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Masters Degrees (Metals)

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis, which includes written documentation and a formal exhibition of a body of work.

Plan of study

The MFA in metals and jewelry design provides students with broad exposure to metal working techniques, expands knowledge of applied design, strengthens perceptual and philosophical concepts, and develops an individual mode of expression. This sequence leads to a master’s thesis, inaugurated by the student and overseen by the faculty. The program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and background preparation, as may be determined through faculty counseling.

Curriculum

- First Year

Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio l
Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio ll
Fine Art Research
Thinking About Making
Crafts Graduate Seminar
Free Elective

- Second Year
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Initiation
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Resolution
Thesis Implementation
Thesis Review
Free Elective
CIAS Studio Electives

Admission requirements

To be considered for the MFA program in metals and jewelry design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. For those applicants applying from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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This programme covers practical, advanced concepts – from technological to environmental – related to the light metals reduction industry, especially alumninium. Read more

This programme covers practical, advanced concepts – from technological to environmental – related to the light metals reduction industry, especially alumninium. It runs near a smelter – previous locations have included Bahrain, Dubai, and the USA. Having minimal access restrictions allow opportunities for you to work hands-on and witness processes in person. 

Our content is curated for experienced technical and operations staff, many of whom can learn from each other. We boast tutors with decades of industry experience and significant research accolades, and an international focus that allows you to maximise your learning while only being away for three weeks.

Programme structure

This programme runs biennially. It consists of four core courses (60 points) that are completed through a combination of extramural study and an intensive, three-week, residential block course that takes place in a location adjacent to a working smelter (usually in an international location).

It contains three major sections:

  • Section 1 features review and fundamentals assignments (extramural)
  • Section 2 focuses on onsite lectures by world experts on each area of technology. These are interspersed with tutorials, group work, assignments, tests and site visits – this allows you to practice the techniques and concepts. You must complete all four courses in order to meet the programme requirements.
  • In Section 3, you will complete an extramural advanced topics assignment. This is tailored to a specific technical issue of your interest. Sections 1 and 3 are to be completed from your home in approximately six weeks, and they contribute to your final assessment. Detailed feedback will be provided.

Where could this programme take you?

Our students are generally already employed as engineers in the smelting industry, and this programme tops up your technical underpinnings with knowledge of the in-depth processes necessary for career progression. Those intending to work in process control, as opposed to operations, may be particularly interested in the PGCertLMRTech.

Jobs related to this programme

  • Lead engineer
  • Process control and improvement superintendent
  • Process control engineer
  • Technical manager

Further study options



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The MSc course in Metals and Energy Finance is designed to provide training in the technical and financial appraisal of natural resource projects emphasising quantitative skills and how these are applied in the development of capital-intensive mining, oil and gas industries. Read more
The MSc course in Metals and Energy Finance is designed to provide training in the technical and financial appraisal of natural resource projects emphasising quantitative skills and how these are applied in the development of capital-intensive mining, oil and gas industries.
This is a combined Department of Earth Science & Engineering and Tanaka Business School degree.

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We invite applications from well-qualified candidates whose research interests correspond to our areas of research expertise focused on Engineering. Read more
We invite applications from well-qualified candidates whose research interests correspond to our areas of research expertise focused on Engineering. Our EngD projects are defined by our long standing industrial sponsors and address operational requirements identified by these companies. Projects are focused on our established areas of engineering expertise.
We are a leader in developing new manufacturing processes and products, such as functional coated steel. Our research in this area is led by the SPECIFIC project, in collaboration with Tata Steel.

Research into advanced, structural materials is undertaken in conjunction with the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre (UTC) in Materials based at Swansea. These projects are funded by the EPSRC Strategic Partnership in Structural Metals for Gas Turbines.

We also offer EngD programmes in the research areas of functional coatings and advanced manufacturing. Please visit our website for more information.

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The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is an alternative to the traditional PhD if you are interested in a career in industry. The EngD is equivalent to a PhD in its intellectual challenge, but as a Research Engineer (EngD student), your research will be industry-led and your project will involve working with a company. Read more
The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is an alternative to the traditional PhD if you are interested in a career in industry.

The EngD is equivalent to a PhD in its intellectual challenge, but as a Research Engineer (EngD student), your research will be industry-led and your project will involve working with a company. The progamme also includes a taught component. This provides an unparralled opportunity to gain experience working at the cutting-edge of research that is relevant to industry. The four-year programme combines PhD-level research projects with taught courses. You will spend at least 50% of your time working directly with a company. As a Research Engineer, you will be supervised by two academics and an industrial contact within the company.

The EngD scheme was established by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to provide ambitious and motivated graduates with doctorate-level training, putting new ideas into practice and progressing careers to reach senior positions in industry.

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This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. Read more

This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. The course has considerable variety and offers career opportunities across a wide range of industry sectors, where qualified materials scientists and engineers are highly sought after.

This course is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Core study areas include advanced characterisation techniques, surface engineering, processing and properties of ceramics and metals, design with engineering materials, sustainability and a project.

Optional study areas include plastics processing technology, industrial case studies, materials modelling, adhesive bonding, rubber compounding and processing, and polymer properties.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

Programme modules

Full-time Modules:

Core Modules

- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)

- Surface Engineering (SL)

- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (SL)

- Design with Engineering Materials (SL)

- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW)

- Metals: Processing and Properties (SL)

- MSc Project

Optional Modules

- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)

- Industrial Case Studies (OW)

- Materials Modelling (SL)

Part-time Modules:

Core Modules

- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (DL)

- Design with Engineering Materials (DL)

- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW or DL)

- Metals: Processing and Properties (DL)

- Surface Engineering (DL)

- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)

- MSc Project

Optional Modules

- Industrial Case Studies (OW)

- Adhesive Bonding (OW)

- Rubber Compounding and Processing (OW or DL)

Alternative modules:*

- Polymer Properties (DL)

- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)

- Materials Modelling (SL)

Key: SL = Semester-long, OW = One week, DL = Distance-learning

Alternative modules* are only available under certain circumstances by agreement with the Programme Director.

Selection

Interviews may be held on consideration of a prospective student’s application form. Overseas students are often accepted on their grades and strong recommendation from suitable referees.

Course structure, assessment and accreditation

The MSc comprises a combination of semester-long and one week modules for full-time students, whilst part-time students study a mix of one week and distance-learning modules.

MSc students undertake a major project many of which are sponsored by our industrial partners. Part-time student projects are often specified in conjunction with their sponsoring company and undertaken at their place of work.

All modules are 15 credits. The MSc project is 60 credits.

MSc: 180 credits – six core and two optional modules, plus the MSc project.

PG Diploma: 120 credits – six core and two optional modules.

PG Certificate: 60 credits – four core modules.

- Assessment

Modules are assessed by a combination of written examination, set coursework exercises and laboratory reports. The project is assessed by a dissertation, literature review and oral presentation.

- Accreditation

Both MSc programmes are accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Careers and further Study

Typical careers span many industrial sectors, including aerospace, power generation, automotive, construction and transport. Possible roles include technical and project management, R&D, technical support to manufacturing as well as sales and marketing.

Many of our best masters students continue their studies with us, joining our thriving community of PhD students engaged in materials projects of real-world significance

Bursaries and Scholarships

Bursaries are available for both UK / EU and international students, and scholarships are available for good overseas applicants.

Why Choose Materials at Loughborough?

The Department has contributed to the advancement and application of knowledge for well over 40 years. With 21 academics and a large support team, we have about 85 full and part-time MSc students, 70 PhD students and 20 research associates.

Our philosophy is based on the engineering application and use of materials which, when processed, are altered in structure and properties.

Our approach includes materials selection and design considerations as well as business and environmental implications.

- Facilities

We are also home to the Loughborough Materials Characterisation Centre – its state of-the-art equipment makes it one of the best suites of its kind in Europe used by academia and our industrial partners.

The Centre supports our research and teaching activities developing understanding of the interactions of structure and properties with processing and product performance.

- Research

Our research activity is organised into 4 main research groups; energy materials, advanced ceramics, surface engineering and advanced polymers. These cover a broad span of research areas working on today’s global challenges, including sustainability, nanomaterials, composites and processing. However, we adopt an interdisciplinary approach to our research and frequently interact with other departments and Research Schools.

- Career prospects

Over **% of our graduates were in employment and / or further study six months after graduating. Our unrivalled links with industry are hugely beneficial to our students. We also tailor our courses according to industrial feedback and needs, ensuring our graduates are well prepared

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/



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Scientific analysis is a key tool in the study of archaeological artefacts and assemblages. Read more

Scientific analysis is a key tool in the study of archaeological artefacts and assemblages. This MSc offers detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of archaeological and heritage materials, and a solid background in the archaeology and anthropology of technology, allowing students to design and implement archaeologically meaningful scientific projects.

About this degree

This degree aims to bridge the gap between archaeology and science by integrating both a detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of inorganic archaeological materials and a solid background in the anthropology of technology. By the end of the degree, students should have a good understanding of the foundations of the most established analytical techniques, practical experience in their application and data processing, as well as the ability to design research projects that employ instrumental analyses to address archaeological questions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

  • Laboratory and instrumental skills in archaeological science

Optional modules

You are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 75 credits. At least 15 credits must be made up from the following:  

  • Technology within Society
  • Archaeological Data Science

At least 30 credits must be made up from the following list below: 

  • Technology within Society
  • Archaeological Data Science
  • Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
  • Archaeological Glass and Glazes
  • Archaeometallurgy
  • Geoarchaeology: Methods and Concepts
  • Key topics in the Archaeology of the Americas
  • Interpreting Pottery
  • Working with Artefacts and Assemblages

In order to allow for a flexible curriculum, students are allowed to select up to 30 credits from any of the postgraduate modules offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology under other Master's degrees

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and laboratory work. A popular aspect of this programme is its extensive use of analytical facilities. Assessment is through essays, practicals, projects, laboratory reports and oral presentations depending on the options chosen, and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Archaeological Science: Technology and Materials MSc

Careers

Given our strong emphasis on research training, many of our MSc graduates take up further research positions after their degree, and over half of our MSc students progress to PhD research. Their projects are generally concerned with the technology and/or provenance of ceramics, metals or glass in different regions and periods, but most of them involve scientific approaches in combination with traditional fieldwork and/or experimental archaeology. 

Some of our graduates are now teaching archaeometry or ancient technologies at different universities in the UK and abroad. Others work as conservation scientists in museums and heritage institutions, or as finds specialists, researchers and consultants employed by archaeological field units or academic research projects.

Employability

Due largely to an unparalleled breadth of academic expertise and laboratory facilities, our graduates develop an unusual combination of research and transferable skills, including critical abilities, team working, multimedia communication, numerical thinking and the use of advanced analytical instruments. On completion of the degree, graduates should be as comfortable in a laboratory as in a museum and/or an archaeological site. They become acquainted with research design and implementation, ethical issues and comparative approaches to world archaeology through direct exposure to an enormous variety of projects. The range of options available allows students to tailor their pathways towards different career prospects in archaeology and beyond.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK. Its specialist staff, outstanding library and fine teaching and reference collections provide a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The excellent in-house laboratory facilities will provide direct experience of a wide range of techniques, including electron microscopy and microphone analysis, fixed and portable X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy, petrography and metallography under the supervision of some of the world's leading specialists.

The institute houses fine teaching and reference collections that are extensively used by MSc students including ceramics, metals, stone artefacts and geological materials from around the world. In addition, the institute has a wide network of connections to museums and ongoing projects offering research opportunities for MSc students.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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What's the Master of Materials Engineering about? .  The structure of the program consists of a core of 60 credits, four options of 12 credits, three fixed elective packages of 12 credits, engineering and general interest electives of 12 credits and the Master's thesis of 24 credits. Read more

What's the Master of Materials Engineering about? 

 The structure of the program consists of a core of 60 credits, four options of 12 credits, three fixed elective packages of 12 credits, engineering and general interest electives of 12 credits and the Master's thesis of 24 credits. The four options focus on materials families or on application domains: Metals and Ceramics, Polymers and Composites, Materials for Nanotechnology, and Materials for Biomedical Applications. The three fixed elective packages have been designed to help the students in imagining themselves in their future professional environment and thus in developing a career profile: research, production and management. The two latter packages include industrial internships.

The programme is crowned with the 24 credits Master's thesis where the student will apply his/her knowledge to a research topic of choice. These topics are usually embedded in a cutting-edge research project in cooperation with other institutions and/or industrial companies.

Spotlight 

  • The hosting Department of Materials Engineering (MTM) is a world player in production, characterization, modelling and development of new materials to solve material challenges in sectors such as transport, energy or health. MTM has close ties with industrial partners through a broad variety of national and international projects which is reflected in the program through plant visits, practical exercises, internships and the master thesis topics.
  • Thanks to the diversity of the research profile of the host department MTM, the programme is able to cover a broad gamut of materials families and applications. Concerning structural materials, MTM is one of the few materials departments where both metals and composites are strongly represented in both research and teaching. Concerning functional materials, the close links with imec and KU Leuven's biomedical group position the programme in addressing upcoming application domains.
  • Scarcity, closed materials loops ('cradle to cradle') and recycling processes are core research topics and are taught in several engineering courses as well as in a dedicated core course on Sustainable Materials Management. The efforts in this domain have recently been rewarded with the grant of an EIT-KIC 'Raw Materials'.
  • At MTM, students in classes, exercises and practical sessions meet fellow-students, assistants (68% non-Belgian) , lecturers (26% non-Belgian) from all over the world. In terms of outgoing mobility, participation in the Erasmus+ programme is encouraged for the Belgian students. The concentration of core courses in the first Master year has considerably simplified Erasmus exchanges.
  • In terms of gender, Materials Engineering is doing pretty well among the engineering disciplines: in the Dutch-language programme, 21% of the students are female, in the English-language programme 41% and among the incoming Erasmus students 37%.

This programme is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time of part-time basis.

Career perspectives

Graduates have access to a wide range of engineering sectors. Prominent technical industries such as the automotive, aerospace, energy, microelectronics, and chemical industries and emerging sectors such as nanotechnology, biomaterials and recycling are keen to hire qualified and talented materials engineers. Materials engineers are also well suited for functions as process engineers, materials or product developers, design specialists, quality control engineers or consultants. Graduates with an interest in research can apply for an R&D position or start a PhD. Several alumni have also gone on to start their own companies.



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We live in a material world, materials form the spaces in which we live and the objects that we use. Materials create and, unfortunately, may destroy the environments that we inhabit. Read more

We live in a material world, materials form the spaces in which we live and the objects that we use. Materials create and, unfortunately, may destroy the environments that we inhabit. Even in an increasing digital age in which the global economy and market continues to expand, the physical nature of materials is always present but it changes and is subject to contextual particularities, such as traditional practices, availability of resource and skills, emerging materials and technologies such as digital fabrication.

The programme focuses on process; the direct experience of using and making with materials; how materials are used in creative works, design and production; how new opportunities and ideas may evolve through reflective practice.

The programme employs a cross disciplinary approach and uses the workshops and expertise across Edinburgh College of Art. You will work with many materials including glass, textiles, metals, timber and concrete. You will also access and use various methods of digital fabrication such as additive manufacture and CNC routing and laser cutting.

The programme addresses directly important contemporary issues of economy, inclusion and sustainability, through the practical, collaborative and individual projects.

The programme is available to students from a variety of design and creative material practice, art, design, craft, and architecture backgrounds and from more traditional technologically based disciplines, such as engineering, looking to expand their skills and understanding in both material techniques and collaborative practice.

Programme structure

The programme is largely workshop- and studio-based. You will gain experience and expertise from a variety of tutors, support staff and technicians.

Periods will be spent in different workshops of the ECA, to explore materials and technique including: metals, glass, textiles and architecture.

As you progress through the programme you will acquire both skills and understanding of various materials, apply these in a series of projects that consider contemporary issues, culminating in a self-directed project, developed from your own experience.

Learning outcomes

The MSc in Material Practice seeks to provide core learning outcomes:

  • To understand and develop further skills in materials technique and processes
  • To explore and develop cross disciplinary design and creative practice
  • To understand the evolving nature of material practice and digital fabrication
  • To understand explore contemporary issues and themes through material investigations
  • To formulate and undertake cross-disciplinary research in materials and material practice

Career opportunities

Opportunities exist with the many and various cross-disciplinary practices that operate in design professions such as product design, manufacturing, architecture and art practice.

Graduates can direct their career, having furthered their skills, explored and developed cross disciplinary design and creative practice and explored contemporary issues and themes. During the programme there will be opportunities to meet with other designers and industries.

The programme will also help those that wish to develop their own practice as fabricators, designers. artists or contractors.



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The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields. Read more

Program Overview

The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields: casting and solidification of metals; ceramic processing and properties; refractories; corrosion; composites; high temperature coatings; biomaterials; extractive metallurgy including hydrometallurgy, bio-hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, and pyrometallurgy; physical metallurgy; thermo-mechanical processing related to materials production; environmental issues related to materials productions; electronic materials; nanofibers; textile structural composites.

Materials Engineers are experts on the entire life cycle of materials, including recovery of materials from minerals, making engineered materials, manufacturing materials into products, understanding and evaluating materials performance, proper disposal and recycling of materials, and evaluating societal and economic benefits.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Applied Science
- Specialization: Materials Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Registration options: Full-time
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

Research focus

Composites, Microstructure Engineering, Extractive Metallurgy, Solidification, Biomaterials & Ceramics

Research highlights

In our research, we work closely with industry partners internationally. We have faculty with world-renowned expertise in hydrometallurgy, sustainability, nanomaterials, biomaterials and ceramics. Recent research developments in the department are helping to reduce environmental impact in the mining industry and enabling new possibilities in medical treatments. We also have a leading role in MagNet, an initiative that aims to achieve significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions in the transportation sector. We have a long history of providing excellence in education and offer one of the top-rated materials programs in North America. Graduates of our program are enjoying rewarding careers locally and internationally in a wide range of industries from mining to advanced electronics, health care and aerospace.

Related Study Areas

Biomaterials, Ceramics, Composites, Hydrometallurgy, Microstructure Engineering, Corrosion

Facilities

Research is carried out in both the Frank Forward Building and the Brimacombe Building (AMPEL) on UBC campus.

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The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields. Read more

Program Overview

The Department of Materials Engineering offers opportunities for study in the following fields: casting and solidification of metals; ceramic processing and properties; refractories; corrosion; composites; high temperature coatings; biomaterials; extractive metallurgy including hydrometallurgy, bio-hydrometallurgy, electrometallurgy, and pyrometallurgy; physical metallurgy; thermo-mechanical processing related to materials production; environmental issues related to materials productions; electronic materials; nanofibers; textile structural composites.

Materials Engineers are experts on the entire life cycle of materials, including recovery of materials from minerals, making engineered materials, manufacturing materials into products, understanding and evaluating materials performance, proper disposal and recycling of materials, and evaluating societal and economic benefits.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Science
- Specialization: Materials Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

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Backed by an unparalleled reputation for expertise and innovation in mineral extraction, mineral processing and environmental protection, the graduate program in Mining Engineering has two types of students in mind. Read more

MASTERS OF APPLIED SCIENCE

Backed by an unparalleled reputation for expertise and innovation in mineral extraction, mineral processing and environmental protection, the graduate program in Mining Engineering has two types of students in mind:

Those from industry who wish to improve their workplace skills; and

Those who wish to pursue research leading to advances in state-of-the-art or state-of-the-practice mining and mineral process engineering.

In order to best meet the needs of these two groups, the program encourages interaction between universities in North America and other countries. In many cases, this collaborative outlook leads to joint research projects and student exchanges.

Program Overview

The graduate program in Mining Engineering offers opportunity for study in the fields of mining and mineral processing, including mine environment and coal preparation. Areas of research interest are indicated below.
1. Mining. Mine economics and valuation, mine design, drilling and blasting methods, rock mechanics and slope stability, optimization and simulation of mining operations, advanced mining methods, mine services (particularly mine ventilation), and climatic control.
2. Mineral processing. Unit operations, comminution, process modeling and optimization, expert systems, instrumentation and computer control. Flotation, surface chemistry, fines recovery, coal recovery, treatment of fine and oxidized coal, and precious metals recovery.
3. Mining and Environment. Acid rock drainage, environmental protection, effluent control and treatment. Social and legal aspects of sustainable mining practices, small-scale mining in developing countries.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Applied Science
- Specialization: Mining Engineering
- Subject: Engineering
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Applied Science

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On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession. Read more

On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession.

Based within a thriving art college environment at the university's central Brighton Grand Parade campus, you will learn from experienced professionals in a welcoming atmosphere that allows craftspeople to discuss and develop their ideas as a community.

You will develop both your creative skills and your ways of thinking. You will work with people who understand craft both as a profession and as a personal expression. Your options within this specialist course can include extensive work with a wide range of materials and professions, with expert provision across metal, ceramics, polymers, wood and more.

Throughout the course you'll be doing research and experimentation using innovative thinking and approaches to craft practice. To get your masters degree, you'll demonstrate both how you work and how you think as a craftsperson, with an extended essay and craft-in-context modules allowing you to develop your ideas around your own practice and the wider context of your craft.

Our MA strives to help you towards exemplary creative output. Through exploration of the traditional discipline categories to the evolution of future interpretations and directions, you will be encouraged to fully engage with what the craft scene is today.

Why study with us?

  • Professional opportunities across the craft industry, with options in business and entrepreneurial practice, community outreach and work placements
  • Lecturers who are dynamic and active researchers, creative designers, craft practitioners and leaders in their fields – both nationally and internationally
  • Departmental expertise in a range of materials and professions, including furniture, ceramics, jewellery, product, polymers and metals
  • Cross-disciplinary exploration of sustainability, craft heritage, material experimentation, and environmental, medical and digital technologies
  • Fully equipped workshops in wood, metal, ceramics, polymers and composites, with digital technologies supported by a highly skilled team of technical demonstrators
  • Department that recognises, nurtures and demonstrates craft's role in and capacity for cultural, social, economic and environmental benefit

Syllabus

While focusing on the physical act of making, the Craft MA also covers the theory of craft, allowing practitioners to conceptualise and contextualise their practice with deeper insight. The history, theory and traditions of craft form a core component in every module, and are delivered through lectures, presentations and studio discussion groups.

Craft Practice

This module provides a reflective and productive environment for you to create new and innovative approaches to combine theory, concept and practice through your own craft work. Together with your supervisors, you will formulate a written proposal to guide you towards your own working practice, while undertaking a set project to explore and identify audience and context.

Craft in Context

The Craft in Context module exposes you to contemporary craft debates, allowing you to explore and critically reflect on the process, context and definition of craft as a creative pursuit and investigative methodology. You will investigate how craft practice can relate to and affect cultural and social issues such as the environment, health and wellbeing, the economy, sustainability, ethics and education. You will test and challenge the value of your ideas within a wider social context.

Research Skills and Training

This module offers a broad-based introduction to research and introduces its relationship to your practice. The module seeks to place your own practice and academic work in context. A series of seminar/workshop sessions will introduce you to the range of key research methods and help you develop your own research plans.

Creative Enquiry

Through this practice-based module you will develop a personal portfolio of research – digital or conventional – to inform the creation of artefacts and/or products relevant to your own creative practice. You will be introduced to a range of creative research methods – notational, physiological and improvisational – which will critically challenge and further develop your current practice.

Masters project

The masters project represents the synthesis and culmination of the modules taken on the programme. You will undertake a rigorous investigation into your personally defined area of craft practice, with the final body of work realised through three-dimensional artefacts, objects or other related forms.

Your work will be defined and structured through the personal research statement and plan, which you will develop together with a member of staff. This process of informed individual authorship and ownership enables you, as a creative practitioner, to move forward and pioneer distinctive territories of expertise and insight.

Options

You will be able to choose from a range of modules from across our arts and humanities courses. Options include:

  • Sustainable Design Presents
  • Political Economy of Globalisation
  • Professional Entreprenurial Development
  • Fine Art: Mentoring
  • Historical and Critical Studies Dissertation
  • Professional Entreprenurial Development
  • Professional Experience with Industrial Placement

Making sure that what you learn with us is relevant, up to date and what employers are looking for is our priority, so courses are reviewed and enhanced on an ongoing basis. When you have applied to us, you’ll be told about any new developments through our applicant portal.

Careers and employability

After completing the course successfully, you will be able – as a master of your craft – to take opportunities across the craft professions, either in your own practice as an entrepreneur or in the use of craft for social and community engagement. Craftspeople find these opportunities in a range of fields including fine arts, design, museum curation, teaching, prop making and interior design. The course also provides a route into academia, teaching and research.



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This exciting programme will equip you with the skills required to be a modern mechanical engineer. It focuses on the latest techniques and technologies used in mechanical engineering, teaching you how to apply these to complex contemporary problems. Read more

This exciting programme will equip you with the skills required to be a modern mechanical engineer. It focuses on the latest techniques and technologies used in mechanical engineering, teaching you how to apply these to complex contemporary problems.

Alongside the core engineering modules, you will also study two management modules taught by the Business School which will help you develop transferable professional management skills that will enhance your study experience and improve your career prospects.

You will gain a range of computational skills which will enable you to analyse systems using numerical methods, simulation and optimisation techniques. Sustainability is also emphasised throughout the programme and you will be encouraged to consider responsible solutions to modern day challenges.

The programme is supported by internationally leading research projects in areas such as nano-scale materials engineering, biomedical engineering, 3D analysis from CT scans for prosthetic bone replacement surgery, additive layer manufacturing for high specification applications with aerospace metals, and application and recycling of polymers and composites.

The programme has been designed for mechanical engineers who want to develop their management expertise in order to progress their careers. It also enables graduates to proceed to Chartered Engineer status.

Professional accreditation

This degree has been accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers under licence from the UK regulator, the Engineering Council for the purposes of meeting the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) undergraduate first degree. Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Programme Structure

This programme is modular and consists of seven core engineering, modules totalling 150 credits, and two 15-credit option modules.

Core modules

The core modules can include;

  • Mechanics of Materials;
  • Software Modelling;
  • Systems Analysis in Engineering;
  • Management Concepts;
  • Professional Skills;
  • Computer Aided Engineering Design;
  • Engineering MSc Project

Optional modules

Some examples of the optional modules are

  • Advanced CFD, Contemporary Advanced Materials Research;
  • Functional Materials.
  • Strategic Innovation Management
  • Strategy.

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand

Teaching and assessment

The programme is delivered through a mix of lectures, seminars, tutorials, industrial presentations, case studies, industry visits, computer simulations, project work and a dissertation. It has particular value in developing transferable skills development including management skills, communication skills, computational techniques, data handling and analysis, problem solving, decision making and research methodology. Many of these skills will be addressed within an industrial and commercial context.



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Why this course?. This course was introduced last year and is aimed at students who want to study advanced topics in mechanical engineering with a focus on power plant technologies. Read more

Why this course?

This course was introduced last year and is aimed at students who want to study advanced topics in mechanical engineering with a focus on power plant technologies.

It provides mechanical engineering graduates with an in-depth technical understanding of advanced mechanical engineering topics relevant to the power generation industry. You’ll also develop generic skills that allow you to contribute effectively in developing company capabilities.

The course helps to make you more employable and also satisfies the further learning requirements necessary to obtain Chartered Engineer status.

You’ll study

You’ll have the opportunity to select technical and specialist classes.

Compulsory modules

You’ll study compulsory modules:

  • Gas & Steam Turbines
  • Electrical Power Systems
  • Advanced Boiler Technologies 1

Other specialist instructional modules

These focus on different technical aspects allowing you to tailor learning to your individual needs. When choosing technical modules, you’ll discuss the options with the course co-ordinator. These options include:

  • Ceramic & Polymer Engineering; Engineering Composites
  • Metals & Alloys
  • Light Weight Structures
  • Machine Dynamics
  • Pressurised Systems
  • Systems Engineering 1 & 2
  • Polymer & Polymer Composites
  • Industrial Metallurgy

Faculty-wide generic instructional modules

You’ll choose three faculty-wide generic modules which satisfy the broader learning requirements for Chartered Engineer status. You'll choose from:

  • Design Management
  • Project Management
  • Sustainability
  • Finance
  • Risk Management
  • Environmental Impact Assessment

Individual project

MSc students take on an individual project which allows study of a selected topic in-depth. This may be an industry-themed project or one aligned to engineering research at Strathclyde.

Facilities

Our facilities include many laboratories and research centres including:

We have local access to a 3500-node region supercomputer.

Learning & teaching

Students take three compulsory modules and a selection of specialist and generic modules.

To qualify for the MSc, students undertake an individual project which allows study of a selected topic in depth, normally industry-themed or aligned to engineering research at Strathclyde.

Assessment

Assessment is by written assignments, exams and the individual project.

Careers

This course is particularly suitable for graduate engineers in these sectors:

  • chemical, petrochemical & process engineering
  • design engineering
  • power generation
  • manufacturing
  • oil & gas


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