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The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are… Read more
The Master’s Programme in Micro- & Nanotechnology Enterprise is an exciting opportunity in which world-leading scientists and successful entrepreneurs are brought together to deliver a one-year Master’s degree combining an in-depth multidisciplinary scientific programme with a global perspective on the commercial opportunities and business practice necessary for the successful exploitation in the rapidly developing fields of nanotechnology and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).

The programme is intended for those with a good first degree in the physical sciences and engineering who wish to develop research skills and a commercial awareness in micro- and nanotechnology. It combines cutting-edge science with business practice skills, giving students knowledge and experience of a range of disciplines. This should enable students graduating from the course to evaluate the scientific importance and technological potential of new developments in the field of the field of Micro and Nanotechnology and provides an unparalleled educational experience for entrepreneurs in these fields.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/pcmmmpmne

Course detail

Students will:

- be able to develop a discipline-specific terminology to describe and discuss relevant aspects of Micro and Nanotechnology, as well as Business;
- be able to develop their scientific writing skills through lab reports, literature survey, project dissertation, and scientific communication skills through oral presentations;
- be able to develop independence and critical thinking, as well as project management skills;
- have the opportunity develop team project skills.

Format

The programme is modular in structure and lasts ten months. It is envisaged that students attend all modules, which consist of no more than 16 hours of lectures per module with additional discussion groups and personal study time. The students will be examined on all core modules and may select which elective modules they are examined on. The modules are taught in the first two terms and will be followed by formal examinations. The modules are drawn from Science and Technology, Business Management and Innovation strands and so cover the many complexities involved in the processes of discovery and exploitation.

Written or oral feedback is provided after completion of assessed course work. In addition students must sit a mock exam at the beginning of the Lent Term; detailed individual feedback is provided by the Course Directors, who are also available for consultation throughout the academic year.

Assessment

A dissertation of not more than 15,000 words in length (including tables, figure legends and appendices, but excluding bibliography) on a major project, involving (i) in-depth scientific research (following a literature survey in the same scientific field), or (ii) an in-depth case study concerned with a topic in science, business, ethics, law or policy (related to the topic covered during the literature survey). The assessment will include a viva voce examination.

No more than eight essays, each of not more than 3,000 words in length, covering the fields of science, ethics, law, and policy, and the interface of micro- and nanoscience and business.

A literature survey report of not more than 5000 words in length on a scientific topic, to be followed by either a major research project in the same field, or a business, ethics, law, or policy-related case study, concerning the scientific topic.

Course work, which may include written work, group work, and class participation.

Two unseen written examination papers, which may cover all core and elective scientific subjects prescribed in the syllabus.

Five practical assessments.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Research profile. Read more

Research profile

The Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems (IMNS) brings together researchers from integrated-circuit design, system-on-chip design, image-sensor design, bioelectronics, micro/nano-fabrication, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micromachining, neural computation and reconfigurable and adaptive computing.

Research interests include low-level analogue, low-power, adaptive and bio-inspired approaches, system-on-chip computing and applications from telecommunications to finance and astronomy. There is also a research focus on integrating CMOS microelectronic technology with sensors and microsystems/MEMS to create smart sensor systems. We also have a strong and growing interest in applications relating to life sciences and medicine, with particular focus on bioelectronics, biophotonics and bio-MEMS.

IMNS has laboratory facilities that are unique within the UK, including an advanced silicon and MEMS micro-fabrication capability coupled with substantial design and test resources. The Institute has an excellent reputation for commercialising technology.

Training and support

The development of transferable skills is a vital part of postgraduate training and a vibrant, interdisciplinary training programme is offered to all research students by the University’s Institute for Academic Development (IAD). The programme concentrates on the professional development of postgraduates, providing courses directly linked to postgraduate study.

Courses run by the IAD are free and have been designed to be as flexible as possible so that you can tailor the content and timing to your own requirements.

Our researchers are strongly encouraged to present their research at conferences and in journal during the course of their PhD.

Every year, the Graduate School organises a Postgraduate Research Conference to showcase the research carried out by students across the Research Institutes

Our researchers are also encouraged and supported to attend transferable skills courses provided by organisations such as the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Facilities

The Institute has laboratory facilities that are unique within the UK, including a comprehensive silicon and MEMS micro-fabrication capability coupled with substantial design and test resources.

The Institute has an excellent reputation for commercialising technology.

Research opportunities

We offer a comprehensive range of exciting research opportunities through a choice of postgraduate research degrees: MSc by Research, MPhil and PhD.

Masters by Research

An MSc by Research is based on a research project tailored to a candidate’s interests. It lasts one year full time or two years part time. The project can be a shorter alternative to an MPhil or PhD, or a precursor to either – including the option of an MSc project expanding into MPhil or doctorate work as it evolves. It can also be a mechanism for industry to collaborate with the School.



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Microsystems Engineering is one of the most dynamic and interdisciplinary engineering fields. The Master of Science program in Microsystems Engineering (MSE) provides the educational basis for your success in this field. Read more
Microsystems Engineering is one of the most dynamic and interdisciplinary engineering fields. The Master of Science program in Microsystems Engineering (MSE) provides the educational basis for your success in this field. The MSE program is designed for highly qualified graduate students holding a Bachelor degree in engineering or science.

In the first year 12 mandatory courses provide the fundamental theoretical framework for a future career in Microsystems. These courses are designed to provide students with a broad knowledge base in the most important aspects of the field:

• MSE technologies and processes
• Microelectronics
• Micro-mechanics
• MSE design laboratory I
• Optical Microsystems
• Sensors
• Probability and statistics
• Assembly and packaging technology
• Dynamics of MEMS
• Micro-actuators
• Biomedical Microsystems
• Micro-fluidics
• MSE design laboratory II
• Signal processing

As part of the mandatory courses, the Microsystems design laboratory is a two-semester course in which small teams of students undertake a comprehensive, hands-on design project in Microsystems engineering. Requiring students to address all aspects of the generation of a microsystem, from conceptualization, through project planning to fabrication and testing, this course provides an essential glimpse into the workings of engineering projects.

In the second year, MSE students can specialise in two of the following seven concentration areas (elective courses), allowing each student to realize individual interests and to obtain an in-depth look at two sub-disciplines of this very broad, interdisciplinary field:

• Circuits and systems
• Design and simulation
• Life sciences: Biomedical engineering
• Life sciences: Lab-on-a-chip
• Materials
• Process engineering
• Sensors and actuators

Below are some examples of subjects offered in the concentration areas. These subjects do not only include theoretical lectures, but also hands-on courses such as labs, projects and seminars.

Circuits and Systems
• Analog CMOS Circuit Design
• Mixed-Signal CMOS Circuit Design
• VLSI – System Design
• RF- und Microwave Devices and Circuits
• Micro-acoustics
• Radio sensor systems
• Optoelectronic devices
• Reliability Engineering
• Lasers
• Micro-optics
• Advanced topics in Macro-, Micro- and Nano-optics


Design and Simulation
• Topology optimization
• Compact Modelling of large Scale Systems
• Lattice Gas Methods
• Particle Simulation Methods
• VLSI – System Design
• Hardware Development using the finite element method
• Computer-Aided Design

Life Sciences: Biomedical Engineering
• Signal processing and analysis of brain signals
• Neurophysiology I: Measurement and Analysis of Neuronal Activity
• Neurophysiology II: Electrophysiology in Living Brain
• DNA Analytics
• Basics of Electrostimulation
• Implant Manufacturing Techologies
• Biomedical Instrumentation I
• Biomedical Instrumentation II

Life Sciences: Lab-on-a-chip
• DNA Analytics
• Biochip Technologies
• Bio fuel cell
• Micro-fluidics 2: Platforms for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

Materials
• Microstructured polymer components
• Test structures and methods for integrated circuits and microsystems
• Quantum mechanics for Micro- and Macrosystems Engineering
• Microsystems Analytics
• From Microsystems to the nano world
• Techniques for surface modification
• Nanomaterials
• Nanotechnology
• Semiconductor Technology and Devices

MEMS Processing
• Advanced silicon technologies
• Piezoelectric and dielectric transducers
• Nanotechnology

Sensors and Actuators
• Nonlinear optic materials
• CMOS Microsystems
• Quantum mechanics for Micro- and Macrosystems Engineering
• BioMEMS
• Bionic Sensors
• Micro-actuators
• Energy harvesting
• Electronic signal processing for sensors and actuators


Essential for the successful completion of the Master’s degree is submission of a Master’s thesis, which is based on a project performed during the third and fourth semesters of the program. Each student works as a member of one of the 18 research groups of the department, with full access to laboratory and cleanroom infrastructure.

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Electronic technologies have evolved enabling many new device concepts, fabrication methods and characterisation techniques. This has led to the simultaneous fabrication of micro scale mechanical structures with integrated electronics to form MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). Read more

Course Summary

Electronic technologies have evolved enabling many new device concepts, fabrication methods and characterisation techniques. This has led to the simultaneous fabrication of micro scale mechanical structures with integrated electronics to form MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). MEMS technology is becoming ubiquitous; it is the key enabling technology that will underpin the internet of things and the proliferation of smart technology in the world around us. You will gain an understanding of the techniques developed by the microelectronics industry to produce micron-scale mechanical devices such as accelerometers and micropumps on silicon wafers. You will work in research laboratories and in the cleanroom.

Modules

Semester one: Microfabrication; Introduction to MEMS; Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip; Nanoelectronic Devices; Advanced Memory and Storage; Bionanotechnology

Semester two: MEMS Sensors and Actuators; Practical Application of MEMS; Green Electronics; Nanofabrication and Microscopy; Quantum Devices and Technology; Biosensors; Medical Electrical and Electronic Technologies

Visit our website for further information...



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The Industrial Masters by Research is is supported by the University of Salford and by Dyer Environmental Controls Ltd. Supervisors. Read more
The Industrial Masters by Research is is supported by the University of Salford and by Dyer Environmental Controls Ltd

Supervisors: Professor Will Swan and Richard Fitton

It will run for 1 year and includes:
• A fee waiver
• A stipend of £15,363 p.a.

Candidates must have settled status in the UK and meet the Residency Requirements of EPSRC – see below.

Description:

An exciting Industrial Masters by Research opportunity has arisen out of the ongoing relationship between the University of Salford and Dyer Environmental Controls Ltd.

Highlighted by the recent flooding issues in the UK, Dyer Environmental Controls Ltd believes that there is a need for improved weather detection and is looking to design a low-cost , wireless weather sensor and transmitter to enable early warning sensing and quantitative data for analysis. Dyer believes this data can be used for many applications e.g. flood warning/defenses; agricultural irrigation control; building automation; and the data collection for future modelling.

The aim of this Industrial Masters project is to produce a trialed and tested working prototype unit which Dyer Environmental can then look to submit for commercial development.

The collaboration

The School of Built Environment at the University of Salford has a strong track record of working with industry. The placement will be with the Applied Buildings and Energy Research Group, which is home to the Salford Energy House. Over the last 5 years we have developed detailed knowledge of sensors to understand both internal and external environments that are used in both laboratory and field environments.

Dyer Environmental Controls Ltd has worked closely with the University of Salford for the past 8 years, completing a 2.5 year KTP project and also sponsoring a PhD student. Dyer has also worked on various projects with the University of Salford’s Energy House. Now celebrating its 25th year, Dyer has worked within the ventilation and building automation sectors and is constantly striving for innovation. Dyer’s success is through customer relationships and flexibility – providing the most efficient and most effective solution for their customer’s needs. The KTP project succeeded in bringing a new product to market and is now sold globally.

Candidates:

The preferred candidates must have a good understanding of:
• A suitable undergraduate level award in electronics/electronics engineering
• The design/implementation and construction of analogue and digital electronic circuits.
• A good working knowledge of C & C++ for embedded microcontrollers, wireless/ mobile communications and PCB layout and design.
• Should have a working knowledge of meteorological or environmental sensors

Candidates are asked to provide a personal statement describing their background, skills, academic interests and their motivation for doing a Masters in no more than 2 sides of A4. This should include evidence of being able to work independently to a high standard, collaborate with others, and excellent writing skills.

The Successful candidate will work mainly on the premises of the University but will spend a significant amount of time at the Company Partner premises.

Funding:

This Industrial Masters by Research studentship is only available to students with settled status in the UK, as classified by EPSRC eligibility. http://www.epsrc.ac.uk/funding/students/Pages/eligibility.aspx

Eligibility: Residence requirements

To be eligible for a full award (stipend and fees) a student must have:

• Settled status in the UK
• Been ‘ordinarily resident’ in the UK for 3 years prior to the start of the grant.
• Not been residing in the UK wholly or mainly for the purpose of full-time education. (This does not apply to UK or EU nationals)

Enquiries: Informal enquiries may be made to Professor Will Swan by e-mail
Applicants should send a curriculum vitae and a covering letter explaining their interest to Vicky Beckett

Application deadline: Friday 22nd July 2016.

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The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. Read more
The Masters in Nanoscience & Nanotechnology teaches skills desired by modern industry for scientists and engineers doing research, development and production in nanoscience and nanofabrication. This multidisciplinary programme complements backgrounds in electronics, materials science, or physics.

Why this programme

-◾The University of Glasgow is a recognised pioneer in many of the most exciting aspects of nanotechnology, with an international reputation in micro and nanofabrication for applications including nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and bioelectronics.
◾You will have access to the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) cleanrooms and the Kelvin Nanocharacterisation Centre. The JWNC holds a number of world records in nanofabrication including records for the performance of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices.
◾Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Glasgow is consistently highly ranked recently achieving 1st in Scotland and 4th in the UK (Complete University Guide 2017).
◾This MSc caters to a growing demand for scientists and engineers who can fabricate systems of sensors, actuators, functional materials and who can integrate electronics at the micro and nano scale. As a graduate you will also possess the necessary insights in nanoscience to develop new products using these skills.
◾You will be taught by experts in the field and have access to research seminars given by our international collaborators, many of whom are world leaders in nanoscience.
◾With a 92% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2015, Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the School of Engineering combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses

◾Electronic devices
◾Introduction to research in nanoscience and nanotechnology
◾Micro- and nano-technology
◾Nanofabrication
◾Research methods and techniques
◾MSc project.

Optional courses

◾Applied optics
◾Cellular biophysics
◾Microwave electronic & optoelectronic devices
◾Microwave and mm wave circuit design
◾Microscopy and optics
◾Nano and atomic scale imaging
◾Semiconductor physics.

Projects

◾The programme builds towards an extended project, which is an integral part of the MSc programme: many projects are linked to industry or related to research in the school. Our contacts with industry and our research collaborations will make this a meaningful and valuable experience, giving you the opportunity to apply your newly learnt skills.
◾To complete the MSc degree you must undertake a project worth 60 credits that will integrate subject knowledge and skills that you acquire during the MSc programme.
◾The project is an important part of your MSc where you can apply your newly learned skills and show to future employers your ability to apply them in industrially relevant problems.
◾MSc projects are associated with Glasgow's James Watt Nanofabrication Centre, one of Europe's premier research cleanrooms. Projects range from basic research into nanofabrication and nanocharacterisation, to development of systems in optoelectronics, microbiology and electronic devices which require such fabrication.
◾You can choose from a list of approximately 30 projects published yearly in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Example projects

Examples of projects can be found online

*Posters shown are for illustrative purposes

Industry links and employability

◾Over 250 international companies have undertaken commercial or collaborative work with the JWNC in the last 5 years and over 90 different universities from around the globe presently have collaborations with Glasgow in nanoscience and nanotechnology.
◾Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.
◾During the programme students have an opportunity to develop and practice relevant professional and transferrable skills, and to meet and learn from employers about working in the nanofabrication industry.

Career prospects

Companies actively recruit from Glasgow and our research in nanosciences, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and nanotechnology means you will have access to industry networks.

Former Glasgow graduates in the subject area of nanoscience and nanotechnology are now working for companies including Intel, TSMC, IBM, ST Microelectronics, Freescale, Oxford Instruments Plama Technology, ASM, and Applied Materials.

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The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology. Read more
The Nanoscale Engineering master is a two-year program corresponding to 120 ECTS credits. Students receive a universal and profound training in physics, materials science and electronics at the nanoscale, but also in nanobiotechnology.

Elective courses can be followed by the students in their desired area of specialization and/or to broaden their horizons. The entire curriculum is taught in English.

A key educational concept of the program is that each student is immersed in a high-quality research environment for at least half of the time in the curriculum. Throughout the academic year, lab practicals and projects are carried out in research institutions that participate in the program, and thesis projects are undertaken in research laboratories or in nanotechnology companies.

In addition to the scientific and technological aspects, ethical issues and the societal impact of nanotechnology, as well as business considerations, are addressed in specialized seminars and courses.

Structure of the Curriculum

First Year (60 ECTS)

The major part of semester 1 is dedicated to lectures: The students follow 7 courses from the core modules and 2 elective modules. Laboratory practicals and mini-projects ensure a smooth transition into semester 2 with its four-month internship in a research group. This internship is prepared in semester 1 already with a dedicated literature survey. Seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program throughout the entire first year.

Second Year (60 ECTS)

Semester 3 is again dedicated to lectures, featuring 5 slots for core modules and 3 for electives, as well as some ancillary courses. The entirety of semester 4 is taken up by the six-month Master thesis project, which can be conducted in a research laboratory or in a company, in France or abroad. As in the first year, seminars of speakers from both academia and industry complement the educational program.

Modules and Courses

Core Modules

These courses impart the fundamental knowledge in the nanotechnology field applied to physics, electronics, optics, materials science and biotechnology. Students are required to follow at least twelve core module courses during the two-year program.

Core modules in the first year There are four obligatory core modules in the first year:

Introduction to Nanoscale Engineering
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 1
Characterization Tools for Nanostructures
Quantum Engineering

Furthermore, there is a remedial physics course to which students are assigned based on the results of a physics test at the beginning of semester 1:

Basics of Physics

Finally, students have to select a minimum of three courses from the following list for their first year:

Solid State Physics at the Nanoscale
Continuum Mechanics
Physics of Semiconductors, part 1
Physical Chemistry and Molecular Interactions
Biomolecules, Cells, and Biomimetic Systems

Core modules in the second year Students have to choose at least four courses from the following selection for their second year:

Nano-Optics and Biophotonics
Surface-Analysis Techniques
Physics of Semiconductors, part 2
Micro- and Nanofluidics
Micro- and Nanofabrication, part 2
Biosensors and Biochips
Computer Modeling of Nanoscale Systems

Elective Modules

These courses cover a wide range of nanotechnology-related disciplines and thus allow the students to specialize according to their preferences as well as to broaden their expertise. Elective modules in the first year Three courses from the following list have to be chosen for the first year:

Nanomechanics
MEMS and NEMS
Introduction to System Design
Drug-Delivery Systems

Elective modules in the second year Students follow a minimum of three courses from the following selection in the second year:

Multi-Domain System Integration
Solar Cells and Photovoltaics
Nanomagnetism and Spintronics
Nanoelectronics
Tissue and Cell Engineering

Experimental Modules

Students conduct lab practicals that are integrated into the various courses, during which they familiarize themselves hands-on with all standard techniques for fabrication and characterization of nanostructures. They furthermore have the opportunity to work more independently on individual or group projects.

Ancillary Courses and Seminars

This module deals with complementary know-how, relevant both for academia and in an industrial environment. Students follow a course on intellectual-property issues. Ethical aspects and the societal impact of nanotechnology are covered in specialized seminars, which also allow for networking with national and international nanotechnology companies and research laboratories. Communication skills are likewise developed through written and oral presentations of all experimental work that is carried out during the Master program.

Internship

In the second semester, students conduct two-month internships in two of the research laboratories participating in the program. The students choose their projects and come into contact with their host laboratories earlier in the academic year already, by spending some time in these laboratories to carry out an extensive literature survey and to prepare their research projects under the guidance of their supervisors.

Master Thesis Project

The final six-month period of the program is devoted to the master project, which can be carried out either in an academic research laboratory or in an industrial environment. Students have the option to conduct their thesis project anywhere in France or abroad.

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Bridging the gap between theory and practice – and applying them to the design of sound, feasible policies – can provide the key to solving micro, meso and macroeconomic issues. Read more

Master's specialisation in Economics, Behaviour and Policy

Bridging the gap between theory and practice – and applying them to the design of sound, feasible policies – can provide the key to solving micro, meso and macroeconomic issues.
How do policy makers make decisions that affect economic, societal and personal welfare? How is welfare defined and measured? And how can we design more effective policies? This specialisation covers not only econometric questions, but also psychological, cultural, legal and philosophical ones. By improving your insight into complex issues, it will prepare you for designing successful strategies in your future career as a policy maker or consultant .
Our graduates are experts in economic policies who work for government and semi-government organisations, and also as consultants in business and industry. You can do the same. By examining real-world scenarios, you’ll acquire the analytical skills you need to take research results and apply them to a wide variety of problems.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ep

Why study Economics, Behaviour and Policy at Radboud University?

- You’ll tackle economic and policy issues at all levels – focusing mostly on the real economy.
- You’ll combine learning with research: your lecturers are researchers who incorporate the latest findings into their teaching. As a student, you’ll also do research.
- You’ll interact with your professors in small seminar groups.
- By taking our ‘Economics Plus’ package, you’ll combine ‘standard’ economics with disciplines such as psychology and sociology. This will give you the knowledge you need to tackle policy issues in today’s globalised world.

Change perspective

You’ll gain a strong theoretical background in both mainstream and heterodox (i.e. non-mainstream) economic theories, augmented by methods derived from disciplines that include psychology and sociology. There’s good reason for this broad approach: if an economic problem seems intractable, you may need to change your perspective. We also examine the policy relevance of theoretical insights and give you the tools you need to design policies that will make a difference to people’s lives.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A Bachelor's degree in Economics – or a closely-related discipline – from a research-oriented university, with sufficient background in Research Methods and Mathematics (and Economics if you took a different degree).

2. Proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you must be fluent in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English need one of qualifications below. Please note that certificates must have been awarded in the past two years, and that no other certificates are accepted:
- A TOEFL (iBT) Certificate with a minimum overall score of 90 and no subscore not less than 18, or
- IELTS Academic Certificate: a minimum overall score of 6.5 less than 6.0, or
- A Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) with a minimum score of C, or
- A Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a minimum score of C.

3. A letter of motivation (max. 2 pages)
Please explain why you want to follow this programme and why you think you should be part of this programme.

Career prospects

This programme will provide you with a toolbox filled with the skills and knowledge needed to tackle a whole array of economic problems. Besides issues at the micro and macroeconomic level, graduates learn to deal with issues at the meso level, for example, how to stimulate innovation.
Our graduates devise policies and learn to analyse critically which solutions are most likely to work in a specific economic and social context. They regularly find employment as policy makers for government and semi-government organisations, in ministries, national banks, NGOs, think tanks, the UN and the EU , as well as national and international labour organisations. But your career prospects are much broader than that. You could for example, work as a consultant in industry or as a lobbyist.

Our approach to this field

By giving you a strong theoretical grounding in a broad range of current economic theories – both mainstream and heterodox –this programme will show you not just what is happening, but also why and how. To ensure that it is always relevant, we update the content every year.

Our main aim is to unravel the diversity – and the complexity – of economic issues, and thus clarify the role of economics in society. At the micro level, we might look at, for example, policies for reducing traffic jams or encouraging citizens to opt for more sustainable ways of living. At the meso level, we might examine policies intended to determine which companies should be supported – those that are struggling or those that are successful? – and how companies can be encouraged to innovate. And at the macro level, we might try to determine whether government policies should respond to financial crises through austerity or through investment.

Lectures are devoted to detailed discussions of a wide range of real-world scenarios. As an active participant, you’ll join in debates with your lecturers and your fellow students, and sometimes with experts from the field. One module – Technology & Innovation Policy – is taught by an emeritus professor and two business leaders. Guest speakers are drawn from varied backgrounds, such as a recent speaker from the Dutch Ministry of Finance, who discussed financial illiteracy. Activities such as these all exemplify the kinds of concerns – economic and otherwise – you’ll be likely to encounter as a policy maker.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/ep

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Innovation in product design and manufacturing has become a major driver for industrial competitiveness and profitablity in recent years. Read more
Innovation in product design and manufacturing has become a major driver for industrial competitiveness and profitablity in recent years. As enabling technologies become more easily accessible, engineers are faced with increasing demands for designing and producing more complex mechanical devices to serve the needs of the society. Next generation engineering products will be ‘smart’ with many functionalities; they will be made of new materials; they will increase energy efficiency and reduce environmental impact; they will vary in size from nano to mega scales; and they will be more closely integrated with information processing systems. Also as mechanical systems are becoming increasingly complex to analyze and expensive to experiment, more emphasis will have to be placed on computer aided analysis, design, verification and manufacturing. Our research program in mechanical engineering responds to these trends and focuses on basic research related to materials science and process engineering, product design, and information integrated manufacturing processes. In doing so applications to different physical processes are studied (e.g. energy systems, bioengineering, metal forming, polymer processing, discrete part manufacturing to name a few).

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Computer Aided Numerical Control (CNC) Systems and Machine Tools
• Automation and Mechatronics
• Composite Materials Manufacturing
• Human and Machine Haptics
• Multi-Scale Experimental and Computational Mechanics of Materials
• Bioinspired and Biological Fluid Mechanics
• Cardiovascular Mechanics
• Vibrations and Structural Dynamics
• Modelling and Design of Micro /Macro Systems
• Computational Materials Science (Polymers, Biomaterials, Shape
Memory Alloys)
• Computational Fluid Dynamics
• Thermal and Bio/Micro Fluidic Systems
• Micro-Nano Electromechanical Systems (MEMS/NEMS)
• Microstructure Evolution Dynamics (Solidication, Crystal Groeth)
• Control systems and Robotic

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This course provides comprehensive knowledge and practical training in the spread of microorganisms (predominantly bacterial and viral pathogens), disease causation and diagnosis and treatment of pathogens significant to public health. Read more
This course provides comprehensive knowledge and practical training in the spread of microorganisms (predominantly bacterial and viral pathogens), disease causation and diagnosis and treatment of pathogens significant to public health. The increasing incidence of microbial infections worldwide is being compounded by the rapid evolution of drug-resistant variants and opportunistic infections by other organisms. The course content reflects the increasing importance of genomics and molecular techniques in both diagnostics and the study of pathogenesis.

In response to a high level of student interest in viral infections, the School has decided to offer the opportunity for students who focus on viruses in their module and project choices to be awarded a Master's degree in Medical Microbiology (Virology). This choice will depend on the module selection of the individual student in Terms 2 and 3 and choice of project.

Graduates from this course move into global health careers related to medical microbiology in research or medical establishments and the pharmaceutical industry.

The Bo Drasar Prize is awarded annually for outstanding performance by a Medical Microbiology student. This prize is named after Professor Bohumil Drasar, the founder of the MSc Medical Microbiology course.

The Tsiquaye Prize is awarded annually for the best virology-based project report.

- Full programme specification (pdf) (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/edu/qualityassurance/mm_progspec.pdf)
- Intercalating this course (http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/intercalate)

Visit the website http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmm.html

Objectives

By the end of the course students should be able to:

- demonstrate advanced knowledge and understanding of the nature of viruses, bacteria, parasites and fungi and basic criteria used in the classification/taxonomy of these micro-organisms

- explain the modes of transmission and the growth cycles of pathogenic micro-organisms

- demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and the outcomes of infections

- distinguish between and critically assess the classical and modern approaches to the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines for the prevention of human microbial diseases

- demonstrate knowledge of the laboratory diagnosis of microbial diseases and practical skills

- carry out a range of advanced skills and laboratory techniques, including the purification of isolated microbial pathogens, study of microbial growth cycles and analyses of their proteins and nucleic acids for downstream applications

- demonstrate research skills

Structure

Term 1:
There is a one-week orientation period that includes an introduction to studying at the School, sessions on key computing and study skills and course-specific sessions, followed by two compulsory modules:

- Bacteriology & Virology
- Analysis & Design of Research Studies

Recommended module: Molecular Biology

Sessions on basic computing, molecular biology and statistics are run throughout the term for all students.

Terms 2 and 3:
Students take a total of five modules, one from each timetable slot (Slot 1, Slot 2 etc.). The list below shows recommended modules. There are other modules that can be taken only after consultation with the Course Director.

- Slot 1:
Clinical Virology
Molecular Biology & Recombinant DNA Techniques

- Slot 2:
Clinical Bacteriology 1
Molecular Virology

- Slot 3:
Advanced Training in Molecular Biology
Basic Parasitology

- Slot 4:
Clincal Bacteriology 2
Molecular Biology Research Progress & Applications

- Slot 5:
Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Molecular Cell Biology & Infection
Mycology
Pathogen Genomics

Further details for the course modules - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/currentstudents/studentinformation/msc_module_handbook/section2_coursedescriptions/tmmi.html

Project Report

During the summer months (July - August), students complete a laboratory-based original research project on an aspect of a relevant organism, for submission by early September. Projects may take place within the School or with collaborating scientists in other colleges or institutes in the UK or overseas.

The majority of students who undertake projects abroad receive financial support for flights from the School's trust funds set up for this purpose

Course Accreditation

The Royal College of Pathologists accepts the course as part of the professional experience of both medical and non-medical candidates applying for membership. The course places particular emphasis on practical aspects of the subjects most relevant to current clinical laboratory practice and research.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.lshtm.ac.uk/study/masters/msmm.html#sixth

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Our MSc is for students from a variety of backgrounds with varied levels of biotechnology experience. You will develop an understanding of contemporary molecular biology and biotechnology principles and practices. Read more
Our MSc is for students from a variety of backgrounds with varied levels of biotechnology experience. You will develop an understanding of contemporary molecular biology and biotechnology principles and practices. You will also gain the skills and knowledge base required for employment in the biotechnology industry.

This course covers the scientific principles needed to give you an advanced understanding of contemporary industrial biotechnology. It helps you to develop generic practical skills in:
-Handling micro-organisms
-Molecular biological techniques
-Data analysis

You will examine:
-The production of novel biological compounds
-The fundamental role played by micro-organisms in the turnover of pollutants
-The search and discovery of commercially significant natural products
-Use and exploitation of genetically modified organisms (GMO)

The course also explores areas of related interest in biotechnology, such as:
-Bioethics
-Regulatory affairs
-The role of intellectual property and commercialisation

Facilities

The School of Biology has an outstanding range of facilities to support our research and teaching, including:
-Fully equipped teaching and research laboratories
-Lab scale fermentation of novel biological compounds

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If you want to develop a specialist career in multinational enterprises, this course offers high-level strategic learning in a range of areas. Read more
If you want to develop a specialist career in multinational enterprises, this course offers high-level strategic learning in a range of areas.

This course will provide you with the specialist knowledge to manage and adapt supply chains, and pioneer logistics in a growing field of industry. If you are looking to refine your skills or further progress within the profession, this course will enable you to gain a better understanding of how to apply strategic thinking in senior decision-making roles.

The University of South Wales is a preferred provider of professional and Masters level qualifications for the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) and the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (CIPS). The course is also accredited by the Institute of Operations Management (IOM). These accreditations highlight the industry-level standards embedded within the course and ensure your learning can be applied and inform best practice in the modern workplace.

Upon successful completion of this course, you will gain MCIPS (in addition to three years’ work experience) and MCILT (with an average mark of 50% across the course with work experience, which will be assessed by the professional body). You are also set to gain from further exemptions from the Institute of Operations Management.

This course includes field trips that enable you to understand the practical implications of logistics and supply chain management in a variety of industrial settings (additional costs may apply).

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/492-msc-international-logistics-and-supply-chain-management

What you will study

There are two pathways available to students studying the MSc International Logistics and Supply Chain Management course. Modules of study for each pathway depend upon whether students complete a 60 Credit Dissertation or a 20 Credit management project. The normal mode of study will be to undertake the 20 credit management project route.

Route One

- Sustainable Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
The module will explore the strategic need, role and value for logistics, purchasing and supply chain research within organisations in order to achieve sustainable supply chain networks in the future. Examining the major changes that are currently affecting logistics and supply chain strategies and how management in the future will be influenced by new structures, reconfiguration of material and information flows, the role of technology in evolving supply chains and the key issues in managing this transition process. This module aims to provide an integrative view of the complex inter- and intra-organisational dynamics which contribute to sustained organisational success and maximisation of competitive advantage. Exploring the sustainable supply chain from a global and local perspective.

- Commercial Relationships (20 credits)
This module explores the
 theory and practical application that underpins the processes involved in
formation of commercial agreements and relationships with external organizations.The module will examine the
current and relevant approaches to achieve an effective commercial agreements
by identifying with and critically evaluating the activities and documentation involved; the legal processes and terms and the main contractual arrangements required for a commercial agreements and relationship with customers and / or suppliers.

- Strategic Operations Management (20 credits)
This module aims to provide an appreciation of operational processes, techniques, planning and control systems with reference to both manufacturing and service industries from a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

- Globalisation of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
This module aims to identify the key drivers and trends that are increasing the globalisation of industries, markets and sectors, including the role of the SME. Also explore the structure and management and main activities of a global and international logistics and supply networks.

- Strategic Systems Thinking (20 credits)
This module aims to develop and enhance the skills and knowledge explored to enable participants to actively consider how they may personally make a difference in the different strategic contexts which may confront them. In particular, students will focus on innovative practices and an inclusive social approach to business and organisational development.

- Economies, Markets and Decision Making in International Contexts (20 credits)
The module aims to develop the ability to analyse the macroeconomic and micro frameworks within which strategic decisions are made. To develop the ability to solve problems which relate to management decision-making in the context of changing economic and market conditions.

- Project Management and Consultancy Skills (20 credits)
This module aims to critically explore and examine project management and consultancy skills in a business and supply chain context. Enabling students to understand and explore relevant and key project management techniques and principles and the impact that they have on operations, supply chain and business processes. Students will be able to use consultancy skills to reflect, monitor and evidence the ‘management of self’ in a marketing and business context.

- Research Methods (20 credits)
The module aims to develop your understanding and research skills in a management and/or professional development context; critically reviewing a range of research methodologies and methods of providing management information for decision making.

- Management Project (20 credits)
The module explores the concept, theories and practice of project management and consultancy skills. This module builds on the research methodology skills and requirements of critical debate established throughout the program and shows how these key skills are vital within a business context to ensure rigorous decision making. It examines combining the traditional research skills with project management and consultancy skills to enable an evidenced based approach to problem solving within an organisation.

Route Two

- Sustainable Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
The module will explore the strategic need, role and value for logistics, purchasing and supply chain research within organisations in order to achieve sustainable supply chain networks in the future. Examining the major changes that are currently affecting logistics and supply chain strategies and how management in the future will be influenced by new structures, reconfiguration of material and information flows, the role of technology in evolving supply chains and the key issues in managing this transition process. This module aims to provide an integrative view of the complex inter- and intra-organisational dynamics which contribute to sustained organisational success and maximisation of competitive advantage. Exploring the sustainable supply chain from a global and local perspective.

- Strategic Operations Management (20 credits)
This module aims to provide an appreciation of operational processes, techniques, planning and control systems with reference to both manufacturing and service industries from a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

- Globalisation of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
This module aims to identify the key drivers and trends that are increasing the globalisation of industries, markets and sectors, including the role of the SME. Also explore the structure and management and main activities of a global and international logistics and supply networks.

- Strategic Systems Thinking (20 credits).
This module aims to develop and enhance the skills and knowledge explored to enable participants to actively consider how they may personally make a difference in the different strategic contexts which may confront them. In particular, students will focus on innovative practices and an inclusive social approach to business and organisational development.

- Economies, Markets and Decision Making in International Contexts (20 credits)
The module aims to develop the ability to analyse the macroeconomic and micro frameworks within which strategic decisions are made. To develop the ability to solve problems which relate to management decision-making in the context of changing economic and market conditions.

- Research Methods (20 credits)
The module aims to develop your understanding and research skills in a management and/or professional development context; critically reviewing a range of research methodologies and methods of providing management information for decision making.

- Dissertation in Purchasing, Logistics, Supply Chain (60 credits)
You’ll be required to produce an extended piece of written postgraduate research, involving a significant piece of student-directed learning, based on a detailed investigation into a key area.

Learning and teaching methods

You can study the MSc International Logistics and Supply Chain Management full-time, part-time or online. The full-time programme starts in September and February.

Full-time: Full-time students study Stages One and Two in an academic year, followed directly by the dissertation. Part-time students usually complete one stage each academic year followed by the dissertation.

Part-time: We offer part-time weekend delivery, where you come to the University for one weekend every six weeks. For those who want to tailor a programme that suits their needs, we can be flexible in terms of when, where and how often lectures take place. This is useful for organisations and associations.

Online: The University of South Wales also offers online delivery through our partners the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT). Please note that CIPS accreditation is not available through our online course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Graduates are able to demonstrate specialist knowledge to help them manage and adapt their global supply chains to respond to the dynamic needs of 21st century business. You will also be able to lead logistics and supply chain management in a growing field, and develop a specialist role in multinational enterprises. The additional professional accreditations associated with this Masters course will enable you to make a significant step in developing your professional career moving forward.

Assessment methods

Part-time students usually complete one stage each academic year followed by the dissertation, which can be completed in nine months.

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The English Language Centre's MA TESOL programme offers excellent opportunities to develop careers in English language teaching for inexperienced teachers or for those starting out in the field.

The programme is designed for anyone with an interest in the wider aspects of teaching English as a foreign language, combining innovative classroom practices with an understanding of issues such as language structure and research methodology.

Course Structure

The programme offers a core of syllabus design and assessment, with greater depth provided through further required modules focusing on both theoretical and practical aspects of the English language and on classroom practice. Students then have the opportunity to broaden their knowledge base by taking three or four further optional modules covering a wide range of relevant areas. The MA is completed by a 15,000-word dissertation.

Core Modules

-Basic Research Methods
-Language for Teachers
-Language Teaching Methods and Practice
-Fundamentals in ELT.

Previous optional modules have included:

-World Englishes
-English for Specific Purposes
-ELT Materials Development and Evaluation
-Discourse Texts and TESOL
-Language Teaching Methodology
-Advanced Research Methods
-Second Language Acquisition: Perspectives for Teachers
-Evaluation and Assessment
-Teaching Young Learners
-Pragmatics and the Language Classroom

You can also choose to study an optional module offered to students across the University as one of your four optional modules.
-Expert English
-Foreign Language

MA Streams

You can choose to further focus your Masters qualification through our programme streams. To qualify, you must choose one of the below as an optional module and complete your dissertation in the same topic area.

Learning and Teaching

ELC MA programmes are delivered via lectures, seminars, practical sessions and micro-teaching sessions, giving students a solid grounding in both the theoretical and practical aspects of the field. In many cases, contact hours will be a mixture of these approaches (rather than, say, a session consisting solely of a two hour lecture). The balance will depend on the particular module, with some more suited to a lecture/seminar approach, others being of a more practical nature.

The focus throughout the programmes is on independent learning and student engagement, with students expected to participate in presentations, micro-teaching and the like. The average weekly number of contact hours over the first two terms is 12, with students filling the remaining time with reading, class preparation and assignments.

In addition, starting in the first term, students attend a series of dissertation sessions (typically 2 hours per fortnight) culminating in a poster conference in term 3. Students are assigned a dissertation supervisor, and can expect 3 or 4 meetings during term 3 and the summer. Students each have an academic tutor, with whom they will meet on average once a term, and all staff have office hours.

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Taught Modules:

Introduction to Nanotechnology & Microsystems: Focuses on the device fabrication techniques at the nano and micro scale, as well as introducing some of the diagnostic tools available to test the quality and characteristics of devices.

Modelling and Design: Focuses on the simulation and design of electronic devices using an advanced software package – COMSOL. This powerful commercial software package is extremely adaptable and can be used to simulate and design a very wide range of physical systems.

Advanced Sensor Systems: Provides students with an understanding of more complex sensor systems and a view of current developments in specific areas of sensor development. Applications of these systems and their main producers and users are also discussed.

Mini Project: Focuses on applying the skills and techniques to a mini project, whose theme will form the basis of the research project.

RF and Optical MEMs: Introduces the use and benefits of miniaturisation in RF and optical technologies. The module will investigate improvements in component characteristics, and manufacturing processes. Applications of RF and optical nano and microsystems will be discussed using examples.

Microengineering: This module provides an introduction to the rapidly expanding subject of microengineering. Starting with a discussion of the benefits and market demand for microengineered systems, the module investigates clean room-based lithographic and related methods of microfabrication. Micro manufacturing issues for a range of materials such as silicon, polymers and metals will be discussed along with routes to larger scale manufacture. A range of example devices and applications will be used to illustrate manufacturing parameters.

Further Microengineering: This module builds on the knowledge of microengineering and microfabrication gained in module IES4003 Microengineering and provides practical microfabrication experience. The module examines a broad range of advanced manufacturing process including techniques suitable for larger scale production, particularly of polymer devices. The module also examines specialist fabrication methods using laser systems and their flexibility in fabricating macroscopic and sub micron structures.

Masters Project Preparation: To place computing and engineering within a business context so that students relate the technical aspects of their work to its commercial and social dimensions and are able to prepare project plans which take into account the constraints and limitations imposed by non-technical factors.



Research Project
After the successful completions of the taught component of the MSc programme, the major individual project will be undertaken within the world-leading optoelectronics or optical communications research groups of the School. Students will then produce an MSc Dissertation.

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Electronic engineering defines the very fabric of today’s modern technologically advanced society. A myriad of consumer electronic products - televisions, CD and DVD players - are in daily use by practically everyone on the planet. Mobile phones and computers enable global communications on a scale unimaginable even a few decades ago. Yet electronic engineering continues to develop new capabilities which will shape the lives of future generations.

This programme aims to provide a broad based Electronic Engineering MSc which will enable students to contribute to the future development of electronic products and services. The course reflects the School’s highly regarded research activity at the leading edge of electronic engineering. The MSc will provide relevant, up-to-date skills that enhance the engineering competency of its graduates and allows a broader knowledge of electronic engineering to be acquired by studying important emerging technologies, such as, optoelectronics, bioelectronics, polymer electronics and micromachining. The course is intended for graduates in a related discipline, who wish to enhance and specialise their skills in several emerging technologies.

Course Structure
This course runs from 29 September 2014 to 30 September 2015.

The course structure consists of a core set of taught and laboratory based modules that introduce advanced nanoscale and microscale device fabrication processes and techniques. In addition, device simulation and design is addressed with an emphasis placed on the use of advanced CAD based device and system based modelling. Transferable skills such as project planning and management, as well as, presentational skills are also further developed in the course.

Taught Modules:

Introduction to Nanotechnology & Microsystems*: focuses on the device fabrication techniques at the nano and micro scale, as well as introducing some of the diagnostic tools available to test the quality and characteristics of devices.

Modelling and Design: Focuses on the simulation and design of electronic devices using an advanced software package – COMSOL. This powerful commercial software package is extremely adaptable and can be used to simulate and design a very wide range of physical systems.



Advanced Sensor Systems: Provides students with an understanding of more complex sensor systems and a view of current developments in specific areas of sensor development. Applications of these systems and their main producers and users are also discussed.

Masters Mini Project: focuses on applying the skills and techniques already studied to a mini project, the theme of which will form the basis of the research project later in the year.

RF and Optical MEMs*: Introduces the use and benefits of miniaturisation in RF and optical technologies. The module will investigate improvements in component characteristics, and manufacturing processes. Applications of RF and optical nano and microsystems will be discussed using examples.

Microengineering*: Provides an introduction to the rapidly expanding subject of microengineering. Starting with a discussion of the benefits and market demand for microengineered systems, the module investigates clean room-based lithographic and related methods of microfabrication. Micro manufacturing issues for a range of materials such as silicon, polymers and metals will be discussed along with routes to larger scale manufacture. A range of example devices and applications will be used to illustrate manufacturing parameters.

Further Microengineering*: This module builds on the knowledge of microengineering and microfabrication gained in the Microengineering module. The module examines a broad range of advanced manufacturing process including techniques suitable for larger scale production, particularly of polymer devices. This module also examines specialist fabrication methods using laser systems and their flexibility in fabricating macroscopic and sub micron structures.

Mobile Communication Systems*: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of current and emerging mobile communication systems, with a particular emphasis on the common aspects of all such systems.

Broadband Communication Systems: This module provides students with an in-depth understanding of current and emerging broadband communications techniques employed in local, access and backbone networks. Particular emphasis will be focussed on the following aspects: 1) fundamental concepts, 2) operating principles and practice of widely implemented communications systems; 3) hot research and development topics, and 4) opportunities and challenges for future deployment of broadband communications systems.

Data Networks and Communications*: This module will provide an in-depth understanding of how real communication networks are structured and the protocols that make them work. It will give the students an ability to explain in detail the process followed to provide end to end connections and end-user services at required QoS.

Masters Project Preparation: To place computing and engineering within a business context so that students relate the technical aspects of their work to its commercial and social dimensions and are able to prepare project plans which take into account the constraints and limitations imposed by non-technical factors.

*optional modules

Research Project
After the successful completion of the taught component of the MSc programme, the major individual project will be undertaken within the world-leading optoelectronics or optical communications research groups of the School. Students will then produce an MSc Dissertation.

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