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Masters Degrees (Metal)

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Jewellery & Metal (J&M) forms part of the School of Material. Within this context we are committed to exploring the rich and diverse field of adornment and object culture. Read more

Jewellery & Metal (J&M) forms part of the School of Material. Within this context we are committed to exploring the rich and diverse field of adornment and object culture. We encourage an open-minded approach that in principle embraces all materials. But it is metal that constitutes the technological core of our subject and we believe that a deepening understanding of the metal elements is key in these developments; the Periodic Table is our reference in expanding our activity within the subjects of jewellery and metalwork.

The attitude of Jewellery & Metal has shifted from a purely object-centred focus to a wider scope, questioning and exploring issues centred on the human condition. We are responsive to the rapidly changing social and cultural landscape, and draw on history and technology in nurturing intellectual and creative skills directed at understanding and pushing forward jewellery and objects of human making. The rich and extensive bodies of knowledge associated with object-making and jewellery underpin an approach that is outward-looking, open to the wider discourse on commodity objects, connecting to contemporary life.

As applied artists, being in control of the making process either by using our hands or through digital technologies is very important, it is our way of making sense of the world. As individuals we are fascinated with the rich and diverse materials and resources the world has to offer, and through the individuality of our personal visions we make our contribution to the bigger picture.

Jewellery & Metal provides an environment for exploring, in practical and theoretical ways, what it means to be an applied artist today. We see our role as challenging norms and questioning conventions, interrogating the role and purpose of objects and adornment through the development of a personal approach to researching, experimenting, designing and making in the context of an increasingly complex object culture.

The growing importance and interdisciplinary character of our distinctive discipline within material culture gives the applied arts an added vibrancy and relevance. We believe the physical act of making has an essential role to play in an increasingly virtual world, but we also embrace digital technologies and the virtual and believe that creating a dialogue between these worlds provides the applied arts with one of its most fertile testing grounds at this time.



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The key emphasis of the Jewellery & Metal programme in the first year is on establishing a personal creative mindset. This happens through set projects and seminars. Read more

First Year

The key emphasis of the Jewellery & Metal programme in the first year is on establishing a personal creative mindset. This happens through set projects and seminars. The ideas and work are supported by individual tutorials and progress is evaluated at set formal points. additional course components are designed to complement and underpin this work, developing and deepening students’ understanding of their chosen subject and strengthening their confidence in their own creative language.

During the first year there are set projects running alongside the Personal Projects that address and explore design methodologies, context, presentation skills, technical and digital inductions, introduction to emerging technologies, visits, seminars and group crits as well as visits and live projects.

Students are expected to explore and develop ideas for their Personal Project on an individual basis during the first year, using time between common elements and course project requirements. By the end of the year students should have developed a clear direction for their second-year Personal Project.

Second Year

During the second year students are expected to pursue their Personal Projects and produce work that will reflect the context of their anticipated professional practice.

The major part of the second year is devoted to the Personal Project. The student is responsible for progressing the work, according to a schedule of development that is subject to a timetable of deadlines for delivery and review throughout the second year. Completed work is presented in the RCA Show.

Critical & Historical Studies

The RCA provides a unique environment for postgraduate art and design students to reflect upon their own practice, and to engage with students from their own and other disciplines. The role of Critical & Historical Studies (CHS) is to support the studio programmes in enabling these critical engagements to take place. The courses offered by CHS to first year studio-based MA students propose an intellectual framework within which they can begin to establish a coherent relationship between theory and practice.

In the autumn and spring terms there are a series of College-wide seminars and lectures. The autumn term series will relate to your particular discipline (though it is possible to elect to join a series being offered to students on other programmes) whereas the spring term series will be more broad-based and cross-disciplinary in nature.

In the spring and summer terms, a CHS tutor will give you individual tutorials to support the development of a dissertation which is submitted at the start of the second year. The dissertation should be between 6,000–10,000 words in length – this is a major piece of work and you will be not be able to submit for the Final Examination until you have passed this assessment.

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Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers… Read more
Be part of a lively popular music research community that embraces everything from metal music to film scores with the opportunity to work alongside performers, composers and studio experts.This course is about the here and now - you will study everything from folk to jazz, right through to rock, hip-hop and dance, developing your knowledge of contemporary popular music.You'll join peers from backgrounds in cultural studies, sociology, music and the creative arts to explore today's local live music scene and its connection to the wider national and international industry. From getting out into the Leeds area and conducting ethnographic research into local gigs and events, to composing scores for film and television, you'll discover how a wide variety of communities fuse together to create what is recognised as a vibrant and expanding scene.Whether it's developing your music editing techniques in our studios, or organising events and liaising with artists at Leeds Festival, you'll gain the hands-on experience employers are looking for, gathering evidence for your major research project.This course is the perfect springboard to make contacts, help you discover the interconnectivity of popular music and culture, and really engage with a vibrant and varied scene which covers everything from metal right through to country.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/popularmusicandculture_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

With more festivals and independent producers and artists than ever before, the need for live music and industry professionals has soared.

Employment opportunities could be open to you in sound engineering, performance, teaching, song writing, production, music for film and television, music journalism, marketing and PR, and events organisation.

Alternatively you may wish to further your research by studying for a PhD.

- Performer
- Songwriter
- Sound Technician
- Events Organiser

Careers advice: The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

As well as having access to modern, professional music studios, you'll benefit from being taught by a highly skilled and experienced teaching team, including Professor Karl Spracklen who is Secretary of the International Society for Metal Music Studies and the Editor of Metal Music Studies. You'll also have the chance to network with industry professionals during our guest lecture series. Previous speakers have included Leeds Festival boss Melvin Benn and chart-toppers Rudimental. We also have fantastic links with local and national music, arts and festival organisations, which help ensure you get the most from your course.

Core Modules

Popular Music as Leisure & Culture
Examine the importance of popular music as a form of leisure and culture. You will explore music subcultures through sociology, cultural geography, cultural studies and leisure theory.

Researching Popular Music & Culture
Develop an understanding of the strategies used in the study of popular music and culture, drawing on advanced approaches from sociology, musicology, cultural studies, ethnography, leisure and other relevant areas.

Popular Music Analysis
Examine performance, record production, video and reception and the meaning of music for your small scale, individual research project which focuses on the analysis of popular music artefacts.

Popular Music in Contemporary Culture
Engage in debate and discussion of how, where and why certain strands of musical productivity and creativity remain constantly part of the vocabulary of popular music.

Final Individual Project
Combine your learning into a significant piece of work, the nature of which will be determined by yourself and the course team.

Option Modules

Studio Production Skills
Produce a series of sound design projects and create your own systems for the purpose of manipulating/processing sound which will demonstrate your understanding of the concepts behind the tools used for sound design.

Creative Music Production
Develop a broad understanding of the creative possibilities of the studio environment by investigating a range of theoretical, technical, and creative approaches to the production process.

Music Industries in Context
Develop a range of theoretical perspectives drawing on contemporary research into the ecology of the music industries and how different stakeholders across the music sector work together.

Music Industries in Practice
Investigate a host of contemporary issues affecting the practice of operating in the music industries, focusing on one key area determined by your own interests.

Facilities

- Library
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Broadcasting Place
Broadcasting Place provides students with creative and contemporary learning environments, is packed with the latest technology and is a focal point for new and innovative thinking in the city.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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The course philosophy for MA Fine Art - Contemporary Dialogues is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium-specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy for MA Fine Art - Contemporary Dialogues is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium-specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

MA Fine Art within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

Core Modules
-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
 Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty. These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunities while also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event-based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services. The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Swansea (formerly Swansea Metropolitan University). CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

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The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

The Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Masters Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Masters Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suits and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty.These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunity whilst also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services.

 The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at Swansea Metropolitan University. CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

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Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Read more
Glass has remarkable properties; its transparency, durability and versatility have been explored in architectural and artistic contexts for thousands of years. Recent technological advances provide continuing opportunities for creative application. Its unique properties of transparency and interaction with light gives MA Glass students the opportunity to explore new possibilities and build specialist knowledge as a material for the future.

Course Overview

The MA Glass programme within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Master's Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork.

In this century, glass as a material offers a unique place in design and architecture and there are very few institutions that offer the opportunity to explore this material, with particular reference to its applications in architecture. Swansea glass department has a long established reputation for glass and strong industrial links help underpin the educational experience for students. The history of the department enables a broad spectrum of approaches that draw on the historical, cultural and technological uses of this material. Glass in its many forms; mosaic, glaze, enamel and window façade covers a broad association of surfaces, which offers for the maker a rich and varied pallet. This is a hands-on course!

The main strands of the programme are: design and philosophy, material innovation and glass design. These themes are considered in the context of glass for the environment, to fulfill the need to develop innovative, sustainable and possibly universal solutions for a variety of architectural, public and private spaces.

The programme prides itself in newly equipped workshops that provide excellent specialist facilities including sandblasters, acid etching bay, cold working machinery, screen printing facilities for glass and an extensive range of glass and ceramic kilns for casting and decorative processing. Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suites and workshops in other areas within the art school such as wood, metal, ceramics, 3D printing and water jet and laser cutting.

The teaching team consists of highly experienced glass artists and designers who are either engaged in professional practice or are research active, supported by industrially trained technical staff. This ensures that the course delivers a qualification and experience that is highly relevant to the changing needs of the industry and wider architectural glass community.

The department works closely with the Architectural Glass Centre, which often supports and advises the students on live commissions and commercial work. We also work with the CIRIC research centre within the faculty, with 2 members of this research centre specialising in glass. This provides research opportunities and access to high technology resources giving the students opportunities to link with creative industries infrastructure in the region as a potential starting point for future employment.

With an eighty year history the glass department benefits from strong support from Alumni and the local glass community as well as networks and connections from world-renowned glass artists.

Assessment

The main modes of assessment used on this programme are; studio projects, written assignments and seminar presentations.

Assessment at postgraduate level is reflected by your ability to reformulate and use relevant methodologies and approaches to address problematic situations that involve many interacting factors. It includes taking responsibility for planning and developing courses of action that initiate or underpin substantial change or development, as well as exercising broad autonomy and judgement. It should also reflect an understanding of the relevant theoretical and methodological perspectives and how they affect your area of study or work.

Career Opportunities

Students from the Master's Programme have gone on to many varied careers within the Architectural Glass Industry, Glass Studios, teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Many have continued to practice as designers and artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

Possible career pathways have included:
-Establishing yourself as an artist, designer or maker
-Setting up a studio as a sole supplier or in a partnership with others
-Employed in specialist glass studios
-Engaging in freelance work on architectural and interiors projects
-Designing for industry or working in the glass industry
-Working on private and public commissions
-Working on art projects and community projects
-Other opportunities include arts administration, curating, teaching and mentoring, community work and arts editorial
-Continuation of studies to postgraduate level on our MA programme
-Further academic research leading to MPhil, or PhD is available

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Led by Reader in Time-based Media Jordan Baseman, the Sculpture programme establishes a framework that encompasses the material, historical and theoretical conditions of sculpture where students are supported to develop their own practice. Read more

Led by Reader in Time-based Media Jordan Baseman, the Sculpture programme establishes a framework that encompasses the material, historical and theoretical conditions of sculpture where students are supported to develop their own practice.

Sculpture includes object-making, public art and social practices, site and space, performance, sound, film and video: but rather than consider the specific manifestations of sculpture we prefer to think of our position as a methodology from which to progress the production of art.

The Sculpture programme provides a structure that incorporates both individual and group tutorials, as well as a dedicated seminar programme. Critical reviews of student work are conducted consistently throughout the year, at the end of each term and we invite external visitors to contribute to these discussions when they become School-wide. Our students are eager, determined, inquisitive, ambitious – actively defining their own terms in regards to the ideas and actualities of Sculpture.

Sculpture occupies a purpose-built studio space at the RCA’s Battersea campus, alongside the other School of Fine Art programmes. Students have access to all specialist workshops across the College, including wood and metal workshops, spray rooms and our celebrated foundry, in which we facilitate casting with bronze, aluminum and iron. There are project spaces in which students can experiment with larger-scale production and display, as well as the practicalities of documentation. We have high-end computer suites with full 3D modeling facilities, alongside a number of still and moving image workstations. 

The programme offers:

  • associations with a broad constituency of artists, architects, designers and thinkers across the RCA, with the expectation that the wider discourse this community represents should be a dynamic foil to the work and development of all aspiring RCA Sculpture graduates
  • a teaching structure that incorporates individual and group tutorials, crits and seminars
  • a flexible space that can be adapted to various uses; there is also project space available for short bookings for exhibitions, documentation and to realise larger projects
  • a range of technical facilities, including wood and metal workshops, spray rooms and the celebrated Foundry casting in a range of metals including bronze, aluminium and iron, all housed in the Sculpture Building
  • dedicated high end computer room with full 3D modelling suite, retouching and moving image workstations, scanning and colour printing
  • access to college-wide workshop facilities and printmaking and photography digital printing and retouching suites
  • access to the Moving Image Studio
  • national and international exchange and residency opportunities, which have included Paris, Kyoto, Dusseldorf, the Hague and Edinburgh
  • an ongoing programme of off-site events, exhibitions and commissions


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The Interior Design MA at DMU is a creative, practice based course with an inspiring curriculum that will broaden and deepen your design skills and knowledge. Read more
The Interior Design MA at DMU is a creative, practice based course with an inspiring curriculum that will broaden and deepen your design skills and knowledge. It is aimed at working designers and newly qualified aspirational designers.

The programme will provide you with an opportunity to develop, research and practise design skills to an advanced level, and to apply these skills to the formulation, investigation and detailed development of a personally selected design project. Particular emphasis is placed on the integration of research within the creative design process and the effective rationalisation of the relevant functional, legislative, idealistic and aesthetic parameters.

Modules are taught through seminars, lectures, team working and design workshops, supported by tutorials and guidance. You will undertake independent research, analysis, design development and writing-up of your projects, supported by individual tutorials. Typical contact time will be 19 hours per week. Assessment methods include report submissions, individual and group presentations (oral and design based presentations) and a major design project submission.

Teaching staff have a wide variety of expertise and knowledge in many different areas, including interior design, design management, innovation management, creativity management, enterprise, technology transfer, multimedia design, web design, new product development, design history, retail design and resource efficient design. You will have access to excellent CAD and workshop facilities including soft modelling, wood, plastics, metal fabrication, metal machining and finishing. The workshops house four computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling machines, a CNC lathe, two laser cutters, a vinyl cutter and three rapid prototyping (RP) machines with a 3D paper printer and CNC water-jet cutter. This equipment allows you
to experiment with techniques and finishes to a high level, adding unique self-development to your portfolio.

You will graduate with a wide range of design skills creating career opportunities in retail, public spaces, leisure environments, contract interiors and workplaces, working for employers such as Conran Design, Pinewood Studios, Kelly Hoppen, Tesco's Design, Think Tank, Blue Print, Haley Sharpe and Foster + Partners. Opportunities are also available in further research study at PhD level.

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The Product Design MA will allow you to gain new insights within the field of product design, and to develop an enhanced understanding of design practice, design and research methodologies, as well as the application of emerging digital technologies, knowledge of business, global markets and sustainability. Read more
The Product Design MA will allow you to gain new insights within the field of product design, and to develop an enhanced understanding of design practice, design and research methodologies, as well as the application of emerging digital technologies, knowledge of business, global markets and sustainability.

You will benefit from an internationally acknowledged subject area, recognised for its undergraduate and postgraduate successes along with its design and research activities. You will be supported by expert academics and design practitioners to broaden and deepen your understanding of design. You will also study a variety of core and elective module choices, creating a personal and distinct programme of study that is focused on your individual interests and ambitions. These studies culminate in the final term where you will undertake a comprehensive design project within your own specialised area of product design.

Modules are taught through seminars, lectures, team working and design workshops, supported by tutorial guidance. You will also undertake independent research, analysis, design development and writing up of your projects, supported by individual tutorials. Assessment methods include report submissions, individual and group presentations (oral and design based presentations) and a major design project submission comprised of development, technical specification, prototyping and testing.

Teaching staff are involved in research and commercial activities that inform the curriculum, and have expertise encompassing additive manufacture, new product development, inclusive design plus publications related to material and manufacturing technology and innovation. You will have access to excellent CAD and workshop facilities including soft modelling, wood, plastics, metal fabrication, metal machining and finishing. The workshops house four computer numerically controlled (CNC) milling machines, a CNC lathe, two laser cutters, a vinyl cutter and three Rapid Prototyping (RP) machines with a 3D paper printer and CNC water jet cutter. There are also 29 Wacom drawing tablets linked to high specification Intel Core2 Duo computer workstations.

Graduates are employed in product and display design and manufacturing in Europe and the Far East. Current Product Design
MA student James Murray recently secured a job for the UK based retail designers 4G Design. As their Development Designer,
James' job involves all aspects of design including concept origination, CAD development, specification for manufacture and graphic presentation.

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What's the Master of Mechanical Engineering all about? . The Master of Science in Engineering. Mechanical Engineering is a general training programme integrating all disciplines of basic sciences, engineering and technology. Read more

What's the Master of Mechanical Engineering all about? 

The Master of Science in Engineering: Mechanical Engineering is a general training programme integrating all disciplines of basic sciences, engineering and technology. An essential element of the mechanical engineering curriculum at KU Leuven is the direct training of each student in a real-life industrial or research setting. Following up on the design assignment in the Bachelor's programme, the Master's programme brings the student in close contact with the industrial reality.

Structure 

Three versions

The Master's programme in Mechanical Engineering has three versions:

  • A Dutch-language version for students who have already obtained a Master's degree of Engineering Technology: Electromechanical Engineering
  • A Dutch-language version for students who have completed their Bachelor's training at our Faculty or at another university with Mechanical Engineering either as a major or as minor.
  • An English-language version which mainly addresses foreign students, and to which admission is granted after evaluation of the application file.

Five modules 

The programme consists of five modules.

  • The first major component is the core module in mechanical engineering.
  • The second major component is one out of five options, which have been put together in a complementary way.

Three generic options 

  • Manufacturing and Management: modern techniques for the design and production of discrete components, CAD and computer integration in production, management techniques, maintenance and logistics of a production company.
  • Mechatronics and Robotics: mechatronics is the discipline in which the synergy of construction, sensing, actuation and control of machinery are concurrently defined and tuned for optimum integration
  • Thermo-technical Sciences: physical principles and analysis, design, construction and operation of combustion engines and thermal and flow machines, cooling machines, power plants, etc.

Two application oriented options

  • Aerospace technology: physical principles, analysis, design, construction, exploitation and operation of aircraft and space systems;
  • Vehicle technology: physical principles, design, analysis and production of cars and ground vehicles and of systems for ground transportation.

Elective courses 

The third and fourth components in the programme structure concern a set of elective courses, to be chosen from a list of technical coursesand from a list of general interest courses.

Master's thesis

The final component is the Master's thesis, which represents 20% of the credits of the entire curriculum.

Strengths

  • The department has a large experimental research laboratory with advanced equipment, to which Master's students have access. FabLab (a "Fabrication Laboratory") is also directly accessible for students.
  • The department has built up an extensive network of companies which recruit a large number of our alumni since many years already, from whom we receive lots of informal feedback on the programme.
  • In addition to their academic teaching and research assignments, several members of the teaching staff also have other responsibilities in advisory boards, in external companies, science & technology committees, etc. and they share that expertise with students.
  • The programme attracts a large number of students.
  • The programme offers students the choice between application oriented options and generic methodology oriented options.
  • Many courses are dealing with contents in which the R&D of the Department has created spin-off companies, and hence can offer very relevant and innovation driven contents.
  • The programme has a clearly structured, extensive and transparent evaluation procedure for Master's theses, involving several complementary assessment views on every single thesis.
  • Several courses are closely linked to top-level research of the lecturers, and they can hence offer up-to-date and advanced contents to the students.

International experience

The Erasmus+ programme gives students the opportunity to complete one or two semesters of their degree at a participating European university. Student exchange agreements are also in place with Japanese and American universities.

Students are also encouraged to learn more about industrial and research internships abroad by contacting our Internship Coordinator. Internships are scheduled in between two course phases of the Master’s programme (in the summer period after the second semester and before the third semester).

These studying abroad opportunities and internships are complemented by the short summer courses offered via the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST) network. This student organisation allows students to follow short courses in the summer period between the second and the third semester. The Faculty of Engineering Science is also member of the international networks CESAER, CLUSTER and T.I.M.E.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty

Career perspectives

The field of mechanical engineering is very wide. Mechanical engineers find employment in many industrial sectors thanks to our broad training programme. Demand for this engineering degree on the labour market is very strong and constant. A study by the Royal Flemish Engineers Association, identifies the specific sectors in which graduated mechanical engineers are employed.

  • mechanical engineering: e.g. production machinery, compressed air systems, agricultural machinery
  • metal and non-metal products: a very wide range of products e.g. pressure vessels, piping, suit cases,...
  • off-shore and maritime engineering
  • automation industry
  • vehicle components, such as exhaust systems, drivetrain components and windshield wipers,...
  • development and production of bicycles
  • aircraft components, such as high lift devices, aircraft engines and cockpit display systems
  • building, textile, plastic, paper sector
  • electrical industry
  • chemical industry
  • environmental engineering and waste management
  • energy sector
  • financial, banking and insurance sector
  • communications sector
  • transportation sector: infrastructure and exploitation and maintenance of rolling stock
  • software development and vendors
  • technical and management consulting: large companies and small offices
  • education and research
  • technical and management functions in the public sector


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The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests. Read more
The course philosophy is that of experimentation, offering a challenge to conventional notions of medium - specificity in order to properly facilitate your ‘style' of expression and your inherent interests.

Course Overview

MA Textiles within the Contemporary Dialogues portfolio offers an exciting and innovative re-thinking of Postgraduate provision that reflects the strategic thinking of Swansea College of Art. The portfolio facilitates migration between diverse thematic disciplines, exploring new ideas and conceptual approaches to allow young artists and designers to confront the issues that face society today and into the future.

The portfolio’s ethos of collaborative dialogues through material practices provides an innovative model of design, fine and applied arts education. This development allows students from all pathways to experience and share creative practices and innovative mind-sets through inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary dialogues. This ethos is enhanced within each programme to stimulate ‘collaborative’ practices and experimentation across a broader spectrum of specialist fields, developing graduates with the contextual awareness, creative thinking and technical skills to operate at the forefront of their discipline.

During the course of your studies you will be supported by specialist staff, leading professionals and practicing artists through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. We have exceptional traditional and digital facilities, housed in spacious purpose-build workshops. Through these, we encourage creative freedom within all of our students and support you in challenging conventional thinking and established practices and facilitate new technological advances across a broad range of disciplines. We have found that through collaborative experimentation and innovative design thinking our students are able to produce work that meets the challenges and respond to the demands of the 21st century.

Facilities include:
-Firing kilns for glass and ceramics
-Printmaking, Screen Printing and Digital Textile Technologies
-Traditional and Digital Stitch
-Wood, Metal, Clay
-Cutting Etching and Engraving Technologies - Waterjet, Laser, Plotter
-3D Printing and CNC
-Chemical and Digital Darkrooms
-Specialist computer facilities with commercial standard software

Modules

-Collaborative Dialogues (20 credits)
-Co-Existent Perspectives (20 credits)
-The Thought Experiment (20 credits)
-Explorative Research Praxis (60 credits)
-Confirmative Praxis (60 credits)

Key Features

Students use the Masters Programme for all kinds of reasons; to gain an extra qualification, to achieve a higher and more sophisticated level of practice, as well as to have supported research and development time in order to elevate themselves to a more professional plateau with their artwork. Students from the Masters Programme have gone on to many varied careers in teaching and lecturing positions, in community arts and the cultural industries in general. Lots have continued to practice as artists and some have progressed to PhD study.

The programme has access to well equipped workshops including a resin, plaster, wood, metal and ceramic.
Beyond this specialist equipment, you will also have access to an extensive range of facilities including an excellent library, open-access computer suits and workshops in other areas within the art school. 
We currently have two research centres within the faculty.These research centres provide staff with research opportunities and access to high technology resources, they provide students with placement opportunity whilst also developing the creative industries infrastructure in the region, which will benefit graduating students.

CIRIC The Creative Industries Research and Innovation Centre was established in 2005 and is a knowledge transfer centre for projects that support the creative industries in Wales.

Current projects include Moving Image Wales, which supports the digital media industry, the Textiles Technologies Project, which supports the textiles and apparel industries, CIME, which supports business through creative intervention and SATnet, which provides a link between artists and businesses in the science and technology sectors. In addition, IPCRES is also based in CIRIC and is developing and disseminating research about durational and event based practices.

Alongside the numerous projects operating within CIRIC, there is also a Design Bureau, with water jet cutting, laser cutting and fabric printing services.

 The Centre for Lens Arts and Science Interaction is a research centre based within The Dynevor Centre for Art, Design, and Media at Swansea Metropolitan University. CLASI aims to encourage and promote interdisciplinary research projects, which stimulate research, innovation, and experimentation across photographic, digital and electronic arts. A strong emphasis is placed on research strands where the histories, philosophies and practices of art and science intersect. The definition of art and science is intentionally broad and the centre is aligned with SATnet and CIRIC.

Assessment

Our students have access to a diverse range of equipment and resources, which in most cases are sufficient to complete their programme of study. We provide the basic materials necessary for students to develop their practical work within our extensive workshop and studio facilities. However, it is likely that art and design students will incur some additional costs to extend their investigation of their personal practice. For example, purchasing their own specialised materials and equipment, joining in optional study trips, and printing.

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Programme description. This programme is currently under review for the 2017/18 Academic Year. Please be aware that the programme structure and course availability is subject to change. Read more

Programme description

This programme is currently under review for the 2017/18 Academic Year. Please be aware that the programme structure and course availability is subject to change.

This programme encourages practices that are speculative and reflective, supporting work in a range of media. It is concerned with ways of learning that are experiential – embodied through and understood by the acquisition of a practice.

During the late 20th century, developments within visual art introduced new processes and situations, which resulted in an expanded concept of artistic practice.

Media-related disciplines supported by the programme include sculpture, painting and printmaking, photography, audio-visual and new media. The programme also encompasses approaches to practice that are non media-specific, including intermedia, time-based arts, performance, installation, public art and art writing.

Programme structure

You may complete the MA in one year, or continue on to the MFA. You will have access to a designated studio space and a wide range of studio equipment, technicians and resources, including printmaking, metal, wood, casting, painting, photography, reprographic and digital facilities.

Our students often work in groups across subject areas in the School of Art and collaborate throughout the year on critical, creative and curatorial projects. This gives you a unique opportunity to integrate the fields of art practice, art writing and curating, culminating in an exhibition of your own work or in a research project of your own design.

We regularly organise field trips and offer short residency and project opportunities with our local and international partners.

The programme also involves the theoretical study of this family of media and approaches, drawing on related fields and methods.

Facilities

Students on this programme will benefit from studio-based learning in Edinburgh College of Art's (ECA) historic Lauriston Place campus, along with the exhibitions and events associated with a vibrant art college. The art college experience will be complemented by the University's extensive range of student support facilities, its libraries, student societies, and student accommodation.

Our purpose-built studios are adaptable, serving both as working studios and project and exhibition spaces. Our workshops and foundry provide excellent accommodation for working in wood, metal, mould-making, casting and carving and there are facilities for working with sound, digital imaging and video editing.

The programme develops from a broad to a specialist understanding of the technical resources and validating contexts in which artists work today, drawing inspiration and nourishment from the experience of our international student cohort.

Career opportunities

This programme enables you to develop an ambitious art practice as well as providing you with the organisational and economic knowledge required to thrive as a self-employed artist. You will also be qualified to teach studio art in higher education and to work in the contemporary art sector.



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On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession. Read more
On this MA you will learn to think about your craft in new ways, understand research as a craftsperson and become increasingly expert in your chosen practice and profession.

Based within a thriving art college environment at the university's central Brighton Grand Parade campus, you will learn from experienced professionals in a welcoming atmosphere that allows craftspeople to discuss and develop their ideas as a community.

You will develop both your creative skills and your ways of thinking. You will work with people who understand craft both as a profession and as a personal expression. Your options within this specialist course can include extensive work with a wide range of materials and professions, with expert provision across metal, ceramics, polymers, wood and more.

Throughout the course you'll be doing research and experimentation using innovative thinking and approaches to craft practice. To get your masters degree, you'll demonstrate both how you work and how you think as a craftsperson, with an extended essay and craft-in-context modules allowing you to develop your ideas around your own practice and the wider context of your craft.

Our MA strives to help you towards exemplary creative output. Through exploration of the traditional discipline categories to the evolution of future interpretations and directions, you will be encouraged to fully engage with what the craft scene is today.

Why study with us?

• Professional opportunities across the craft industry, with options in business and entrepreneurial practice, community outreach and work placements

• Lecturers who are dynamic and active researchers, creative designers, craft practitioners and leaders in their fields – both nationally and internationally

• Departmental expertise in a range of materials and professions, including furniture, ceramics, jewellery, product, polymers and metals

• Cross-disciplinary exploration of sustainability, craft heritage, material experimentation, and environmental, medical and digital technologies

• Fully equipped workshops in wood, metal, ceramics, polymers and composites, with digital technologies supported by a highly skilled team of technical demonstrators

• Department that recognises, nurtures and demonstrates craft's role in and capacity for cultural, social, economic and environmental benefit

Syllabus

While focusing on the physical act of making, the Craft MA also covers the theory of craft, allowing practitioners to conceptualise and contextualise their practice with deeper insight. The history, theory and traditions of craft form a core component in every module, and are delivered through lectures, presentations and studio discussion groups.

Modules:

Craft Practice
Craft in Context
Research Skills and Training
Creative Enquiry
Masters project

Options:

You will be able to choose from a range of modules from across our arts and humanities courses. Options include:

Sustainable Design Presents
Political Economy of Globalisation
Professional Entreprenurial Development
Fine Art: Mentoring
Historical and Critical Studies Dissertation
Professional Entreprenurial Development
Professional Experience with Industrial Placement

Careers and employability

After completing the course successfully, you will be able – as a master of your craft – to take opportunities across the craft professions, either in your own practice as an entrepreneur or in the use of craft for social and community engagement. Craftspeople find these opportunities in a range of fields including fine arts, design, museum curation, teaching, prop making and interior design. The course also provides a route into academia, teaching and research.

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This is your chance to be at the forefront of the latest advances in 3D printing and advanced engineering design. Read more

Overview

This is your chance to be at the forefront of the latest advances in 3D printing and advanced engineering design. Whether you already hold a degree in engineering or have a related physical sciences, design or mathematical background, this course will develop your skills and knowledge in additive manufacturing to meet the demands of industry worldwide.

Covering a range of topics from product design to 3D CAD modelling, additive manufacturing strategy to engineering management, our course equips you with the end to end knowledge required to produce prototypes and products across a range of industries including the biomedical and aviation sectors.

Our impressive facilities will provide you with access to advanced computer based analysis and modelling software, together with leading-edge engineering facilities including 3D printers and a metal direct metal laser sintering machine.

Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the development of problem-solving skills, together with those critical, analytical, interpersonal and computational skills, which are directly applicable to additive manufacturing engineering.

Recognising the importance of teamwork to the success of organisations and projects, the Course includes the development of the knowledge and skills required to effectively lead and manage teams. It also recognises the growing importance of environmental influences and the demands of health and safety.

Careers

Our course will help you develop a career in engineering, or give you an additional skills boost if you’re already working in the industry. You may want to work as a production or research engineer, mechanical designer or technical lead working directly in engineering and design or, use this degree as a step towards a career in operations, project management or consultancy. You’re also in the perfect position to continue your research with our Professional Doctorate in Science and Technology - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/professional-doctorate-in-science-and-technology

Assessment

You’ll be assessed in a variety of ways, including written assignments, portfolios, presentations, analysis reports and an Industry Based Project.

Where you'll study

Your faculty -

The Faculty of Science & Technology is one of the largest of five faculties at Anglia Ruskin University. Whether you choose to study with us full- or part-time, on campus or at a distance, there’s an option whatever your level – from a foundation degree, to a BSc, MSc, PhD or professional doctorate.

Whichever course you pick, you’ll gain the theory and practical skills needed to progress with confidence. Join us and you could find yourself learning in the very latest laboratories or on field trips or work placements with well-known and respected companies. You may even have the opportunity to study abroad.

Everything we do in the faculty has a singular purpose: to provide a world-class environment to create, share and advance knowledge in science and technology fields. This is key to all of our futures.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/science-and-technology

Where can I study?

Chelmsford - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/student-life/life-on-campus/chelmsford-campus

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Labelled by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), AMIS is a Master program in Advanced Materials for Innovation and Sustainability which explores the theme of “Substitution of critical or toxic materials in products for optimized performance”. Read more

Labelled by the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT), AMIS is a Master program in Advanced Materials for Innovation and Sustainability which explores the theme of “Substitution of critical or toxic materials in products for optimized performance”. It also covers the topics of “Material chain optimization for end-of-life products” and “Product and services design for the circular economy” - all of which are central themes of the AMIS. The primary focus of the AMIS program is metal and mineral raw materials. Bio-based and polymer materials are studied in view of their substitution potential. Other materials are also analyzed in the context of multimaterial product recycling. In addition, the AMIS program includes a solid package of courses and project work in innovation and entrepreneurship.

Program structure

Mobility is integrated within the two-year program, during which students study at two of the consortium partner universities. Upon completion of the program, graduates are awarded 120 ECTS and a double degree delivered by two of the five partner institutions where they studied. Students begin the Master program at Grenoble INP, Aalto University or T.U. Darmstadt. In their second year, students specialize in another partner university:

  • To attend the specialization year offered at the University of Bordeaux, prospective students must attend the first year at either Aalto University or the Technical University of Darmstadt.

Year 2 specializations are the following:

  • University of Bordeaux: Advanced Hybrid Materials: Composites and Ceramics by Design
  • T.U. Darmstadt: Functional Ceramics: Processing, Characterization and Properties
  • Aalto University: Nanomaterials and interfaces: Advanced Characterization and Modeling
  • University of Liège: Nanomaterials and Modeling
  • Grenoble INP: Materials Interfaces: Surfaces, Films & Coatings

SEMESTER 1 TO 4 CONTENT

Master 1: Basic level competencies.

Mandatory courses in:

  • Fundamentals of materials science
  • Applied materials
  • Modelling tools and materials
  • Innovation, business and entrepreneurship.

Joint collaboration courses with AMIS partners:

  • Inno project I: business model development and the commercialization process of new technologies.
  • Summer camp: a week intensive course working in teams on industry case studies to create and produce new ideas, innovative technologies, improved products or services.
  • Internship: work experience in a company or research organization to develop a solution-focused approach by translating innovations into feasible business solutions and commercializing new technologies.

Master 2: Specialization year.

Mandatory courses in:

  • Advanced functional materials with a specialization in material interfaces, nanomaterials, ceramics or hybrids.

Joint collaboration course with AMIS partners:

  • Practical work on various industrial projects integrated with innovation and entrepreneurship contents.
  • Inno project II: a specialized approach on business model development and commercialization process of new technologies.

Master thesis:

  • A research and development experience in material science jointly supervized by the home university professors and the host partners. The results of the Master thesis will be defended during a presentation. Certain subjets may lead to setting up a business or a spin-off.

Strengths of this Master program

  • Develop expertise in the field of innovative and sustainable advanced materials.
  • Meet, study and work with relevant academic and non-academic contacts in the innovation and entrepreneurship ecosystem.
  • Gain a holistic view on value and process chains.
  • Acquire transferable skills through modern teaching methods. These transferable skills include: entrepreneurship, negotiation techniques, intellectual property, problem solving, working cooperatively and creatively, co-designing, and life cycle approaches.

After this Master program?

As a resource engineer, students may continue in the following fields:

Freelance and entrepreneurship:

  • Create a business or become a consultant

Resource industry:

  • SMEs in chemistry, exploration, green energy, machinery and plant construction, metal working industry, ceramics, environmental economy (R&D, product development, management, production, marketing and sales)

Research:

  • Universities, research institutions, lecturer or managerial position
  • Circular economy
  • Production, analytics, management, marketing and sales

And also:

  • Science journalism, consulting, project development and management, advisor to policy makers, administration, specialist agencies and media.


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