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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage. Read more
Taught by internationally-recognised experts in the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), this programme will see you discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials, nanotechnology for renewable energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The programme's broad theme is the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

The programme covers the fundamentals behind nanotechnology and moves on to discuss its implementation using nanomaterials – such as graphene – and the use of advanced tools of nanotechnology which allow us to see at the nanoscale, before discussing future trends and applications for energy generation and storage.

You will gain specialised, practical skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of-the-art equipment and facilities. Completion of the programme will provide you with the skills essential to furthering your career in this rapidly emerging field.

The delivery of media content relies on many layers of sophisticated signal engineering that can process images, video, speech and audio – and signal processing is at the heart of all multimedia systems.

Our Mobile Media Communications programme explains the algorithms and intricacies surrounding transmission and delivery of audio and video content. Particular emphasis is given to networking and data compression, in addition to the foundations of pattern recognition.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Energy Economics and Technology
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-Microwave Engineering
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Renewable Energy Technology
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

NANOTECHNOLOGY AT SURREY

We are one of the leading institutions developing nanotechnology and the next generation of materials and nanoelectronic devices.

Taught by internationally-recognised experts within the University’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), on this programme you will discover the practical implementation of nanoscience and quantum engineering, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.

You will gain specialised skills through an individual research project within our research groups, using state-of- the-art equipment and facilities.

The ATI is a £10 million investment in advanced research and is the flagship institute of the University of Surrey in the area of nanotechnology and nanomaterials. The ATI brings together under one roof the major research activities of the University from the Department of Electronic Engineering and the Department of Physics in the area of nanotechnology and electronic devices.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate Degree Programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant).

To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates:
-Underpinning learning – know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin Nanoscience and nanotechnology for renewable systems
-Engineering problem solving - be able to analyse problems within the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Engineering tools - be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Technical expertise - know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within Nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanoelectronics for renewable energy
-Societal and environmental context - be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Employment context - be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Research and development investigations - be able to carry out research-and- development investigations
-Design - where relevant, be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability.
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering.

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/. Read more
Drawing on current research across the social sciences, government guidance, and legislative frameworks, this degree focuses on the issues that are key in facilitating your professional and academic development as a social worker- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-social-work/

Why study MA Social Work at Goldsmiths?

-This Masters programme is ideal if you are a graduate, with relevant experience, interested in pursuing a professional career in social work

-It prepares you according to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Standards of Proficiency – Social Workers in England and the Professional Capabilities Framework (PCF), the Quality Assurance Agency subject benchmark for social work, and the Department of Health's requirements for social work training

-Social work education at Goldsmiths has a long and distinguished record – we house one of the most respected social work units in the UK, and you will be taught by established social work academics and associate lecturers who have considerable research and/or practice experience in their fields

-Our social work programmes are highly regarded by potential employers within London and further afield, and our graduates have an excellent record of securing employment; they've gone on to work in local authority children's services departments, adult services departments, and independent sector and voluntary sector agencies such as the NSPCC, Family Action and Mind, and a recent graduate was named Newly Qualified Social Worker of the Year

-We'll equip you with the knowledge, values and skills you'll need to practise as a reflective and ethical social worker, equipped for the challenges of contemporary social work practice

-You will cover areas of human growth and development; community; needs and services; law and organisational contexts of social work; and research methods. Specific learning will include mental health and disability, and social work processes of assessment, planning, intervention and review

-The Masters includes practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups, so you'll be able to gain invaluable real world experience

-We'll encourage you to think deeply about human rights and social justice, and to embed these values in your practice

-You will develop your skills for reflective and evidence-based practice and will be able to further your research mindedness

This programme is approved by the Health & Care Professions Council.

Excellence in practice and teaching

Goldsmiths has a long tradition of social work education, and our programmes are internationally regarded as excellent in both practice learning and critical studies. They also have a strong focus on anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practice.

We have a lively programme of research taking place in areas as diverse as:

-the links between child abuse and domestic violence
-multi-family group work with teenage parents
-service user perspectives and transnational adoption
-mental health social workers' use of mental health laws and coercion
-equality and diversity in social work education
-the effects of political conflict on social work practice and education
-reflective professional social work practice
-evaluative approaches to service provision

Our research informs and underpins our teaching and students are invited to share our interests as well as develop their own through undertaking a small scale research project and developing their research mindedness in a final year extended essay.

Find out more about service user and carer involvement in social work education at Goldsmiths.

South East London Teaching Partnership

The Department of Social, Therapeutic and Community Studies at Goldsmiths has recently entered into a formal Teaching Partnership with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, the London Borough of Southwark and the London Borough of Lewisham for the delivery of social work education at Goldsmiths.

We are one of only four sites across the country to have received government funding to develop and test new and innovative approaches to social work qualifying education, early career training and continuing professional development programmes. As a result, a significant number of social work practitioners, from all levels within these three local authorities, are involved in the MA Social Work programme, delivering or co-delivering lectures, workshops and seminars. This means that there is a very close relationship with practice to ensure that by the end of the programme students are equipped to deliver authoritative, compassionate, social work practice that makes a positive difference to people’s lives.

You will be encouraged to make links between anti-oppressive practice, social work values, the legal framework, theories, methods and skills of intervention and social work practice throughout the course.

Intake

The programme has an intake of around 35-40 students each year. Goldsmiths is committed in its policy and practice to equal treatment of applicants and students irrespective of their race, culture, religion, gender, disability, health, age or sexual orientation. We particularly welcome applications from members of minority groups.

The teaching includes lectures and workshops with the entire student group and small study groups, reflective practice discussion groups and seminars of between 10 and 14 students. A significant proportion of the course takes the form of small study groups and seminars.

The MA is a full-time course. It is not possible to study the course part-time. It is not possible for students to transfer from a social work course at another university onto the second year of the Goldsmiths MA in Social Work course.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact the Admissions Tutor.

Modules & Structure

Successful applicants on the MA in Social Work commit to studying on a full-time taught course over two years. On successful completion you will receive a MA in Social Work which is the professional entry qualification to be a social worker and it enables you to apply for registration as a social worker with the Health and Care Professions Council.

The curriculum aims to provide you with the value, knowledge and skill base for practice and is organised around study units, workshops, lectures/seminar modules, projects and private study. The teaching and learning opportunities centre on the key areas of the social sciences and their application to Social Work practice, as well developing your intellectual capacity, and the skills necessary to get you ready for practice. There is an expectation that you attend at least 85% of all aspects of the programme.

The structured learning includes specific learning in:

human growth and development, mental health and disability
social work theories and methods; assessment, planning, intervention and review
communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs
law, and partnership working across professional disciplines and agencies
social science research methods, including ethical issues
Practice is central to the programme, and there will be practice placements in two settings and with different service user groups (eg child care and mental health). The learning on the programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply your knowledge to practice situations. We work closely with a range of practice organisations in the Greater London Area. The placements are allocated by our placement tutor and matched with individual profiles. In some instances you may have to travel long distances to your placement organisation. You will need to cover the cost of travel to your placement. You will be expected to work the core hours.

At Goldsmiths we recognise:

the unique contribution that all students bring as individuals to the programme in terms of their personal qualities and life experiences
that professional training builds on the uniqueness of each individual by facilitating the student’s exploration of the values, knowledge base and skills of Social Work practice
that it is the student’s responsibility not only to develop a technical acquaintance with the framework of Social Work practice but also to demonstrate competence through its application in practice
that Social Workers are at the interface of society’s attempts to promote welfare
Social workers have a dual responsibility to act within the state’s welfare framework and also to recognise the pervasive influence of oppression and discrimination at an individual and a structural level in most of the situations in which they work. We will prepare you for this professional responsibility.

Year 1

In year 1 you are introduced to social work as a professional activity and an academic discipline. You consider key concepts such as the nature of need, community, social work services, and the significance of the service user perspective.

You are also provided with an introduction to: life-span development, assessment in social work and a range of social work intervention approaches. Your assessed practice consists of 70 days spent as a social worker; this gives you the chance to develop your communication and social work practice skills with service users, and to work in partnership across professional disciplines and agencies.

Year 2

Year 2 provides you with an overview of the legal and organisational context of social work, and extends your knowledge and skills in one of the two main specialist areas of social work practice: working with children and families, or working with adults in need. You will work in small groups to explore methods of intervention, research and theories which are relevant to a particular area of social work, while another assessed practice element enables you to meet the professional requirements for social work training via 100 days of practice under the guidance of a practice assessor.

You are expected to demonstrate competence across a range of standards and this is formally assessed. The learning on the MA Social Work programme builds over the two years and prepares you to apply that knowledge to practice situations.

Practice placements

You are required to spend 170 days in practice settings.

In Year 1 there is a practice placement lasting 70 days and in Year 2 the practice placement lasts 100 days. These placements are arranged through the allocation system devised by the College. The practice placements will be supported by 30 days for the development of practice skills.

You have an identified Practice Educator for each of the two practice placements. Most of our placements are located in South East London, so if you live elsewhere you will need to travel.

We have partnership agreements with the following organisations for placements in social work:

London Borough of Brent – Childrens Services
London Borough of Brent – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea – Adults Services
London Borough of Lambeth – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Childrens Services
London Borough of Southwark – Adults Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Childrens Services
London Borough of Lewisham – Adults Services
London Borough of Croydon – Adults Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Childrens Services
Royal Borough of Greenwich – Adults Services
London Borough of Bromley – Childrens Services
London Borough of Bromley – Adults Services
NSPCC (London Region)

We also work with about 20-30 voluntary/private social care agencies each year. Here are some that we've worked with recently:

Equinox Care Mental Health Services
Body and Soul HIV Service
Jamma Umoja Family Assessment Services
Advocacy in Greenwich Learning Disability Service
Lewisham Refugee Network
Turning Point Mental Health Services
Carers Lewisham

Assessment

The programme is assessed by a range of methods including essays, assessed role plays, take home papers, project work, a practice based case study, a final year dissertation, and the production of a practice portfolio for each placement.

Assessment of practice is by reports by your Practice Educator. This includes direct observation of your work with service users as well as your practice portfolio, and a narrative giving an evaluation of your work.

Professional standards

Social work is a regulated profession. From 1 August 2012, the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) took on the regulation of social workers and the regulation of the performance of social work courses. This means that social work students will need to adhere to the standards set out in the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) Guidance on conduct and ethics for students (HCPC 2009), and work towards meeting the HCPC Standards of Proficiency - Social workers in England (HCPC 2012). These are the standards social work students are expected to demonstrate at the end of their last placement/ qualifying level.

Skills

You'll develop the ability to practise social work in a wide variety of settings with different service user groups.

Careers

The programme will enable you to register and practise as a qualified social worker.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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If you are intrigued by the acquisition, processing, analysis and understanding of computer vision, this Masters is for you. The programme is offered by Surrey's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, recognised for world-leading research in multimedia signal processing and machine learning. Read more
If you are intrigued by the acquisition, processing, analysis and understanding of computer vision, this Masters is for you.

The programme is offered by Surrey's Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, recognised for world-leading research in multimedia signal processing and machine learning.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This degree provides in-depth training for students interested in a career in industry or in research-oriented institutions focused on image and video analysis, and deep learning.

State-of-the-art computer-vision and machine-learning approaches for image and video analysis are covered in the course, as well as low-level image processing methods.

Students also have the chance to substantially expand their programming skills through projects they undertake.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 12 months and part-time over 48 months. It consists of eight taught modules and a standard project.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-Image Processing and Vision
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Image and Video Compression
-Standard Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department of Electronic Engineering are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in Electronic Engineering, Physical Sciences, Mathematics, Computing and Communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas.
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

Intended capabilities for MSc graduates
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin computer vision, machine learning as well as how they can be related to robotics
-Be able to analyse problems within the field computer vision and more broadly in electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within computer vision, machine learning
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Technical characteristics of the pathway
This programme in Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning aims to provide a high-quality advanced training in aspects of computer vision for extracting information from image and video content or enhancing its visual quality using machine learning codes.

Computer vision technology uses sophisticated signal processing and data analysis methods to support access to visual information, whether it is for business, security, personal use or entertainment. The core modules cover the fundamentals of how to represent image and video information digitally, including processing, filtering and feature extraction techniques.

An important aspect of the programme is the software implementation of such processes. Students will be able to tailor their learning experience through selection of elective modules to suit their career aspirations.

Key to the programme is cross-linking between core methods and systems for image and video analysis applications. The programme has strong links to current research in the Department of Electronic Engineering’s Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The Department's taught postgraduate programmes are designed to enhance the student's technical knowledge in the topics within the field that he/she has chosen to study, and to contribute to the Specific Learning Outcomes set down by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) (which is the Professional Engineering body for electronic and electrical engineering) and to the General Learning Outcomes applicable to all university graduates.

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods

Time and resource management
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
-Relevant part of: Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT AND SUPPORT

To support your learning, we hold regular MSc group meetings where any aspect of the programme, technical or non-technical, can be discussed in an informal atmosphere. This allows you to raise any problems that you would like to have addressed and encourages peer-based learning and general group discussion.

We provide computing support with any specialised software required during the programme, for example, Matlab. The Faculty’s student common room is also covered by the University’s open-access wireless network, which makes it a very popular location for individual and group work using laptops and mobile devices.

Specialist experimental and research facilities, for computationally demanding projects or those requiring specialist equipment, are provided by the Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing (CVSSP).

CAREER PROSPECTS

Computer vision specialists are be valuable in all industries that require intelligent processing and interpretation of image and video. This includes industries in directly related fields such as:
-Multimedia indexing and retrieval (Google, Microsoft, Apple)
-Motion capture (Foundry)
-Media production (BBC, Foundry)
-Medical Imaging (Siemens)
-Security and Defence (BAE, EADS, Qinetiq)
-Robotics (SSTL)

Studying for Msc degree in Computer Vision offers variety, challenge and stimulation. It is not just the introduction to a rewarding career, but also offers an intellectually demanding and exciting opportunity to break through boundaries in research.

Many of the most remarkable advancements in the past 60 years have only been possible through the curiosity and ingenuity of engineers. Our graduates have a consistently strong record of gaining employment with leading companies.

Employers value the skills and experience that enable our graduates to make a positive contribution in their jobs from day one.

Our graduates are employed by companies across the electronics, information technology and communications industries. Recent employers include:
-BAE Systems
-BT
-Philips
-Hewlett Packard
-Logica
-Lucent Technologies
-BBC
-Motorola
-NEC Technologies
-Nokia
-Nortel Networks
-Red Hat

INDUSTRIAL COLLABORATIONS

We draw on our industry experience to inform and enrich our teaching, bringing theoretical subjects to life. Our industrial collaborations include:
-Research and technology transfer projects with industrial partners such as the BBC, Foundry, LionHead and BAE
-A number of our academics offer MSc projects in collaboration with our industrial partners

RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES

This course gives an excellent preparation for continuing onto PhD studies in computer vision related domains.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry. Read more
This degree mirrors the two-year Masters programme structure that is common in the USA, and is an ideal stepping stone to a PhD or a career in industry.

The optional professional placement component gives you the opportunity to gain experience from working in industry, which cannot normally be offered by the standard technically-focused one-year Masters programme.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The Electronic Engineering Euromasters programme is designed for electronic engineering graduates and professionals with an interest in gaining further qualifications in advanced, cutting-edge techniques and technologies. Current pathways offered include:
-Communications Networks and Software
-RF and Microwave Engineering
-Mobile Communications Systems
-Mobile and Satellite Communications
-Mobile Media Communications
-Computer Vision, Robotics and Machine Learning
-Satellite Communications Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Space Engineering
-Nanotechnology and Renewable Energy
-Medical Imaging

Please note that at applicant stage, it is necessary to apply for the Electronic Engineering (Euromasters). If you wish to specialise in one of the other pathways mentioned above, you can adjust your Euromaster programme accordingly on starting the course.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over 24 months and part-time over 60 months. It consists of ten taught modules and an extended project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Digital Communications
-Digital Signal Processing A
-Object Oriented Design and C++
-RF and Microwave Fundamentals
-Nanoscience and Nanotechnology
-Space Dynamics and Missions
-Space Systems Design
-Antennas and Propagation
-Image Processing and Vision
-Fundamentals of Mobile Communications
-Principles of Telecommunications and Packet Networks
-Space Robotics and Autonomy
-Speech and Audio Processing and Recognition
-Satellite Communication Fundamentals
-Satellite Remote Sensing
-Molecular Electronics
-RF Systems and Circuit Design
-Internet of Things
-Nanofabrication and Characterisation
-Space Avionics
-Applied Mathematics for Communication Systems
-Data and Internet Networking
-Digital Design with VHDL
-Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
-Mediacasting
-Semiconductor Devices and Optoelectronics
-AI and AI Programming
-Advanced Signal Processing
-Advanced Guidance, Navigation and Control
-Image and Video Compression
-Launch Vehicles and Propulsion
-Advanced Mobile Communication Systems
-Microwave Engineering Optional
-Nanoelectronics and Devices
-Network and Service Management and Control
-Operating Systems for Mobile Systems Programming
-Advanced Satellite Communication Techniques
-Nanophotonics Principles and Engineering
-Mobile Applications and Web Services
-Spacecraft Structures and Mechanisms
-Space Environment and Protection
-Renewable Energy Technologies
-Engineering Professional Studies 1 (with industrial Placement)
-Engineering Professional Studies 1
-Engineering Professional Studies 2
-Extended Project

PARTNERS

The MSc Euromasters complies with the structure defined by the Bologna Agreement, and thus it is in harmony with the Masters programme formats adhered to in European universities. Consequently, it facilitates student exchanges with our partner universities in the Erasmus Exchange programme.

A number of bilateral partnerships exist with partner institutions at which students can undertake their project. Current partnerships held by the Department include the following:
-Brno University of Technology, Czech Republic
-University of Prague, Czech Republic
-Universität di Bologna, Italy
-Universität Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
-Universita' degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Italy

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The taught postgraduate degree programmes of the Department are intended both to assist with professional career development within the relevant industry and, for a small number of students, to serve as a precursor to academic research.

Our philosophy is to integrate the acquisition of core engineering and scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills (where relevant). To fulfil these objectives, the programme aims to:
-Attract well-qualified entrants, with a background in electronic engineering, physical sciences, mathematics, computing and communications, from the UK, Europe and overseas
-Provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applicable to the MSc degree
-Develop participants' understanding of the underlying science, engineering, and technology, and enhance their ability to relate this to industrial practice
-Develop participants' critical and analytical powers so that they can effectively plan and execute individual research/design/development projects
-Provide a high level of flexibility in programme pattern and exit point
-Provide students with an extensive choice of taught modules, in subjects for which the Department has an international and UK research reputation

A graduate from this MSc programme should:
-Know, understand and be able to apply the fundamental mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles that underpin electronic engineering
-Be able to analyse problems within the field of electronic engineering and find solutions
-Be able to use relevant workshop and laboratory tools and equipment, and have experience of using relevant task-specific software packages to perform engineering tasks
-Know, understand and be able to use the basic mathematical, scientific and engineering facts and principles associated with the topics within electronic engineering
-Be aware of the societal and environmental context of his/her engineering activities
-Be aware of commercial, industrial and employment-related practices and issues likely to affect his/her engineering activities
-Be able to carry out research-and-development investigations
-Be able to design electronic circuits and electronic/software products and systems

Enhanced capabilities of MSc (Euromasters) graduates:
-Demonstrate transferable skills such as problem solving, analysis and critical interpretation of data, through the undertaking of the extended 90-credit project
-Know how to take into account constraints such as environmental and sustainability limitations, health and safety and risk assessment
-Have gained comprehensive understanding of design processes
-Understand customer and user needs, including aesthetics, ergonomics and usability
-Have acquired experience in producing an innovative design
-Appreciate the need to identify and manage cost drivers
-Have become familiar with the design process and the methodology of evaluating outcomes
-Have acquired knowledge and understanding of management and business practices
-Have gained the ability to evaluate risks, including commercial risks
-Understand current engineering practice and some appreciation of likely developments
-Have gained extensive understanding of a wide range of engineering materials/components
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Have become aware of quality issues in the discipline

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

General transferable skills
-Be able to use computers and basic IT tools effectively
-Be able to retrieve information from written and electronic sources
-Be able to apply critical but constructive thinking to received information
-Be able to study and learn effectively
-Be able to communicate effectively in writing and by oral presentations
-Be able to present quantitative data effectively, using appropriate methods
-Be able to manage own time and resources
-Be able to develop, monitor and update a plan, in the light of changing circumstances
-Be able to reflect on own learning and performance, and plan its development/improvement, as a foundation for life-long learning

Underpinning learning
-Know and understand scientific principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering, to enable appreciation of its scientific and engineering content, and to support their understanding of historical, current and future developments
-Know and understand the mathematical principles necessary to underpin their education in electronic and electrical engineering and to enable them to apply mathematical methods, tools and notations proficiently in the analysis and solution of engineering problems
-Be able to apply and integrate knowledge and understanding of other engineering disciplines to support study of electronic and electrical engineering

Engineering problem-solving
-Understand electronic and electrical engineering principles and be able to apply them to analyse key engineering processes
-Be able to identify, classify and describe the performance of systems and components through the use of analytical methods and modelling techniques
-Be able to apply mathematical and computer-based models to solve problems in electronic and electrical engineering, and be able to assess the limitations of particular cases
-Use of quantitative methods for problem solving. Be able to apply quantitative methods relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems
-Understand and be able to apply a systems approach to electronic and electrical engineering problems

Engineering tools
-Have relevant workshop and laboratory skills
-Be able to write simple computer programs, be aware of the nature of microprocessor programming, and be aware of the nature of software design
-Be able to apply computer software packages relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, in order to solve engineering problems

Technical expertise
-Know and understand the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of the range of electronic and electrical engineering topics he/she has chosen to study
-Know the characteristics of particular materials, equipment, processes or products
-Have thorough understanding of current practice and limitations, and some appreciation of likely future developments
-Be aware of developing technologies related to electronic and electrical engineering
-Have comprehensive understanding of the scientific principles of electronic engineering and related disciplines
-Have comprehensive knowledge and understanding of mathematical and computer models relevant to electronic and electrical engineering, and an appreciation of their limitations
-Know and understand, at Master's level, the facts, concepts, conventions, principles, mathematics and applications of a range of engineering topics that he/she has chosen to study
-Have extensive knowledge of a wide range of engineering materials and components
-Understand concepts from a range of areas including some from outside engineering, and be able to apply them effectively in engineering projects

Societal and environmental context
-Understand the requirement for engineering activities to promote sustainable development
Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk issues
-Understand the need for a high level of professional and ethical conduct in engineering

Employment context
-Know and understand the commercial and economic context of electronic and electrical engineering processes
-Understand the contexts in which engineering knowledge can be applied (e.g. operations and management, technology development, etc.)
-Be aware of the nature of intellectual property
-Understand appropriate codes of practice and industry standards
-Be aware of quality issues
-Be able to apply engineering techniques taking account of a range of commercial and industrial constraints
-Understand the basics of financial accounting procedures relevant to engineering project work
-Be able to make general evaluations of commercial risks through some understanding of the basis of such risks
-Be aware of the framework of relevant legal requirements governing engineering activities, including personnel, health, safety and risk (including environmental risk) issues

Research and development
-Understand the use of technical literature and other information sources
-Be aware of the need, in appropriate cases, for experimentation during scientific investigations and during engineering development
-Be able to use fundamental knowledge to investigate new and emerging technologies
-Be able to extract data pertinent to an unfamiliar problem, and employ this data in solving the problem, using computer-based engineering tools when appropriate
-Be able to work with technical uncertainty

Design
-Understand the nature of the engineering design process
-Investigate and define a problem and identify constraints, including environmental and sustainability limitations, and health and safety and risk assessment issues
-Understand customer and user needs and the importance of considerations such as aesthetics
-Identify and manage cost drivers
-Use creativity to establish innovative solutions
-Ensure fitness for purpose and all aspects of the problem including production, operation, maintenance and disposal
-Manage the design process and evaluate outcomes
-Have wide knowledge and comprehensive understanding of design processes and methodologies and be able to apply and adapt them in unfamiliar situations
-Be able to generate an innovative design for products, systems, components or processes, to fulfil new needs

Project management
-Be able to work as a member of a team
-Be able to exercise leadership in a team
-Be able to work in a multidisciplinary environment
-Know about management techniques that may be used to achieve engineering objectives within the commercial and economic context of engineering processes
-Have extensive knowledge and understanding of management and business practices, and their limitations, and how these may be applied appropriately

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Read more
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams.

The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field.

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three sub-programmes (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme.

The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are:
-Their ability to apply theoretical knowledge.
-A broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues.
-Strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists.
-Their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings.
-Their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data.
-Their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography.
-Their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography.
-Their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen sub-programme, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis.

In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your sub-programme. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year.

Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into sub-programmes. The sub-programmes offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and sub-programme-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University.

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for geography are:
-Physical Geography
-Human Geography and Spatial Planning
-Geoinformatics

Physical Geography
Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change.

The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice.

Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute.

Human Geography and Spatial Planning
Human geography and spatial planning is a sub-programme, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the sub-programme is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the sub-programme. Relevant themes for the sub-programme are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods.

The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing.

Geoinformatics
Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results.

At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree:
-60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to sub-programme (including MSc thesis 30 credits).
-60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes.
-60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students.
-The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study.
-Working-life orientation and career planning.
-Personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include:
-Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation.
-Positioning and remote-sensing work.
-Regional and urban planning.
-Governmental community and regional administration.
-Governmental posts in ministries.
-Organisational posts.
-Development cooperation projects.
-Communication and publishing work.
-Teaching.

Internationalization

The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeship abroad.
-Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya).
-Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis).
-Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones).

Research Focus

In physical geography:
-Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change.
-Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems.
-Natural systems, their function and change.
-Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems.
-Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments.
-‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data.
-The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability.

In human geography and spatial planning:
-Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment.
-The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning.
-Regional policy and geopolitics.
-Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities.
-Internationalisation of cities and states.
-The spatial planning system of the European Union.