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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature is the first of its kind in the world. It draws on world-level expertise to explore the various types of narrative produced in ancient Greece, Rome and Egypt.

Key Features

This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. It is taught by a team of scholars associated with the KYKNOS research centre, whose research in this field is internationally recognised.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature offers excellent preparation for students who intend to undertake further research in this exciting and rapidly developing area of Classical literature. Students will have the opportunity to begin or continue the study of Greek and/or Latin.

Students of the MA Ancient Narrative Literature can take advantage of the College of Arts and Humanities' Graduate Centre which fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin language
• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Greek and Roman Magic :Exploring the Sources
• Reading Academic German
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity
• Word, Metaphor, Allegory: effective models of reality

Student Quote

"I studied at Swansea University for my Undergraduate degree and fell in love with the city, the university campus and the lecturers and supporting staff at the university. Deciding to do my MA in Ancient Narrative Literature here was therefore partly influenced by this. However, Ancient Narrative Literature at Swansea University was an attractive choice mostly because of the quality of the lecturers here. Both Professor John Morgan who is already a highly esteemed scholar within the area of the Ancient Greek novels and Dr Ian Repath who is a rising star in the same subject area make Swansea University the ideal place to study Ancient Narrative Literature at MA level."

Ida Meland

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The MA in Cognitive Linguistics is primarily aimed at those students who wish to undertake a taught programme of graduate-level study in order to pursue research in some aspect of Cognitive Linguistics. Read more
The MA in Cognitive Linguistics is primarily aimed at those students who wish to undertake a taught programme of graduate-level study in order to pursue research in some aspect of Cognitive Linguistics.

Cognitive Linguistics is a modern and innovative approach to the study of language and mind, and their relationship with embodied experience and culture. The MA provides a focused and comprehensive programme of graduate-level training in the core subject matter of Cognitive Linguistics, including the most important theoretical frameworks. The subject matter covered includes conceptual structure and organisation, figurative language, grammar and mind, the relationship between language, thought and culture, lexical and cognitive compositional semantics, the issue of embodiment, and contemporary methodology in Cognitive Linguistics. The MA also provides a platform for those interested in pursuing an advanced research degree such as a PhD.

Students must take 180 Credits in total from the lists below:



Modules
The modules for this degree vary each year, but a selection will be offered including:

Issues in Cognitive Linguistics
Metaphor and Thought
Language and Communication
Grammatical Systems and Change,
Language Space and Time
The Bilingual Mind

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This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Read more
This Anthropology MA provides an understanding of the ways in which anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. It attracts students with diverse backgrounds and study/work experiences which makes for a lively and challenging atmosphere.

The degree is designed to provide students with a fairly detailed knowledge of anthropology, development issues, research methods and either an ethnographic region (and/or language) and/or thematic interest in health/gender/food/ media. Advice will be given to match the choice of optional components to the requirements, interests, and qualifications of individual students whose background may be in general social science, regional, language or other studies. While the focus of the degree is on development issues and practice, its disciplinary orientation remains anthropological.

Students explore the contribution of anthropology to contemporary development debates, for example, on donors/aid agencies and NGOs, poverty, migration and development, dominating discourses, human rights, violence and complex emergencies, refugees, gender, social capital and community action, health, climate change, the ‘market’ (as a core metaphor of globalised development), whether there are alternatives to the market, the role of business in development (corporate social responsibility and markets for the poor) and the importance of ethical, professional conduct by anthropologists. Anthropological studies provide the basis for understanding issues of state and governance in development, as well as the meaning of community development, and of popular ‘participation’ and ‘empowerment’. Throughout the programme, the role of, and opportunities for anthropologists as professionals in development is discussed, in part through a dedicated series of seminars in term 2.

Note: (1) Students registered in other departments who wish to take this course MUST write to the Director of Study for this course for permission to take it.

The programme consists of four elements: three assessed course units and a dissertation of 10,000 words.

The degree’s core course – ‘Anthropology of Development’ – provides an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of anthropological perspectives on policy and practice in contemporary international development, and gives a theoretical overview of the relationship between development and anthropology. The course examines the politics of aid, shifting aid frameworks, and concrete intervention programmes, bridging the disparate worlds of planners and beneficiaries. This involves close reading of anthropological monographs/studies which examine the nature of policy-making, bureaucracy and programmes in a variety of sectors – health, agriculture, water and others – while always paying close attention to the specific cultural contexts of intervention. Students should note that the course is continuously assessed which each term students are expected to write 1 book review, 1 essay and sit a 50 minute examination. This form of assessment has been found to be much fairer to overseas students whose first language is not English. While continuous assessment requires students to organize their studies efficiently from the very beginning of the year, we have found that a much higher proportion of our students graduate having achieved a distinction.

Commonwealth Shared Scholarship Scheme

The Commonwealth Shared Scholarship scheme (http://www.soas.ac.uk/registry/scholarships/soas-hakluyt-scholarship.html) has been extended to cover the MA Social Anthropology of Development.

Note (2). Students registered in other departments at SOAS, notably in Development Studies, must apply in writing/email to the Director of Studies for permission to take this course as part of their degree.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/

Structure

Overview
The programme consists of four units in total: three units of examined taught courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words.

Core Courses:
- Anthropology of Development - 15PANC090 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Social Anthropology of Development and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme can be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- A total of either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may be selected.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 134kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/masocanthdev/file39771.pdf

Employment

A postgraduate degree in the Social Anthropology of Development at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised with a particular focus on how anthropological approaches and debates inform the study of meanings and concepts in development, its priorities, policies and practice. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Bath Spa has pioneered the teaching of songwriting, and launched the world's first Songwriting Master’s degree in 2007. Its blend of practical, theoretical and scholarly practice is taught by published, practicing songwriters and academics. Read more
Bath Spa has pioneered the teaching of songwriting, and launched the world's first Songwriting Master’s degree in 2007. Its blend of practical, theoretical and scholarly practice is taught by published, practicing songwriters and academics. The course is aimed at unpublished songwriters wishing to develop their craft to a professional level, or published songwriters wishing to achieve academic accreditation whilst continuing their creative development. Based at our postgraduate centre at Corsham Court, and also offered as a distance learning option, the course maintains strong links with industry through publishers, guest artists and guest lecturers, and offers the chance to consolidate and focus your creative output whilst developing a perspective on your work informed by research. You'll study with us on Mmus Songwriting so that you can:

• Comment critically upon your own and others’ material
• Examine the musicological roots of your craft
• Consider the commercial value of your songs in the marketplace
• Rewrite and collaborate
• Conduct academic research
• Develop technical skills
• Create a professional-standard portfolio of your work
• Establish networks, collaborators and contacts

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is available on either a full-time (typically one year) or part- time (typically two year) basis. We also offer a low-residency ‘distance learning’ option that will be open to both UK and overseas applicants. The course aims:

• To enable you to write and record songs to a professional level
• To develop critical awareness relating to your own songs and others'
• To develop your ability to perform/present your songs
• To inform you of historical and musicological developments in songwriting
• To enhance your understanding of the market value ((and artistic value) of your own work
• To provide opportunities for you to discuss current developments in songwriting with songwriters, producers and publishers
• To encourage you to develop re-writing and collaborative songwriting skills
• To help you to develop technical skills relevant to songwriting practice
• To develop your academic writing skills at level 7

MODULES

Songwriting Skills: As an essential component of this module you will engage weekly with a series of preparatory creative writing and compositional exercises designed to supply you with the raw creative material from which to increase your lyrical, harmonic and melodic range. These exercises are technique-based and serve to extend your creative palette and songwriting choices. Tutorial and group-playback support engage real-time with critical feedback and professional advice. Online virtual classroom exercises are supported by instruction videos and examine imagery, metaphor, narrative, rhyme, meter, melody, harmonic construction, narrative perspectives, intertextuality and rhetorical principles.

History of Song: Through this module you will gain a systematic and comprehensive knowledge of strategies and form used in popular songwriting. You will also develop an advanced ability to contextualize your own songs. With reference to popular songs written between 1920 and the present day, a series of lectures examines key developments in the musical, lyrical and structural development of song. The teaching approach is analytical and particular attention is paid to strategies used by songwriters to convey ideas.

Context and Methodology: In this module, visiting professional practitioners deliver master-classes to explore particular ecologies within the songwriting profession. In master-classes and seminars, students explore diverse songwriting contexts such as writing for musical theatre, writing for the charts, writing to pitch-sheets and writing for an original performer. Research methods and postgraduate research methodology skills are then utilised to explore a possible blend of contexts identified by the student as being potential markets for their music. Becoming aware of the modalities and nuances of these cultures is the key to successful songwriting. In preparation for the Major Project portfolio, this module serves to refine your eventual work by investigating the cultural, semiotic, linguistic, musicological, economic and pragmatic structures of your intended song culture. This is a key Level 7 module, with a generic research emphasis designed to prepare the student for further postgraduate and doctoral study.

Collaborative Songwriting: This module aims to develop skills in collaborative songwriting, enabling you to experience a variety of collaborative methods, and to explore the relationship between collaborative process and final song product. Although primarily based around a systematic understanding of the creative process of collaboration, the module also helps students to explore collaborative works in their cultural and economic context, including royalty splits, publishing implications, and issues of shared Intellectual Property between joint creators.

Major Project: This double module represents the culmination of the MMus, and a chance for you to work on a substantial album/portfolio project. The module will be largely student-led, with most of the work centered on individual practice. You will receive tutorial support.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Bath Spa’s approach to the teaching of songwriting combines analysis of existing repertoire with a focus on song crafting technique and students are encouraged to develop by writing new songs throughout the course. Lectures, seminars and tutorials combine to offer a range of expert and peer critique that seeks to enable the student to examine original and known works in a range of critical and technical contexts. Students have access to laptop-based recording equipment and the programme has its own dedicated facilities. The curriculum is supported by a Virtual Learning Environment, so course materials can be accessed from any web link.

Recording Facilities - while our studio facilities are designed to enable the capture of high quality recordings, in keeping with contemporary songwriting industry practice it is anticipated that learners will become self-sufficient in the sense that, following completion of the course, they will be able to repeat the core processes of writing, planning and recording without incurring recording studio expenses. To enable mastery of the home recording process, students have access to laptop based ‘notepad’ setups and industry-standard plug-ins (Stylus, MachFive, BFD, Trilogy, Waves etc) throughout their studies.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment takes the form of individual assignments for each module. Typical assessments include audio CD, presentation, essay, and evaluative account. Assessment is continuous and there are no written exams.

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As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. Read more
As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. In addition to this, there are regular visits by other writers. The final taught module includes a session given by agents and editors. Staff are also willing to advise on professional issues of placing work.

The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. It is possible to write prose fiction (the novel or short story), poetry and drama. We are interested in literary fiction in all its forms.
Our MA Creative writing students 'read as writers', explore their reading in group discussions and engage in writing exercises designed to enlarge and stimulate their practice.
In the intensive MA workshops, students share work, learn to write to deadlines, learn how to redraft, polish, edit imaginatively and find the creative thread which, when followed, reveals how their own writing will achieve its optimum level.
All written assignments are accompanied by the writing of a commentary on the process; the commentary speeds and makes explicit a writer's discoveries, and so aids future practice.
Recent guest readers include: Simon Brett, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Vicki Feaver, Ed Hogan, Susanna Jones, Adam Marek, Bernard O'Donoghue, Michele Roberts, Jo Shapcott, Robert Shearman, Matthew Sweeney and Nick Warburton.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00


Many of our writers go on to publish and win prizes. For instance, Isabel Ashdown's novel Glasshopper, written during the MA, was hailed as one of the five best debut novels of 2009 in The Observer. MA graduate Wendy French won the £5000 2010 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. These are just two recent examples of the success of our graduates.

The annual Publishing Panel of six specialists has regularly welcomed literary agents from agencies such as David Godwin Associates, Rogers, Coleridge and White, United Artists, Greene & Heaton, Janklow and Nesbitt, RAFT and Lucy Luck Associates. Agents join literary editors for a discussion of the publishing world today and how to approach an agent or editor. We have welcomed literary editors from Penguin/Hamish Hamilton, Chatto&Windus, Myriad Editions, Simon & Schuster, Pighog Press, the Frogmore Papers and producers from BBC Radio.

Student Successes

Jane Rusbridge’s first novel, The Devil’s Music, was published by Bloomsbury in the summer of 2009. It is described as ‘a beautifully told story of family secrets and betrayal, involving knots, Harry Houdini and the shifting landscape of memory.’ The novel was started as part of her MA dissertation project. Jane's second novel, Rook, was published in 2012 and was a Guardian Readers' Book of the Year. Jane has won or been placed in several national and international short story competitions, including the WritersInc ‘Writer of the Year’ award (2005), the Ilkley literature Festival competition (2005), the Bluechrome Short Story competition (2005), the Bridport (2003, 2005) and the Fish Prize (2006). Jane's website can be found at http://janerusbridge.co.uk/

All these stories were written while studying on the MA. MA assignment poems have featured in The Interpreter's House, Red Hot Fiesta, New Beginnings, First Time, and the Surrey Poetry Competition anthology. Jane’s story ‘Sputnik’ was published in Mslexia (2006) and ‘The Devil’s Music’ – a chapter from the novel – was published by Route (2006).

On the Third Day by Kate Betts won Channel 4’s ‘The Play’s The Thing’ script-writing competition in 2006. The play was performed in The New Ambassadors Theatre, London. Michael Billington, renowned theatre critic for The Guardian, wrote, ‘Betts reveals a bold theatrical sense’ and ‘a gift for wry humour’ while Charles Spencer of The Telegraph praised the ‘emotional candour and generosity’ of the script. Kate featured each week in the major Channel 4 serial documentary, The Play’s The Thing.

Bethan Roberts' fourth novel, Mother Island (Chatto and Windus), was winner of Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Award in 2015. Bethan's first novel, The Pools, which evolved from her MA dissertation, was published by Serpent's Tail in the summer of 2007.

While on the MA, Bethan was selected for the prestigious Arvon/Jerwood mentoring scheme for writers under 35. Entry was highly competitive, with only 9 creative writers chosen from MA courses throughout the country. As part of the scheme, Bethan completed her novel under the guidance of an experienced novelist. Bethan has also published short stories, all written for the MA, including 'Family Portrait' (MsLexia, 16, 2003). She won The Olive Cook Award (Society of Awards) for another short story in 2006. Bethan's website can be found at http://bethanrobertswriter.co.uk/

Gabrielle Kimm wrote her first novel, My Last Duchess (Sphere 2010) on the MA in Creative Writing. Since then Sphere have gone on to publish The Courtesan’s Lover (2012) and The Girl with the Painted Face (2013). Gabrielle's website can be found at http://gabriellekimm.co.uk/

Indicative modules
The MA comprises four taught modules and a creative dissertation:

The Writing Studio enables writers to experiment in any genre prose, poetry or drama, while exploring key features of those genres. This first module also serves as induction to the MA and to the distinctive methods of the 'Chichester workshop'.

Metaphor and the Imagination encourages innovation and experimentation, pushing writers beyond their usual boundaries.

Sources and Transformations engages writers with the essential writerly skills of transforming both outer research and inner biographical concerns into fiction.

Launching the Manuscript encourages autonomy, sustaining the longer project, learning about the publishing industry and includes guest readers and the publishing panel.
The Manuscript (a creative dissertation of 20,000) allows writers to develop a longer piece of work through one to one tutorials with a tutor as a consultant reader.

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Internationally recognised as a pioneering incubator of original designers who challenge the notion of how fashion products change and influence the world we live in. Read more

Introduction

Internationally recognised as a pioneering incubator of original designers who challenge the notion of how fashion products change and influence the world we live in.

Content

MA Fashion Artefact is as original as its name suggests. The course is recognised as a pioneering incubator of ideas and philosophies and has been hailed as a leader in educational studio practice. It has developed and nurtured an impressive roster of alumni who have been awarded top prizes at many international competitions and had their work showcased at prestigious international exhibitions.

Students within Fashion Artefact develop both a comprehensive and personal perspective on fashion in its widest context. The course defines its position within education and the wider creative industries by focusing on the provocative possibilities of an ever-changing spectrum of arenas and audiences.

We believe that fashion is one of the most influential forms of expression in contemporary culture, serving as a reflection of our social behavior. We define fashion artefact as a post-modern metaphor of what occurs in today’s society. Consideration of the fashion artefact in its theoretical and social contexts allows us to gain an insight into complex underlying meanings and open them up for discussion and contemplation.

We strive for perfection and originality in both the exploration and pursuit of material methodologies in construction and manufacture, exploiting both hand-crafted and new technologies. The course leader and teaching team are all internationally recognised practicing artists and designers and are at the forefront of research within studio practice.

Structure

Term One

Creative and Technical Innovation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collaborative Unit (20 credits)
Technical Analysis and Development (40 units)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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MA Dance and Somatic Wellbeing is a unique, visionary and pioneering programme offering a professional training in Dance & Somatic Movement Education. Read more
MA Dance and Somatic Wellbeing is a unique, visionary and pioneering programme offering a professional training in Dance & Somatic Movement Education. The programme is on the cutting edge of contemporary international practice exploring the creative skills required to use movement with sensitivity, imagination and individuality. A deeper connection to our bodily experience, as well as to image, story and metaphor, all contribute towards a sense of authentic self and vital skills of self-care.

Focusing on community facilitation, this programme offers the opportunity to study individual and group improvisation, kinaesthetic awareness and applied somatics philosophy to dance and movement studies.

All sessions are taught in the spirit of self-discovery, non-judgement and reflection. The course develops somatic awareness with a focus on spontaneity, intuition and connection to others.

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Modern society has seen a number of changes to the family dynamic which have played a part in the increase of troubled children. Today, 20 per cent of children in the UK experience emotional, behavioural and mental health difficulties, leading to an increasing demand for play therapists. Read more
Modern society has seen a number of changes to the family dynamic which have played a part in the increase of troubled children. Today, 20 per cent of children in the UK experience emotional, behavioural and mental health difficulties, leading to an increasing demand for play therapists.

As a play therapist, you will help children come to terms with traumatic events in their lives through the use of play, where the child has the freedom and opportunity to express themselves by recreating their own world during their time with you.

Whether you're looking for a change in career, wanting to add therapeutic play to your existing psychological therapies, social work or medical skillset, or if you are a graduate just starting out in the field, this professional course, delivered in partnership with the Academy of Play and Child Psychotherapy Ltd (APAC), allows you to work under supervision with individual children who have slight to moderate problems. Please note that all applications and queries for this course will be dealt with by APAC, and that start dates may differ depending on your location of study. Find out more on the APAC website

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: we entered an increased number of units for this assessment, up from 11% in 2008 to 33% in 201.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/therapeuticplay_pgcert

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

You will be able to practise, with the guidance of a supervisor, using therapeutic play skills in schools and other settings including primary health care, providing emotional support for slight to moderate problems with individual children. If you are already working as a self-employed play therapist, this qualification will give you added confidence to continue working and offering your services as a practitioner.

- Play Therapist
- Play Worker
- Children's Nurse
- Nursery Nurse

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

You will undertake 100 hours of clinical practice in either a primary school, special needs school, nursery, primary health care, hospital, care home or adoption and foster care setting, where you will apply your learning in a practical setting.

Our Faculty of Health and Social Sciences has a well-established Playwork team and over recent years has developed close links with APAC and professional organisations Play Therapy UK and Play Therapy International.

Modules

Orientation and Setting Up Play Therapy Practice Using Non-Directive Play Therapy
You will be introduced to the principles of non-directive play and the therapeutic play continuum so you will be prepared to work one to one with children who have slight to moderate social, emotional and behaviour difficulties.

Using Expressive Arts Therapy to Reach the Unconscious
Add to your repertoire of play therapy tools and conditions, and study the main research methods that are applicable to play therapy and the fundamentals of neurobiology showing the beneficial effects of play.

Using Symbolic Play Therapy Tools and Metaphor Safely
Gain a sound working knowledge of child protection issues and add to your repertoire of therapeutic play media by including art, therapeutic story telling, movement, clay and sand therapy.

Professor Ieuan Ellis

Dean, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences

"We have a long history of providing education across a wide range of professional and academic disciplines in health, applied global ethics, social sciences and related subject areas... The Faculty has a number of areas of research excellence."

Ieuan is responsible for the strategic leadership of the Faculty of Health and Social sciences. He is also a member of Academic Board, and an elected staff representative on the Board of Governors. He is also Chair of the UK Council of Deans of Health and Co-chair of the National Allied Health Professions Advisory Board. After practicing as a chartered physiotherapist in the NHS and private sector, Ieuan entered higher education working initially at Northumbria University prior to joining our University. Ieuan has held a number of leadership and management roles across health and social care education and was awarded a personal chair as Professor in Healthcare Education.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Clinical Skills Suite
The £1 million suite has been designed to meet the learning needs of a range of health professionals, with specialist equipment in purpose-built rooms enabling a variety of sessions to be carried out in a suitable and safe environment.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The MPhil/PhD in Creative Writing is for writers who want to embark on a course of sustained study and research at a high level of academic and creative achievement. Read more
The MPhil/PhD in Creative Writing is for writers who want to embark on a course of sustained study and research at a high level of academic and creative achievement.

Your studies will consist of research into a specific subject area relevant to your chosen field of creative endeavour and a substantial work of creative writing, consisting of a collection of poems, a prose work or a dramatic script for stage, screen or radio.

The subject of your academic study and your creative writing submission will be agreed with your tutor during the process of your application. It is expected that your final creative writing submission, and the process of its development, will be of a professional standard.

Available Projects

Examples of projects include a study of ‘victimhood’ in the novel in parallel with writing a novel involving victims, a study of metaphor in poetry as a means of helping people either as clients or therapists in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT), war poetry and the poetry of confession.

Students embarking on creative writing PhDs tend to have developed particular areas of interest as part of an MA in Creative Writing from Bolton or elsewhere. For example, you may have a particular fascination with a creative or formal problem in your art or an interest in how writing can help in the community. There are many possibilities and it is worth discussing your ideas with us.

For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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We offer excellent candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain. We specialise in, and welcome applications from prospective PhD students interested in the following areas. Read more
We offer excellent candidates the opportunity to carry out research in one of the most dynamic institutions in Britain.

We specialise in, and welcome applications from prospective PhD students interested in the following areas: Corpus Research, Cognitive Linguistics and Psycholinguistics, Discourse Analysis and Stylistics, and Language Learning and Teaching.

The MA by Research programme requires you to prepare a dissertation of up to 40,000 words on a topic of your choice, for which an academic staff member will provide expert supervision.

The PhD – the most advanced research degree – leads to a dissertation of up to 80,000 words on a subject of your choice and under the expert supervision of an academic member of staff.

Our principal areas of research are:

Corpus Research - We are well known for our innovative approaches to the analysis of large corpora, which have had a strong impact on language teaching, dictionary development, and research into academic discourses. We are home to the Centre for Corpus Research (CCR), which supports the use of corpus analysis in research, teaching and learning. CCR provides access to a range of corpora and has a dedicated computer suite with specialist resources as well as an eye-tracking laboratory.

Cognitive Linguistics and Psycholinguistics - Our research in cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics covers a wide range of areas including figurative language, idioms, embodied cognition, language and perception, sign languages, second language acquisition, and construction grammar. We have particular strengths in British Sign Language, Australian Sign Language and gesture studies.

Discourse Analysis and Stylistics - We are known for the development of several highly influential discourse analysis frameworks, and for our work on narrative, the discursive representation of inequality, new media, the language of politics, as well as new ideas on evaluation and phraseology. Our research draws on a variety of linguistic and theoretical traditions, including: systemic-functional linguistics; critical discourse analysis; corpus linguistics; multimodal analysis; narrative analysis; conversation analysis, and genre analysis. Our particular strength at Birmingham is that we combine discourse analysis with corpus analytic methods of research.

Language Learning and Teaching - We research and publish in: academic literacies; phraseology; the teaching and learning of metaphor and other types of figurative language; applications of cognitive linguistics to second language learning and teaching; and the use of corpora in language teaching.

About the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies

"Welcome to the School of English, Drama and American & Canadian Studies, in the College of Arts and Law. This is one of the largest Schools in the College, and variety is our watchword. We offer one of the most extensive ranges of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the country. Our research expertise is equally diverse, and we welcome students and researchers from all over the world." - Professor Andrzej Gasiorek, Head of School

We particularly encourage creative thinking, with a range of pioneering programmes including Masters opportunities in Creative Writing, Film and Television and Shakespeare and Creativity. Our creative offerings are also strengthened by the development of our Department of Film and Creative Writing – established in 2015 – which has opened up exciting new opportunities for postgraduates to benefit from synergies between the two fields.

Our well-established Departments also provide an excellent environment for postgraduate study. The Department of Drama and Theatre Arts has a highly respected national and international reputation for excellence in teaching and research. We are also one of the leading centres for the postgraduate study of English in the UK, spanning language and literature. The Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics is a world-leading centre of excellence for both teaching and research in this field.

We are also proud to be home to the world-renowned Shakespeare Institute, based in Stratford-upon-Avon. Situated within walking distance of Shakespeare’s birthplace, school and grave, and the theatres of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC), the Shakespeare Institute offers postgraduate students and scholars an academic experience unrivalled by any other university.

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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Metaphysics deals with basic philosophical questions such as. Read more

Metaphysics and Epistemology

Metaphysics deals with basic philosophical questions such as: What is being? What is truth? What is the essence of something? Is reality one or many? In Nijmegen, the Department of Metaphysics and Epistemology focuses mainly on the question of how these metaphysical questions are affected by hermeneutical philosophy as it has been developed in the 19th and 20th century. In particular, this impact is examined in discussion with the work of philosophers such as Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Husserl, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur and Derrida.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/metaphysics

Information for students

In Metaphysics and Epistemology you focus on the development of the hermeneutic tradition - key figures being Schleiermacher, Dilthey, Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur and Derrida.
This specialisation covers the classic metaphysical tradition from Aristotle and Thomas Aquinas to Hegel, but more particularly the hermeneutic philosophical tradition of the 19th and 20th centuries. The hermeneutic tradition is studied from a metaphysical and ontological point of view, with particular attention to hermeneutic philosophers of the 19th century (Schleiermacher, Dilthey) as well as to the 20th-century authors who continued this tradition in a phenomenological framework (Heidegger, Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida).
Research in this line mainly focuses on the meaning and status of being, truth and subjectivity in the hermeneutic tradition. Those authors in the continental tradition who were critical of these hermeneutic developments in philosophy are also included.
Current research projects are devoted to Ricoeur and Derrida on Metaphor and Truth and The Hermeneutics of Strangeness. Finally, the section has for some years been running a successful Heidegger seminar.

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Philosophy or in a related discipline (in the latter case, students must have acquired at least 60 EC in Philosophical disciplines).
The applicant must have a degree with merit or distinction or equivalent. Meaning: a student’s weighted grade-point average in philosophy in the 2nd and 3rd year of their Bachelor's programme must be the equivalent of 7.5 or more (on the Dutch scale of 10).
On the page "Conversions of international grades" you will find an indication of what the equivalent of a Dutch 7.5 or 8 might be in the country where you obtained your Bachelor’s degree.

2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Master's degree must either have obtained a higher diploma from an English-teaching institution or be in possession of one of the following certificates:
- A TOEFL score of >577 (paper based) or >233 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)
- An IELTS score of >6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher

3. Highly motivated
An applicant must be able to demonstrate to the Examination Board that they have serious research interests and skills. Applicant must write a motivation letter and send a writing sample which can help evaluate their research and writing skills.

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers poke their noses into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers poke their noses into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Our research in this field

What makes this programme special?
The English-taught Research Master's programme in Philosophy is a two-year course that is meant for students of proven ability who wish to prepare for an academic career in philosophy. We offer the following to provide you with the best possible academic background:
- A combination of internationally acclaimed research and excellent teaching
- A big offer of research seminars in the history of philosophy, continental philosophy and analytic philosophy
- A broad range of specialisations in Philosophical Anthropology, Metaphysics, Philosophy of mind, Philosophy of language and Logic, Philosophical Ethics, Social and Political Philosophy and the History of Philosophy
- An emphasis on the training of research skills
- A personal supervisor who guides you throughout the programme
- An excellent preparation for post-graduate life by means of the specialised character of the Research Master's thesis, which is composed of a publishable article and of a PhD research proposal
- A high chance of obtaining a PhD position in the Netherlands or abroad
- An international climate. Read what our Master's students say about our programme

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/metaphysics

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The Postgraduate Diploma is designed for those who work with young people in educational or other settings who have either satisfactorily completed the Introduction to Child and Adolescent Counselling Skills (60-hour PAES course) or have an equivalent qualification in counselling and psychotherapy. Read more
The Postgraduate Diploma is designed for those who work with young people in educational or other settings who have either satisfactorily completed the Introduction to Child and Adolescent Counselling Skills (60-hour PAES course) or have an equivalent qualification in counselling and psychotherapy.

Visit the website: http://www.ice.cam.ac.uk/component/courses/?view=course&cid=16022

Course detail

The programme is designed to enable participants to:

- work therapeutically with children and young people especially through communication using the arts and play;
- develop the skills of counselling in one-to-one and group settings through the use of practicums, experiential, active learning methods and practical work with other students;
- gain a grounding in the theoretical base of counselling and group work;
- increase their understanding of the development of young people personally, socially and emotionally;
- explore the ethical and professional aspects of working with children and adolescents in schools and other settings.

Format

The diploma comprises three core units:

- Unit 1: Working through the therapeutic relationship and developing counselling skills: practicum and theory sessions
- Unit 2: Communication through images: the use of the creative arts in counselling and affective education
- Unit 3: Working with and understanding groups

Unit 1

Three main areas will be explored:

- Counselling theory and psychology - including a detailed look at the main approaches to counselling children and adolescents, the theory of human development and motivation and the psychology of change.

- Working with the therapeutic relationship - where participants will explore the role of the relationship in therapeutic work and have an opportunity to develop relational qualities including the core processes. There will also be discussions of transference and counter-transference and the use of self.

- Counselling skills and their application - where participants will study and practise the skills of listening, reflecting, observation and attunement, questioning, summarising, communicating empathy and challenging, which will involve the use of a practicum (working on skills in the group).

The unit also covers the social and professional content of counselling, where the ethical and professional issues of working with children and in organisations will be explored, which involves an exploration of issues such as confidentiality and working with colleagues, other professionals and children’s networks.

Unit 2

This unit aims to work in an experiential way and to explore the following:

- the use of non-verbal methods in counselling and affective education (this is important because many participants will be working with students who are either young or unable to express themselves with ease verbally);
- the theory behind the use of play and arts media in counselling;
- the satisfactory expression of an experience through metaphor;
- exploring working with key emotional themes and feelings;
- the use of the creative arts in counselling and affective education in schools.

Practicum work will continue through the use of video with opportunity for peer review and tutor supervision

Unit 3

The final unit aims to provide an opportunity for participants to:

- develop an understanding and awareness of how they experience and behave in a group;
- increase their knowledge and understanding of the theory of group psychology and psychotherapy and the application of this to therapeutic group work with children.

It will be structured around four components:

- the theory of group and group processes;
- application in the workplace, which looks at ways of integrating knowledge and awareness of groups and group processes into the work setting;
- personal growth and awareness, in which activities will be used to engage participants in reflection on themselves and their communication;
- the personal development group, which offers participants the opportunity to develop self-awareness by sharing their thoughts and feelings with each other and the effect they have on each other.

This is an essential process for future counsellors as otherwise their own preconceptions, anxiety and distress may distort their attempts to help the client.

In addition participants are required to complete a minimum of 40 hours of self-funded personal therapy during the course of the Postgraduate Diploma year.

Assessment

- 2 x 4,000-word essays
- 1 x 8,000-word essay

Participants receive formal feedback on their assignments and informal feedback throughout the course (including through supervision).

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding

Hoxter bursary (deadline 31 July annually) http://www.bacp.co.uk/crs/Training/bursary.php

Sources of government funding and financial support (including Professional and Career Development Loans) https://www.gov.uk/browse/education/student-finance

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This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning. Read more

Course description

This Master's course will give you a completely new insight into how language really works and the way people use words to create meaning.

If you would like to learn how to explore language using innovative techniques and computer tools, then our course will offer you cutting-edge, research-led training of the highest quality, taught by leading researchers in the fields of linguistics and computer science.

You will have options enabling you to study:
• How people use words to make meanings;
• How to analyse real language usage;
• The role of phraseology, metaphor, and idioms;
• Creative and poetic uses of language;
• New approaches to language teaching;
• Translation tools such as translation memory systems;
• Creating dictionaries using new kinds of evidence;
• Using computer tools for teaching and translation.

For further information, please download our flyer here: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/MA-Practical-Corpus-Linguistics-for-ELT-Lexicography-and-Translation.pdf

Why choose Wolverhampton?

MA Practical Corpus Linguistics for ELT, Lexicography and Translation is an innovative, unique, and up-to-date course based on high-quality interdisciplinary research, with a selection of modules that is unparalleled both on a national and international level. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field. As a result, the knowledge and practical skills developed on the course will allow you to meet the most recent and relevant demands of the industry.

You will become proficient in the use of sophisticated corpus tools such as the Sketch Engine (https://www.sketchengine.co.uk), as well as state-of-the-art specialist software for professional translators and lexicographers. You will also be given an option to learn basic computer programming in Python, which is one of the most robust, popular, and widely used programming languages in the field. By the end of the course, you will have developed a unique set of transferrable skills that will make you highly competitive in the marketplace and allow you to find employment as a language professional in industry or in academia.

Figures speak louder than words: the University of Wolverhampton boasts an outstanding graduate employability rate – 98% of our postgraduate students are in work or further training six months after graduation!

What will I learn?

This course will introduce you to the use of corpora – large electronic collections of written and/or spoken text that serve as a reliable source of evidence in linguistic analysis. (‘Corpora’ is the plural of ‘corpus’.) You will learn how to design, analyse, and exploit corpora in language teaching, dictionary writing, and translation for English or any other language.

You will be given freedom and flexibility to tailor the course content to your needs and research interests as we offer a unique selection of general and specialized elective modules from which to choose. Our teaching staff will provide you with support and guidance in selecting the most suitable combination for your research topic.

Semester I will focus on developing general linguistic knowledge and research skills, which you will be able to apply to your chosen area of expertise in Semester II. You will learn about words, meanings, and linguistic creativity, broaden your knowledge of grammar, and acquire basic research and professional skills. You will also have an opportunity to learn the essentials of computer programming by attending our elective module in Python.

Semester II will introduce you to corpus linguistic methods and their application to three areas of research: language teaching, lexicography, and translation. You will start planning your dissertation and engage in one-on-one consultations with your supervisor.
For further information on modules and assessments, please visit our website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling

Opportunities

As a Master's student on this course, you will be part of our Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), an independent, research-driven University unit specializing in linguistics and natural language processing.
• You will be taught by leading researchers in the field: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/macorling/who-will-teach-you-on-this-course/; our teaching staff at RIILP are engaged in high-quality research, as evidenced by the latest RAE 2008 and REF 2014 results;
• We offer an exciting programme of invited lectures and research seminars, attended by both students and staff;
• The institute has a wide network of contacts in academia and in the industry which you will be able to benefit from;
• You will also have an opportunity to travel the world – Malaga, Valencia, Besançon, Naples, Alicante, and Plovdiv are just a few of the many possible destinations covered by our institute’s Erasmus agreements.

Career path

Graduates will be able to pursue a career path in language teaching, translation, lexicography, editing, and human language technology, working either as freelancers or in a variety of industry locations, including publishing houses, translation agencies and IT companies that specialize in the development of language resources and tools (e.g. language learning applications, CAT tools). English language teachers will benefit greatly from the course, as they will develop knowledge and practical skills in using modern lexical resources, corpus data and tools in the preparation of teaching material and in the classroom, which will significantly improve their chances of securing a job in the ELT sector.

The course will also provide a sound intellectual platform for students to progress onto doctorate level study and a career in higher education. As the teaching on the course is based on research carried out within the Research Institute of Information and Language Processing (RIILP), graduates will be well-placed to continue their academic careers by applying for PhD positions within our institute or at other leading centres specializing in Corpus Linguistics, ELT/TESOL, Lexicography, Translation Studies, or Natural Language Processing.

Contact us

• Dr Sara Moze (course leader):
• April Harper (admin office):
• Research Group website: http://rgcl.wlv.ac.uk/
• Twitter: @RGCL_WLV


*Subject to approval

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Our two-year MFA gives you the opportunity to launch your career as a director with a full run in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. This course has been launched to extend a great opportunity for trainee directors. Read more
Our two-year MFA gives you the opportunity to launch your career as a director with a full run in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

This course has been launched to extend a great opportunity for trainee directors. Working in the heart of the festival city, there will be time to work with actors on all years of the BA Acting & English and the BA Acting for Stage & Screen courses. You'll be working on contemporary and classic texts, and working alongside trainee playwrights to create new work. You'll have dedicated industry-recognised mentors providing support throughout your training time and you’ll be studying in one of the most culturally vibrant cities in the world.

What you'll learn

The course is structured over 5 trimesters and, along with many opportunities to direct various projects and to assistant direct public shows, you will study:
• Dramatic Story and Structure
• Script Analysis
• Design and Metaphor
• Applied Directing
• Professional Preparation
• Festival Production

Careers

While we can’t predict the future, we can be certain that an ever-expanding range of entertainment platforms will require an ever-expanding range of content. We believe that directors trained in the core skills of good story-telling, inspiring great performance, working effectively and creatively in a collaborative environment, preparing and adhering to schedules and budgets, and understanding a variety of marketing possibilities will be able to adapt their work to a variety of platforms. This course aims to train such graduates, who can see unlimited potential and a variety of opportunities for themselves in the entertainment industry.

How to apply

http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/how-to-apply

SAAS Funding

Nothing should get in the way of furthering your education. Student Awards Agency Scotland (SAAS) awards funding for postgraduate courses, and could provide the help you need to continue your studies. Find out more: http://www.napier.ac.uk/study-with-us/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/saas-funded-courses

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