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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-metalcrafts-graduate

The MFA is a professional degree for practicing artists, craftspeople, or designers who desire to leave a lasting impression on their fields by devotion to their work and high standards of discipline and artistic ideals. The MFA is generally a two-year, full-time program that involves the presentation of a thesis, which includes written documentation and a formal exhibition of a body of work.

Plan of study

The MFA in metals and jewelry design provides students with broad exposure to metal working techniques, expands knowledge of applied design, strengthens perceptual and philosophical concepts, and develops an individual mode of expression. This sequence leads to a master’s thesis, inaugurated by the student and overseen by the faculty. The program is structured on the basis of individual needs, interests, and background preparation, as may be determined through faculty counseling.

Curriculum

- First Year

Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio l
Metals and Jewelry Design Graduate Studio ll
Fine Art Research
Thinking About Making
Crafts Graduate Seminar
Free Elective

- Second Year
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Initiation
Metals and Jewelry Design Thesis Resolution
Thesis Implementation
Thesis Review
Free Elective
CIAS Studio Electives

Admission requirements

To be considered for the MFA program in metals and jewelry design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. For those applicants applying from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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The MSc course in Metals and Energy Finance is designed to provide training in the technical and financial appraisal of natural resource projects emphasising quantitative skills and how these are applied in the development of capital-intensive mining, oil and gas industries. Read more
The MSc course in Metals and Energy Finance is designed to provide training in the technical and financial appraisal of natural resource projects emphasising quantitative skills and how these are applied in the development of capital-intensive mining, oil and gas industries.
This is a combined Department of Earth Science & Engineering and Tanaka Business School degree.

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We invite applications from well-qualified candidates whose research interests correspond to our areas of research expertise focused on Engineering. Read more
We invite applications from well-qualified candidates whose research interests correspond to our areas of research expertise focused on Engineering. Our EngD projects are defined by our long standing industrial sponsors and address operational requirements identified by these companies. Projects are focused on our established areas of engineering expertise.
We are a leader in developing new manufacturing processes and products, such as functional coated steel. Our research in this area is led by the SPECIFIC project, in collaboration with Tata Steel.

Research into advanced, structural materials is undertaken in conjunction with the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre (UTC) in Materials based at Swansea. These projects are funded by the EPSRC Strategic Partnership in Structural Metals for Gas Turbines.

We also offer EngD programmes in the research areas of functional coatings and advanced manufacturing. Please visit our website for more information.

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The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is an alternative to the traditional PhD if you are interested in a career in industry. The EngD is equivalent to a PhD in its intellectual challenge, but as a Research Engineer (EngD student), your research will be industry-led and your project will involve working with a company. Read more
The Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is an alternative to the traditional PhD if you are interested in a career in industry.

The EngD is equivalent to a PhD in its intellectual challenge, but as a Research Engineer (EngD student), your research will be industry-led and your project will involve working with a company. The progamme also includes a taught component. This provides an unparralled opportunity to gain experience working at the cutting-edge of research that is relevant to industry. The four-year programme combines PhD-level research projects with taught courses. You will spend at least 50% of your time working directly with a company. As a Research Engineer, you will be supervised by two academics and an industrial contact within the company.

The EngD scheme was established by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to provide ambitious and motivated graduates with doctorate-level training, putting new ideas into practice and progressing careers to reach senior positions in industry.

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Still accepting applications for 2016/17. An internationally respected postgraduate metals conservation programme. The strongly practical emphasis of this programme (73%) is based on assessment and treatment of clients' objects. Read more
Still accepting applications for 2016/17

An internationally respected postgraduate metals conservation programme.

The strongly practical emphasis of this programme (73%) is based on assessment and treatment of clients' objects. You will consolidate your skills in the treatment of ferrous metals, copper allows, base metals and precious and plated metals. All work is grounded by your research into the historical context of each object, visiting lecturers and postgraduate science lecturers. Network within the sector, visit museums and collections, attend seminars and undertake optional work placements to develop your progressional practice.

::You can expect::

- Practical hands-on bench skills and object based treatments
- Tutors with extensive experience
- To work on artefacts from public and private collections
- An interdisciplinary environment
- Visiting lecturers from public and private institutions
- Access to dedicated workshops, 7am-10pm
- An approach intormed by national and international practive, to Icon standards
- Theoretical, scientific and analytical study of artefacts and materials
- To perform historical research and interpretation of the objects you work on

Programme Aims

The aims of the programme are to provide:

Practical:

1. A context for the analysis, assessment and treatment of museum-class metalwork objects

2. The opportunity to develop sophisticated specialist craft and conservation skills

3. A research environment for the development and public dissemination of innovative
approaches to the conservation of historic metalwork objects

Theoretical:

1. The opportunity to contribute to the development of historical, cultural and technical
understanding of metalwork objects through primary research and investigation

2. The opportunity to evaluate methodologies, develop critiques and propose new hypotheses

3. A context for individual inquiry and group debate across the conservation specialisms

Professional:

1. A context for the development of a range of verbal, written and visual skills appropriate for the
communication and documentation of conservation projects and research

2. A context for the development of, and critical reflection upon, personal and professional codes
of practice

3. Opportunities to plan and implement a range of projects that are either increasingly technically
more complex, or have issues that are of a compounded or more complex nature

Careers

Graduates of the programme often progress to MA Conservation Studies - https://www.westdean.org.uk/study/school-of-conservation

Alumni have had work placements or gone on to work at The British Museum, The Royal Armouries, National Maritime Museum, National Museum of Scotland, Fitzwilliam Museum, National Gold Museum Colombia, and at UK businesses including Plowden & Smith Ltd, Hall Conservation Ltd and Richard Rogers Conservation Ltd. Others have become independent conservators.

Facilities

You will work in our well-equipped metals workshop with areas for photography, analysis, chemicals, hot work (casting, soldering, and welding) and a machine shop. Adjacent to the workshop is the newly-built forge to which you will have access. Collaboration with other conservation specialisms makes for a uniquely enriched learning environment.

The computer suite and the on-site Art and Conservation Library put thousands of specialist books and journals, databases within your reach. A well-equipped analytical laboratory is also available to students.

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This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. Read more
This challenging inter-disciplinary programme spans the major classes of engineering materials used in modern high technology manufacturing and industry. The course has considerable variety and offers career opportunities across a wide range of industry sectors, where qualified materials scientists and engineers are highly sought after.

This course is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Core study areas include advanced characterisation techniques, surface engineering, processing and properties of ceramics and metals, design with engineering materials, sustainability and a project.

Optional study areas include plastics processing technology, industrial case studies, materials modelling, adhesive bonding, rubber compounding and processing, and polymer properties.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

Programme modules

Full-time Modules:
Core Modules
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)
- Surface Engineering (SL)
- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (SL)
- Design with Engineering Materials (SL)
- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW)
- Metals: Processing and Properties (SL)
- MSc Project

Optional Modules
- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)
- Industrial Case Studies (OW)
- Materials Modelling (SL)

Part-time Modules:
Core Modules
- Ceramics: Processing and Properties (DL)
- Design with Engineering Materials (DL)
- Sustainable Use of Materials (OW or DL)
- Metals: Processing and Properties (DL)
- Surface Engineering (DL)
- Plastics Processing Technology (OW)
- MSc Project

Optional Modules
- Industrial Case Studies (OW)
- Adhesive Bonding (OW)
- Rubber Compounding and Processing (OW or DL)

Alternative modules:*
- Polymer Properties (DL)
- Advanced Characterisation Techniques (SL)
- Materials Modelling (SL)

Key: SL = Semester-long, OW = One week, DL = Distance-learning
Alternative modules* are only available under certain circumstances by agreement with the Programme Director.

Selection

Interviews may be held on consideration of a prospective student’s application form. Overseas students are often accepted on their grades and strong recommendation from suitable referees.

Course structure, assessment and accreditation

The MSc comprises a combination of semester-long and one week modules for full-time students, whilst part-time students study a mix of one week and distance-learning modules.

MSc students undertake a major project many of which are sponsored by our industrial partners. Part-time student projects are often specified in conjunction with their sponsoring company and undertaken at their place of work.

All modules are 15 credits. The MSc project is 60 credits.

MSc: 180 credits – six core and two optional modules, plus the MSc project.
PG Diploma: 120 credits – six core and two optional modules.
PG Certificate: 60 credits – four core modules.

- Assessment
Modules are assessed by a combination of written examination, set coursework exercises and laboratory reports. The project is assessed by a dissertation, literature review and oral presentation.

- Accreditation
Both MSc programmes are accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3), allowing progression towards professional chartered status (CEng) after a period of relevant graduate-level employment.

Careers and further Study

Typical careers span many industrial sectors, including aerospace, power generation, automotive, construction and transport. Possible roles include technical and project management, R&D, technical support to manufacturing as well as sales and marketing.
Many of our best masters students continue their studies with us, joining our thriving community of PhD students engaged in materials projects of real-world significance

Bursaries and Scholarships

Bursaries are available for both UK / EU and international students, and scholarships are available for good overseas applicants.

Why Choose Materials at Loughborough?

The Department has contributed to the advancement and application of knowledge for well over 40 years. With 21 academics and a large support team, we have about 85 full and part-time MSc students, 70 PhD students and 20 research associates.

Our philosophy is based on the engineering application and use of materials which, when processed, are altered in structure and properties.
Our approach includes materials selection and design considerations as well as business and environmental implications.

- Facilities
We are also home to the Loughborough Materials Characterisation Centre – its state of-the-art equipment makes it one of the best suites of its kind in Europe used by academia and our industrial partners.
The Centre supports our research and teaching activities developing understanding of the interactions of structure and properties with processing and product performance.

- Research
Our research activity is organised into 4 main research groups; energy materials, advanced ceramics, surface engineering and advanced polymers. These cover a broad span of research areas working on today’s global challenges, including sustainability, nanomaterials, composites and processing. However, we adopt an interdisciplinary approach to our research and frequently interact with other departments and Research Schools.

- Career prospects
Over 90% of our graduates were in employment and / or further study six months after graduating. Our unrivalled links with industry are
hugely beneficial to our students. We also tailor our courses according to industrial feedback and needs, ensuring our graduates are well prepared

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/materials/materials-science-tech/

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The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering. Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/. Read more
The Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering offers a master of science in metallurgical engineering.

Visit the website http://mte.eng.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

The program options include coursework only or by a combination of coursework and approved thesis work. Most on-campus students supported on assistantships are expected to complete an approved thesis on a research topic.

Plan I is the standard master’s degree plan. However, in exceptional cases, a student who has the approval of his or her supervisory committee may follow Plan II. A student who believes there are valid reasons for using Plan II must submit a written request detailing these reasons to the department head no later than midterm of the first semester in residence.

All graduate students, during the first part and the last part of their programs, will be required to satisfactorily complete MTE 595/MTE 596. This hour of required credit is in addition to the other degree requirements.

Course Descriptions

MTE 519 Principles of Casting and Solidification Processing. Three hours.
Overview of the principles of solidification processing, the evolution of solidification microstructure, segregation, and defects, and the use of analytical and computational tools for the design, understanding, and use of solidification processes.

MTE 520 Simulation of Casting Processes Three hours.
This course will cover the rationale and approach of numerical simulation techniques, casting simulation and casting process design, and specifically the prediction of solidification, mold filling, microstructure, shrinkage, microporosity, distortion and hot tearing. Students will learn casting simulation through lectures and hands-on laboratory/tutorial sessions.

MTE 539 Metallurgy of Welding. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Thermal, chemical, and mechanical aspects of welding using the fusion welding process. The metallurgical aspects of welding, including microstructure and properties of the weld, are also covered. Various topics on recent trends in welding research.

MTE 542 Magnetic Recording Media. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271.
Basic ferromagnetism, preparation and properties of magnetic recording materials, magnetic particles, thin magnetic films, soft and hard film media, multilayered magnetoresistive media, and magneto-optical disk media.

MTE 546 Macroscopic Transport in Materials Processing. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 353 or permission of the instructor.
Elements of laminar and turbulent flow; heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation; and mass transfer in laminar and in turbulent flow; mathematical modeling of transport phenomena in metallurgical systems including melting and refining processes, solidification processes, packed bed systems, and fluidized bed systems.

MTE 547 Intro to Comp Mat. Science Three hours.
This course introduces computational techniques for simulating materials. It covers principles of quantum and statistical mechanics, modeling strategies and formulation of various aspects of materials structure, and solution techniques with particular reference to Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamic methods.

MTE 549 Powder Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 380 or permission of the instructor.
Describing the various types of powder processing and how these affect properties of the components made. Current issues in the subject area from high-production to nanomaterials will be discussed.

MTE 550 Plasma Processing of Thin Films: Basics and Applications. Three hours.
Prerequisite: By permission of instructor.
Fundamental physics and materials science of plasma processes for thin film deposition and etch are covered. Topics include evaporation, sputtering (special emphasis), ion beam deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and reactive ion etching. Applications to semiconductor devices, displays, and data storage are discussed.

MTE 556 Advanced Mechanical Behavior of Materials I: Strengthening Methods in Solids. Three hours. Same as AEM 556.
Prerequisite: MTE 455 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include elementary elasticity, plasticity, and dislocation theory; strengthening by dislocation substructure, and solid solution strengthening; precipitation and dispersion strengthening; fiber reinforcement; martensitic strengthening; grain-size strengthening; order hardening; dual phase microstructures, etc.

MTE 562 Metallurgical Thermodynamics. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of instructor.
Laws of thermodynamics, equilibria, chemical potentials and equilibria in heterogeneous systems, activity functions, chemical reactions, phase diagrams, and electrochemical equilibria; thermodynamic models and computations; and application to metallurgical processes.

MTE 574 Phase Transformation in Solids. Three hours.
Prerequisites: MTE 373 and or permission of the instructor.
Topics include applied thermodynamics, nucleation theory, diffusional growth, and precipitation.

MTE 579 Advanced Physical Metallurgy. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Graduate-level treatments of the fundamentals of symmetry, crystallography, crystal structures, defects in crystals (including dislocation theory), and atomic diffusion.

MTE 583 Advanced Structure of Metals. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
The use of X-ray analysis for the study of single crystals and deformation texture of polycrystalline materials.

MTE 585 Materials at Elevated Temperatures. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Influence of temperatures on behavior and properties of materials.

MTE 587 Corrosion Science and Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 271 and CH 102 or permission of the instructor.
Fundamental causes of corrosion problems and failures. Emphasis is placed on tools and knowledge necessary for predicting corrosion, measuring corrosion rates, and combining this with prevention and materials selection.

MTE 591:592 Special Problems (Area). One to three hours.
Advanced work of an investigative nature. Credit awarded is based on the work accomplished.

MTE 595:596 Seminar. One hour.
Discussion of current advances and research in metallurgical engineering; presented by graduate students and the staff.

MTE 598 Research Not Related to Thesis. One to six hours.

MTE 599 Master's Thesis Research. One to twelve hours. Pass/fail.

MTE 622 Solidification Processes and Microstructures Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 519
This course will cover the fundamentals of microstructure formation and microstructure control during the solidification of alloys and composites.

MTE 643 Magnetic Recording. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Static magnetic fields; inductive head fields; playback process in recording; recording process; recording noise; and MR heads.

MTE 644 Optical Data Storage. Three hours.
Prerequisite: ECE 341 or MTE 271.
Characteristics of optical disk systems; read-only (CD-ROM) systems; write-once (WORM) disks; erasable disks; M-O recording materials; optical heads; laser diodes; focus and tracking servos; and signal channels.

MTE 655 Electron Microscopy of Materials. One to four hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 481 or permission of the instructor.
Topics include basic principles of operation of the transmission electron microscope, principles of electron diffraction, image interpretation, and various analytical electron-microscopy techniques as they apply to crystalline materials.

MTE 670 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Three hours
Theory, construction, and operation of the scanning electron microscope. Both imaging and x-ray spectroscopy are covered. Emphasis is placed on application and uses in metallurgical engineering and materials-related fields.

MTE 680 Advanced Phase Diagrams. Three hours.
Prerequisite: MTE 362 or permission of the instructor.
Advanced phase studies of binary, ternary, and more complex systems; experimental methods of construction and interpretation.

MTE 684 Fundamentals of Solid State Engineering. Three hours.
Prerequisite: Modern physics, physics with calculus, or by permission of the instructor.
Fundamentals of solid state physics and quantum mechanics are covered to explain the physical principles underlying the design and operation of semiconductor devices. The second part covers applications to semiconductor microdevices and nanodevices such as diodes, transistors, lasers, and photodetectors incorporating quantum structures.

MTE 691:692 Special Problems (Area). One to six hours.
Credit awarded is based on the amount of work undertaken.

MTE 693 Selected Topics (Area). One to six hours.
Topics of current research in thermodynamics of melts, phase equilibra, computer modeling of solidification, electrodynamics of molten metals, corrosion phenomena, microstructural evolution, and specialized alloy systems, nanomaterials, fuel cells, and composite materials.

MTE 694 Special Project. One to six hours.
Proposing, planning, executing, and presenting the results of an individual project.

MTE 695:696 Seminar. One hour.
Presentations on dissertation-related research or on items of current interest in materials and metallurgical engineering.

MTE 698 Research Not Related to Dissertation. One to six hours.

MTE 699 Doctoral Dissertation Research. Three to twelve hours. Pass/Fail.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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A fantastic time to be a specialist in aerospace materials, Sheffield is in the heartland of the UK aerospace industry, meaning many international aerospace companies look to the Department to discover ways to improve both materials and processes for use in their products. Read more

About the course

A fantastic time to be a specialist in aerospace materials, Sheffield is in the heartland of the UK aerospace industry, meaning many international aerospace companies look to the Department to discover ways to improve both materials and processes for use in their products.

You’ll develop knowledge of the manufacturing, processing and properties of the metals and composite materials used in airframes and aeroengines. You’ll also be trained in the fundamentals of thermodynamics, structure and mechanical behaviour.

A welcoming department

A friendly, forward-thinking community, our students and staff are on hand to welcome you to the department and ensure you settle into student life.

Your project supervisor will support you throughout your course. Plus you’ll have access to our extensive network of alumni, offering industry insight and valuable career advice to support your own career pathway.

Your career

Prospective employers recognise the value of our courses, and know that our students can apply their knowledge to industry. Our graduates work for organisations including Airbus, Rolls-Royce, the National Nuclear Laboratory and Saint-Gobain. Roles include materials development engineer, reactor engineer and research manager. They also work in academia in the UK and abroad.

90 per cent of our graduates are employed or in further study 6 months after graduating, with an average starting salary of £27,000, the highest being £50,000.

Equipment and facilities

We have invested in extensive, world-class equipment and facilities to provide a stimulating learning environment. Our laboratories are equipped to a high standard, with specialist facilities for each area of research.

Materials processing

Tools and production facilities for materials processing, fabrication and testing, including wet chemical processing for ceramics and polymers, rapid solidification and water atomisation for nanoscale metallic materials, and extensive facilities for deposition of functional and structural coatings.

Radioactive nuclear waste and disposal

Our £3million advanced nuclear materials research facility provides a high-quality environment for research on radioactive waste and disposal. Our unique thermomechanical compression and arbitrary strain path equipment is used for simulation of hot deformation.

Characterisation

You’ll have access to newly refurbished array of microscopy and analysis equipment, x-ray facilities, and surface analysis techniques covering state-of-the-art XPS and SIMS. There are also laboratories for cell and tissue culture, and facilities for measuring electrical, magnetic and mechanical properties.

The Kroto Research Institute and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre enhance our capabilities in materials fabrication and characterisation, and we have a computer cluster for modelling from the atomistic through nano and mesoscopic to the macroscopic.

Stimulating learning environment

An interdisciplinary research-led department; our network of world leading academics at the cutting edge of their research inform our courses providing a stimulating, dynamic environment in which to study.

Teaching and assessment

Working alongside students and staff from across the globe, you’ll tackle real-world projects, and attend lectures, seminars and laboratory classes delivered by academic and industry experts.

You’ll be assessed by formal examinations, coursework assignments and a dissertation.

Core modules

Aerospace Metals; Design and Manufacture of Composites; Science of Materials; Materials Processing and Characterisation; Materials Selection, Properties and Applications; Technical Skills Development; Heat and Materials with Application; Advanced Materials Manufacturing; Deformation, Fracture and Fatigue; Research project in an area of your choice.

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Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. Read more
Scientific analysis is a key tool in the interpretation of archaeological artefact and assemblages. This MSc offers detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of archaeological and heritage materials, and a solid background in the archaeology and anthropology of technology allowing students to design and implement archaeologically meaningful scientific projects.

Degree information

This degree aims to bridge the gap between archaeology and science by integrating both a detailed training in the use of scientific techniques for the analysis of inorganic archaeological materials and a solid background in the anthropology of technology. By the end of the degree, students should have a good understanding of the foundations of the most established analytical techniques, practical experience in their application and data processing, as well as the ability to design research projects that employ instrumental analyses to address archaeological questions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Laboratory and instrumental skills in archaeological science

Optional modules - you are then able to choose further optional modules to the value of 75 credits. At least 15 credits must be made up from the following:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science

At least 30 credits must be made up from the following list below:
-Technology within Society
-Archaeological Data Science
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Geoarchaeology: Methods and Concepts
-Interpreting Pottery
-Working with Artefacts and Assemblages

In order to allow for a flexible curriculum, students are allowed to select up to 30 credits from any of the postgraduate courses offered at the UCL Institute of Archaeology under other Master's degrees.

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practical demonstrations and laboratory work. A popular aspect of this programme is its extensive use of analytical facilities. Assessment is through essays, practicals, projects, laboratory reports and oral presentations depending on the options chosen, and the dissertation.

Careers

Given our strong emphasis on research training, many of our MSc graduates take up further research positions after their degree, and over half of our MSc students progress to PhD research. Their projects are generally concerned with the technology and/or provenance of ceramics, metals or glass in different regions and periods, but most of them involve scientific approaches in combination with traditional fieldwork and/or experimental archaeology.

Some of our graduates are now teaching archaeometry or ancient technologies at different universities in the UK and abroad. Others work as conservation scientists in museums and heritage institutions, or as finds specialists, researchers and consultants employed by archaeological field units or academic research projects.

Employability
Due largely to an unparalleled breadth of academic expertise and laboratory facilities, our graduates develop an unusual combination of research and transferable skills, including critical abilities, team working, multimedia communication, numerical thinking and the use of advanced analytical instruments. On completion of the degree, graduates should be as comfortable in a laboratory as in a museum and or an archaeological site. They become acquainted with research design and implementation, ethical issues and comparative approaches to world archaeology through direct exposure to an enormous variety of projects. The range of options available allows students to tailor their pathways towards different career prospects in archaeology and beyond.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK. Its specialist staff, outstanding library and fine teaching and reference collections provide a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

The excellent in-house laboratory facilities will provide direct experience of a wide range of techniques, including electron microscopy and microphone analysis, fixed and portable X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, infra-red spectroscopy, petrography and metallography under the supervision of some of the world's leading specialists.

The institute houses fine teaching and reference collections that are extensively used by MSc students including ceramics, metals, stone artefacts and geological materials from around the world. In addition, the institute has a wide network of connections to museums and ongoing projects offering research opportunities for MSc students.

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The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Applied Science (MASc), Master of Engineering (MEng), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Read more
The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Applied Science (MASc), Master of Engineering (MEng), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). Graduate courses and research opportunities are offered to qualified students in a wide range of subjects.

Typical subjects in extractive and process metallurgy involve a study of the equilibria existing during the reduction of oxides with carbon and metals, life cycle analysis of materials, properties of iron and steelmaking slags, the fundamental properties of fused salt solutions, fused salt electrolysis of reactive metals, kinetics of high-temperature reactions, mathematical modelling of metallurgical processes, process metallurgy, and hydrometallurgy.

Typical physical metallurgy and materials science subjects deal with the structure, properties, and application of advanced materials in such fields as nanomaterials, surface chemistry, energy, sustainability, optoelectronics, biomaterials, nuclear materials, metalmatrix composites (MMCs), metallic glasses, corrosion, fatigue, phase transformations, and solidification. These studies are all related to the general problem of understanding structure-property-processing-performance relationships in materials.

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Advances in technology depends more and more on the discovery and development of new materials having particular desired properties. Read more
Advances in technology depends more and more on the discovery and development of new materials having particular desired properties. In addition to mechanical strength, various structural, optical, electrical, magnetic and thermal properties are demanded from materials depending on the application. The field of Materials Science and Engineering investigates different classes of materials -metals, ceramics, polymers, electronic materials, biomaterials- with an emphasis on the relationships between the underlying structure and the processing, properties, and performance of the materials.
Understanding various material properties is the first step in finding ways to tailor these properties to meet some particular need or application, and for creating entirely new materials having particular desired properties. The M.S. program in Material Science & Engineering at Koç University is an interdisciplinary program with the objective of giving the students the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge required for material synthesis, structure-property characterization and processing; and complementing this with practical laboratory experience.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Nanostructured materials
• Photonics & laser materials
• Polymeric materials & composites
• Fuel cells & hydrogen storage materials
• Processing & device applications
• Protein biochemistry & biotechnology
• Micro-optics & micro-nano system Technologies

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass. The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that develops students personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-glass

The MFA in glass is a two-year program of study that develops students personal creative voice through intensive research, discussion, critique, and experimentation. Students are provided full access to a complete glass facility and individual studio space to strengthen their technique and to practice designing pieces that flourish their personal expression of the medium. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses, and in-depth critiques are offered in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation to provide students with a deep understanding of this personal craft. Students are exposed to a broad range of critical issues related to the conception and production of art, to inspire and provoke critical reflection and facilitate the development of a thesis exhibition and supporting documentation.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in glass, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses),

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-woodworking-graduate. The MFA program in furniture design is structured around the individual student’s needs, interests, and background. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-woodworking-graduate

The MFA program in furniture design is structured around the individual student’s needs, interests, and background. As such, the program seeks to strengthen students' techniques, advance their aesthetic and design sensibilities, and hone their personal expression. The first year of the program exposes students to a broad range of critical issues related to the conception and production of art, serves to inspire and provoke their critical reflection, and facilitate the development of a preliminary thesis topic. In the second year students propose and fully engage in a thesis project, which culminates in a major exhibition in the spring.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in furniture design, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of art, science, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours of studio courses), and

- Complete a graduate application

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System are accepted in place of the TOEFL. An IELTS score of 6.5 is required. For international students coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not given for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

Studio Residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-ceramics-graduate. The MFA in ceramics focuses on intellectual and artistic development through an intensive teaching of the aesthetics and techniques of ceramic design. Read more
See the department website - http://cias.rit.edu/schools/american-crafts/graduate-ceramics-graduate

The MFA in ceramics focuses on intellectual and artistic development through an intensive teaching of the aesthetics and techniques of ceramic design. Graduate studio courses, seminar courses, and in-depth critiques, in conjunction with thesis planning and implementation, provide students with a deep understanding of not only their own work, but the work of other students and their peers. Students examine the creativity, perceptions, aesthetics, and criticism of the work of contemporary artists and craftspeople in courses and discussions. Thesis reviews track students' progress towards the final thesis presentation, which is completed when a formal critique and evaluation is performed by the thesis committee. The MFA program in ceramics strengthens and deepens the understanding of the aesthetics, techniques, and theory of this fine art.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MFA program in ceramics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in a field of arts, sciences, or education from a regionally accredited institution in the United States,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work (the undergraduate degree should include 50 semester hours in studio courses),

- Demonstrate, through the quality of the undergraduate record and creative production, a genuine, professional potential, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International students whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) are required. Scores from the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) are accepted in place of the TOEFL. A minimum score of 6.5 is required. Applicants coming from countries where the baccalaureate degree is not awarded for programs in the practice of art may be admitted to graduate study if the diploma or certificate received approximates the standards of the BFA, BA, or BS degrees, and if their academic records and portfolios indicate an ability to meet graduate standards.

Additional information

- Studio residency program

The School for American Crafts offers a Studio Residency program for students in ceramics, furniture design, glass, and metals and jewelry design. Residence positions are limited and are awarded after the review of all applicants’ portfolios, transcripts, and references. An interview is required. Accepted residents are required to register for one independent study credit during each semester of residence.

Accepted residents are expected to be present in their assigned studio during class hours and to contribute up to 10 hours of work per week in the main studio. These work hours are coordinated and overseen by the faculty in the resident's discipline. In exchange, the school will provide workspace, access to facilities, and supportive instruction. The resident is invited to participate in the full range of studio activities.

Participants may be those seeking additional studio experience prior to undergraduate or graduate study, early career professionals, or teachers on leave who wish to work again in an academic studio environment. The faculty in each discipline will make decisions concerning appropriate candidates.

Inquiries should be made to the Studio Residency Program, School for American Crafts, College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623-5603.

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Our Advanced Materials MSc is a broad-based, flexible modular programme, giving you a thorough understanding of advanced engineering materials, their manufacture, and the techniques used for their characterisation. Read more
Our Advanced Materials MSc is a broad-based, flexible modular programme, giving you a thorough understanding of advanced engineering materials, their manufacture, and the techniques used for their characterisation.

This programme is a springboard for career development, new employment opportunities and postgraduate research. It provides a strong platform for workplace-based continuing education with many part-time students funded by their employers.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Full-time and part-time students study a number of one-week short-course modules comprising lectures, laboratory sessions and tutorials.

The modules cover metals, polymers, ceramics, composites, nanomaterials, bonding, surfaces, corrosion, fracture, fatigue, analytical techniques and general research methods. Each module is followed by an open book assessment of approximately 120 hours.

There is also a materials-based research project, which is made up of the Research Project Planning and the Project modules.

The MSc in Advanced Materials is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3) and by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) when a Project is undertaken.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time over five academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a compulsory Project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Materials Science
-Research Methods
-Research Project Planning
-Project
-Introduction to Composite Materials Science
-Characterisation of Advanced Materials
-Introduction to Physical Metallurgy
-Polymers: Science, Engineering and Applications
-Structural Ceramics and Hard Coatings
-Surface Analysis: XPS, Auger and SIMS
-Materials Under Stress
-The Science and Technology of Adhesive Bonding
-Composite Materials Technology
-Corrosion Engineering
-Nanomaterials

-Advanced Materials Independent Study (part-time only)
-Advanced Materials Project (part-time only)
-Project (part-time only)

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-To provide students with a broad knowledge of the manufacture, characterisation and properties of advanced materials
-To address issues of sustainability such as degradation and recycling
-To equip graduate scientists and engineers with specific expertise in the selection and use of materials for industry
-To enable students to prepare, plan, execute and report an original piece of research
-To develop a deeper understanding of a materials topic which is of particular interest (full-time students) or relevance to their work in industry (part-time students) by a project based or independent study based thesis

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:

Knowledge and understanding
-The different major classes of advanced materials
-Routes for manufacturing and processing of advanced materials
-Characterisation techniques for analysing bonding and microstructure
-Mechanical, chemical and physical properties of advanced materials
-Processing -microstructure - property relationships of advanced materials
-Material selection and use
-Appropriate mathematical methods

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Reason systematically about the behaviour of materials
-Select materials for an application
-Predict material properties
-Understand mathematical relationships relating to material properties
-Plan experiments, interpret experimental data and discuss experimental results in the context of present understanding in the field

Professional practical skills
-Research information to develop ideas and understanding
-Develop an understanding of, and competence, in using laboratory equipment and instrumentation
-Apply mathematical methods, as appropriate

Key / transferable skills
-Use the scientific process to reason through to a sound conclusion
-Write clear reports
-Communicate ideas clearly and in an appropriate format
-Design and carry out experimental work

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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