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The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. Read more
The Global Mental Health academic programmes are designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The Global Mental Health academic programmes offered by the University of Glasgow are unique to Scotland and are the only online Global Mental Health Postgraduate courses offered anywhere in the world. These online programmes are intended for people who are unable to come to Glasgow to complete on-campus delivery of the programmes.

Why this programme

-You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
-The Global Mental Health academic programmes will help people to develop the knowledge to integrate innovative initiatives related to mental health and wellbeing into the wider aims of international development, and address the global inequities in the provision of mental health services.
-The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
-We have collaborative partnerships with organisations working in low and middle income countries. You will have opportunities to complete placements and projects with them.
-The Global Mental Health academic programmes at the University of Glasgow place specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
-Contributors to the Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
-The Institute of Health and Wellbeing at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides.

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents.

Year 1 (exit with PgCert Global Mental Health)
-Introduction to mental health and disability
-The global burden of mental health difficulties
-Cultural, social and biological determinants of mental health
-Improving access to mental health care in the global context

Year 2 (exit with PgDip Global Mental Health)
-Research methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
-Mental health promotion across the life-span
-Mental health and disability: international law and policy

Year 3 (exit with MSc Global Mental Health)
-Dissertation

Career prospects

Graduate of the Global Mental Health academic programmes establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.

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This Masters degree is designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The MSc in Global Mental Health is unique to Scotland and one of only two in the UK. Read more
This Masters degree is designed to produce graduates who can take charge of mental health service provision at a global level. The MSc in Global Mental Health is unique to Scotland and one of only two in the UK.

Why this programme

-You will develop the capacity to think critically about the potential risks of globalising notions of mental illness. You will gain the skills to develop and implement policies aimed at reducing the burden of mental health difficulties worldwide.
-Opportunities exist for students to complete placements with a NHS service that supports the mental health needs of refugees and asylum seekers in Greater Glasgow and Clyde.
-The MSc mental health course will help you develop the knowledge to integrate your intitiatives into the wider aims of international development, and address the global ineuities in the provision of mental health services.
-The learning outcomes (ILOs) for the programme are based on the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health that were identified in a 2011 issue of Nature.
-We have collaborative partnerships with organisations working in low and middle income countries. You will have opportunities to complete placements and projects with them.
-Students will have an opportunity to complete research projects with organisations doing mental health related work both nationally and internationally.
-The MSc Global Mental Health programme at the University of Glasgow places specific emphasis on the important role that social and cultural factors play in how mental health difficulties can be understood and treated across the globe.
-Contributors to the MSc Global Mental Health teaching come from a diverse range of disciplines including: clinical psychology, social work, anthropology, sociology, law and psychiatry. Teaching also includes contribution from those with a lived experience of mental health difficulties.
-The Global Mental Health programme at the University of Glasgow has a formal collaboration with the College of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of Rwanda. This partnership has fostered a range of research and teaching activities that have been jointly coordinated by staff at the respective universities. It is hoped that this partnership will continue to grow and that MSc Global Mental Health students will avail of opportunities that it provides.

Programme structure

The core teaching is based around lectures. There is a strong emphasis on discussion and debate with your academic staff and fellow students, focusing on relevant research literature and policy documents.

Core courses
-Introduction to mental health and disability
-The global burden of mental health difficulties
-Cultural, social and biological determinants of mental health
-Research methods (qualitative, quantitative and health economics)
-Mental health promotion across the life-span
-Improving access to mental health care in the global context
-Mental health and disability: international law and policy
-Dissertation

Career prospects

Graduates of the MSc Global Mental Health programme establish careers in national mental health policy and planning, epidemiological and mental health services research, as well as advisory and advocacy roles in governments, international agencies and non-governmental organisations.

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The UCL Division of Psychiatry is pleased to offer this programme focused on clinical practice in mental health and its evidence base. Read more
The UCL Division of Psychiatry is pleased to offer this programme focused on clinical practice in mental health and its evidence base. The Clinical Mental Health Sciences MSc integrates biological, psychological and social perspectives on mental health and caters both for psychology graduates and for clinicians wishing to undertake a broad-based, rigorous and flexible higher degree.

Degree information

Students will develop an in-depth understanding of current evidence regarding mental health problems and the interventions provided to address them, as well as enhancing their research skills. A wide range of options from across the School of Life and Medical Sciences at UCL allows students to tailor a programme that fully fits their needs.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of 1–2 core double modules (30–60 credits), 4–6 optional modules (60–90 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits). A diploma may be awarded to students who complete the equivalent of 8 taught single modules, amounting to 120 credits. A certificate may be awarded to students who complete the equivalent of 4 taught single modules, amounting to 60 credits.

Core modules
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
-Clinical Mental Health (double module – compulsory only for those who do not have at least six months’ full-time experience, or the equivalent, of working in mental health settings).

Optional modules - students who take the Clinical Mental Health module will choose at least one option (15 credits) from the following:
-Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
-Current Research in Dementia
-Current Research in Learning Disability
-Current Research in Psychosis
-Mental Health Services – Policy, Design and Evaluation
-Culture in the Clinic
-Advanced Treatment and Management of Dementia (only to be taken if Current Research in Dementia has already been taken)

Please note: Students who do not take the Clinical Mental Health module will select at least three modules (45 credits) from the above list. Any UCL modules approved by the Programme Director can be selected to make up the remaining credit(s). Note that due to timetable clashes only one Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student. Approved options, from across UCL, include:
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health (Department of Epidemiological and Social Methods in Public Health)
-Social Determinants of Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
-Neurodevelopmental Disorders in Child Mental Health (UCL Institute of Child Health)
-Interventions in Child and Adolescent Mental Health – Psychological (UCL Institute of Child Health)
-Quality Improvements in Health (UCL CHIME)
-Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
-Treatment in Child and Adolescent Mental Health - Pharmacological (UCL Institute of Child Health)

(Note that due to timetable clashes only one UCL Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student)

NB: due to timetable clashes only one UCL Institute of Child Health module may be taken by each student.

Research project/report
All students undertake a final project. This may be a research project, to be reported as a paper of 6,000-8,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk, or a clinical project of 10,000 words reporting on a clinical topic or service evaluation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through lectures, seminars and workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include one unseen examination, coursework including designing questionnaires and protocols and analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters, and a final report in the format of a journal paper or brief for clinicians or service planners.

Placement
The programme team support students in obtaining volunteer placements in relevant mental health care and research settings, but this is not a formal part of the course and is entirely optional.

Careers

For non-clinicians, the programme will be an excellent grounding for clinical training, such as in clinical psychology, or for embarking on a research career in mental health. Many graduates go on to research assistant, clinical support worker or assistant psychologist posts as a first destination. For clinicians, this is a great opportunity to gain a higher qualification through a programme based in a leading university department which can be closely tailored to your interests across clinical, research and management fields.

Employability
Students will be taught by leading experts in their fields, will gain a strong clinical understanding of mental health, and will be able to develop their skills in research, service design and evaluation, and writing and presenting. Previous Division of Psychiatry Master’s graduates have been enthusiastic about their career enhancement, both through their programme and the connections they have made through it. A large proportion of our first cohort of graduates have gone on to paid employment in relevant areas of mental health, especially research assistant, clinical support worker, psychological wellbeing practitioner and assistant psychologist posts. Others have embarked on PhD studies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a cluster of international experts in mental health, including in genetics, epidemiology, and applied clinical research, and most are also clinicians. We are able to offer a broad programme encompassing both cutting-edge research and a clinical perspective.

The programme is strongly focused on student participation, with much use of small-group learning, and the environment in the Division of Psychiatry is stimulating, friendly and supportive.

A wide range of options at UCL allows programmes to be tailored to students’ needs and interests in clinical, research and management domains.

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Mental health makes a big impact on public health. Mental illness is now the most important cause of disability in the UK and it is very costly, Mental wellbeing is central to our efforts to address health related lifestyles, social inequalities and care in chronic illness. Read more
Mental health makes a big impact on public health. Mental illness is now the most important cause of disability in the UK and it is very costly, Mental wellbeing is central to our efforts to address health related lifestyles, social inequalities and care in chronic illness. This means that a sound knowledge of public mental health is now essential for public health practice.

Most public health professionals and many practitioners working in health care, social care or the 3rd sector will benefit from this course which offers:
-A theoretical and practical map of this complex field including definitions, concepts, measurement, risk and protective factors.
-A thorough grounding in different approaches and interventions to promote mental health and prevent mental illness.
-A life course perspective.
-An understanding of the evidence base.
-The skills and knowledge to make an impact on your community’s mental health.

Who is the Course For?

The course is for professionals and practitioners with an interest in public health and or mental health including people working in/with:
-Public health
-Social care
-Mental health services
-Education
-Voluntary/community/ 3rd sector
-Commissioners
-GPs

People working in senior public health and clinical roles, public health Masters students and people working in related disciplines who want to move into public health have all benefitted from this course.

Benefits

Our course seeks to enhance knowledge and skills in the mental health component of public health and complies with various current policies including No Health without Mental Health, The Marmot Review and the NHS 5 year Forward View. You can trust that you will be gaining the most up to date education in public mental health and wellbeing and will become skilled in making a real difference in this pre-eminent twenty first century issue.

Content

This course draws on unique research currently being undertaken at the University of Warwick.

Module content includes:
-Understanding Mental Health and Mental Wellbeing:
-Definition and measurement
-Social and cultural determinants
-Family influences
-Environmental influences
-Economics of Mental Health

Interventions to Promote Public Mental health:
-Mental Well-Being Impact Assessment (MWIA)
-Parenting and family focused supports
-School and community based approaches
-Workplace wellbeing
-Community approaches
-Primary care mental health
-Recovery and Integration

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Gain significant recognition in your field whilst continuing to work in your own team, with our course for health and social care staff aiming to become Approved Mental Health Professionals (AMHPs). Read more
Gain significant recognition in your field whilst continuing to work in your own team, with our course for health and social care staff aiming to become Approved Mental Health Professionals (AMHPs).

Our course combines practice and theory to offer you the most effective learning experience. With the support from your employer, you'll shadow your local AMHP duty team to gain a valuable insight into the role. You’ll also study in university over a six-month period, while working two days a week in your own team.

You’ll learn beside a variety of professionals, from expert practitioners and service users to law professional trainers and psychiatric staff. We’ll also encourage you to visit services, such as older people wards or Child and Adolescent Mental Health, to gain further experience in clinical practice.

Before starting the course, we’ll visit you to put together a learning programme that best suits you and your teams. To prepare you for your first day, you’ll be expected to attend a five day pre-AMHP course in either August or September.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/mental-health-practice-pgcert

Careers

Successfully completing this course, you'll be eligible to apply for AMHP registration through your Mental Health Trust, having met the Health & Care Professions Council's (HCPC) requirements for the role. You'll enhance your employment opportunities with sought-after skills which meet the regulations of the Mental Health Act 2008.

Supported by local employers, our professional vocational course is designed to promote professionals’ qualifications in mental health practice and to fill the shortage of AMHPs nationally.

Modules & Assessment

Core modules:
‌• Mental Health Law
‌• Statutory Mental Health Practice

Please note that you will need to complete all of the above core modules. This course does not have any optional modules. Modules are subject to change.

Assessment

We'll assess the skills and knowledge you'll develop in a variety of ways. For example, a written assignment examining themes in mental health legislation or a multiple choice questionnaire exploring law. As part of your placement we'll provide you with a practice document outlining key competencies, which you'll evidence with a portfolio. Your Practice Educator will also produce a report on how you've applied what you've learnt.

Where you'll study

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly and experienced staff.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

Visit your faculty - http://www.anglia.ac.uk/health-social-care-and-education

Where can I study?

Fulbourn - You'll study at Ida Darwin, a 32-acre hospital in Fulbourn, home to Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust (CPFT).
http://www.cpft.nhs.uk/

Additional study information -

Practice placements are a significant part of the course, running for 45 days, spread across seven months. You’ll shadow practitioners and lead mental health assessments, supported by a Practice Educator, who'll manage and oversee your practice experience.

Placements are arranged through Local Authorities and Mental Health Trusts in conjunction with our university.

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This programme develops your skills to work at advanced levels as a clinical expert, manager or educator in settings where distress. Read more
This programme develops your skills to work at advanced levels as a clinical expert, manager or educator in settings where distress
arising from mental ill health is an influence on outcome.

About the programme

Designed for nurses, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, social workers and other professional groups working with mental ill health, this programme will develop your practice and knowledge in therapeutic skills, leadership or education.

Additional Entry Information

Consideration will be given to applicants who have a degree in an unrelated topic or who have gained their degree several years ago
where continued further development in knowledge through postgraduate studies would demonstrate currency in certified learning, at the discretion of the Programme Leader.
English language proficiency with candidates expected to achieve IELTS standard of 6 (with no less than 5.5 for each component)

Your learning

You will choose one of three pathways prior to starting the programme – Therapeutic Skills; Leadership; or Education, aligning your study with your career aspirations.

You can exit with a Postgraduate Certificate after completing three modules (60 credits); a Postgraduate Diploma after completing six modules (120 credits); or the Masters award in MSc Mental Health Practice (180 credits). Each of the awards will reflect your chosen pathway e.g. the Leadership pathway includes the optional awards of Postgraduate Certificate Mental Health Practice (Leadership), Postgraduate Diploma Mental Health Practice (Leadership) or MSc Mental Health Practice (Leadership).

- Postgraduate Certificate:
• Core Values in Mental Health Practice (core): reviews the development of policy and understanding of mental ill health and its treatment.

• The Supervisory Process (core): explores how supervision and support can most effectively support practice development.

You will also select one option from the following pathway specific modules:
• Therapeutic Skills for Mental Health: introduces key cognitive and behavioural interventions for individuals and families.

• Education for Mental Health: reviews the educational theories as specifically related to mental health policy and practice.

• Leadership for Mental Health: explores current policy directives and the leadership qualities required in order to meet their demands

- Postgraduate Diploma:
• Independent Study for Mental Health (core): you will select a relevant professional focus, undertaking a supported investigation of this pathway related topic.

• Research for Health and Social Care (core): a deeper exploration of research paradigms leading to the development of research questions applicable for the MSc dissertation.

• Changing Mental Health Services (core): explores change management, essential skills for influencing practice development at a team level.

- MSc:
You will complete the Research and Enquiry Dissertation module.

Our Careers Adviser says

You may pursue management, educational and clinical leadership roles in practice, and also in research and education.

State-of-the-art facilities

Our campuses are equipped with artificial simulated environments with contemporary healthcare technology, where you’ll learn in a realistic context, to put your knowledge into practice. The unpredictability of patient symptoms are mimicked using sophisticated software in a clinical ward setting, ranging from low to high dependency beds.

Investment in the Domus Initiative – an older adult artificial home environment – provides you with experience in caring for older people and dementia care. In a first for the Scottish university sector, we have established A Community Orientated Resource for Nursing (ACORN) where students can practice within a simulated primary care environment.

Lanarkshire and Paisley campuses also provide midwifery students with excellent learning and teaching environments with facilities and equipment that includes a birthing room with maternal simulator and a birthing pool for simulated water births.

Life-changing research

We work jointly with a range of partners, both nationally and internationally, on our research interests, and this directly informs teaching at UWS – which means that you’ll learn from the experts.

Our programmes are informed by practice and all of our academic staff are members of the School’s Institute of Healthcare Policy and
Practice. Some of our most recent initiatives include –

• the launch of a new resource, ‘Jenny’s Diary’, which will provide an invaluable tool for families and practitioners to help people with a learning disability understand their diagnosis of dementia

• the development of a new ‘Philosophy of Care’ in partnership with Broomfield Court Care Home in Glasgow, which will look at ways of enhancing the culture and care within a care setting

• we have collaborated with Ayrshire Hospice to launch the first University Hospice in Scotland to help improve the lives of people with life-limiting illness, their families, partners and carers across Ayrshire & Arran; and Ardgowan Hospice in Greenock, with it becoming a University Teaching Hospice and launching a two-year research project with the University aimed at revolutionising the way palliative
care is delivered to improve the patient journey

• the launch of Dumfries & Galloway Recovery College – the first of its kind in Scotland – which offers short courses designed to enhance self-belief, identify ambitions and encourage learning

• in partnership with Edinburgh Napier University and the University of Edinburgh, the mental health team lead research into the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical and academic performance in student nurses

• we are working with the Glasgow Improving Cancer Journey Programme to evaluate this groundbreaking intervention in cancer care in Scotland

• we have launched a new state-of-the-art microbiology lab which will form a research base in the fight against Healthcare Associated Infection

• a collaboration with a number of European partners to develop shared academic and practicebased programmes to prepare family health nurses in Europe

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The programme is delivered by two internationally recognised centres of excellence and provides an integrated, strongly interdisciplinary, education in mental health, ethics and law. Read more
The programme is delivered by two internationally recognised centres of excellence and provides an integrated, strongly interdisciplinary, education in mental health, ethics and law. It will equip students to become leaders in healthcare, mental health law or policy.

Key benefits

- In-depth and integrated clinical, philosophical and legal analysis of key issues presented in the field of mental health.

- Supported by the UK's first centre of medical law and ethics (CMLE) and Europe’s largest centre for research and teaching in psychiatry, psychology and neuroscience (IoPPN).

- Located in central London and maintains close links with national and international policy formers and leading legal and clinical practitioner communities.

- Generous scholarships are available to support the brightest and best students.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/mental-health-ethics-and-law-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The interface between the law and the mental health disciplines raises fundamental questions concerning our very human nature. Concepts such as autonomy, responsibility, decision making capacity and risk are central and have come under increasing scrutiny in the literature. While each discipline approaches the debate from its own perspective and understanding of the world, increasingly connections have been made and relationships recognised. At a theoretical level this has led to a growing and vibrant literature. At the level of practice the close interaction between law and psychiatry, which had been evident across the centuries, has become increasingly significant and sensitive. In the context of evolving societal attitudes to mental ill health and disability and the expanding influence of international human rights norms the role of the law is becoming both more complex and more contentious.

Building on the experience gained from working across our disciplinary boundaries we have developed a strongly interdisciplinary programme, designed to investigate the interface between mental health, law and ethics at a theoretical level and to engage directly with the dilemmas and experience of illness encountered in practice. The course will expand students’ understanding, both within and beyond their own disciplines, and will provide them with the skills necessary to analyse and critique current law, practice and policy in relation to mental health.

- Course purpose -

A joint programme between The Dickson Poon School of Law and Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience. This integrated MSc is for anyone concerned with mental health who wishes to study the clinical, ethical and legal thinking behind current law, policy and clinical practice. It has been designed for health professionals, lawyers, policy makers, and all those with a relevant first degree who are keen to consider the difficult questions raised by mental ill health and society’s response. Students will be able to study alongside others from a wide range of academic and professional disciplines at the heart of London’s legal and psychiatric world.

- Course format and assessment -

Teaching is predominantly by seminar to encourage active student participation in critical enquiry. Case studies will be held as part of each taught core module.

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year. Some modules will be assessed by examinations held in January or May of that year, while others will be assessed by coursework. Dissertations are due by late August the same year.

Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Employers value interdisciplinary skills and graduates of MHEL will be able to use the degree for many different career opportunities. These include:

- Leadership roles in relevant policy-related areas including positions in mental health advocacy groups nationally and internationally, professional regulatory organisations and governmental departments in UK and overseas;

- For clinical practitioners, evidence of professional development in order to obtain promotion, or to take their career in a more specialist direction in clinical management, education or research;

- For legal practitioners, opportunities for specialisation in mental health and mental capacity law;

- A stepping stone to a career in clinical psychology or other clinical roles within the NHS or other healthcare settings;

- Possibilities to move into the private sector, into areas such as scientific publishing, human resources, occupational health, management consultancy or roles;

- A stepping stone to purse doctoral-level research (PhD or MD(Res)), including at King's;

- Research students may find academic positions in law schools, health schools and other research centres within a range of humanities departments.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. Read more
This programme offers a stimulating and practical training in mental health research. The UCL Division of Psychiatry offers teaching and supervision from leaders in international research in fields from neuroscientific to social and epidemiological, along with a range of relevant options from other leading UCL departments. This diversity of options allows students to tailor a programme that closely fits their needs.

Degree information

This programme will equip students with the research skills needed to undertake doctoral-level research and/or to collaborate in major research projects. They will produce a piece of original research ready to submit for publication, and will acquire current knowledge of cutting-edge research in mental health.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of two core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules
-Core Principles of Mental Health Research (double module)
-Statistical Methods in Mental Health

Optional modules - students will select at least 60 credits from the following modules of which at least 30 credits must be from the Division of Psychiatry’s own modules:
-Culture in the Clinic
-Current Research in Depression and Anxiety
-Current Research in Dementia
-Current Research in Learning Disability
-Current Research in Psychosis
-Epidemiological and Social Methods in Mental Health (double module)
-Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health
-Mental Health Services – Policy, Design and Evaluation

Other approved modules:
-Cellular and Molecular Modules of Disease (Institute of Neurology)
-Ethnicity, Migration and Health (Department of Epidemiology & Public Health)
-Health Inequalities across the Lifecourse (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Higher Functions of the Brain (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Introductory Science and Methods (Institute of Neurology)
-Neuroimaging: Imaging Modalities (Institute of Neurology)
-Social Determinants of Global Health (Department of Epidemiology and Public Health)
-Or any other module approved by the Programme Director as having a large research component relevant to mental health.

The final 15 credits may be obtained from any available module at UCL, subject to the Programme Director approving the overall selection for each student.

Final report
All students undertake a final research project. This is reported as a research paper of 6,000-8,000 words ready for submission to a specified journal, a blog of 1,000 words and a 20-minute talk.

Teaching and learning
This programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and practical workshops, with considerable use of supporting online learning. Assessment methods include unseen exams, coursework including designing questionnaires and systematic review strategies, developing protocols, analysing data, giving talks and presenting posters. There is a strong emphasis on developing practical research skills.

Careers

This new programme will equip graduates with strong practical research skills and understanding of the current status and direction of mental health research in their area of interest, preparing them to pursue doctoral studies, including through applications for nationally funded fellowships. Clinicians will be equipped to participate fully in collaborative studies and to begin to function as independent investigators. For those without clinical qualifications, the programme is likely to assist students in embarking on a career in mental health research by obtaining research posts and opportunities for PhD places.

Employability
Students will be taught by and carry out projects with leading researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields, learning about research directly from experts rather than from textbooks. Previous Division of Psychiatry MSc graduates have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their research projects in peer-reviewed journals, and of going on to further academic posts and to doctoral studies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has a cluster of international research leaders in mental health in fields including genetics, epidemiology, and applied clinical research. Optional modules provide an entrance to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. in neuroscience and epidemiology.

The programme is strongly focused on student participation and acquisition of the practical skills needed to embark on a career in research. The wide range of research interests within our division allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychosocial approaches.

We offer opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in a stimulating, friendly and supportive atmosphere.

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The aspiration of this challenging and rewarding programme is to influence how practitioners work in acute mental health care in order to deliver and enhance care. Read more
The aspiration of this challenging and rewarding programme is to influence how practitioners work in acute mental health care in order to deliver and enhance care.

About the programme

This programme has a strong focus on learning by action. You will investigate evidence-based subjects that will enhance the delivery of care to people experiencing an acute episode of care requiring intensive inpatient or community-based care. There is a commitment through the programme to ensure the person experiencing acute mental health issues is firmly at the heart of the programme.

Your learning

This programme consists of three 20 credit modules:
• Acute Mental Health Care (Trimester 1)
• Medication and Mental Health (Trimester 2)
• Modernising Acute Mental Health (Trimester 1 & 2)

The programme will be delivered in a blended learning format; each module will have a maximum of four on-campus days, which will be enhanced by module content delivered through the University’s virtual learning environment, Moodle. The programme recognises the importance of ensuring part-time students are supported effectively in university and in practice settings. Supervision is a key aspect of the programme and it is essential students engage with a clinical supervisor.

The programme is set up to develop confidence in graduate skills and to enhance care delivery. The content of the programme reflects the breadth and depth of knowledge, skill and understanding needed to effectively work with people requiring acute mental health care.

Our Careers Adviser says

Graduates are equipped with the practice skills necessary to make a major contribution to this challenging area within mental health care. They will also display enhanced interpersonal attributes that are essential for those wishing to develop their careers in roles such as Mental Health Staff Nurse, Mental Health Charge Nurse, Chaplain, Occupational Therapist and Social Worker.

State-of-the-art facilities

Our campuses are equipped with artificial simulated environments with contemporary healthcare technology, where you’ll learn in a realistic context, to put your knowledge into practice. The unpredictability of patient symptoms are mimicked using sophisticated software in a clinical ward setting, ranging from low to high dependency beds.

Investment in the Domus Initiative – an older adult artificial home environment – provides you with experience in caring for older people and dementia care. In a first for the Scottish university sector, we have established A Community Orientated Resource for Nursing (ACORN) where students can practice within a simulated primary care environment.

Lanarkshire and Paisley campuses also provide midwifery students with excellent learning and teaching environments with facilities and equipment that includes a birthing room with maternal simulator and a birthing pool for simulated water births.

Life-changing research

We work jointly with a range of partners, both nationally and internationally, on our research interests, and this directly informs teaching at UWS – which means that you’ll learn from the experts.

Our programmes are informed by practice and all of our academic staff are members of the School’s Institute of Healthcare Policy and
Practice. Some of our most recent initiatives include –

• the launch of a new resource, ‘Jenny’s Diary’, which will provide an invaluable tool for families and practitioners to help people with a learning disability understand their diagnosis of dementia

• the development of a new ‘Philosophy of Care’ in partnership with Broomfield Court Care Home in Glasgow, which will look at ways of enhancing the culture and care within a care setting

• we have collaborated with Ayrshire Hospice to launch the first University Hospice in Scotland to help improve the lives of people with life-limiting illness, their families, partners and carers across Ayrshire & Arran; and Ardgowan Hospice in Greenock, with it becoming a University Teaching Hospice and launching a two-year research project with the University aimed at revolutionising the way palliative
care is delivered to improve the patient journey

• the launch of Dumfries & Galloway Recovery College – the first of its kind in Scotland – which offers short courses designed to enhance self-belief, identify ambitions and encourage learning

• in partnership with Edinburgh Napier University and the University of Edinburgh, the mental health team lead research into the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical and academic performance in student nurses

• we are working with the Glasgow Improving Cancer Journey Programme to evaluate this groundbreaking intervention in cancer care in Scotland

• we have launched a new state-of-the-art microbiology lab which will form a research base in the fight against Healthcare Associated Infection

• a collaboration with a number of European partners to develop shared academic and practicebased programmes to prepare family health nurses in Europe

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The Master of Health Science (Developmental Disability) is designed for practitioners from diverse backgrounds in disability services, including medical, nursing, dental, allied health therapies, social work, behavioural science and educational professions to develop specialist knowledge in the field of developmental disability. Read more
The Master of Health Science (Developmental Disability) is designed for practitioners from diverse backgrounds in disability services, including medical, nursing, dental, allied health therapies, social work, behavioural science and educational professions to develop specialist knowledge in the field of developmental disability.

Developmental disability is a diverse group of chronic conditions including intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and cerebral palsy. People living with developmental disability, across their lifespan, confront many issues, especially in communication, physical and mental health, learning, family life, social inclusion, sexuality, self-help, and independent living.

Underpinned by theory, scholarship and research, this program looks to expand the knowledge and understanding of the issues faced by people with developmental disability, and enhance the skills of professionals to respond to the challenges faced by the sector.

The Master of Health Science (Developmental Disability) is taught by world-class leaders in the field who are committed to advancing health and social policy and practice solutions to enable affected individuals and their families to participate fully in society.

This program tackles some of the difficult questions in developmental disability, including sexuality, end-of-life issues, and parenting to ensure that people receive the support they need in these crucial aspects of their life that are all too often overlooked.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees. Read more
The Centre offers excellent opportunities for full or part-time research in intellectual disability and community care leading to higher degrees.

The Tizard Centre has a strong track record of attracting University and ESRC research studentship funding.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/112/mental-health

About the Tizard Centre

The Tizard Centre is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR) and has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments.

The Centre is at the forefront of learning and research in autism, intellectual disability and community care, and in 2013 received a Queen’s Anniversary Prize in recognition of its outstanding work in these areas.

The Centre has excellent links with health and social care organisations, and other relevant establishments. Our primary aims, through research, teaching and consultancy, are:

- to find out more about how to effectively support and work with people with learning disabilities

- to help carers, managers and professionals develop the values, knowledge and skills that enable better services

- to aid policymakers, planners, managers and practitioners to organise and provide enhanced services.

The Tizard Centre is recognised as leading the field in deinstitutionalisation and community living, challenging behaviour, quality of staff support, sexuality and autism, and has had a significant impact on national policies in these areas. We are committed to addressing issues arising from social inequality.

Study support

All teaching takes place at the Tizard Centre. Postgraduate research students have a shared office space with a computer and telephone.

- Acclaimed active department

The Tizard Centre runs an annual seminar series where staff or guest lecturers present the results of research or highlight recent developments in the field of social care. The Jim Mansell Memorial Lecture invites public figures or distinguished academics to discuss topics that could interest a wider audience. The Centre also publishes the Tizard Learning Disability Review (in conjunction with Emerald Publishing) to provide a source of up-to-date information for professionals and carers.

The Tizard Centre provides consultancy to organisations in the statutory and independent sectors, both nationally and internationally, in diversified areas such as service assessment, person-centred approaches, active support and adult protection. The Centre also teaches a range of short courses, often in conjunction with other organisations.

- Dynamic publishing culture

Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Mental Health; Journal of Applied Research and Intellectual Disabilities; American Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; and Journal of Intellectual Disability Research.

- Researcher Development Programme

Kent's Graduate School co-ordinates the Researcher Development Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/tstindex.html) for research students, which includes workshops focused on research, specialist and transferable skills. The programme is mapped to the national Researcher Development Framework and covers a diverse range of topics, including subjectspecific research skills, research management, personal effectiveness, communication skills, networking and teamworking, and career management skills.

Research areas

Current research areas include: social inequalities and community care; intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Careers

Our postgraduate courses improve employability prospects for both those with established careers and new entrants to the field. Many of our students already work with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in professional, management or supporting capacities.

Our programmes support their continuing professional development and enhance their opportunities for career advancement. Other students, who are at the beginning of their careers, move on to a range of professional roles in health and social care including working as psychologists in learning disability or behavioural specialists in community learning disability teams; service management of development roles; clinical psychology training or a PhD.

Career destinations include roles in counselling, health recovery work, mental health tutor, counsellor, psychiatric consultant, mental health worker/specialist, health services manager, chief executive, childcare practitioner, nursing, directorship and therapist for organisations including PROMIS, Turning Point, UK Resettlement and various NHS Trusts.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This course is aimed at qualified experienced professionals in mental health who wish to become approved mental health professionals (AMHP). Read more
This course is aimed at qualified experienced professionals in mental health who wish to become approved mental health professionals (AMHP).

You complete three modules to gain the postgraduate certificate, which are: values, ethics and evidence informed practice; mental health law and policy; AMHP practice (placement).

You study the application of values, ethics and dilemmas, mental health and wider associated law and policy. You also examine the current research that informs knowledge about mental health conditions and treatments. We encourage you to locate and evaluate research findings relevant to your practice.

Learning takes place in workshops, lectures, group and individual tasks and in practice as well as in private study. During the course you develop:
-Autonomous decision making and assessment skills in crisis situations.
-The ability to work with a range of professionals to promote recovery.
-The ability to work in a culturally competent way with a wide range of people in distress the skills and knowledge to apply the law in a way that reflects understanding of the impact on service users and carers.

Placements are in your own agency, usually with an AMHP team. An allocated practice educator provides supervision while you shadow and then lead assessments with a range of AMHP colleagues.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/pgcert-approved-mental-health-professional-amhp

Professional recognition

This course is approved by The Health and Care Professions Council. You are eligible to be approved by your local Social Services Authority as an approved mental health professional.

Course structure

Full time or part time. Starts September

The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) is achieved by successfully completing 60 credits.

Core modules
-Values, ethics and evidence informed practice (15 credits)
-Mental health law and policy (30 credits)
-Approved mental health professional practice (15 credits)

Assessment
Assessments are by: reflective essays; on-line law test; short presentation; case studies Practice is assessed during your placement.

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OVERVIEW. Read more
OVERVIEW

The Approaches to Forensic Intellectual Disability PgCert course is aimed at nurses, social workers and associated health practitioners, members of the Criminal Justice System working with vulnerable adults, such as the police, prison and probation officers and those with an interest in enhancing their knowledge and skills in this area.

WHY CHOOSE THIS COURSE?

This exciting programme, the first in the UK, intends to develop the knowledge and skills of professionals already working in this area, or who have a specific interest in the field of mental health and the care of people with intellectual disabilities who have offended, or may be at risk of offending.

By choosing to study at Coventry you will get the opportunity to:

Enhance the quality and standard of treatment and care delivered to a vulnerable sector of the population,
influence the ‘offender pathway’ within you own field of practice,
develop into an enquiring and reflective worker,
expand the professional boundaries of your work/practice as a result of increased theoretical knowledge and inter-professional thinking,
adopt a pro-active approach to continuing professional development,
respond to the changing demands of health and social care practice.
The Faculty of Health and Life Sciences is able to offer expert teaching staff in the areas of intellectual disability, mental health, criminology and forensic investigative science. The Faculty has a track record of delivering excellent e-learning. We have extensive links with practice partners and key experts in the field to benefit your learning in this area.

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

The Faculty has a track record of delivering excellent e-learning. We have extensive links with practice partners and key experts in the field to benefit your learning in this area.

Three core modules

contemporary definitions and principles of practice current interpretations of intellectual disability and associated mental health issues will be considered. Opportunities to examine different frameworks and service responses in working with this population;
law and ethics and intellectual disability A current awareness of the changing legislation relating to people with intellectual disabilities. The legal system will be covered encompassing the unique ethical issues relating to this population;
forensic issues in intellectual disability and mental health drawing on student's own experience and interest, specific approaches to working with this vulnerable population will be analysed, covering the main psychiatric disorders affecting this population.

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The course is a flexible evidence-based postgraduate programme in contemporary advanced forensic mental health practice and research that is open to students from a multidisciplinary and multiagency background. Read more
The course is a flexible evidence-based postgraduate programme in contemporary advanced forensic mental health practice and research that is open to students from a multidisciplinary and multiagency background.

This master’s programme would be suitable for staff who are currently employed in, or who desire to be employed in, a forensic setting.

This would include settings such as:
- Secure hospitals
- Prisons
- Ministry of justice
- Probation
- Community-based services for mentally disordered offenders
- Private/independent secure sector providers

The masters programme would also be suitable for staff currently employed in settings where service users present with complex mental health/psychological needs with risk behaviours or vulnerabilities that place them at risk of contact with the criminal justice system or forensic mental health services.

This would include settings such as:
- Patient Intensive Care Units
- Early Intervention Services
- Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) inpatient services
- Substance Misuse Services
- Learning Disability Services

The course aims to be skills-based, so that staff completing the programme return to services with demonstrable skills to meet service objectives.

The part-time course will be run on a part-time modular basis with four modules per year for the first two years. The full-time course will feature eight modules from September to May and a dissertation from June to September. Teaching will be a blend of face-to-face teaching, e-learning and supervised clinical practice. The third year will be dedicated to completion of the Masters dissertation under close supervision from University staff.

The course is designed to be flexible, to enable students to balance academic work with existing workplace demands. Students will have options where they can choose from skills-based modules including:
- Psychosocial Interventions for Individuals with Complex Mental Health Needs
- Structured Family Interventions for Psychosis
- Developing practice and managing change

Teaching sessions will be prepared and presented by leading authorities in the field of forensic mental health. The School of Medicine has a number of affiliated staff who are leading authorities in forensic and related mental health issues including Professor Jenny Shaw, Professor Louis Appleby, Dr Caroline Logan, Dr Jane Senior, Dr Roger Webb and Dr Charlotte Lennox.

There will be an initial induction. Following this, the programme requires one day per week dedication for the part-time pathway, and two days per week full-time during term-time, which will involve periodic attendance at University. In order to achieve the practical-skills outcomes associated with some course modules, the equivalent of one day per week in practice will be required. Students are required to identify a suitable practice supervisor/mentor to oversee and assess the clinical and/or practice work required for the programme modules.

Full-time students will require access to a suitable clinical or similar placement.

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The MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) is open to all professionals working with people who have a learning disability. Read more
The MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) is open to all professionals working with people who have a learning disability. Professionals working with this client group need to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in order to meet the clients’ changing needs.

The aim of this degree is to transform your practice and thus improve the quality of care for service users. Module content and delivery is underpinned by the latest research evidence, which ensures that this award meets the challenges of the demanding and dynamic environments that health and social care practitioners work in today.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/609-msc-professional-practice-learning-disability

What you will study

Modules
Core modules:
- Research methods
- Dissertation

Specialist modules:
There modules relate directly to this degree.

- Autistic Spectrum Disorder
This 20 credit module covers areas such as Introduction to Autistic Spectrum Disorders; autism; Asperger’s syndrome; incidence and prevalence, diagnosis; assessment strategies; related syndromes and conditions; bio-psycho-social factors; diet; pharmacotherapy; environmental considerations; communication methods; TEACCH; therapeutic approaches;

- Contemporary Issues in Learning Disability
This 20 credit module covers areas such as local, national and international policy developments; inter-professional practice; quality of life; frameworks and philosophies of care; anti-discriminatory practice; vulnerability and abuse issues; stake holder involvement; developments in research and service delivery; person centred approaches; developments in technology.

- Advocacy
This 20 credit module covers areas such as – What is Advocacy and the different types of advocacy- independent; self; group; citizen and professional; Legislation and duties; Mental Capacity Act 2005 and consent; the role of the IMCA; DOLS; Human Rights Act 1998 and Equalities Act 2010; Power, Empowerment and Participation; Practical skills – supporting people to self advocate; Communicating concepts; listening, negotiation skills; Developing, marshalling and presenting coherent arguments on behalf of others; Policy and Guidance e.g. POVA; advocacy within the policy process; ethical principles, frameworks and decision making; interagency working, confidentiality and sharing information; thresholds for intervention/referral; creating an advocacy culture.

Learning and teaching methods

To gain the MSc Professional Practice (Learning Disability) degree you will need to study at least 80 credits (including your dissertation of 60 credits) relating to the support and care of people with learning disabilities. This means that you must choose to study at least one of the specialist modules. To graduate from a masters’ degree course you must study a total of 180 credits which must include a 40 credit research module.

These modules run yearly depending on demand and are usually delivered via weekly four-hour sessions throughout the academic year.

Teaching methods include facilitated discussions, seminars, workshops and presentations. You will be required to undertake background reading to develop a broad knowledge base and encouraged to become a critical thinker, enabling you to question theories and develop your own ideas informed by evidence and research.

We offer a range of support services for students with a disability. We encourage you to discuss your individual requirements with an adviser as early as possible when you apply.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

To date, students undertaking this course have normally been qualified nurses. However, other professionals such as psychologists, speech and language therapists, occupational therapists and social workers have undertaken modules. Currently, there are attempts being made to include this pathway or elements of it in the post qualified social work framework and childrens nursing post registration programme. Feedback received from students undertaking modules has so far been very positive especially the use of service users and carers as well as specialist practitioners and leading academics.

Assessment methods

Assessments will take the form of written assignments (one linked to publication).

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