to design, plan, navigate research governance pathways, and conduct and analyse their own research project. Both scientific and clinical research projects are offered. 

Key Benefits

  • Substantial student-tutor contact time
  • Cross disciplinary teaching with a focus on translating research to the clinic and the global community
  • Research project in world class laboratories and research groups in Women’s, Perinatal and Child Health, Paediatric Allergy, Mental Health, Nutrition, Mental and Global Health.
  • Access to the latest leading cutting edge technologies housed at KCL and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre including next generation sequencing, a range of ‘Omics and neonatal imaging, as well as dedicated clinical research units.
  • Lectures delivered by experienced and internationally recognised researchers and clinicians covering contemporary issues in Womens and Children’s health research 
  • Interactive tutorials and workshops on writing successful research grants, clinical study protocols and ethics applications.
  • The programme offers advanced practical experience and supervised training together with an in-depth research project
  • The programme prepares students for future MD and PhD study

Description

The MSc Women and Children's Health comprises three core taught modules, including ‘Fundamentals of Womens and Children’s Health’ which covers health and disease from the periconception period to birth and early childhood. Research led lectures will cover topics such as infertility, pre-pregnancy health, placentation, preeclampsia; immunology of pregnancy and autoimmune disease, metabolic disease in pregnancy, parturition and dysfunctional labour, miscarriage and preterm birth, lactation and infant nutrition, the developing brain and prematurity, childhood diet and dental health, premature infant and the neonatal lung, gut microbiome, obesity, childhood allergy, epigenetics and lifelong health, nutrition and global health and perinatal mental health.

The other required taught modules are Statistics and Research Governance, and Scientific and Clinical Research skills followed by an intensive six month core research projectwithin a lab or clinical research group.

Students can also select 1-2 optional taught module(s) to tailor the course to their developing interests, examples include Perinatal Mental Health, Ethics in Child Health, Regenerative Medicine, Principles of Implementation and Improvement, Science, Leadership and Management, Birth Defects, Assisted Conception, Regenerative Medicine and Global Women's Health.

The programme fosters intellectual skills of students through:

  • Critical assimilation and appraisal of the research literature pertaining to Womens and Children's Health.
  • Production of original pieces of written work that explain, review and evaluate primary research literature and using this evaluation to develop ideas and hypothesises.
  • Understand research governance and demonstrate compliance with research regulations.
  • Understand and apply scientific and clinical study design and statistical analysis principles.
  • Recognise the moral and ethical issues of investigations and appreciate the need for ethical standards and professional codes of conduct.
  • Think critically about their own work/research and to input into the synthesis and design of future hypotheses and experiments.
  • Use subject knowledge and understanding to explore and solve familiar and unfamiliar problems.
  • Collect, interpret and analyse data with a critical understanding of the appropriate contexts for their use through the study of primary research articles, and the student's own data.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

A typical week would be have approximately 10-15 hours teaching with the remaining hours dedicated to self-guided learning. In the final semester, research projects are full time with hours dedicated to practical and data collection, data analysis and writing.

You will study via a combination of lectures, journal clubs, group discussions, practicals, workshops and independent study.

Peer feedback, in course assignments such as data handling, research project and project report write-up, journal club, presentations and essays. All will be actively encouraged throughout the research project.

Typically, one credit equates to 10 hours of work.

Assessment

We will assess you through a combination of coursework, seen/unseen written exams, essays, problem directed learning exercises, case studies, ethical problem debate, data-handling, creation of clinical study materials such as patient information sheets and consent forms, research proposal, oral presentations, and a final research project report.

The study time and assessment methods detailed above are typical and give you a good indication of what to expect. However, they may change if the course modules change.

Career prospects

The course will prepare scientists and clinicians for further research into Womens & Children’s Health



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