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Masters Degrees (Metals)

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis, which includes written documentation and a formal exhibition of a body of work.

Plan of study

The MFA in metals and jewelry design provides students with broad exposure to metal working techniques, expands knowledge of applied design, strengthens perceptual and philosophical concepts, and develops an individual mode of expression. This sequence leads to a master’s thesis, inaugurated by the student and overseen by the faculty. The program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and background preparation, as may be determined through faculty counseling.

Curriculum

- First Year

Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio l
Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio ll
Fine Art Research
Thinking About Making
Crafts Graduate Seminar
Free Elective

- Second Year
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Initiation
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Resolution
Thesis Implementation
Thesis Review
Free Elective
CIAS Studio Electives

Admission requirements

To be considered for the MFA program in metals and jewelry design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. For those applicants applying from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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The MSc course in Metals and Energy Finance is designed to provide training in the technical and financial appraisal of natural resource projects emphasising quantitative skills and how these are applied in the development of capital-intensive mining, oil and gas industries. Read more
The MSc course in Metals and Energy Finance is designed to provide training in the technical and financial appraisal of natural resource projects emphasising quantitative skills and how these are applied in the development of capital-intensive mining, oil and gas industries.
This is a combined Department of Earth Science & Engineering and Tanaka Business School degree.

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We invite applications from well-qualified candidates whose research interests correspond to our areas of research expertise focused on Engineering. Read more
We invite applications from well-qualified candidates whose research interests correspond to our areas of research expertise focused on Engineering. Our EngD projects are defined by our long standing industrial sponsors and address operational requirements identified by these companies. Projects are focused on our established areas of engineering expertise.
We are a leader in developing new manufacturing processes and products, such as functional coated steel. Our research in this area is led by the SPECIFIC project, in collaboration with Tata Steel.

Research into advanced, structural materials is undertaken in conjunction with the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre (UTC) in Materials based at Swansea. These projects are funded by the EPSRC Strategic Partnership in Structural Metals for Gas Turbines.

We also offer EngD programmes in the research areas of functional coatings and advanced manufacturing. Please visit our website for more information.

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The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is an alternative to the traditional PhD if you are interested in a career in industry. The EngD is equivalent to a PhD in its intellectual challenge, but as a Research Engineer (EngD student), your research will be industry-led and your project will involve working with a company. Read more
The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is an alternative to the traditional PhD if you are interested in a career in industry.

The EngD is equivalent to a PhD in its intellectual challenge, but as a Research Engineer (EngD student), your research will be industry-led and your project will involve working with a company. The progamme also includes a taught component. This provides an unparralled opportunity to gain experience working at the cutting-edge of research that is relevant to industry. The four-year programme combines PhD-level research projects with taught courses. You will spend at least 50% of your time working directly with a company. As a Research Engineer, you will be supervised by two academics and an industrial contact within the company.

The EngD scheme was established by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to provide ambitious and motivated graduates with doctorate-level training, putting new ideas into practice and progressing careers to reach senior positions in industry.

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This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. Read more
This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. The course has considerable variety and offers career opportunities across a wide range of industry sectors, where qualified materials scientists and engineers are highly sought after.

This course is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Core study areas include advanced characterisation techniques, surface engineering, processing and properties of ceramics and metals, design with engineering materials, sustainability and a project.

Optional study areas include plastics processing technology, industrial case studies, materials modelling, adhesive bonding, rubber compounding and processing, and polymer properties.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

Programme modules

Full-time Modules:
Core Modules
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)
- Surface Engineering (SL)
- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (SL)
- Design with Engineering Materials (SL)
- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW)
- Metals: Processing and Properties (SL)
- MSc Project

Optional Modules
- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)
- Industrial Case Studies (OW)
- Materials Modelling (SL)

Part-time Modules:
Core Modules
- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (DL)
- Design with Engineering Materials (DL)
- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW or DL)
- Metals: Processing and Properties (DL)
- Surface Engineering (DL)
- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)
- MSc Project

Optional Modules
- Industrial Case Studies (OW)
- Adhesive Bonding (OW)
- Rubber Compounding and Processing (OW or DL)

Alternative modules:*
- Polymer Properties (DL)
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)
- Materials Modelling (SL)

Key: SL = Semester-long, OW = One week, DL = Distance-learning
Alternative modules* are only available under certain circumstances by agreement with the Programme Director.

Selection

Interviews may be held on consideration of a prospective student’s application form. Overseas students are often accepted on their grades and strong recommendation from suitable referees.

Course structure, assessment and accreditation

The MSc comprises a combination of semester-long and one week modules for full-time students, whilst part-time students study a mix of one week and distance-learning modules.

MSc students undertake a major project many of which are sponsored by our industrial partners. Part-time student projects are often specified in conjunction with their sponsoring company and undertaken at their place of work.

All modules are 15 credits. The MSc project is 60 credits.

MSc: 180 credits – six core and two optional modules, plus the MSc project.
PG Diploma: 120 credits – six core and two optional modules.
PG Certificate: 60 credits – four core modules.

- Assessment
Modules are assessed by a combination of written examination, set coursework exercises and laboratory reports. The project is assessed by a dissertation, literature review and oral presentation.

- Accreditation
Both MSc programmes are accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Careers and further Study

Typical careers span many industrial sectors, including aerospace, power generation, automotive, construction and transport. Possible roles include technical and project management, R&D, technical support to manufacturing as well as sales and marketing.
Many of our best masters students continue their studies with us, joining our thriving community of PhD students engaged in materials projects of real-world significance

Bursaries and Scholarships

Bursaries are available for both UK / EU and international students, and scholarships are available for good overseas applicants.

Why Choose Materials at Loughborough?

The Department has contributed to the advancement and application of knowledge for well over 40 years. With 21 academics and a large support team, we have about 85 full and part-time MSc students, 70 PhD students and 20 research associates.

Our philosophy is based on the engineering application and use of materials which, when processed, are altered in structure and properties.
Our approach includes materials selection and design considerations as well as business and environmental implications.

- Facilities
We are also home to the Loughborough Materials Characterisation Centre – its state of-the-art equipment makes it one of the best suites of its kind in Europe used by academia and our industrial partners.
The Centre supports our research and teaching activities developing understanding of the interactions of structure and properties with processing and product performance.

- Research
Our research activity is organised into 4 main research groups; energy materials, advanced ceramics, surface engineering and advanced polymers. These cover a broad span of research areas working on today’s global challenges, including sustainability, nanomaterials, composites and processing. However, we adopt an interdisciplinary approach to our research and frequently interact with other departments and Research Schools.

- Career prospects
Over 90% of our graduates were in employment and / or further study six months after graduating. Our unrivalled links with industry are
hugely beneficial to our students. We also tailor our courses according to industrial feedback and needs, ensuring our graduates are well prepared

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

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A fantastic time to be a specialist in aerospace materials, Sheffield is in the heartland of the UK aerospace industry, meaning many international aerospace companies look to the Department to discover ways to improve both materials and processes for use in their products. Read more

About the course

A fantastic time to be a specialist in aerospace materials, Sheffield is in the heartland of the UK aerospace industry, meaning many international aerospace companies look to the Department to discover ways to improve both materials and processes for use in their products.

You’ll develop knowledge of the manufacturing, processing and properties of the metals and composite materials used in airframes and aeroengines. You’ll also be trained in the fundamentals of thermodynamics, structure and mechanical behaviour.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Aerospace Metals; Design and Manufacture of Composites; Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Heat and Materials with Application; Advanced Materials Manufacturing; Deformation, Fracture and Fatigue; Research project in an area of your choice.

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Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. Read more
Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. This MSc offers detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of archaeological and heritage materials, and a solid background in the archaeology and anthropology of technology allowing students to design and implement archaeologically meaningful scientific projects.

Degree information

This degree aims to bridge the gap between archaeology and science by integrating both a detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of inorganic archaeological materials and a solid background in the anthropology of technology. By the end of the degree, students should have a good understanding of the foundations of the most established analytical techniques, practical experience in their application and data processing, as well as the ability to design research projects that employ instrumental analyses to address archaeological questions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Laboratory and instrumental skills in archaeological science

Optional modules - you are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 75 credits. At least 15 credits must be made up from the following:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science

At least 30 credits must be made up from the following list below:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Geoarchaeology: Methods and Concepts
-Interpreting Pottery
-Working with Artefacts and Assemblages

In order to allow for a flexible curriculum, students are allowed to select up to 30 credits from any of the postgraduate courses offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology under other Master's degrees.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and laboratory work. A popular aspect of this programme is its extensive use of analytical facilities. Assessment is through essays, practicals, projects, laboratory reports and oral presentations depending on the options chosen, and the dissertation.

Careers

Given our strong emphasis on research training, many of our MSc graduates take up further research positions after their degree, and over half of our MSc students progress to PhD research. Their projects are generally concerned with the technology and/or provenance of ceramics, metals or glass in different regions and periods, but most of them involve scientific approaches in combination with traditional fieldwork and/or experimental archaeology.

Some of our graduates are now teaching archaeometry or ancient technologies at different universities in the UK and abroad. Others work as conservation scientists in museums and heritage institutions, or as finds specialists, researchers and consultants employed by archaeological field units or academic research projects.

Employability
Due largely to an unparalleled breadth of academic expertise and laboratory facilities, our graduates develop an unusual combination of research and transferable skills, including critical abilities, team working, multimedia communication, numerical thinking and the use of advanced analytical instruments. On completion of the degree, graduates should be as comfortable in a laboratory as in a museum and or an archaeological site. They become acquainted with research design and implementation, ethical issues and comparative approaches to world archaeology through direct exposure to an enormous variety of projects. The range of options available allows students to tailor their pathways towards different career prospects in archaeology and beyond.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK. Its specialist staff, outstanding library and fine teaching and reference collections provide a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The excellent in-house laboratory facilities will provide direct experience of a wide range of techniques, including electron microscopy and microphone analysis, fixed and portable X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy, petrography and metallography under the supervision of some of the world's leading specialists.

The institute houses fine teaching and reference collections that are extensively used by MSc students including ceramics, metals, stone artefacts and geological materials from around the world. In addition, the institute has a wide network of connections to museums and ongoing projects offering research opportunities for MSc students.

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What's the Master of Materials Engineering about? .  The structure of the program consists of a core of 60 credits, four options of 12 credits, three fixed elective packages of 12 credits, engineering and general interest electives of 12 credits and the Master's thesis of 24 credits. Read more

What's the Master of Materials Engineering about? 

 The structure of the program consists of a core of 60 credits, four options of 12 credits, three fixed elective packages of 12 credits, engineering and general interest electives of 12 credits and the Master's thesis of 24 credits. The four options focus on materials families or on application domains: Metals and Ceramics, Polymers and Composites, Materials for Nanotechnology, and Materials for Biomedical Applications. The three fixed elective packages have been designed to help the students in imagining themselves in their future professional environment and thus in developing a career profile: research, production and management. The two latter packages include industrial internships.

The programme is crowned with the 24 credits Master's thesis where the student will apply his/her knowledge to a research topic of choice. These topics are usually embedded in a cutting-edge research project in cooperation with other institutions and/or industrial companies.

Spotlight 

  • The hosting Department of Materials Engineering (MTM) is a world player in production, characterization, modelling and development of new materials to solve material challenges in sectors such as transport, energy or health. MTM has close ties with industrial partners through a broad variety of national and international projects which is reflected in the program through plant visits, practical exercises, internships and the master thesis topics.
  • Thanks to the diversity of the research profile of the host department MTM, the programme is able to cover a broad gamut of materials families and applications. Concerning structural materials, MTM is one of the few materials departments where both metals and composites are strongly represented in both research and teaching. Concerning functional materials, the close links with imec and KU Leuven's biomedical group position the programme in addressing upcoming application domains.
  • Scarcity, closed materials loops ('cradle to cradle') and recycling processes are core research topics and are taught in several engineering courses as well as in a dedicated core course on Sustainable Materials Management. The efforts in this domain have recently been rewarded with the grant of an EIT-KIC 'Raw Materials'.
  • At MTM, students in classes, exercises and practical sessions meet fellow-students, assistants (68% non-Belgian) , lecturers (26% non-Belgian) from all over the world. In terms of outgoing mobility, participation in the Erasmus+ programme is encouraged for the Belgian students. The concentration of core courses in the first Master year has considerably simplified Erasmus exchanges.
  • In terms of gender, Materials Engineering is doing pretty well among the engineering disciplines: in the Dutch-language programme, 21% of the students are female, in the English-language programme 41% and among the incoming Erasmus students 37%.

This programme is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time of part-time basis.

Career perspectives

Graduates have access to a wide range of engineering sectors. Prominent technical industries such as the automotive, aerospace, energy, microelectronics, and chemical industries and emerging sectors such as nanotechnology, biomaterials and recycling are keen to hire qualified and talented materials engineers. Materials engineers are also well suited for functions as process engineers, materials or product developers, design specialists, quality control engineers or consultants. Graduates with an interest in research can apply for an R&D position or start a PhD. Several alumni have also gone on to start their own companies.



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If you’re a graduate from a science, mathematics, technology or another engineering discipline, this programme provides the knowledge and skills to convert… Read more

If you’re a graduate from a science, mathematics, technology or another engineering discipline, this programme provides the knowledge and skills to convert to a specialism in materials science and engineering or metallurgy to meet the present needs and future challenges of advanced materials and manufacturing in areas such as transportation, bioengineering, energy, electronics and information technology, sport and sustainable development.

Alternatively, if you’re already a professional engineer in the materials sector, you’ll have the chance to expand your expertise to enhance your career prospects.

Core modules cover key topics such as materials structures, processing-structure-property relationships, characterisation and failure analysis. You’ll also choose one from three groups of optional modules to focus your specialism to suit your own career plans and interests. Taught by experts in world-class facilities, you’ll gain the skills to thrive in a growing and fast-changing field.

Specialist facilities

You’ll benefit from the chance to study in cutting-edge facilities where our researchers are pushing the boundaries of materials science and engineering and metallurgy. We have state-of-the-art preparative facilities for making and characterising a wide range of materials, as well as equipment and instrumentation for carrying out more fundamental studies into their process-microstructure-property relationships.

Accreditation

The course is designed to provide graduates with the educational base required for Chartered Engineer (CEng) status. Accreditation is currently being sought from IoM3

Course content

Compulsory modules at the beginning of the programme lay the foundations of your studies in materials science or metallurgy. You’ll learn about processing-structure-property relationships, which lie at the heart of the discipline, as well as examining topics such as mechanical, physical and chemical behaviour, phase transformations and how the structure and local chemistry of materials may be characterised. You’ll cover materials and process selection and their role in design, and extend this into the principles and practice of failure analysis.

This prepares the way for three sets of specialist modules: you can decide to specialise in metallurgy, functional and nanomaterials or take a broader materials science approach covering metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and biomaterials. You’ll complete your taught modules either by studying a module in materials modelling (if you already hold an accredited Engineering degree) or participating in an industry-focused interdisciplinary design project.

You will complete your programme with a major individual research project of your own. With guidance from your supervisor, you will work on a topic related to the internationally-leading materials and metallurgical research carried out in the University, or you could propose a topic of your own related to your own professional work or that of an industrial sponsor.

Want to find out more about your modules?

Take a look at the Materials Science and Engineering module descriptions for more detail on what you will study.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Research Project (MSc) 60 credits
  • Phase Transformations and Microstructural Control 15 credits
  • Structure-Property Relationships 15 credits
  • Materials Selection and Failure Analysis 15 credits
  • Materials Structures and Characterisation 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Team Design Project 15 credits
  • Biomaterials and Applications 15 credits
  • Materials Modelling 15 credits
  • Materials for Functional Applications 30 credits
  • Metals and Alloys 15 credits
  • Ceramics, Polymers and Composites 15 credits
  • Nanomaterials 15 credits
  • Process Metallurgy 15 credits
  • Extractive Metallurgy 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Materials Science and Engineering MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Our groundbreaking research feeds directly into teaching, and you’ll have regular contact with staff who are at the forefront of the discipline through lectures, seminars, tutorials, small group work and project meetings. Independent study is also important to the programme, as you develop your problem-solving and research skills as well as your subject knowledge.

Assessment

You’ll be assessed using a range of techniques including case studies, technical reports, presentations, in-class tests, assignments, vivas and projects.

Projects

The research project is one of the most satisfying elements of this course. It allows you to apply what you’ve learned to a piece of research focusing on a real-world problem, and it can be used to explore and develop your specific interests.

Recent projects by MSc Materials Science and Engineering students have included:

  • Hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles
  • Temperature variable X-ray diffraction of high temperature piezoelectric material BiFeO3-KBiTiO3-PbTiO3
  • Fabrication of glass waveguide devices by femtosecond laser inscription
  • Microstructure development in drop-tube processed cast iron
  • Validation of cooling rate models of drop-tube processing
  • Characterisation of graphite nanoplatelets (GNPs) produced by solvent exfoliation of graphite
  • Studies of the effect of milling variables in the production of nanoparticles
  • Microstructural investigation of spray atomized powders

Career opportunities

There is currently an increasingly high demand for qualified materials scientists, materials engineers and metallurgists.

Career prospects are excellent and cover a wide range of industries concerned with the research and development of new and improved materials, materials synthesis and commercial production, and materials exploitation in cutting-edge applications in engineering and technology.

Careers support

You’ll have access to the wide range of engineering and computing careers resources held by our Employability team in our dedicated Employability Suite. You’ll have the chance to attend industry presentations book appointments with qualified careers consultants and take part in employability workshops. Our annual Engineering and Computing Careers Fairs provide further opportunities to explore your career options with some of the UKs leading employers.

The University's Careers Centre also provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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We live in a material world, materials form the spaces in which we live and the objects that we use. Materials create and, unfortunately, may destroy the environments that we inhabit. Read more

We live in a material world, materials form the spaces in which we live and the objects that we use. Materials create and, unfortunately, may destroy the environments that we inhabit. Even in an increasing digital age in which the global economy and market continues to expand, the physical nature of materials is always present but it changes and is subject to contextual particularities, such as traditional practices, availability of resource and skills, emerging materials and technologies such as digital fabrication.

The programme focuses on process; the direct experience of using and making with materials; how materials are used in creative works, design and production; how new opportunities and ideas may evolve through reflective practice.

The programme employs a cross disciplinary approach and uses the workshops and expertise across Edinburgh College of Art. You will work with many materials including glass, textiles, metals, timber and concrete. You will also access and use various methods of digital fabrication such as additive manufacture and CNC routing and laser cutting.

The programme addresses directly important contemporary issues of economy, inclusion and sustainability, through the practical, collaborative and individual projects.

The programme is available to students from a variety of design and creative material practice, art, design, craft, and architecture backgrounds and from more traditional technologically based disciplines, such as engineering, looking to expand their skills and understanding in both material techniques and collaborative practice.

Programme structure

The programme is largely workshop- and studio-based. You will gain experience and expertise from a variety of tutors, support staff and technicians.

Periods will be spent in different workshops of the ECA, to explore materials and technique including: metals, glass, textiles and architecture.

As you progress through the programme you will acquire both skills and understanding of various materials, apply these in a series of projects that consider contemporary issues, culminating in a self-directed project, developed from your own experience.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Material Practice seeks to provide core learning outcomes:

  • To understand and develop further skills in materials technique and processes
  • To explore and develop cross disciplinary design and creative practice
  • To understand the evolving nature of material practice and digital fabrication
  • To understand explore contemporary issues and themes through material investigations
  • To formulate and undertake cross-disciplinary research in materials and material practice

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist with the many and various cross-disciplinary practices that operate in design professions such as product design, manufacturing, architecture and art practice.

Graduates can direct their career, having furthered their skills, explored and developed cross disciplinary design and creative practice and explored contemporary issues and themes. During the programme there will be opportunities to meet with other designers and industries.

The programme will also help those that wish to develop their own practice as fabricators, designers. artists or contractors.



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The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Applied Science (MASc), Master of Engineering (MEng), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Read more
The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Applied Science (MASc), Master of Engineering (MEng), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Graduate courses and research opportunities are offered to qualified students in a wide range of subjects.

Typical subjects in extractive and process metallurgy involve a study of the equilibria existing during the reduction of oxides with carbon and metals, life cycle analysis of materials, properties of iron and steelmaking slags, the fundamental properties of fused salt solutions, fused salt electrolysis of reactive metals, kinetics of high-temperature reactions, mathematical modelling of metallurgical processes, process metallurgy, and hydrometallurgy.

Typical physical metallurgy and materials science subjects deal with the structure, properties, and application of advanced materials in such fields as nanomaterials, surface chemistry, energy, sustainability, optoelectronics, biomaterials, nuclear materials, metalmatrix composites (MMCs), metallic glasses, corrosion, fatigue, phase transformations, and solidification. These studies are all related to the general problem of understanding structure-property-processing-performance relationships in materials.

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The AMIR Master program focuses on the raw material value chain, with particular emphasis on recycling. The two main objectives are. Read more

The AMIR Master program focuses on the raw material value chain, with particular emphasis on recycling. The two main objectives are:

  • Educate students to become highly-skilled European professionals with expertise in various types of materials. This expertise will enable them to develop, at a large and ambitious scale, new methods for material recycling. In addition, the AMIR program includes classes on transferable skills such as innovation, ethics, intellectual property, life cycle assessment, sustainability and advanced research strategies.
  • Develop a deep entrepreneurship mind-set with the help and expertise of associated businesses, incubators and innovation services as well as a large panel of industries.

Program structure

Semesters 1 and 2

The first year of the Master program takes place at the University of Bordeaux in partnership with the research and technology organization, Tecnalia. Students learn about general and technical aspects of the raw material value chain (general chemistry, material science, lifecycle of materials) as well as about the main outcomes of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT): sustainability, intellectual transformation, value judgments (ethical, scientific and sustainability challenges), creativity, innovation, leadership and entrepreneurship. 

Semesters 3 and 4

The third semester (Master 2) is dedicated to a specialization in one of the partner universities. This part of the program offers the possibility to follow selected advanced materials classes for various applications (energy, e-mobility - magnets, transport, environments - catalysis, etc.).

The specializations are:

  • Darmstadt: material design for recycling
  • Liege: metallurgy and metals recycling
  • Madrid: mineral recycling for construction and other sectors 

The program is completed with a three to six months’ internship (Master thesis).

Strengths of this Master program

  • AMIR graduates are international entrepreneurs and innovators, able to work anywhere in Europe and beyond.
  • High-level education and research environment.
  • Practical insights with advanced research labs.
  • High-quality internships.
  • Mandatory international and intersectoral mobility.
  • Supported by the European Institute of Innovation & Technology (EIT) and the International Master program of the Bordeaux “Initiative of Excellence” (IdEx).

After this Master program?

The AMIR program benefits from a strong academic, research and industrial network.

After graduation, students are fully prepared to integrate the working environment as professionals in the recycling sector (process optimization, materials design, plant administration, project management, etc.) whether it be in the industrial field or governmental organizations. Possible sectors include: information and communication technologies, building construction, energy, machinery tools, mobility.

Graduates also obtain the necessary skills and knowledge to set up their own company or work in sales and marketing.

Finally, further doctoral studies are another possibility and students may apply for Ph.D. programs in Europe, including those offered in the framework of the European Multifunctional Materials Institute (EMMI : http://www.emmi-materials.eu).



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Offered as part of the. Continuing Professional Development. (CPD) programme. Full-time and part-time students study a number of one-week short-course modules comprising lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorials. Read more

Offered as part of the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) programme.

Full-time and part-time students study a number of one-week short-course modules comprising lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorials.

The modules cover metals, polymers, ceramics, composites, nanomaterials, bonding, surfaces, corrosion, fracture, fatigue, analytical techniques and general research methods. Each module is followed by an open book assessment of approximately 120 hours.

There is also a materials-based research project, which is made up of the Research Project Planning and the Project modules.

The MSc in Advanced Materials is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3) and by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) when a Project is undertaken.

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Educational aims of the programme

  • To provide students with a broad knowledge of the manufacture, characterisation and properties of advanced materials
  • To address issues of sustainability such as degradation and recycling
  • To equip graduate scientists and engineers with specific expertise in the selection and use of materials for industry
  • To enable students to prepare, plan, execute and report an original piece of research
  • To develop a deeper understanding of a materials topic which is of particular interest (full-time students) or relevance to their work in industry (part-time students) by a project based or independent study based thesis

Programme learning outcomes

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding

  • The different major classes of advanced materials
  • Routes for manufacturing and processing of advanced materials
  • Characterisation techniques for analysing bonding and microstructure
  • Mechanical, chemical and physical properties of advanced materials
  • Processing -microstructure - property relationships of advanced materials
  • Material selection and use
  • Appropriate mathematical methods

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Reason systematically about the behaviour of materials
  • Select materials for an application
  • Predict material properties
  • Understand mathematical relationships relating to material properties
  • Plan experiments, interpret experimental data and discuss experimental results in the context of present understanding in the field

Professional practical skills

  • Research information to develop ideas and understanding
  • Develop an understanding of, and competence, in using laboratory equipment and instrumentation
  • Apply mathematical methods, as appropriate

Key / transferable skills

  • Use the scientific process to reason through to a sound conclusion
  • Write clear reports
  • Communicate ideas clearly and in an appropriate format
  • Design and carry out experimental work

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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This programme explores experimental archaeology's potential as a powerful research method, an effective educational tool and an excellent medium for public outreach. Read more
This programme explores experimental archaeology's potential as a powerful research method, an effective educational tool and an excellent medium for public outreach.

You will receive a sound practical and theoretical grounding in scientific use of experiments in archaeological research. The programme will give you practical experience of experiments related to archaeological and taphonomic processes and the production of a range of material culture types including ceramics, stone tools, metals and a range of organic materials.

The role of experiments and ‘reconstructions’ in education and public outreach is investigated through classes, practical activities, and field visits. Links with professionals, such as museums and independent establishments, provide opportunities for practical work based on a sound appreciation of theory.

The University has established an outdoor centre on its Streatham Campus to provide a location for both short- and long-term experimental archaeology research. The programmes involve practical work and field trips.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

The compulsory modules can include; Research Methods and Archaeological Theory; Experimental Archaeology; Material Culture and Dissertation

Optional modules

You can choose from a variety of modules on offer, some examples of these are; Advanced Project; Field Study; Landscape Archaeology: Understanding the historic environment; Advanced Human Osteology; Zooarchaeology and Funerary Osteoarchaeology.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

Learning and teaching

This programme involves a high degree of learning through practice and experiments. Most of the formal classes that you attend will be based on a mixture of lectures, seminars, and workshops. The precise mix will vary between modules.

All members of staff are actively engaged in research, both in Britain and abroad, and regularly attend conferences, symposia and workshops. It is through this active engagement in the discipline that we are able to supply top quality teaching by experts in their field and as a result we have a 24/24 grading for our teaching from the Quality Assurance Agency.

We have excellent facilities for experimental archaeology including:
• experimental archaeology lab - this flexible laboratory space is the epicentre of our students' experimental activity and is a hard- wearing practical space in which we can carry out the unusual projects that only experimental archaeologists can dream up!
• material stocks - including sinew, feathers, hides, bones, antlers, wood, different stone types and plant materials
• pottery and kiln room, where students can work with clay, equipped with a potter's wheel and a large programmable electric kiln that can reach 1300 degrees Celsius
• workshop equipped with all the tools necessary to prepare materials for experiments
• knapping area - an outdoor space reserved for flintknapping and other activities best done in the fresh air
• experimental land - a substantial area of land on campus for long-term outdoor experiments.

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MA Fine Art. gives you the opportunity to explore subject-specific areas, and our course also provides the intellectual and physical space for multi or interdisciplinary practices. Read more

MA Fine Art gives you the opportunity to explore subject-specific areas, and our course also provides the intellectual and physical space for multi or interdisciplinary practices.

Throughout this MA you'll develop visual and conceptual thinking, with the aim of establishing and refining a research project to be sustained beyond graduation, and developed into either a practice-based or theoretically-led enquiry.

Whilst working towards your qualification, you might choose to specialise within or across subject areas. And our course welcomes applicants who are looking to re-examine their current work and research.

MA Fine Art aims to test the relationship between your work and key historical and critical developments. It also looks to consider it within current societal and political contexts.

As a student on our course, you'll need to be ready to question, curious and enthusiastic about testing the boundaries of what constitutes art practice in the twenty-first century.

Our course at UCA Farnham is unique in that it provides students studying at postgraduate level with a range of first-class facilities, including bronze foundry, printmaking, metals, wood and casting facilities and resources. We provide specialist studio spaces for both full and part-time students, and dedicated technical staff are on hand to support individual projects as well as introductions to workshop areas.

Throughout your studies, you'll be supported by professional artists, curators and theorists. The department has a rich tradition in the teaching and exploration of fine art, and many of the staff are research practitioners, contributing to the wider development of knowledge within their specialist areas.

Part-time students are normally taught on a Tuesday but sometimes field trips, study visits or other events take place on other days of the week. You should check before enrolling if you have concerns about the days your course will be taught on.

Industry Partners

Our industry links are with publicly-funded galleries and commercial London-based spaces.

We also enjoy links with regional artist groups and artist-run spaces throughout the South East. We work closely with a number of public arts projects throughout the region.

Throughout your studies, you'll be supported by professional artists, curators and theorists. The department has a rich tradition in the teaching and exploration of fine art, and many of our staff are research practitioners, contributing to the wider development of knowledge within their specialist areas.

Careers

Graduates from this course go on to work as:

-Professional artists

-Curators

-Arts administrators

-Community artists

-Technicians

-Lecturers and teachers.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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