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This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics. Read more
This new Masters is designed to bridge the gap between economics and development, providing strong training in quantitative and policy analysis in development economics.

Who is it for?

The Development Economics MSc course at City is designed for those looking to gain an understanding of key issues in economic development and provide you with rigorous economic theory and statistical tools to be able to analyse policies and assess their impact on economic and human development.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in economics, with particular reference to development. By the time you graduate, you should be able to:
-Demonstrate that modern economic theory is relevant to development economics.
-Critically interpret current research in development economics and evaluate its relevance to development practice and policy analysis.
-Understand the enduring determinants of poverty.
-Analyse the issues of fertility, education, health, work, migration and microfinance and their contribution to economic development.
-Develop microeconomic models to explain how people make such decisions and how policy is likely to affect their choices.
-Assess policies designed towards helping the poor by taking into account how people react to policy interventions, and statistically assess the success of such policies.
-Undertake empirical investigations in development economics, using appropriate quantitative methods.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from City's London location, and our proximity to the centres of decision-making in development economics. (We are six tube stops away from the Department for International Development, for example.).

Teaching and learning

The Development Economics MSc course is designed to be flexible in the range of teaching methods used. You learn through a mixture of lecturing, discussions, analysis of case studies, student presentations and particularly for the quantitative elements of the course, interactive computer-based exercises. You are encouraged to participate actively in the classes.

The taught modules usually run for a term and have three hours of teaching each week. This time may include workshops and tutorials as well as lectures.

Outside your timetabled hours you have access to City’s library and computing facilities for independent study. Your independent study will include reading recommended books and papers, and “reading around” the field to develop a deeper understanding.

In your third term we organise for experts from outside City to come in and present current research on both methodological and applied topics.

For the dissertation or literature survey, each student is allocated a supervisor, who will guide you in your research and writing for this module. We also offer pre-sessional induction courses covering topics such as probability, microeconomics and the Stata software.

Assessment

For each taught module in the Department of Economics, you are assessed through a combination of coursework and one final examination. For most modules the coursework contributes 30% of the overall mark and the examination contributes 70%. The nature of the coursework which the lecturer assigns varies according to the module, for example essays, presentations or computer-based data analysis and calculations. Modules taught in the Department of International Politics are usually assessed solely by coursework.

Overall assessment is based on your performance in the taught modules and a dissertation or literature survey. Students require 180 credits to pass the MSc. The weighting of each module within the overall mark is determined by the credit value assigned to that module.

Modules

You will complete 180 credits. This includes taught modules worth 120 credits plus 60 credits through either of the below paths.
-Literature Survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a Literature Survey worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit Economics Research Project.

Each module typically has a weekly two-hour lecture and a one-hour tutorial, but this may vary.

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other, depending on which electives you choose.

Dissertation Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Dissertation (60 credits)
Elective modules
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Macroeconomics (15 credits)

Literature Survey Path
Core modules
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Literature Survey (30 credits)
Elective modules
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)

Elective modules for both paths
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-Development and World Politics (15 credits)*
-Political Economy of Global Finance (15 credits)*
-The Politics of Forced Migration (15 credits)*

*Students on the Dissertation Path can take only 1 of these modules, which are taught in the Department of International Politics. Students on the Literature Survey Path can take up to 2 of these modules.

Career prospects

Upon completion of this course you will have the skills to work in:
-Consulting firms specialising in development.
-Governmental bodies such as the Department for International Development (DFID).
-Major international financial and development institutions such as World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations or the Overseas Development Institute, which regularly recruits MSc graduates for overseas postings.

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Internationalisation of the world economy and the policy challenges it has posed for business and public decision-makers have increased the demand for economics graduates. Read more
Internationalisation of the world economy and the policy challenges it has posed for business and public decision-makers have increased the demand for economics graduates. This demand is evident in a wide range of national and international institutions, including central banks and finance ministries, commercial and investment banks, rating agencies, and business organisations. Opportunities are also available in international governmental and non-governmental organisations, central and local government departments, and economics and business media.

These employers reflect an ever-increasing demand for high-quality, evidence-based decision making that requires competence in applied economics and state-of-the-art data analysis.

This programme will enable you to respond to this increasing demand by combining solid training in theory and method with stimulating exposure to economics and financial data sources. The programme weaves a three-way linkage between business and financial economics theory, data analysis, and application of theory and method to policy and strategy issues in the world of business and finance.

The programme has a number of distinctive features. These include structured conversion, which will enable you to combine theory and evidence to produce evidence-based work, and rigorous application, enabling you to combine theory and evidence to develop evidence-based answers to economic and business issues. You will also become competent in data access and analysis, enabling you to access, manage and analyse data on a wide range of economic and business issues. A work placement will give you the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills and prepare for work as a professional economist.

We are proud to say that we are first for student course satisfaction in London for Economics, according to both the Guardian and the Complete University Guide 2016 league tables.

The aims of the programme are:

- To equip you with a sound knowledge of business and financial economics, which will help improve your analytical and problem-solving skills

- To introduce you to new insights in the study of business and financial economics, which will develop your critical- and creative-thinking skills

- To enable you to respond to the increasing demand for economics graduates by developing your skills and competence in business and financial economics.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/eco/busfinec

Economics

Internationalisation of the world economy and the policy challenges this has posed for business and public decision makers have increased the demand for economics graduates. Our teaching responds to this demand by combing solid training in theory and method with stimulating exposure to economics and financial data sources.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Selected Topics in International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
Dissertation (MSc Business & Financial Economics) (40 credits)
Data Access, Management and Analysis (10 credits)
Introduction to Economic Analysis and Quantitative Methods (10 credits)
Applied Econometrics (30 credits)
Business Economics (30 credits)
Economics of Financial Markets (30 credits)
Business English for Academic Purposes - Level 4
Work Placement (MSc BFE)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Regulatory Institutions of the World Economy (15 credits)
Micro-Finance In International Development (15) (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Data Access, Management and Analysis (10 credits)
Introduction to Economic Analysis and Quantitative Methods (10 credits)
Applied Econometrics (30 credits)
Business Economics (30 credits)
Business English for Academic Purposes - Level 4

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Selected Topics in International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
Dissertation (MSc Business & Financial Economics) (40 credits)
Economics of Financial Markets (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Regulatory Institutions of the World Economy (15 credits)
Micro-Finance In International Development (15) (15 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Assessment

You are assessed through coursework, presentations, projects, closed-book examinations and a dissertation.

Career options

You can expect to find employment in: national and international business organisations specialised in various business sectors covered in the programme; financial market institutions and organisations including banks; policy-making institutions seeking economists with a sound applied economics background; NGOs with interest in business and economic policies and issues; and finance and business-relations departments of local governments.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/643994/Prog-Spec-MSc-Business-and-Financial-Economics.pdf

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it. Read more
From start-ups to multinationals, the MSc Business Economics course is about applying economics to business – and London is the ideal place to do it.

Who is it for?

The MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics is for students who want to apply economics to real-world issues. From transfer pricing, to the complexity of financial markets and the pros and cons of EU membership, you will need to be strong at statistics and quantitative methods to get to grips with the material that makes up the core modules. The MSc is designed to give you the tools to apply your knowledge, so we expect you to be downloading the free FT app and getting on top of current issues from the second you start.

Objectives

On the MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics you won’t be deriving equations. Instead, we use them to apply economics to current business issues.

The programme has been designed to equip students with a wealth of resources combining data banks from City’s Cass Business School and School of Arts and Social Sciences. This means you have access to everything from Datastream, Bloomberg and Bankscope, to Morning Star and Orbis.

MSc Business Economics / International Business Economics maximises City’s central London location. With high-profile guest lecturers such as Jim O’Neill, former Chief Economist from Goldman Sachs, you gain insight straight from the City studying in the heart of "the world's biggest financial centre" (Economist, 2012.)

Teaching and learning

The course is taught through a series of lectures (which are also available as online resources), seminars, student presentations and interactive group work. Computer laboratory teaching gives you practical experience using software packages to develop statistical and econometric skills that are formatively assessed by computer-based exercises.

You also undertake a research project or economics literature survey on a subject that is of interest to you. This must cover a current topic that is within the remit of Business Economics or International Business Economics.

Assessment

You are assessed by coursework and examination. Your overall degree result is based on your performance in the taught modules and the dissertation.

Modules

The core content is covered in the first term, making this a programme with a lot of choice. There is an economics and econometrics focus, but you also can study topics including the economics of micro-finance, e-commerce, asset pricing and the history of economic thought.

If you choose to study MSc International Business Economics you will need to study the International Business Economics elective in the second term, and your research project has to cover more than one country. So, for example, you could not focus on a single-country subject such as privatisation in the UK. For a detailed module breakdown, see the website: http://www.city.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/business-economics-international-business-economics/2017

Career prospects

When it comes to employer recognition, City is well established. City has become synonymous with quality and the Government Economic Service regularly recruits postgraduate students from this programme. There is also a range of career service events across the School of Arts and Social Sciences and Cass Business School, which you can attend throughout the programme.

Our graduates include Yuliya Bashmakov, Senior Gas Control Scheduler for ExxonMobil and Youssef Intabli who is now working as an account manager at Bloomberg.

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The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries. Read more
The MSc is designed to meet the demand for health economics’ quantitative, theoretical and analytical skills for decision-making in the healthcare sector, both in developed and in developing countries.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone with an economics background interested in developing a career as a health economist working for the public and private sectors, as well as international health organisations and NGOs.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your analytical and modeling abilities and enable you to apply microeconomics and econometrics tools to understand the health care sector and the demand for health. This course will provide you with the experience and the skills you need to work as a health economists in private or public of institutions doing health economics.

Placements

Companies and organisations are invited to meet our students and propose subjects for their dissertation to be done during a placement. Organisations and students liaise directly with the approval of the academic supervisor.

Placements can be for instance with: Boehringer-I, Janssen –Cilag, Eli Lilly, Campbell Aliance, Office of Health Economics, Otsuka, Celgene, Curo, IMS Health, and many others.

Placements provide a unique opportunity to apply the skills learned during the MSc and acquire experience in the workplace.

Academic facilities

You will benefit from state of the art student-geared facilities, including a bright new gym and meeting points. Most importantly, you will benefit from City’s central London location.

Teaching and learning

The course is taught by research active academic staff, teaching assistants and industry and visiting lecturers.

We also have invited speakers that come to present specialised topics in health economics.

Assessments are typically a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module) but this can vary by module. About two thirds of our students secure a placement at a firm. The placement is used to learn about the sector while writing the dissertation.

Assessment

The teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods over one year. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme at the end of September, when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August re-sit exam session will submit their literature review/dissertation in December.

Part time: 20 weeks of lectures plus dissertation/literature review and examination periods spread over one year and 3 months. Part-time students complete all modules over the course of four terms, from September to June, before undertaking their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions will finish the programme in December when they submit their literature review/dissertation. Part-time students who successfully pass all the taught modules in August will submit in March of the following year.

Modules

The teaching takes place over two terms from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Note: for part-time students, the modules are taught on weekdays during the daytime, alongside the students who are studying on the full-time Master’s programme. Please contact us for further details.

We are introducing a revised programme structure for students who join from September 2016. You will take three core modules, then subsequent modules are tailored to your chosen pathway.

Core modules for all students
-Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Advanced Economic Evaluation (15 credits)
-Health Economics (15 credits)

Core modules for the dissertation path
-Microeconomic Theory (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Economics Research Project (60 credits)

Core modules for the literature survey path
-Microeconomic Analysis (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods Health (30 credits)
-Economics Literature Survey (30 credits)

Elective Modules - on the Dissertation route you will take one elective, on the literature survey route you will take three.
-Health Economics
-Economic Evaluation Workshops (15 credits)
-Welfare Economics (15 credits)
-Epidemiology (15 credits)
-Development Economics (15 credits)
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Experimental Economics and Game Theory (15 credits)
-History of Economic Thought (15 credits)

Career prospects

This MSc prepares you for career opportunities in economic consultancies, think-tanks, the pharmaceutical industry, professional associations, governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations.

It also prepares you for a PhD in health economics, or teaching and research positions in academic institutions.

Examples: Abacus International, NICE, Optum, IMS Health, Research International, NHS, Kovis, Eli-Lilly, OHE, United Nations, Fidelity, Oxford Outcomes, Gallaher, Johnson&Johnson, Novo Nordisk, Synovate, Tomtah, as well as PhDs at UCL, York, City University London and Warwick.

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The course is designed to give you a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical and mathematical financial economics. Read more
The course is designed to give you a thorough background in the latest advances in theoretical and mathematical financial economics.

Who is it for?

This course is designed for anyone who wants to undertake rigorous training in financial economics and mathematics, either immediately after completion of an undergraduate degree or as a mid-career professional.

You have the option of studying full-time over the course of one year or part-time over the course of two.

Objectives

The aim of this course is to develop your critical and analytical abilities in mathematics and economics and to prepare you academically for a career as a financial economist or quantitative analyst.

The dissertation track also serves as a stepping stone to an Economics or Finance PhD.

Teaching and learning

The Financial Economics MSc course is delivered through a flexible combination of lectures, seminars and computer lab sessions. Lectures introduce you to the key theories, concepts and economic models. In seminars you have the opportunity to solve applied problems, analyse case studies and make presentations of research published in leading academic journals.

The computer labs provide you with practical experience of using computer software to perform calculations and conduct realistic simulations. In addition, econometric methods are taught in lab sessions, so you have the opportunity to apply econometric software to empirical research and financial market estimations.

When appropriate, "practitioner slots" - such as research seminars conducted by external financial experts, presentations by invited academics etc. - will be incorporated into module delivery.

We also offer pre-sessional induction courses on economic analysis for students who need to build up their background in the fundamental aspects of financial economics.

Teaching takes place over two terms, from September to June. Full-time students who pass all the taught modules during the main exam sessions finish the programme at the end of September when they submit their dissertation or literature review. Full-time students who successfully complete the taught modules in the August resit exam session submit their dissertation or literature review in December.

Part-time students complete there modules over the course of four terms from September to June before undertaking their dissertation or literature review.

Assessment

Assessments are a combination of unseen written examinations (70% for each module) and coursework (30% for each module).

Modules

You will take two 30 credit taught modules, four 15 credit taught modules and will accrue 60 extra credits through one of the following routes:
-Literature survey: two extra elective taught modules of 15 credits each and a literature survey (Economics Literature Survey) worth 30 credits
-Dissertation: a 60 credit dissertation (Economics Research Project).

Note: It is not possible to give exact hours per week because these can vary from one term to the other depending on which electives the students choose.

Dissertation route modules
Core modules:
-Financial Markets (30 credits)
-Econometrics (30 credits)
-Economics Research project (60 credits)

Literature survey route modules
Core modules:
-Financial Markets (30 credits)
-Quantitative Methods (30 credits)
-Economics Literature Survey (30 credits)

Elective modules:
-Economics of Regulation and Competition (15 credits)
-The Economics of Micro-Finance (15 credits)
-Economics and Business Strategy (15 credits)

Electives
On the dissertation route you will choose two modules from group one and one module from group two. On the literature survey route you will choose two modules from group one, two modules from group two and two further electives from either group or from the route specific electives.
Group one
-Financial Derivatives (15 credits)
-Asset Pricing (15 credits)
-Corporate Finance (15 credits)

Group two
-Quantitative Finance with Matlab (15 credits)
-International Macroeconomics (15 credits)
-Corporate |nvestment under Uncertainty (15 credits)

Career prospects

On completing the Masters in Financial Economics course you will have a range of employment possibilities, to some extent determined by the electives you choose.

For example, you may work in the financial industry as a consultant, banker, quantitative analyst, or in the health industry as a financial analyst, or in any industry that requires a financial or industry analyst.

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Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. The Risk and Disaster Reduction MRes is a research-intensive programme, which aims to meet the rapidly growing need for experts trained to analyse and provide solutions to complex issues relating to risk and disasters.

Degree information

Students will learn about and explore the characterisation, quantification, management and reduction of risk and disasters, and their associated impacts, from a diverse range of scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives. They will acquire advanced levels of knowledge of empirical, theoretical and practical aspects of risk and disaster reduction, and will gain research experience and the ability to effectively communicate research findings through the independent research project.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two skills modules (30 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and an independent research project (105 credits). A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) is offered. See separate entry for further details.

Skills modules
-Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
-Research Appraisal and Proposal

Optional modules - students choose three of the following modules:
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Natural and Anthropegenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Emergency and Crisis Management

Dissertation/report
All students undertake a substantial research project of 15,000 to 20,000 words, which culminates in an independent research report and oral presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading, practical problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is through coursework, examination, essays, project reports, oral and poster presentations, and the research dissertation.

Fieldwork
There are a number of UK-based day fieldtrips as part of the programme. These look at the multiple facets of disaster risk including the physical hazard, vulnerability of structures and communities, and mitigation measures and management.

There is also a NGO-led disaster scenario exercise.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering, and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR careers and opportunities forum for students has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, local government and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Employability
Examples of previous graduate students' employment within the field of risk and disaster reduction include working for an international economic consultancy based in London in the area of micro-finance, working as a consultant in disaster risk for a key player in the London insurance market and working for Rescue Global, a NGO based in London. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL. UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with NGOs, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

Read less
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. The Risk and Disaster Reduction Postgraduate Certificate offers students the opportunity to gain a sound grasp of the characteristics of risk and disasters and their past, present and future impacts on society.

Degree information

Students develop the ability to assess risk and disaster potential and appreciate and propose risk and disaster management and mitigation strategies. They gain the knowledge and skills required to make more effective decisions based on the creative and critical analysis of a broad spectrum of information.

Students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of four compulsory modules (15 credits each). There are no optional modules for this programme.

Core modules
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Emergency and Crisis Management

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical problem-solving exercises. Assessment is by oral and written examinations, group exercises, and assessed practicals and coursework. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering, and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR careers and opportunities forum for students has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, local government, academic institutions, and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Employability
Employees of previous graduates include an international economic consultancy based in London in the area of micro-finance, a large London insurance firm, and London-based NGO Rescue Global. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) leads multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well-placed to lead research and teaching in this field, with at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with NGOs, industry and government department based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

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The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. Read more
The importance of science in understanding disaster risks and the need for science-based strategies at local, national and international levels are now widely recognised. The Risk and Disaster Science MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained in disaster science in sectors ranging from finance to humanitarian response.

Degree information

In a science-led programme, students will explore the characterisation of risk from a fundamental understanding of hazard, statistical modelling, appreciation of causes of vulnerability, and quantifying exposure to the management and reduction of disaster risks. There is an emphasis on scientific analysis and statistical methods. Students will enjoy a wide range of taught modules covering scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, six core modules and two optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules
-Decision and Risk Statistics
-Earthquake Hazard Risk
-Emergency and Crisis Management
-Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
-Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
-The Variable Sun: Space Weather Risks

Optional modules - choose options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:
-Climate Risks to Hydro-ecological Systems
-Emergency and Crisis Planning
-Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
-Seismic Risk Assessment
-Statistical Computing

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, practicals, field visits, directed reading and problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in industry and commerce, research, research communication and public policy including insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, business continuity, humanitarian assistance, engineering and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field.

The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and headhunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction.

Employability
This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is currently available. Career destinations of recent IRDR graduates include: a London-based international economic consultancy in the field of micro-finance; a consultancy role in disaster risk for an insurance company; a PhD studentship; the World Food Programme; and Rescue Global - an NGO based in London. A number of MSc students have also participated in internship programmes with Rescue Global.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across twelve departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policymakers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

Read less
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. Read more
Risk and disaster reduction, particularly within the contexts of dealing with uncertainty and increasing resilience, are high on local, national and international agendas. The Risk, Disaster and Resilience MSc aims to meet the growing need for experts trained to analyse and provide solutions to these complex issues.

Degree information

Students will learn about and explore the characterisation, quantification, management and reduction of risk and disasters, and their associated impacts, from a diverse range of scientific, technical, socio-economic, political, environmental, ethical and cultural perspectives. They will benefit from a wide range of taught modules which form the focus of the programme.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of six core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (to the combined value of 30 credits) and an independent research project (60 credits).

A postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, 6 core modules and 2 optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits, 6 core modules and 2 optional modules), full-time nine months, part-time two years, is also offered.

Core modules
All 6 core modules must be taken.
‌•Integrating Science into Risk and Disaster Reduction
‌•Natural and Anthropogenic Hazards and Vulnerability
‌•Emergency and Crisis Planning
‌•Emergency and Crisis Management
‌•Risk and Disaster Reduction Research Tools
‌•Research Proposal and Appraisal

Optional modules
‌Choose two options (to the combined value of 30 credits) from a list which may include the following:
‌•Natural Hazards, Social Vulnerability and Disaster Risk Management
‌•Post Disaster Recovery
‌•Adapting Cities to Climate Change
‌•Disaster Risk Reduction in Cities
‌•Earthquake Seismology and Earthquake Hazards
‌•Decision and Risk (Statistics)
‌•Risk and Contingency Planning (Security and Crime Science)
‌•Risk Power and Uncertainty (Anthropology)
‌•Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health

Dissertation/report
‌•All students undertake an independent research project of 10,000-12,000 words which culminates in a research project and poster presentation.

Teaching and learning
‌•The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, directed reading and practical problem-solving exercises and a real-time disaster scenario event, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and tutorial-style dialogue between students and lecturers. Assessment is by independent and group oral presentations, written examination, coursework essays, and the independent project. Practical applications of critical and creative problem solving will be encouraged and assessed throughout.

Fieldwork
‌•A series of one-day UK based field trips are available.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Risk, Disaster and Resilience MSc

Careers

This programme provides excellent training towards careers in research, research communication, public policy, (re)insurance, catastrophe modelling, finance, risk management, international development, humanitarian assistance, engineering, and many other fields. It supports the career development of professionals already working in risk and disaster reduction, as well as those who intend to go into this field. The IRDR runs a careers and opportunities forum for students; this has been attended by insurance companies, catastrophe modelling firms, NGOs, academic institutions, and head hunters in the field of risk and disaster reduction. Several students have found opportunities through contacts made and positions advertised during this event.

Employability
Employers of previous graduates include:

‌•a London-based international economic consultancy working in micro-finance
‌•insurance companies market,
‌•the World Food Programme
‌•a London council
‌•London-based NGO Rescue Global
‌•and continued academic study through a PhD studentship.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR), where teaching for this programme is based, leads and co-ordinates multidisciplinary research, knowledge exchange and advanced teaching in risk and disaster reduction across UCL.

UCL is uniquely well placed to lead research and teaching in this field; in addition to at least 70 academics across 12 departments and seven faculties involved in world-class research, the IRDR has established links with non-governmental organisations, industry and government departments based in and around London.

Teaching and project supervision will be provided by active researchers, practitioners and policy-makers, all of whom are leaders in their respective fields.

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The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich providing research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. Read more
The Natural Resources Institute (NRI) is a specialised multidisciplinary organisation within the University of Greenwich providing research and consultancy in support of sustainable development, economic growth and poverty reduction, principally, but not solely, in the natural resources sector. NRI has a rapidly growing programme of research at MPhil and PhD level on social-scientific and interdisciplinary topics relating to development in the South and in Europe. The institute provides a vibrant research environment for MPhil and PhD students in development studies with students from a number of countries and a variety of backgrounds in research, government and non-governmental organisations. Students are also actively encouraged to network with peers from other universities in the UK.

The Livelihoods and Institutions Department works on a number of themes related to natural resources, environment and development. Particular interests include participatory and client-oriented methods of agricultural research and their institutionalisation, agricultural service delivery, performance and impact assessment methodologies, community based natural resource management, land tenure, urban agriculture and rural-urban linkages, pastoralism, vulnerability to disasters and climate change. The Food and Markets Department works on many economics-based development issues. Important themes include the performance of agricultural markets, value chains, international standards and agricultural trade, micro-finance, enterprise development and poverty reduction, ethical trade and corporate social responsibility.

We welcome applications from potential students from either a social or natural scientific background. We can offer full-time or part-time registration, with students based on our campus in Medway or in their home countries, or some combination of the two.

Recent research project topics include:

- Forbidden (Sacred) Lakes and Conservation: The Role of Indigenous Beliefs in the Management of Wetland Resources in the Niger Delta, Nigeria

- Farmer organisations and their impacts for pro-poor growth among smallholder farmers in Malawi

- Understanding the influence of livelihood features on cassava value chains

- Rural territorial dynamics in North East Brazil: the Jiquiriçá Valley in Bahia

- Pro-poor market-based approaches for economic recovery in post-conflict countries: the case of Liberia

- Cross-borrowing and its impact on microentrepreneurs' repayment performance and well-being in Peru.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries.

- To strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/res/devstudies

What you'll study

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide an environment for innovative, intellectually rigorous and developmentally significant research, primarily on developing countries.

- To strengthen the research capacity of students from a variety of intellectual and professional backgrounds.

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through their thesis and oral examination.

Career options

Postgraduate research students from NRI have a good record of finding employment within their specific technical discipline or in the field of international development.

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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