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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. Read more
The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. You will enhance your ability to facilitate and lead the development of expert knowledge within your specific area of higher education including academic practice.

In an increasingly global world the study of higher education is no longer limited to local, regional or national contexts. Universities influence and are influenced by factors such as globalisation, technological change and ongoing sophistication of higher education national and international characteristics. The study pathway therefore aims to enhance practice, research and policy of higher education within these fluid contexts. The course contributes to the personal development of those concerned with the study of higher education both formally and informally in a wide range of institutional settings and locations. Coursework encourages you to bring together your personal understanding of issues relating to specific aspects of higher education with the established and current body of professional and academic research literature relevant to your professional or personal aims. Underpinned by the development of advanced, specialist research skills, the course allows you to progressively broaden the knowledge and understanding of your chosen aspects of higher education. It emphasises the synthesis of theory and practice, including academic practice, and the importance of both structure and agency when understanding interactions within higher education institutions.

Careers

The MA graduates from a wide range of backgrounds, including tutors, lecturers and academics from different disciplines and educational contexts will benefit from the provision of specialist knowledge and research methods training. The course actively seeks to support the professional development, employability and career progression of managers, administrators and academic-related, professional staff (e.g. learning technologists, academic developers). The offering of a range of specialised research skills is tailored to enhance the expertise of these professionals as well as those aspiring to progress to higher levels of management in the areas of higher education policy, widening participation and access in higher education institutions. Invited lecturers from external higher education and policy institutions will highlight possible pathways for future employment within specialist organisations or universities in a number of countries. The design of authentic course assessment tasks underlines the importance of developing specialised research and professional skills applicable in the workplace. Equally, the research skills element of the course will equip participants with necessary skills for progression to doctoral or independent research.

Module list

• National and International Perspectives on Higher Education Policy

This module examines policy and policy-making as distinct processes of implementation and change. Students will consider the approaches of different countries to important debates in the field including the purpose and nature of universities, funding, internationalisation, access and widening participation, management, quality, and regulation processes. Utilising policy analysis methods as well as key concepts and theoretical frameworks students will critically examine comparative evidence to enhance their knowledge and understanding of higher education principles, processes and practices drawing on individual national case studies. The module covers the following broad areas of higher education policy, policy-making and change:

• Access, recruitment and widening participation
• Quality assurance and regimes of (de)regulation in higher education
• Management and change at institutional, national and international level
• Tiers of higher education provision, rankings and their implications for governments and universities.
• Higher education financing and shifting patterns of funding.
• Internationalisation, global competition and cross-border flow of students and researchers.

• Universities as Contemporary Learning and Teaching Environments

This module examines the historical development of research in teaching-learning with a view to identify key contributions that influenced how we conceptualise teaching-learning in the university sector. Several theoretical traditions are presented (e.g. communities of practice, student approaches to learning, actor network theory) and emphasis is placed on the role of assessment and feedback as well as the wide-scale implementation of technological media in higher education and their impact on new modalities of learning. Students will be offered the means to enhance their critical understanding and use of relevant theory by supporting critical and systematic reflection on the changing nature of teaching-learning in higher education, on the changing management landscape, and on the relationships between them in national and international contexts.

• Special Research Methods in Higher Education

This module provides an overview of the methods and methodologies applied to research in higher education. In doing so, it provides links between higher education and educational and social research in general without losing its particular focus and applicability on higher education settings. The meanings and associations between methods are discussed and their position in wider epistemological paradigms is considered. Students will be given an overview of the development of these methods and methodologies in higher education and will develop applied research skills on methods relevant to their practice or interests. Conclusions will be drawn on the methodological opportunities and challenges of the presented research methods and their supplementary to wider educational and social research will be critically examined.

• Educational and Social Research Methods

This module provides you with the opportunity to consider the aims and intentions of educational research, critique published journal articles, and examine the role of evidence from research as a basis for improving education and social care. You will gain grounding in educational research issues, methods and strategies together with knowledge of how to match intended outcomes with specific educational questions and methods of investigation.

• Postgraduate Major Study

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of their Master's Major project and involves a dissertation of 14,000 words or the equivalent. The Major Project enables students to demonstrate the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism which may involve working at the current limits of theoretical and / or research understanding. It will involve the ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice. The project enables students to expand or redefine existing knowledge, to develop new approaches to changing workplace situations and / or to contribute to the development of best practice. It asks the student to communicate these processes in a clear and elegant fashion and to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. Students' research topics must be negotiated with their appointed supervisor. An application for ethical approval and ethics discussion paper must then be submitted. The project may take the form of a written dissertation, a formal presentation and full research paper, an exhibition, a performance, an artefact or the development of software, or other written, aural or visual material. The project may be formed from a combination of these modes but will normally include a written component.

Assessment

You will be assessed in a number of ways, from systematic literature reviews to reflective accounts on your professional practice, to ensure you're learning effectively. Other forms of assessment may include presentations, critical analyses of existing research, producing a dissemination poster and a research project. Each module comprises of one summative assessment and one core formative assessment. The assessment of the modules places emphasis on authenticity of the assessment tasks. Assessment are designed to strengthen your ability to conduct research in higher education settings.

Your Faculty

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly, supportive and experienced staff. With over 150 research students across our three doctoral programmes (PhD; DProf and EdD), we provide the multi-disciplinary perspective and potential for academic debate that reflects our position as a leader in practitioner-focused and practice-led research studies.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, social services, local and regional authorities, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

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Competency in project management has become a key part of the skills-set of every construction professional and executive, with many construction project managers functioning in a strategic and co-ordinating role in the delivery of the client’s physical development and investment programme. Read more
Competency in project management has become a key part of the skills-set of every construction professional and executive, with many construction project managers functioning in a strategic and co-ordinating role in the delivery of the client’s physical development and investment programme.

Society continues to value and shape the built environment resulting in both public and private investment in construction assets and the successful completion of construction projects. As these projects become more socially and technically complex in a changing world dominated by a concern for sustainability, there has been a growing challenge to develop existing and new skills and expertise in construction project management. This challenge is not only national but global as the need for construction project management skills continues to grow internationally. Indeed, our student cohorts reflect this global challenge with students from across multiple continents.

We have been running programmes in MSc Construction Project Management for nearly 20 years. This arose from the need to extend the managerial remit to those activities that fall outside the construction phase to include areas such as financing, design and hand-over. The programme is therefore tailored for construction professionals looking for a more holistic perspective of construction project processes and the challenge of project management in complex building and infrastructure projects.

Accreditation of the programme is provided by the UK’s Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Core study areas include: Building Information Modelling, Design Management and Sustainability in the Built Environment.

Key facts

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015
- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.
- Fully accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-project-management/

Programme modules

- ICT for Construction Projects
This module introduces managers to a wide range of tools and technologies appropriate for their role and projects. The module covers a range of topics including project information flows, e-business, database technologies, emerging technologies, building information modelling technologies, groupware and collaborative systems.

- Research and Communication
The aims of this module are to provide the student with an overview of sources of information in construction; to explain to students how to conduct a literature review and introduce students to the principal methods of investigation in construction research; and provide an opportunity for each student to develop professional and academic skills in oral and written communication.

- Principles of Design and Construction
This module teaches students the fundamental principles of managing a project during the design and construction phases. The module develops knowledge and understanding of the role and principles of the estimating, tendering and planning of construction projects and the importance of health and safety in relation to design and construction activities.

- Principles of Project Management
Students will gain an understanding of construction project management principles and theory. Specific areas covered include management responsibility for running construction projects; contemporary issues facing the construction industry; cultural complexity and the impact of behaviour and motivation on performance; and applying appropriate project management techniques for the different project phases.

- Design Management
This module introduces various Design Management techniques and approaches. These include process mapping techniques for design; ways to analyse and optimise the design process; and students will gain an understanding of the internal workings of a design office and their relationship with the construction team.

- Sustainability and the Built Environment
Students will gain an understanding of sustainability issues that relate to the built environment; ways in which these issues can be managed and effective communication of both strategic and technical information.

- Management of Construction Processes
This module introduces students to cutting edge contemporary management concepts and innovations; complexities of setting up and managing logistics on large construction sites; and essential project management techniques such as risk management.

- Postgraduate Research Project
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to Construction Project Management.

Option Module (part-time students only)
- Management and Professional Development 1
The aim of this module is to enable students to plan, develop and demonstrate progress against a suitable professional development framework, such that they become equipped with a range of transferable management and professional development skills.

Option Modules One
Choose one from
- Strategic Management in Construction
The aim of this module is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of strategic management and the tools for formulating and implementing strategies within the construction sector. The application of strategic management tools to develop appropriate change strategies will be explored and fundamental skills in communication, negotiation and leadership will be developed.

- People and Teams
Students will gain a knowledge and understanding of the key fundamental management principles and theory (such as motivation, teamwork, leadership, task management) and how they can be applied to managing people within the context of the construction project environment. Students will also be able to analyse current theoretical approaches to people management, appreciate importance of ethics and cultural issues and evaluate the key factors driving HRM systems.

- Procurement and Contract Procedure
This module aims to develop students understanding of procurement methods, different forms of contract and contract practice. The module is designed to give students key practical skills including advising clients on appropriate procurement and tendering methods; selecting the most appropriate form of construction contract; and manage a construction contract effectively.

- Business Economics and Finance
Students will gain a sound understanding of macro, meso and micro economics and types, sources and management of finance relating to construction organisations and projects. This will allow students to analyse the policies and operations of construction organisations and projects from an economic perspective to determine likely performance consequences and analyse corporate financial data for investment prospects and business management decisions.

- Federated 3D Building Information Modelling (BIM)
The creation, deployment and use of aggregated and integrated models are key goals of collaboration through BIM. This module aims to deliver hands-on practical skills on the use of BIM technologies (i.e. design software and collaboration tools) for real-time co-creation and data sharing of federated/aggregated 3D BIM models. The concept of shared situational awareness within design teams/processes will be explored.

Careers and further study

Previous students have gone on to work for a variety of organisations nationally and internationally. These include Arup, Atkins, BAM Nuttall Ltd, Balfour Beatty, Kier Group, Morgan Sindall, Skanska and Transport for London. Many of these organisations engage with the University in both collaborative research and in delivering lectures on the courses. This provides an ideal opportunity for students to engage in discussions about employment opportunities.

Scholarships and bursaries

The University offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for a scholarship once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Accreditation

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree.
The course is also accredited by the UK's Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS), the Engineering Council and The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB).

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/construction-project-management/

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Read more

About the course

Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Our students are driven designers, architects, visual and fine artists, performing artists, writers and others who work in the creative and cultural industries. Our faculty members are a lively mix of management specialists and creatives. All of us are passionate about doing work that has a real impact on society.

This unique programme is designed to advance your career as a solo practitioner, an entrepreneur or a member of a larger organisation within the creative economy. During the 12-month programme, you will:

- Build knowledge of business and management within the context of creative and cultural industries
- Gain new methods of learning, creating and managing to improve your career success and satisfaction – in socially responsible and meaningful ways
- Develop a diverse international network of peers, mentors and industry professionals across creative and cultural fields

The interdisciplinary MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is built around the unique learning styles and goals of creative people like you. Designed and taught by Audencia Business School and The Glasgow School of Art’s Institute of Design Innovation (InDI), each module has been created specifically for this programme and integrates a creative mix of teaching and learning methods for both business and arts/design education.

Your programme combines the design approaches and studio (project-based) teaching methods of The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) with the internationally recognised, innovative, collaborative and responsible business education of Audencia Business School. The programme includes:

- Modules designed and taught collaboratively by faculty members at Audencia and the GSA
- Study in Nantes, France, a vibrant, modern city with old-world flair
- Two-week International Winter School in the inspirational Scottish Highlands
- Real-world consulting or research project
- Optional internship in a creative industry
- Collaborative and creative live projects both online and offline, studio (project-based) work and more

Audencia and the Glasgow School of Art

Rather than putting pre-existing management and creative classes on a schedule to form a so-called “new” programme, Audencia and the GSA’s Institute of Design Innovation have jointly designed a customised programme of classes and projects that respond to emerging trends, circumstances and opportunities within the global creative economy.

Every aspect of the programme combines learning in business and management with creative processes and people. The programme is located in Nantes, France, but the GSA faculty members teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week International Winter School, which brings international design schools together in Scotland, is a highlight of the programme.

Taught by Audencia

Shaping a creative career:

Shaping a creative career is an ongoing process which requires the will and ability to keep learning and re-skilling, a good knowledge of yourself and your values and a set of practical tools that will help to enhance your career. This module will mark the start of your journey to design a creative career that is sustainable, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Mapping the creative economy:

Learn what it really means to be a part of the creative economy. Mapping the Creative Economy offers an overview of the development of the cultural and creative industries and their relationship to the creative economy. You’ll learn about important challenges the industries face, such as technological, legal and economic – and the policies adopted to meet those challenges.

Reimagining management:

This module covers the following topics:

- Critical understanding of management
- Management of creativity and innovation
- Sustainable future

From idea to action: starting up:

Building skills to act as bridge between the worlds of creativity and business, you’ll work on a real-life collaborative project where you and your peers will be faced with design, managerial and entrepreneurial challenges.

You’ll learn by doing – working together with a diverse group of students, industry professionals and academic staff.

This experiential work will serve to further develop your career project, as well as help you internalise core entrepreneurial skills and knowledge in an authentic way. Here, you can make mistakes and learn from them in a safe environment.

Creating value in the creative economy:

To have knowledge is a good thing – but to spread it is even more rewarding. During this period, you will be asked to increase societal awareness of the possibilities within the creative economy. How you communicate your knowledge about the creative economy is up to you: conference, digital project, charity work, radio programme, etc. Get creative and begin establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert.

Teaching Methods

A variety of teaching methods are used for the above modules including:

Lectures
Seminars
Workshops
Coaching sessions
Personal blog/vlog
Learning journal
Visits to creative organisations
Group presentations
Debates
Case studies, videos, articles and academic papers
Data visualising techniques

For more information about the course content taught by Audencia please visit the website below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Taught by GSA

Designing today:

Designing Today will help you develop a critical appreciation of the role of design practice and of designers as drivers of social, economic and organisational change. Your final project will be an exhibition. Topics include:

- Exploring service design and organisational design tools and methods
- Seeing social interaction as value creation
- Considering the contemporary role of designers in the area of management: industrial, experience and knowledge economies
- Understanding design not simply as the manufacture of industrial artefacts, but as an activity that creates value

Designing research:

Within Designing Research, you’ll develop an understanding of user-centred design as an ethnographic and engagement-led process of iterative development built upon collaborative working practices and creative refinement and resolution that responds to a variety of contexts. You’ll be evaluated via a project process journal and reflective writing. Components include:

- Formulating design enquiries (open-ended, empirically validated and discursive) that create the possibility of new knowledge and innovative practices or behaviours
- Methods: critical observation, ethnography, STEP analysis, future casting
- Participation in InDI’s two-week International Winter School to gain international, multi-disciplinary teaching and learning experience and develop a personal and professional network of practitioners, researchers and scholars

From idea to application:

From Idea to Application will help you internalise design practice as the material manifestation and evolution of value propositions. You’ll move from collaborative concept generation to product proposal, refinement and validation as understood across a variety of value regimes: manufacture and supply chain, branding and communication, user experience, etc.

The focus will be on the blend of industrial and digital artefacts, experience of use and the cognitive and narrative dimensions of innovative products and their collaborative production.

You’ll be evaluated through a project presentation and exhibition.

International winter school:

Led by the Institute of Design Innovation, the Winter School is an exemplar of our progressive teaching style and offers a method of research and learning that is both bespoke and distinct. The Winter School brings together international students and academics to fashion a new role for design in the exploration of a contemporary challenge during an intense two-week period.

Leading design academics and students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and Copenhagen’s KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) will join students and academics of the GSA, Audencia and other institutions from around the globe, forming an international network of diverse disciplines.

This component of the course offers a unique opportunity to examine current issues in a transcultural environment at the GSA’s stunning new campus in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Research and teaching carried out during the Winter School benefit organisations and communities as well as students.

Company experience

Research or consulting project

Your project is the culmination of your programme experience and the most ambitious expression of your individual motivation, creativity and ability to deliver. It can take the shape of a research project or a consulting project done during an optional internship. You will conduct secondary research, but great value will also be placed on your own primary research efforts.

For more information regarding the project please visit the website by clicking the link below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Optional Internship

This component of the program is not required. However, we will encourage and support you in finding an internship that corresponds to your personal creative project and helps you shape your creative career.

Creative culture

The MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is an alternative to an MBA or MFA programme. It offers you a uniquely creative culture with a degree from a respected and socially responsible business and management school.

Student profile

The students who will join this programme:

- Are creative people who are passionate about their area of expertise
- Want to explore fields in creative and cultural industries
- Love working with people from all over the world
- Know collaboration will be across fields and disciplines
- Understand the importance of business and management to the creative and cultural industries
- Are motivated by the ability of the creative and cultural industries to improve people's lives

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The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. Read more
The Islamic Middle East has given rise to an impressive material culture that continues in the present. This programme covers an area stretching from Islamic Spain through the Arab countries, Turkey, Iran and Central Asia in diverse historical periods. It offers students an unmatched opportunity to study particular regions or categories of art, including Fatimid art; the architecture and urbanism of Morocco; Arab, Persian and Turkish painting; the calligraphy and illumination of the Qur'an; Mamluk art and architecture; the arts and architecture of the Ottomans in Turkey and the Balkans; and the material culture of western Iran. Archaeological issues of the Islamic Middle East are also considered.

In addition, the degree engages with trans-regional topics that extend beyond the Middle East, such as cultural and artistic relationships between the Islamic Middle East and Europe.

Students can decide to study complementary courses on non-Islamic traditions of the Middle East and/or the Islamic traditions of other regions.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of the Islamic Middle East, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as Music, Film and Media in the Middle East and the wider Islamic world. They can also select from courses in other departments, taking advantage of SOAS’s unrivalled expertise in the languages, history, religions and cultures of the Middle East.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/maaaime/

Structure

Students must complete three units (or 0.5 unit equivalent) of taught MA modules in addition to the compulsory dissertation. A minimum of two units (or equivalent) must be selected from the MA modules in the History of Art and Archaeology department related to History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East. Up to one unit (or equivalent) may be selected from the other MA modules in the department or from MA options offered by other SOAS departments. Students must complete the Dissertation in History of Art and Architecture of the Islamic Middle East (15PARC997).

Students may be allowed to study for the MA on a part-time basis. The part-time MA may be taken over two years, in which case the student takes two taught modules in the first year, and one taught module and the dissertation in the second. Alternatively, it can be taken over three years, in which case the student takes one taught module in each year. The dissertation can be written in any year, but it is strongly recommended that this be undertaken in the final year of the programme. It must be submitted in September of the year in which the student registers for it.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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- professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- professionals with a strong interest and need in gaining a thorough academic foundation in, and understanding of, current developments in the area of global economic governance.

- graduate students from other disciplinary backgrounds wishing to further their understanding of global economic policy issues and debates through systematic academic study.

- economics graduate students wishing to specialize in global economic policy and governance.

Prior knowledge of economics is not a requirement.

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is the most recent addition to the Department of Economics’ portfolio of masters programme. The programme builds on the department’s unique combination of expertise – in policy analysis, regional economics and critical theoretical perspectives – to provide students with an in-depth understanding of core policy debates in the area of global economic governance. Specifically, the programme focuses on:

- global economic governance: It offers in-depth specialisation in this area of wider global governance.

- economic policy: It provides high-level training in the understanding and critical evaluation of economic policy issues, design and solutions, their foundation in the evolution of economic theory and methods, as well as critical discussion of the application of policy design to real-world problems, such as issues of implementation and monitoring.

- regional specificities within the global economy: It provides a differentiated analysis of problems of global economic governance from a range of regional perspectives, in advanced as well as developing country regions.

The programme is taught through two dedicated core courses (Global Economic Governance I: Global Economic Policy Debates and Analysis and Global Economic Governance II: Institutional and Governance Debates on Economic Development and Growth). In addition, students can choose from a wide range of optional courses and will write a 10.000 word dissertation.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-global-economic-governance-and-policy/

Structure

The MSc in Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new masters programme designed for professionals and postgraduate students, with or without a prior background in economics, who wish to gain a focused and in-depth understanding of contemporary economic governance and policy debates.

The MSc is taught through two dedicated core courses. The first, Global Economic Governance 1 deals with issues of Global Economic Policy. This covers international trade and investment relationships between countries, trade and industrial policies, global capital markets, the international monetary and financial system, multinationals, global production networks and labour in the global economy. The second core paper, Global Economic Governance 2 deals with issues of institutions and governance. This includes issues of governance reforms for developing countries, the theory of institutional economics informing these debates, the policy and theoretical debates around property rights reforms, anti-corruption, industrial policy, rents and rent seeking, democratization and related governance issues. In addition, students will choose one, two or three optional courses, depending on the weight of the courses (see the list below), from across a range of SOAS departments plus a 10,000 word dissertation.

Students can, but do not have to, choose a course structure that, in addition to the programme’s focus on policy analysis and training, provides research method training.

- Optional Courses

MSc GEGP students can choose either one (1 unit) course or two (0.5 unit) courses or three (0.33 unit courses) to make up a total of 1 unit from the following list of courses by department. The availability of open option courses in other FL&SS departments from the below list is conditional on the approval of individual course convenors as well as the usual restrictions with regard to pre-requisites, timetable compatibilities and availability of individual courses in any one academic year. Students should note that some courses are capped in terms of student numbers, and that students from home departments will be given priority in case the relevant caps are reached. All law courses are open only for students with an LLB or who take the Law pre-sessional course offered by the School of Law at SOAS.

- Economics Department

MSc GEGP students will be eligible to take any of the post-graduate courses offered in the Economics Department, pending permission by the course convenors on the basis of the students’ prior academic qualifications in economics. Economics options with CATS 22.5 (0.5 unit) modules will be made available subject to approval.

Programme Specification

MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy programme specification (pdf; 392kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-global-economic-governance-and-policy/file97019.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.
Access to other London Universities will be provided, where relevant to specific courses.

Teaching & Learning

Courses are taught in lectures and tutorial groups. Degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. Courses are generally assessed on the basis of a final examination (70%) and an essay or project-based coursework (30%). MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years.

Learning Outcomes

Knowledge

- Students will learn about core policy debates on global economic governance.
- Students will study the current institutional and organisational architecture of global economic policy-making and governance.
- Students will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of differing economic theories and methods, and of how these relate to economic policy debates and designs in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will study regionally specific economic policy challenges in the context of the evolution of the global economy, and will have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of different regional perspectives on global economic governance.
- Students will be trained in the understanding and use of economic policy tools and design, as well as issues of policy implementation and monitoring.
- Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will acquire sound knowledge of statistical research techniques and economic research methods.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to develop intellectual initiative and to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on current research in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will acquire the ability to discriminate between competing economic theories and methods underlying the design of global economic policies, and to critically appraise the policy implications of these differing approaches.
- Students will learn to apply theoretical, empirical and technical knowledge about core features of current global economic governance to practical policy analysis through coursework and the dissertation.
- Students will have an opportunity to translate a complex understanding of issues in global economic governance into reform proposals, and to learn how to present these in an articulate, informed and coherent manner.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Students will learn how to gather, organise and employ data, information and evidence for economic policy analysis and design in the area of global economic governance.
- Students will gain the ability to critically assess economic policy tools and to design economic policy proposals in a case study context.
- Students will learn how to identify core problems in economic policy design, implementation and monitoring
- Students will acquire the ability to marshal arguments lucidly, coherently and concisely to present core analyses and policy messages or suggestions in clear language (written and verbal).
- Students taking the research pathway of the MSc GEGP will learn how to apply one or more research methods systematically to a chosen topic or project.

Transferable skills:

- Students will be able to analyse, evaluate and reflect critically on information received.
- Students will learn how to present ideas coherently and concisely, in writing and orally, extracting key elements from complex information.
- Students will be given the opportunity to engage with independent research on well defined tasks or topics.
- Students will learn how to identify policy problems and design solutions, selecting and applying competing theories and methods appropriately.
- Students will gain an understanding of how to gather, organise and deploy data and evidence to form a balanced judgement and to develop and support critical argument and policy recommendations. S
- Students will have an opportunity to present written and oral materials clearly and effectively and to engage constructively with feedback.

Employment

The MSc Global Economic Governance and Policy is a new programme, starting in 2016/17.

Students enrolling in this programme will return to or pursue careers in a wide range of positions in public, private and non-governmental project management and policy advice, for which a thorough understanding of on-going issues in global economic governance is essential.

This includes, for example, government officials from developing and advanced countries whose remit requires a wider understanding of global economic governance issues; employees of international organisations whose remits are not primarily concerned with economic policy-making, but increasingly require a thorough understanding of global economic governance issue to co-ordinate their approaches with those of other national and international organizations; private sector managers and consultants requiring a systematic understanding of current economic crises and imbalances in the world economy as well as regulatory approaches to this; employees of NGOs working in areas affected by current global economic crises and imbalances and policy responses to these; graduate students wishing to build a career in any of the above, and economics graduates with a special interest in global economic policy debates and design.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London have a long tradition. It was Professor Joan M. Read more
Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway, University of London have a long tradition. It was Professor Joan M. Hussey who first introduced and devised the study of Byzantine History in the University of London in 1950; throughout her long academic career she instilled ‘the principles of scholarship and demonstrated the perfect balance between historical detail and the wider implication of the subject’.

Her legacy was continued by Julian Chrysostomides, who taught the next generations of undergraduate and postgraduate students, and in 1987, together with Professor Jonathan Riley-Smith and Dr Athanasios Angelou, established the taught MA degree course in Byzantine Studies at Royal Holloway. This programme centred on the middle and later period of Byzantine history, placing particular emphasis on Byzantine sources and Greek Palaeography. This initiative was joined by King’s College London (KCL) under Professor Averil Cameron and Professor Charlotte Roueché, whose interests centred in Late Antiquity and early Byzantium; thus, the University of London federal MA course in Late Antique and Byzantine Studies (MA LABS) took its original form.

Since October 2009 the MA LABS has been offered as part of the intercollegiate arrangements among Royal Holloway, King's College London and University College London (UCL). In choosing where to register, students should note that they will normally be expected to undertake their MA dissertation at their home College; they should therefore aim to register at the College where staff interests are closest to their own. The MA LABS at Royal Holloway is taught by members of staff of the Hellenic Institute, a research centre for the diachronic and interdisciplinary study of Hellenism, based in the History Department.

Since its establishment a large number of students have successfully pursued this MA course, the majority of whom continued their research on a doctoral level. Today graduates of the programme hold research and teaching posts in universities in Britain and abroad, testifying to its success in meeting its aims.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/malateantiquebyzantinestudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Hellenic Institute, established in 1993, brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royal Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, based largely in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, but also in the Department of Drama and Theatre; and Byzantine Studies, which have always found a home in the Department of History. It aims to consolidate existing strengths and to extend them by promoting the study of the Hellenic tradition across the centuries from archaic and classical Greece, through the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period, to the modern world.

- We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Institute of Historical Research and the Warburg Institute, as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.

- We maintain links with universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus. Scholars from the Universities of Athens, Ioannina and Cyprus regularly visit the Institute as part of collaborative research, offering their expertise to our students and members of staff.

- The Institute organises a range of lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and other events for students, scholars and the wider public, giving the opportunity to engage with experts in the field.

- We receive funding in support of our activities from the Ministries of Culture and Education of the Hellenic Republic, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, the A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), The Friends of the Hellenic Institute and private donors.

- The Institute offers a number of annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards in support of its students.

Department research and industry highlights

Collaborative research includes:
- Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus
- Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts
- Byzantine Autographs
- A Catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library
- The Porphyrogenitus Project: Lexicon of Abbreviations and Ligatures in Greek
- Minuscule Hands, c.800-c.1600
- Lexicon of Terms used in Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics
- Triadic Monarchy: The Concept of Monarchy in the Triadology of the Greek Fathers -
- Ecclesiological Repercussions and the Monastic Model
- The Greek Population of Rhodes under Hospitaller Rule
- The Greek Community in London, 1500-1945.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of Late Antique and Byzantine Studies, and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

- an awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information

- a general appreciation of the varied and interlinked methodologies for understanding antiquity and the medieval age

- the reading and understanding of ancient and medieval texts, both in print and in manuscript

- a grasp of literary criticism necessary for understanding and appreciating the style of ancient and medieval authors

- an awareness of the main forms of material available to those studying classical antiquity and the Byzantine world.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers and university lecturers, teachers in secondary education, librarians, archivists, book conservators, and editors of history journals. A number of our graduates hold teaching posts and research fellowships at the Universities of London, Cyprus, Patras and the Peloponnese, the Institute for Byzantine Research of the Hellenic National Research Foundation, and are employed by the Library of the Greek Parliament and the Department of Book Conservation of the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece.

The majority of our graduates pursue MPhil/PhD studies in the field of Byzantine Literature and History, and Greek Palaeography at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

Read less
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Read more
This two-year programme combines the strengths of the MA History of Art and Archaeology of East Asia with intensive language training in Japanese or Korean. Students study the arts of China, Korea and Japan, exploring a wide range of East Asian arts, from Chinese archaeology to Japanese prints, Korean installation works to Buddhist monuments, in historical and contemporary periods. Instruction in the language of their choice is provided by teachers in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. By the end of the programme, which includes a summer language school abroad, students have received sufficient instruction to reach near-proficiency in the language.

The Department of the History of Art and Archaeology contains some of the world’s leading experts in the art history and archaeology of East Asia, whose ground-breaking research informs and is informed by their teaching. Students benefit from the unparalleled knowledge and enthusiasm of staff. As members of the School of Arts, they profit from the insights of scholars and students working in other related fields, such as East Asian Music, Film and Media, as well as the expertise of specialist language teachers.

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/art/programmes/ma-art-and-archaeology-of-east-asia-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take two intensive language units and one East Asian History of Art and Archaeology unit in their first year. During the summer, they participate in a summer school abroad. Upon their return, they take one intensive language unit in their second year and two East Asian History of Art and Archaeology units. The dissertation is written on East Asian History of Art and Archaeology and submitted in September of year 2.

Teaching

Teaching consists of a combination of lectures and seminars. Classes are normally between two and three hours per week for each course. Teaching methods include lectures with discussion, seminars (at which students present papers) and museum visits. Students at all levels are expected to take an active part in class presentations. A particularly important element is the training of the student's visual memory.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS can participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

Assessment

For each of the three taught courses, the student will be expected to submit two or three pieces of written work usually around 3,000 to 4,500 words – for a total of 9,000 words per course. The emphasis is on developing essay skills during the session in preparation for the dissertation. In some courses the assessment is 100% on written work. On other courses, assessed course work forms 75% of the student’s final grade and an additional 25% is determined by slide quizzes, projects or other forms of assessment. The 10,000 word dissertation is submitted in September of year 2.

Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Destinations

A Masters from the Department of the History of Art and Archaeology provides students with expertise in the History of Art and/or Archaeology of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Our postgraduates progress to work in arts, culture and heritage roles, including in galleries, museums, archives, conservation, publishing and arts administration. The large portfolio of transferable skills they acquire enables them to forge careers in a range of other fields across the world. Our Masters programmes are also an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including:

Asia House
Bonhams
British Museum
Christie's Hong Kong
Design Museum
Dr. Bhau Daji Lad Mumbai City Museum
Hong Kong Museum Of Art
India Foundation For The Arts
Museum of East Asian Art
National Gallery National Museum of Singapore
People Projects Culture & Change
Schoeni Art Gallery
Sotheby's
Taiwan Embassy
The Alliance for Global Education
The British Embassy
The Chester Beatty Library
The National Museum Of Korea
The Royal Collection

Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include:

Manager of Communications
Culture Programme Coordinator
Research Assistant
Social Anthropology Lecturer
Specialist - Indian Art
Architect
Art Historian
Development Specialist
Archivist
Gallery Director Innovation Programmes Learning Manager
Creative Director
Organisational Consultant
Travel writer
Art Collector
Chinese Painting Specialist
Professor of Silk Road History
Rights and Reproductions Officer
Public Education Coordinator
Senior Curator of Photographs

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This programme offers registered midwives an opportunity to engage in postgraduate education, in order to deepen and enhance their practice through acquisition, extension and critical appraisal of their knowledge and skills. Read more
This programme offers registered midwives an opportunity to engage in postgraduate education, in order to deepen and enhance their practice through acquisition, extension and critical appraisal of their knowledge and skills.

The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.
Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context.

The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

[[Learning activities and assessment
Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

[[Career support and prospects
The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake Master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice. Read more
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice.

The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.
It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.

Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context.

The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level
-You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner.

Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice. Read more
This programme is suitable for healthcare professionals working in community practice or mental health practice. The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context. Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context. The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012.

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor. Read more
The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.

Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context.

The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020.

This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes.

The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs.

Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less
The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor. Read more
The Advanced Practice programme at the University of Bradford offers students the opportunity to apply knowledge to a range of clinical and professional situations through reflection and practice experience, supported by an experienced mentor.

It develops skills designed to meet the challenges of delivering and advancing quality healthcare within a global context.

Learning and teaching is designed to equip students with skills in using a range of information, data, tools and techniques to improve the quality of patient care and health outcomes as well as demonstrate impact and value. There is a focus on patient safety, risk assessment and risk management within a clinical governance context. The programme is intended to:
-Provide a flexible educational framework that is vocationally relevant, which meets your professional development needs, as well as the organisational needs of employers
-Provide opportunities for inter-professional teaching and learning to share the knowledge, skills and experience common to a range of different health and social care disciplines
-Provide a framework within which the curriculum, where required, meets the regulatory needs of professional bodies such as the NMC, GPhC and HCPC and recognised National benchmarks
-Stimulate you to become a self-directed learner who is motivated to sustain and advance your own continuous professional learning
-Develop your clinical skills, knowledge and critical understanding to an advanced level, applicable to your own field of practice
-Further develop your cognitive and practical skills to undertake data synthesis, complex problem solving and risk assessment
-Prepare you to become an autonomous practitioner, to work in advanced and specialist roles with high levels of accountability
-Develop you as a practitioner who will innovate, promote evidence informed practice and improve service user outcomes
-Develop you as a leader with skills and confidence, to act as a role model, supporting the professional development of colleagues and the work of your organisation
-Develop you as a critically reflective, competent leader who will manage service development towards effective, sustainable, inclusive, fair and ethically sensitive service provision

Professional Accreditation

This programme has been accredited by the RCN Centre for Professional Accreditation until 31 August 2020. This is the only Nationally recognised quality marker, and is therefore a portable qualification and a quality marker for Advanced Nurse Practitioners programmes in the UK. The accreditation demonstrates that our Advanced Practice programmes have been rigorously evaluated against 15 standards and associated criteria (RCN, 2012) and judged to prepare Advanced Nurse Practitioners to an advanced level commensurate with the RCN guidance (RCN, 2012).

Why Bradford?

This programme is part of the interdisciplinary Specialist Skills and Post Registration Development (SSPRD) Framework within the Faculty of Health Studies. The Framework enables you to undertake a named award or create an individualised programme of study that will meet either your needs and/or your employer’s needs for a changing diverse workforce within a modern organisation.

The SSPRD Framework offers a structure within which students undertaking the MSc Advanced Practice and named awards have a wide choice of modules. Whilst some students can build their own awards by choosing their own menu of module options the module choice on specialist, named award pathways is more clearly defined. If you are a UK student your programme of study will not only focus on research informed knowledge and understanding but will also extend your skills and competence in practice. International students will focus on modules that assess application to practice through a more reflective approach. The module choice for international students and UK students who are not working in a healthcare setting is restricted to those modules with an ‘international’ version.

Your programme of study and the collection of modules you may choose to study will contextualise your learning by addressing the Aims and Learning Outcomes for the programme which are outlined in the next section of this document. Modules such as the research or work based project modules, for example, enable you to shape your own focus of study within the modules aims and learning outcomes by learning the principles being taught and applying them to your own professional/employment area.

The flexibility offered by the Faculty of Health’s framework will enable you to take forward your current experience whatever the area of your work in collaboration with the University of Bradford. If you are not currently working in a UK healthcare setting you will have your choice limited to those modules with an ‘international’ version. An academic advisor will discuss with you and support your choices.

The Faculty of Health Studies is a major provider of education and training for individuals working within the health, social, independent and community/voluntary sector organisations across the Yorkshire and Humber Region and wider. The Faculty focus on excellence though knowledge, practice, research, leadership and management aims to support the future sustainability of the individuals, through lifelong learning and improved employability and thereby influencing the future adaptability of individual organisations and service delivery to promote change.

Learning activities and assessment

Whilst following this programme of study, you will engage with learning through a range of teaching methods. These methods will be dependent on modules studied, however student-centred approaches to learning are a feature of the modules and you will be expected to take responsibility for your learning as you develop your academic skills.

There are a number of approaches to the manner in which modules are delivered and these include block attendance, study day attendance, distance learning and blended learning. When devising your study plan with your academic advisor, you will be informed regarding which delivery methods are utilised for which module.

The aims of the teaching and learning strategies have been designed so that you will be given the opportunity to develop theoretical understanding, research informed knowledge and critical thinking to develop a range of skills appropriate to your professional field, your organisation and workplace setting. You will also develop your skills and knowledge of research and application to your practice area.

Your course of study will expose you to a range of different teaching, learning and assessment strategies required to achieve the learning outcomes. The teaching approaches that are used across the Faculty of Health Studies are informed by the University and Faculty core values which are for teaching and learning to be: Research informed, Reflective, Adaptable, Inclusive, Supportive, Ethical and Sustainable. You may experience these across your choice of modules in order to meet both the aims of the programme and your learning outcomes which may include any number of the following:
-Research informed lectures: to a group of students where information will be presented and discussed
-Facilitated seminars and group discussion: where learning will be through the interpretation and critical application of information and group learning
-Tutorial: where small group number of students reflect and discuss issues related to their learning
-Work-based learning: where learning is directed at consolidating skills in relation to theory and best practice, enabling students to advance their competence in their field of practice
-Use of Web based virtual learning environments: such as Blackboard, to access information and to interact with other students undertaking group work or developing wikis
-Distance learning packages where clearly defined directed study and tasks are available for the student to undertake
-Directed reading: where set reading may be recommended
-Self-Directed learning: Where student are expected to develop their own learning by identifying areas of interest and areas in which knowledge needs to be developed
-Undertaking a work based project or a research module which is shaped by your own self-directed learning needs and the learning outcomes at MSc level

You will be expected to develop an autonomous learning style and become self-directed as a learner. Your learning will be assessed against the learning outcomes and programme aims through the use of a range of different assessment techniques which may include one or more of the following approaches:
-Written essay
-A Reflective Case study
-The development of a reflective portfolio
-Completion of set number of competencies
-Completion of a set number of clinical contacts
-Practical examination
-Computer based Multiple Choice Question examination
-Computer based open book examination
-Seminar Presentation
-Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE)
-Written project report
-Completion of a Dissertation
-Research paper/executive summary

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Experienced nurses and healthcare practitioners now have the opportunity to take on challenging roles, working across professional, organisational and system boundaries to meet diverse patient needs. Healthcare practitioners working towards these advanced practice roles, often at the forefront of innovative practice, are expected to undertake master’s level education. The programme is designed to develop the skills in complex reasoning, critical thinking and analysis required to undertake these roles.

Read less

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