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Masters Degrees (Memory)

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Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations. Read more

Our Cultural History, Memory and Identity MA examines the origins, forms and effects of cultural constructions of history and memory, with a practical focus on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations.

Emphasising the close relation between academic study and broader cultural interest in the past and its significance in everyday life, the programme enables the investigation of various cultural forms and practices, from oral history and autobiography to television and virtual reality.

The course comprises three pathways:

  • Cultural Memory
  • Making Histories: Public History and Heritage
  • ‘Race’, Nation and Ethnicity

The general concerns of the masters programme are developed in relation to these pathways, each of which explores a particular field of enquiry with its own distinctive thematic and methodological focus. The pathways also provide the basis for the PGCert and PGDip awards.

Why study with us?

  • Chance to specialise through one of three pathways: Cultural Memory; Making Histories – Public History and Heritage; or Race, Nation and Ethnicity
  • Practical emphasis on the skills and methods involved in the making of new historical accounts and representations
  • Lecturers with expertise across cultural, social and political history, cultural studies, literary studies, film and visual studies, and the history of ideas
  • Interdisciplinary approach informed by cultural and critical theory
  • Close relationship to the University of Brighton's Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories
  • Flexible modes of study for students with personal or professional commitments

Careers and employability

The knowledge, intellectual skills and confidence acquired through study on this MA provides excellent training for doctoral research. All CHMI students are encouraged to participate in the rich programme of seminars, symposia and conferences, which includes an annual postgraduate conference organised by the Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, and the School of Humanities. CHMI graduates have a direct route on to our Humanities PhD programme, but have also gone on to doctoral research at other universities.

CHMI students have used the MA to secure work in the education, heritage and museum, health and voluntary sectors, and the course has proved attractive to those looking to develop their careers by augmenting existing skills and experience or by opening new professional paths within their workplace or organisation. We have established a small number of voluntary work placements for our students with the local community history group, Brighton and Hove Black History, and hope to maintain this opportunity as well as establish further volunteering opportunities in future.



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Master's specialisation in Plasticity and Memory. - The connection between the brain and cognition. Read more

Master's specialisation in Plasticity and Memory

- The connection between the brain and cognition

How does your brain enable you to remember a certain event? What happens in your brain when you listen to music? How does your brain adapt itself to certain changes, such as a haemorrhage or other form of damage? How do you distinguish between important and relatively unimportant information in the world around you? How do you focus your attention on a playing child? How does our consciousness work? These are just a few of the questions that neurocognitive scientists would like to see answered.

- Neurocognition in Nijmegen: the cutting edge

The Radboud University has an outstanding reputation in the field of neurocognition. In 2002, the ultramodern Donders Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging (DCCN) was officially opened on campus. This centre draws many young researchers from all over the world and to a large extent determines the nature of the Plasticity and Memory specialisation. In 2008 the DCCN formed together with the Donders Centre for Cognition (formerly NICI) and the Donders Centre for Neuroscience the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour.

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree

The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills

The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics

Students who did not follow physics in their highschool curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

If you have successfully completed the Master’s programme in Plasticity and Memory, you will be able to conduct neuroimaging and neurobiological research. You will have ample knowledge of the anatomical and neurophysiological aspects of the human brain and theoretical cognition/neurocognition models. This will enable you to conduct independent research into the neurofunctional architecture of cognitive key functions, such as perception, attention, memory, language, planning and targeted actions. With this educational background you should be able to find a position with one of the research institutes in the Netherlands or abroad, government institutions or specialised companies (e.g. in the pharmaceutical industry).

Our approach to this field

Research in the field of cognitive neuroscience is one of the spearheads in the research policy of Radboud University. Here, in Nijmegen, hundreds of scientists from various faculties and top institutes have joined forces to unravel the workings of the human brain, step by step and bit by bit. They thereby work together very closely, exchange expertise and share state-of-the-art research equipment.

Nijmegen is one of the foremost centres of cognitive neuroscience in the world. We have deliberately created a high admission threshold to ensure that all our students are highly motivated and have the ability to work at an advanced level. Top scientists screen all applications to make sure the new students meet our stringent entry criteria and help maintain the current standards of excellence. Once admitted to the programme you can expect to be trained as a multidisciplinary scientist in the following two years. The research of which you will become a part addresses crossdisciplinary challenges. The teachers and supervisors you will meet are all experts in their own disciplines. We hope that with this programme you will outperform your teachers by being able to combine knowledge from different domains. Alongside language processing and perceptuomotor systems, you may also help improve brain/computer interfaces, a hot topic with applications in medicine and information technology. Apart from being very exciting, it is also logical that various disciplines are merging. After all, everything that happens in the brain is interconnected. In Nijmegen we develop sophisticated cognitive models which we test by means of state-of-the-art imaging techniques, thanks to which you can participate in cutting-edge research that will hopefully lead to new insights into the way the human brain and mind work. Finally, we offer our best CNS students excellent career opportunities in challenging PhD projects.

- Unique multi-disciplinary Master’s programme

Are you also interested in the human brain? Would you like to conduct research into the workings of the brain and join an enthusiastic, international group of top researchers? The Radboud University Nijmegen offers a multi-faculty Master’s programme in Cognitive Neuroscience. The programme takes two years and is of course of a scientific orientation. There is a strong emphasis on experimental research. After all, what counts is hands-on research experience. This Master’s programme is unique in Europe.

The Master’s programme in Cognitive Neuroscience is primarily focussed on training you as a researcher and if possible, a top researcher, because research institutes and businesses around the world desperately need highly qualified and motivated young researchers. Moreover, since cognitive neuroscience is a rather young discipline, much in this field has not yet been explored. There are many challenging questions that need to be answered. So there is plenty of room for new discoveries!

This competitive programme provides a sound balance of theory and practice. We enrol about 50 students per year. Our selective approach guarantees excellence, especially during the research training period.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Read more
Taught at our Parkgate Road Campus in Chester, our MA in Archaeology of Death and Memory explores the complex history of death and memory from the hunter-gatherer societies of the Palaeolithic to recent times. Our course is an exciting, cross-period postgraduate course of global application. It will allow you to study and gain advanced expertise in the study of death, burial and commemoration in the human past, shedding light on debates and concerns of our present day.

The course focuses on archaeology but is unusually cross-disciplinary. You will explore debates that connect archaeology to research themes shared across the humanities and social sciences, including studies of ritual, the body, material culture, memory and mortality. Consequently, this degree will interest those with first degrees in archaeology or history, and also those with backgrounds in other disciplines.

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The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university. Read more
The Qualifying Certificate in Psychology is designed to enable students with no previous experience of psychology in higher education to acquire sufficient knowledge and skills to study at FHEQ level 5/6 (second or third year of full-time study) at a UK university.

The certificate is offered as an entry qualification for the Oxford Brookes MSc Psychology, but it also meets the entry requirements for other universities' psychology conversion courses.

The course is available from September for part-time students, and from January for full-time and part-time students.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/psychology-qualifying-certificate/

Why choose this course?

- Oxford Brookes has one of the largest groups of developmental psychologists in the UK along with expertise in cognitive neuroscience and qualitative methods.

- Our professionally-accredited courses allow chartered membership of the British Psychological Society.

- Excellent opportunities for progression into courses across psychology, education and health.

- State-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab.

- Strong connections through joint research projects with partners in health, education and industry.

- A comprehensive programme of research seminars offered by the department as well as specialist seminars organised by individual research groups.

Teaching and learning

Our department has a thriving community of research-active staff and research scholars. We include aspects of our research in all our courses, teach specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervise dissertations in our specialist subjects. Learning methods include lectures, directed reading, seminars and practical work.

Teaching is organised on a module-credit basis, each involving approximately 150 hours of student effort and approximately 36 hours of staff contact.

Each course module is assessed individually, generally on the quality of written work. Assessment methods may include essays, formal written examinations or in-class tests.

Specialist facilities

The Psychology Department boasts state-of-the-art facilities including a video observation lab, Babylab, action research lab and perception lab. In addition, postgraduate students have a dedicated study and social working space to facilitate group projects and provide a venue for our research seminar series.

Careers

The department offers advice on future career opportunities, including practical help with applications to future training and employment. For many of our students, their postgraduate psychology qualification is a stepping stone to professional training for careers in educational and clinical psychology. Some choose to continue their academic studies, progressing to PhD.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) 95% of our research was internationally recognised and 60% of the impact of our research was rated internationally excellent.

Prof. Margaret Harris has been awarded a grant of over £315K from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) to find out whether technological advances to aid children and babies with hearing loss have had a positive effect on deaf children’s literacy.

Prof. Anna Barnett and her colleague Dr Luci Wiggs have been awarded a grant of £59K from The Waterloo Foundation to examine sleep disturbance in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). This condition is characterised by significant movement difficulty and associated psycho-social and educational problems. Previous work suggests that sleep disturbance may be a relevant factor and this project will examine sleep in DCD with extensive and objective measures in relation to child and parent functioning.

Dr Kate Wilmut has been awarded a prestigious ESRC grant of over £160k to conduct research into forward planning of movement in children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder. It is hoped that furthering our understanding of the mechanisms underlying this condition may lead to the development of effective intervention programmes.

With funding from the Leverhulme Trust, Prof. Vince Connelly is leading an interdisciplinary project conducting research into the writing problems of children with language difficulties. Embracing psychology, education and linguistics, this ground-breaking project is aimed at bridging the gaps in current knowledge and will help practitioners to develop literacy strategies to help this already disadvantaged group of children.

Dr Clare Rathbone has been awarded a grant from the ESRC to examine the relationship between memory and identity across the lifespan. Memory impairments can lead to more than mere forgetfulness; they can affect our sense of self and identity. This work will explore the changes in memory that take place in both normal ageing and in dementia.

Professor Margaret Harris and Dr Mark Burgess were awarded £640k by the Technology Strategy Board, a public research council that facilitates innovative technological collaboration between businesses and researchers. They are conducting multi-method research into the critical socio-psychological factors that underpin people’s transition from traditional combustion engine cars to ultra low carbon vehicles and are feeding their results back to car manufacturers, energy companies, and the government.

Research areas and clusters

Developmental Psychology Research Group
There are three main strands to research in this group:
1. Cognitive & Social Development - this includes work on the impact of socio-cultural contexts on human cognition and identity development, children’s evaluation of other people as sources of information, children’s understanding of emotion, the nature of mother-child interactions, children’s interactions with their peers and explanations for school bullying

2. Language & Literacy - this has a focus on the development of speech, reading, spelling, writing and handwriting

3. Developmental Disorders - this includes research on children with hearing impairment, Specific Language Impairment, Dyslexia, Developmental Coordination Disorder, Autism and sleep disorders.

Some of our research focuses on the description of typical development and explanation of developmental processes in different domains. Other work is concerned with understanding the mechanisms underlying atypical development and an examination of ways to support children and their families. Several staff in this research group work with professionals from other disciplines including health and education and are concerned with the production of practical assessment tools and the evaluation of intervention approaches to help children achieve their full potential.

- Adult Cognition Research Group
Research in this group covers the exploration of basic mechanisms as well as higher order processes in normal and atypical populations. A variety of methods are employed (behavioural and psychophysical measures, eye-tracking, movement analysis, and neuropsychological instruments). Specific research interests include: memory processes in ageing, autobiographical memory and identity processes, visual and attentional processing, reading and, perception and action

- Applied Social Psychology
The work of this group involves the application of a variety of different research methods and theoretical perspectives to investigate a range of contemporary issues and social problems. Members of the group share research interests in the psychological processes that underpin significant life transitions, the self and identify, mental and physical health experiences, attitudes, autism and sex differences.

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Who is it for?. This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. Read more

Who is it for?

This Masters is ideal for those who have an undergraduate degree in Psychology or a related discipline and would like to build more knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. Students will also be well-equipped should they wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

Objectives

This Masters degree bridges three research and clinical disciplines:

  • Cognitive Neuroscience (the study of human brain functions such as memory, perception and language)
  • Clinical Neuroscience (the understanding of neurological, psychological or psychiatric illness via their neural and cognitive antecedents)
  • and Social Neuroscience (the investigation of brain processes that help us communicate, feel, learn and interact with others).

The major aim of this programme is to provide you with a thorough grounding in the neuroscience that underpins human cognitive brain function, clinical, social and affective interaction, and neuropathology.

Teaching will comprise of seminars, lectures, computing and statistics classes, and supervision of an individual research project. Your learning experience during the programme will be enhanced by an invited speaker’s programme of external experts who work in Clinical, Social or Cognitive neuroscience.

Academic facilities

You will have access to all the facilities and laboratories in the Psychology Department. Check our labs facilities in the Cognitive Neuroscience Research Unit (CRNU)the Baby lab, the Autism Research Group (ARG), the Human Memory Research Group, etc. For a full list of facilities visit the Psychology Department.

Our members have experience with a wide range of neuroscientific techniques, including neuropsychological testing, psychophysics, electrophysiology, and neuroimaging methods.  We have particular strengths in the use of Electroencephalography (EEG)Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and Transcranial Electric Stimulation (a weak current applied to the scalp), in addition to measures of human behaviour (e.g. response times, response errors, and eye movements) and physiological measures (e.g. galvanic skin response and heart rate).

We test neurologically normal individuals, special populations (e.g. people with synesthesia) and people with expertise or acquired skills (e.g. dancers, musicians, athletes), as well as people with brain damage (e.g. neglect or split-brain patients), psychiatric diagnoses (e.g. schizophrenia), sensory deficits (e.g. visual and hearing impairments) and developmental disorders (e.g. dyslexia or autism).

Placements

We facilitate clinical internships through our specialist research Centre for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN) and with the local Mind centre.

Teaching and learning

Teaching will be comprised of lectures, seminars, group work and discussions, workshops and tutorials, reports, computing and statistics classes and the individual research dissertation.

You will undertake independent study, supported by the teaching and learning team, and will receive detailed feedback on your coursework. You will be provided with assessment and grade-related criteria which will outline your intended learning outcomes, along with the skills, knowledge and attitudes you are expected to demonstrate in order for you to complete an assessment successfully. You will also be assigned a personal tutor as your primary contact, who will advise you on academic matters and monitor your progress through the programme.

You will find a supportive vibrant research environment in the Department. The course is taught by academics, who are internationally recognised experts in their field with different backgrounds in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience.

Check out what is going on in our laboratories and at the Center for Psychological Wellbeing and Neuroscience (CPWN).

Find our more about our work on our Facebook group.

Assessment

Your learning will be assessed through essays, examinations, oral presentations, research methods projects and interpretation of statistical analyses, formal research proposals and a dissertation.

Modules

The programme consists of eight taught modules worth 15 credits each with around 30-34 hours of face-to-face contact, supported by online resources and an empirical research project (worth 60 credits).

You will learn about the latest advances in clinical, social and cognitive neuroscience and develop an appreciation of the reciprocal nature of research and practice in these domains. For example how insights from functional neuroimaging inform our understanding of neurological disorders and how clinical observations inform neurocognitive modelling.

Career prospects

This course will provide you with knowledge and skills highly valued both in academic research and the clinical professions. The MSc is an ideal platform from which to progress to PhD studies, particularly in Cognitive or Social Neuroscience. You will also be well-equipped should you wish to undertake further professional training in Clinical Psychology, or a related discipline.

The knowledge and skills you will acquire in this programme are highly valuable, whether you choose to pursue further research or an applied occupation. They will enhance your employability prospects in a wide range of sectors including the pharmaceutical industry, neuromarketing, the computing industry, science and the media, science and the arts, business or education.



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At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Read more

At Brighton, we encourage writing that helps readers and writers to understand, shape and connect with the world beyond the classroom. Working with professional writers, you will develop your skills to produce and share stories in a variety of genres.

Through creative workshops, you will partner with supportive lecturers and interdisciplinary postgraduate groups to develop advanced theories and practices that relate to the creative writing process. Both people with and without experience of creative writing should consider applying for this course, which aims to prepare you for a career as a freelancer or portfolio worker.

We have fantastic links with local publishers, writers and creative companies and offer a unique salon series where industry experts offer practical advice and insights. In semester two, you will apply your writing and creative practice in a workplace scenario, while being encouraged to work on your own interests and passions.

If you want to share your work, you have the opportunity to do so through our established student-led anthologies and open mic nights, which form part of Brighton's thriving creative scene.

Why study with us?

  • Chance to develop as a portfolio writer and creative practitioner – somebody who can apply good writing to real-world scenarios and work to specific briefs
  • A transformative experience that goes beyond looking to get your first novel published, so you can explore copywriting and publishing while nurturing your passion for storytelling
  • Guest lectures from publishers and professional writers including Mark Radcliffe and Isabel Ashdown, who runs the Prose Fiction module
  • Links with local publishers, writers and creative companies, with placements available across Brighton
  • Theatre visits, open mic nights and exciting events, including a short story slam at Brighton festival and writing workshops in Bucharest
  • Online journal and in-house creative anthology for you to share your work with other students and the wider community

Areas of study

You will be able to tailor your MA studies to reflect an interest in writing practice, literary theory, community engagement or any combination of these.

We identify the range of modules as intrinsic to catering to diverse creative and intellectual needs and understand that triggers for writing and creative practice can stem from a wide range of places and fields of study.

We have specific modules dedicated to engaging students with the wider Brighton community and local creative industries where they will become a writer in residence and work to link their individual creative practice with a professional scenario.

You will be able to identify teaching and learning opportunities that inspire your creative work and apply this to your professional, academic and personal development and planning.

Syllabus

Core modules

  • Practising Rhetoric: The History of Good Storytelling
  • Creative Writing: Craft and Creative Practice
  • Research Skills and Training
  • Dissertation

Optional modules

  • Prose Fiction
  • Creativity module: Placement
  • The Publishing Process
  • Poetry: Theory and Craft
  • Writing the City
  • The Ethics of Fiction
  • Twenty-first Century Literature
  • Performing Gender
  • Knowing Through Writing
  • Holocaust Memory
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy
  • Cultural Theory
  • History Making and the Screen Archive South
  • Grammar and the English Language
  • Memory and Identity in Postcolonial Cultures
  • Cultural Memory in Ireland
  • Gender, Family and Empire
  • Screenwriting
  • Auto/Biographical Narrative
  • Visual Narrative
  • Cultures of Multimedia Authoring and Web Design
  • Critical and Media Concepts
  • Issues and Debates: Introduction to Critical Arts Practice
  • Traditions of Critical Theory
  • Critical Readings
  • Moral Thought and Practice
  • Globalisation and Culture
  • Aesthetics and Philosophy
  • Foundations of Critical Theory
  • Meaning and Truth
  • Discourses of Culture
  • Writing for Academic Publication
  • Literature and Conflict
  • Auto/Biographical Narrative Communication, Memory and Communication

Careers and employability

Our Creative Writing MA will develop your confidence with creative and critical writing and enhance your communication skills, which are highly valued in a range of professions including publishing, teaching, creative industry management, marketing, PR, journalism, health and wellbeing.

The ability to write for an audience is also fundamental for people working with social media and the web, and this course will ensure that you are able to produce writing that will be effective in these and other work-based scenarios.



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The unique, multidisciplinary MA Program in Holocaust Studies is dedicated to creating and nurturing a new generation of Holocaust researchers and educators. Read more

The unique, multidisciplinary MA Program in Holocaust Studies is dedicated to creating and nurturing a new generation of Holocaust researchers and educators. In addition to a rigorous and varied curriculum with leading academics and researchers, our students gain professional experience through internship opportunities at a variety of Holocaust related institutions, seminars, a foreign study tourand volunteering opportunities with Holocaust survivors to help foster personal relationship and dedication to the field of Holocaust Studies.

What you will study

The program offers courses on the history of the Holocaust period and WWII as well courses on psychological aspects of trauma, the anthropology of memory, genocide and crimes against humanity, international law, museum studies, Holocaust education, and cultural expressions of the Holocaust in film and literature. Language instruction in Yiddish and German is also offered. Both thesis and non-thesis tracks are available.

Please click here for a list of courses currently offered.

Careers

Graduates of the program are well placed for pursuing careers in academic Holocaust research and archiving, as well as a variety of roles within the sphere of Holocaust education at museums, education facilities.

Courses

  • Anthropology of Memory
  • The Holocaust Remembrance and its Impact on the Memory Politics of Genocide 
  • Literature of the Holocaust
  • Visual Culture and the Holocaust
  • From Silence to Omnipresence-Holocaust in the Curriculum
  • From Violence to Tolerance: Psychological Aspects in Holocaust Education
  • Holocaust Education for Democratic Values
  • The Final Solution
  • German Jewry Under the Nazi Regime
  • The Jews of Poland in the Second World War and the Holocaust
  • Nazi Germany
  • The Second World War
  • Holocaust in the Former Soviet Union
  • The Specter of Genocide
  • German Language Course
  • Yiddish Language Course
  • Holocaust Museums: Three Continents, Three Generations
  • Practical Training in Curating
  • Psychological Aspects of the Memory of the Holocaust
  • Research Design and Thesis Writing
  • Research Methods for Holocaust Studies
  • Research Forum Course

Please click here for more information on the courses currently offered.

Faculty

The experienced program faculty staff hold expertise in a variety of disciplines from within the field of Holocaust Studies. The department is headed by Professor Arieh Kochavi, who is the Head of the Strochilitz Institute for Holocaust Studies as well as a professor in the Department of History at The University of Haifa, and who to-date has published five books on historical aspects of the Holocaust in both English and Hebrew. For a full list of faculty staff and their fields of interest please click here.

Scholarships

The program offers scholarships based on academic merit and/or financial need. For details please write to Dr. Yael Granot-Bein at . This program is also eligible for MASA scholarship. More information on scholarships may be found here.



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The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. Read more
The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define ‘public history’ and ‘cultural heritage’ broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and ‘sites of memory’ are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The M.Phil. course in Public History and Cultural Heritage is designed to provide students with a rigorous grounding in public history and to prepare high-calibre graduates in a unique and thorough fashion for the management of cultural heritage. We define 'public history' and 'cultural heritage' broadly. The course involves analysis of cultural memory, its construction, reception and loss; and study of the public status and consumption of history in modern society. Political issues surrounding public commemoration and 'sites of memory' are examined and the role of museums, galleries and the media in shaping public perceptions of the past is considered. The course also surveys the more concrete questions involved in the conservation, presentation and communication of the physical heritage of past cultures, particularly where interpretation and meaning are contested.

The course is taught in collaboration with the leading cultural institutions located in Dublin and several organisations offer internships to students. In recent years participating bodies have included Dublin City Gallery; Dublin City Library and Archive; Glasnevin Trust; Hugh Lane Gallery; The Little Museum of Dublin; Marsh's Library; the National Gallery of Ireland; the National Library of Ireland; the National Museum of Ireland; and St Patrick's Cathedral.

In a variety of modules, students are trained in the analysis and the presentation of their research findings. They are also introduced to the methodological challenges of advanced study and research at postgraduate level. The course comprises a core module, entitled Remembering, Reminding and Forgetting: Public History, Cultural Heritage and the Shaping of the Past, which runs across both terms. A suite of term-long electives is available on substantive themes. A three-month internship, located in one of our collaborating institutions, runs throughout the second term. Practitioner workshops are also held in the second term and provide an opportunity for national and international 'public historians' to discuss their work with the class. In any given year this may include novelists, artists, museum directors, or heritage and tourism policymakers. The course concludes with the production of a dissertation or major project, individually supervised by an member of staff.

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This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society. Read more

This course is about learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of literary texts and how they function within society.

Whether you prefer ancient Greek dramas, medieval Dutch poetry, contemporary American literature, or general literary theory, this Master’s is suited to students wishing to contribute to textual research. The Master’s in Literary Studies will teach you how to approach historical and contemporary texts from an international perspective, as well as to examine the current societal significance of literature. By the end of the programme, you’ll be able to discuss literary texts and scholarly approaches with other scholars at the highest academic level.

At Radboud University, we believe that to fully understand literature, you need to broaden your scope. You will gain insight into methods and theories in both literary studies and the humanities in general. You’ll become familiar with a wide range of literary traditions, critical approaches and theoretical debates. This will enhance your own research. In order to expand your horizon as a literary scholar, you’ll spend a semester conducting research and taking courses abroad.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

Europe and its worlds

The programme welcomes students with interest in all fields of literary studies, but our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including the ways Europe interacts with and differs from the rest of the world. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups.

Why study Literary Studies at Radboud University?

- There is a strong focus on textual scholarship and methods of literary interpretation. The programme studies all forms of literary texts and written records from all historical periods.

- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s as Historical Studies, and Art and Visual Culture. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of other disciplines within the humanities.

- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic world.

- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.

- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Literary Studies will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

- Thematic research groups

There is a literary scientist in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to a literary researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Literary Studies students:

- European Literary History

This group explores the various forms, functions, agents, media, infrastructures, traditions and theories of literature that, now or then, have been involved in relating ‘Europe’ to a certain space, tradition, or identity.

- Studying Criticism And Reception Across Borders

This group researches literary reception in its broadest sense, from analysing the practice of book reviewers and literary criticism, to studying all sorts of literary institutions like publishers, literary magazines.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism

This group studies the media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Literary Studies:

For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:

- Classicism under Justinian. A study of Justinian's classicising policies in the fields of literature, legislation and military conquest.

- The early transmission of Sappho's songs reflected in the ancient sources.

- Performing the Past, Staging the Future: Memory, Modernity, and (Inter)nationalist Identities at the Dublin Gate Theatre.

- Austen: The Next Generation. Modern reworkings of Pride and Prejudice and the Quest for New Audiences.

- De naam van de schrijver. Auteur, lezer en pseudoniem.

- Lolita - ethiek, lezer & effect. Een cognitief narratologische analyse van Vladimir Nabokovs Lolita (1955).

Academia and beyond

This programme is initially intended to prepare its students for an academic career, in particular as PhD researchers. About half of our graduates find such a position in the Netherlands or abroad. The other half also do well and often find academic positions with research orientated duties. Examples include:

- Researcher at a cultural or scientific organisation or research centre

- Assistant of a senior researcher

- Teacher at an institution for higher education

- Policy-making official in the fields of culture and science

- Editor in the field of historical or cultural scholarship

- Staff member of a publishing company or and text agency, usually with regard to scientific, historical or cultural journals

- Curator of a cultural heritage institution or in the museological sector

- Consultant for a political party

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/hlcs/literary

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Overview. Cognitive Psychology is a fascinating area of psychology that is relevant to a range of problems in the modern world. Read more

Overview

Cognitive Psychology is a fascinating area of psychology that is relevant to a range of problems in the modern world. For instance, how; do mobile phones distract attention during driving? What factors influence our purchasing decisions? What are the effects of brain injury and aging on cognition and behaviour? Cognitive psychologists use techniques from psychology and neuroscience to address these and other issues and can have careers in academic, military, and industry research or, with additional clinical training, work with patients suffering from cognitive limitations arising from brain injury. Studying our MSc in Cognitive Psychology will give you exposure to advanced training with specialist cognitive neuroscience methods such as EEG and eye-tracking, research design and statistics, and the opportunity to explore a range of contemporary findings in cognitive psychology with our expert academics in a friendly small group setting. Importantly, you will be directly involved with cutting-edge research that is geared towards your interests and personal skills development.

Course Aims

  • To provide hands on experience with cognitive neuroscience research methods through both teaching and research projects.
  • To develop your ability to design, conduct, and critically evaluate contemporary research in cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience
  • To enable you to use specialist software tools for data collection and analysis
  • To develop research skills which prepare you for careers that use behavioural and/or neuroscience research

Course Content

Our MSc Psychology programmes are designed to foster a vibrant and collaborative peer culture amongst our MSc students. Several of our modules are shared by all four of our MSc psychology programmes. We also know it’s vital that you develop the advanced specialised skills you will need to pursue careers in your chosen fields. Throughout your MSc degree you are supported and encouraged to focus your work to help you conduct in-depth explorations of your specialist subjects and personal interests.

You will undertake a double weighted Advanced Study module in Cognitive Psychology (30 credits).

The module develops students' knowledge and critical understanding of classic and developing areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Indicative topics include attention, executive functioning, memory (short- and long-term), false memory, cognitive neuropsychology, cognitive ageing, face and object perception, emotion contagion, neuroimaging, psychobiology, and metacognition.

All MSc Psychology undertake the following core modules designed to help you engage with the pluralistic nature of psychology and understand the broader field within which your specialised interest sits:

  • Contemporary Research in Psychology (15 credits)
  • Advanced Research Skills and Design (15 credits)
  • Advanced Quantitative Data Analysis (15 credits)
  • Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (15 credits)

In addition to the core modules all students can tailor their research methods training to suit their needs and interests by choosing one of the following option modules:

  • Qualitative Research Methods (15 credits)
  • Advanced Cognitive Neuroscience Research Methods (15 credits)

Research is a key emphasis in our programmes and you will be supported by a specialist tutor in your chosen field to undertake original research as part of the Research Preparation (15 credits) and Dissertation (60 credits) modules.

Projects within cognitive psychology span a wide range of topics including, but not limited to, attention, visual perception of faces, effects of alcohol on cognitive performance, changes in memory due to ageing, analysis of EEG and eyetracking data, and studies of neuropsychological deficits in brain injured patients. Our expert staff and specialist facilities can support a range of projects across the field.

Teaching & Assessment

The course is of one year duration for full time and two years for part-time.

The course is assessed through written coursework, unseen examination, verbal presentation of research, and independent research written up as a dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme. Limited support is available for research-related expenses.

Closing Date

31st May 2018

Scholarships

There are substantial scholarships available, please see this link: http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/internationalfunding/postgraduate/

or

http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/



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Studying in the School of Experimental Psychology will give you the opportunity to be part of a vibrant postgraduate community and a world-class department. Read more
Studying in the School of Experimental Psychology will give you the opportunity to be part of a vibrant postgraduate community and a world-class department. Our postgraduate students are a very important part of the departmental research culture and are a key component in maintaining our international research reputation.

Before submitting an application, we recommend that potential applicants make informal contact with the member of academic staff whose research you are interested in.

Research groups

Research activity in the school is organised into two research themes: Cognitive Processes and Brain, Behaviour and Health. Within each theme, there is a set of focused research groups. An important feature of this research structure is the extent of collaboration across research groups and across the themes. All groups address fundamental questions and look at the impact of their work more broadly in industry, healthcare, education and society. Across these thematic research groups, there are particular strengths in computational neuroscience and neuropsychology.

Cognitive Processes
Focused research groups in cognitive processes are:
-Developmental (includes the Bristol Cognitive Development Centre and Bristol Autism Research Group).
-Language (speech comprehension, speech production, reading and dyslexia, language and thought).
-Memory (short-term memory, modelling, dynamics, lifespan memory).
-Social (social cognition and evolutionary social psychology).
-Vision (fusing cognitive science and information technology to tackle research problems that cannot be comprehensively addressed by the single disciplines alone).

Brain, Behaviour and Health
Focused research groups in brain, behaviour, and health are:
-Neuropsychology (neural basis of both typical and pathological cognition, using a range of methodologies including EEG and fMRI).
-Nutrition and Behaviour Unit (effects of substances on cognition and performance; appetite, weight control, and diet).
-Tobacco and Alcohol Research Group (social drugs and social cognition; plain packaging of tobacco products; carbon-dioxide inhalation model of anxiety).
-Decision-making and rationality (areas of current focus include selecting the appropriate movement response; how properties of the environment shape decisions; structuring the world to facilitate good decisions; food choice and dietary decisions; the origins of supernatural beliefs).

Careers

Many of our PhD graduates work in academia; others work in the private sector or in government institutions.

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Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today. Read more

Through combining arts management with heritage studies, students will develop a sophisticated understanding of the changing political, policy and practice contexts within which the arts and heritage sectors operate today.

Core modules explore the nature of heritage and how meanings of objects, artworks and buildings change in different contexts. You will examine the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders, and the changes that have led some museums to move towards the role of the ‘manager’ rather than the ‘curator’.

You will choose from optional modules to tailor your degree to your interests or career plans – including the opportunity to undertake a work placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

Supported by our Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage, you will benefit from our partnerships with major arts and cultural organisations to find out what it means to work in this challenging sector.

You will study in the heart of a cultural hub for this diverse and vibrant region. Leeds is home to a wide variety of world-leading and innovative arts and heritage organisations, from the Royal Armouries, Opera North, West Yorkshire Playhouse and Northern Ballet through to nine council-run museums, galleries and heritage sites and many contemporary art spaces.

We are also close to everything the rest of Yorkshire has to offer, from The Hepworth Wakefield to the National Science and Media Museum, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Brontë Parsonage Museum. We have close links with many of these cultural institutions to support your practical learning.

Interdisciplinary learning

This exciting programme has been developed in close collaboration with the School of Performance and Cultural Industries and allows students to undertake core and optional courses in both Schools. Students become members of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and enjoy the opportunities that membership offers.

Course content

All MA students in the School take two core modules.

In Arts Management and Cultural Leadership, students will examine theoretical concepts in the emerging field of arts management and the challenges faced by arts managers and cultural leaders. Dialogue with our arts and cultural partners will give an insight into the exciting possibilities opened up by bringing theory and practice together. Students can deepen their learning in this area through optional modules that explore a variety of key issues, such as audience engagement and impact, cultural entrepreneurship, and contemporary cultural strategies, technologies and media.

In Heritage Studies: Key Words, students will develop a critical exploration of heritage through the ways in which people have sought to preserve, understand and pass on their cultures. This is underpinned through combining a sustained theoretical engagement with key ideas which animate heritage – place, community, memory, archive, future – with embedded skills development in heritage and museum interpretative and curatorial practice (which are a core set of sector skills). Students can build on these skills through optional modules such as exploring anthropology and representation, cultural memory and material culture.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Performance and Cultural Industries. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either arts management or heritage. Previous students have undertaken placements focused on collections, digitisation work, digital interpretation and community engagement.

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to allow students to benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures.

Students will also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this course, allowing students to develop individual skills and prepare for taught sessions

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Arts Management and Heritage Studies Dissertation 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Heritage Studies: Key Words 30 credits
  • Arts Management and Cultural Leadership 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Derrida and Deconstruction 30 credits
  • Capitalism-Criticism-Contemporary Art 30 credits
  • Unfinished Business: Trauma, Cultural Memory & the Holocaust 30 credits
  • From Chagall to Kitaj and Beyond 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art & Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art & Representation 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Performance & Collaborative Enterprise 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement & Impact 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Arts Management and Heritage Studies MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods to help you benefit from the expertise of our staff. These include weekly seminars, group learning sessions, tutorials and lectures. You’ll also benefit from the expertise of visiting speakers, visits off campus and practical experience. Independent study is also vital to this programme, allowing you to develop your individual skills and prepare for taught sessions.

Assessment

Depending on the modules you choose, you may experience a range of different assessment methods. These usually include essays of around 7,000 words, individual and group presentations, in-course assessment and project work. You may also be asked to complete a reflective log for your projects, allowing you to look back and critically assess your own practice.

Placement opportunities

All students have a choice of two optional modules. A number of these modules have a work or enterprise component to gain first-hand experience of contemporary museum and gallery practice. If you have a particular ambition in mind for a work placement, we try to find a role that suits you.




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Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?. Read more
Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?

Our MSc Psychology is an advanced fast-track conversion course for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than psychology, or for those whose undergraduate Psychology degree was not accredited by the British Psychological Society.

This course combines the award of a Masters with eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society. The GBC is the minimum academic qualification required to work as a professional psychologist, so passing our course demonstrates that you have studied and acquired an advanced understanding in Masters-level study in psychology. With this qualification you will also be eligible to apply for professional training in any branch of professional psychology.

Our staff have a wide range of research interests, so you gain a critical and detailed understanding of the core areas of psychology, plus some specialisation, and learn research methods to an extent which will enable you to devise, carry out and analyse an empirical research project. Topics studied include:
-Visual and auditory perception and cognition
-Language, concepts, memory and attention
-The relation between brain and behaviour
-Developmental psychology
-Social psychology

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

We are a warm and friendly Department, and we wish to welcome both graduates who have recently completed their studies, and mature students who may wish to upgrade their qualifications, refresh their CV, or return to academic study after a period of time away from education.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Recent graduates of MSc Psychology have found employment as a research assistant at the Anna Freud Centre, a clinical psychologist for the NHS, a child psychologist for Children First and a lecturer at the University of Surrey. Other graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Brain and Behaviour
-Personality and Individual Differences
-Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology I
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology II
-Advanced Social Psychology
-Advanced Developmental Psychology
-Research Project (MSc)
-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Special Topics in Social Psychology (optional)

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Overview. The Euromasters programme offers an outstanding and unrivalled international learning experience, with a unique opportunity to study at the following prestigious world-class institutions. Read more

Overview

The Euromasters programme offers an outstanding and unrivalled international learning experience, with a unique opportunity to study at the following prestigious world-class institutions:

- University of Bath

- Freie Universität Berlin

- Humboldt Universität zu Berlin

- Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

- Sciences Po Paris

- Univerzita Karlova, Prague

- Università degli Studi di Siena

- University of Washington (Seattle)

With an enthusiastic teaching team who are internationally renowned experts in their research fields, and a diverse programme of study, the two year Masters course is recognised throughout the EU and beyond.

You will gain a broad comparative understanding of the European Union, US politics, policy and social evolution as well as specialist knowledge of key issues in the Euro-Atlantic area.

We welcome applications from high-achieving students, who wish to gain the knowledge and skills that will qualify them for a wide range of careers in European and international institutions.

Potential applicants should visit the dedicated Euromasters website (http://www.euromasters.eu/), which contains extensive information about the programme and the Consortium, as well as guidance and advice on applying.

Programme structure

After the initial Core Module in Bath, you will undertake two taught semesters, followed by the completion of a 15,000 word dissertation, to be submitted by September in the second year.

You must study at a minimum of two sites, including Bath, but may also choose to study at a third site (see programme table for more information).

Core units:

International relations theories

Comparative European Politics

Scopes & methods of politics & international relations

Masters dissertation

Optional units:

European union politics and policy making

International security; theories and concepts

Memory culture – memory politics

Foreign policy analysis

Governance, security and development in East and South East Asia

Organised crime in Europe: threats and challenges

International security; the contemporary agenda

Britain and Europe

International organisations in world politics

International relations in South and Central Asia

Economic foreign policy and the international trade regime

Theories of conflict and conflict resolution

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/pl/pl-proglist-pg.html#B) for further information.

Learning and teaching

The Euromasters programme is a truly international experience with regard to teaching, learning and living.

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the units, you will receive credit providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching at Bath takes the form of lectures, classes and seminars. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes and seminars involve more formal interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students. These methods may vary across the consortium according to cultural practices.

The consortium website (http://www.euromasters.eu/) contains links to information about the taught content at other sites.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a combination of coursework essays, class exercises, projects, oral presentations and examinations.

We also place strong emphasis on developing presentation, discussion and communication skills which, may be part of the assessed work.

Careers

The Euromasters programmes are highly regarded by employers for the depth and breadth of knowledge and analysis that they purvey. In particular, the hands-on international experience graduates gain is valued highly.

You can also take advantage of the extensive Careers Service (http://www.bath.ac.uk/careers/) at the University of Bath, as well the opportunity to study another language at the Foreign Languages Centre (http://www.bath.ac.uk/flc/) during your Core Module.

Graduates from these programmes have been employed all over the world in a wide variety of international organisations, multinational corporations, public bodies or policy-formulating institutes. Careers and examples include:

International Organisations:

Forum Europe Cultures, Brussels

The European Commissions, Brussels

International Media:

British Broadcasting Corporation, London

International Herald Tribune, Paris

Finance & Banking:

American Investment Council, Berlin

Citibank, London

Infrastructure & Telecoms:

France Telecom, Paris

International Union of Railways, Paris

Business & Corporations:

Daimler-Chrysler, Berlin,

Microsoft, Dublin

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) (http://www.bath.ac.uk/polis/) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

- Conflict, Security & International Order

- Governance, Citizenship & Policy

- Memory, History & Identity

International collaboration:

Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)

- European Commission Framework Programme

- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Stimulating cutting edge research:

Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/



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Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society. Read more

Why take this course?

Forensic psychology is an expanding field. It interfaces with other disciplines such as clinical, social and cognitive psychology, as well as criminology and law in order to address issues of major concern to the justice system, organisations, individuals and society.

This is a unique course informed by research at the forefront of the field, with many opportunities to get involved with ongoing projects within the Department.

Applications for this course close 15 January 2016 to be considered for interview on 23 or 25 February and close 15 February 2016 to be considered for interview on 22 and 24 March.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Be taught by the largest group of actively researching academics at the cutting edge of forensic psychology research in the UK
Put your investigative techniques to the test in our Forensic Interviewing Suite
Benefit from our connections with a variety of custodial establishments including adult male and women's prisons, young offenders' institutions and secure hospitals

What opportunities might it lead to?

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing an important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. It aims to provide you with a systematic knowledge and understanding of forensic psychology, in accordance with the academic requirements of the Division of Forensic Psychology (DFP), the British Psychological Society (BPS) for accredited courses and eventual progression to autonomous practice.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Working in prisons
Probation work
The police force
Social work
Health services
The courts
Academia
Private practice

Module Details

The course content is structured to reflect developments and priorities in the field of forensic psychology and is kept under constant review to keep it up-to-date.

Here are the units you will study:

Theory into Practice: Foundations of Professional Competence in Forensic Psychology: This unit provides a foundation for working as a scientist-practitioner. From an early introduction to concepts of reflective practice, personal development and core skills relevant to completing the course, it moves to encouraging an awareness of factors involved in criminal behaviour and their implications. The focus is on the application and development of skills in analysis and less on the learning of facts and theories. In the second part of the unit, the focus moves to tasks and challenges that forensic psychologists encounter in applied settings. Some, such as the design and evaluation of training for other personnel or consultancy skills, are of major relevance to Stage 2 of the system for progression to chartered status that usually follows the course. Others such as countering manipulation, stress and managing aggression can be crucial to survival as well as effectiveness as a practitioner.

Assessment and Interventions with Offenders: This unit is concerned with providing an understanding of the theoretical and empirical underpinnings, contents and methods of current and widely-used approaches to assessment (including risk assessment) and interventions with offenders. These approaches are linked and provide a framework for the organisation and evaluation of information, particularly in relation to efficient, useful and accurate formulation and what works in the delivery of interventions. It will build upon knowledge of factors related to criminal behaviour with a focus on effective approaches and context-related factors in the understanding and management of offenders in a variety of settings.

Empirical Research Project for Forensic Psychology: For this unit you will undertake a complete piece of empirical research in an area of forensic psychology that you find particularly interesting. It provides an opportunity to develop and integrate a range of skills and areas of knowledge including creative formulations, problem-solving, ethics, handling interpersonal demands, use of IT and analytical techniques, and writing to a publishable standard.

Investigative Psychology and the Legal Process: This focuses on the contribution made by psychology in the context of forensic investigations and the role of psychologists in criminal and civil law proceedings. It is concerned with the application of psychological research and theory in an effort to critique (and improve) practice in criminal and civil justice systems as an applied context for testing the validity and efficacy of psychological theories and innovative practice derived from these theories. Topics cover relevant procedural information to ensure you appreciate investigative, judicial and custodial processes, and the role of psychologists within these frameworks. Theory and research relevant to applied cognitive and social psychology are presented to inform an understanding of eyewitness recall and recognition memory (and memory errors), effective protocols for testing/probing witness memory, detecting deception and juror decision making.

Research Methods and Data Analysis: This unit is designed to provide a familiarity with psychological research methods and data analysis commensurate with understanding and conducting research at the postgraduate and professional level. Specific methodologies and issues of relevance to specific research areas are addressed within a perspective that emphasises creative problem-solving.

Programme Assessment

We give high priority to integrating our research activities with your teaching programme. This ensures that you learn about the most important and current issues in forensic psychology that effect real-life practice.

Teaching usually takes the form of lectures and small tutorial groups, together with practical sessions in our labs and studios.

We assess you in a variety of ways throughout the course. Here’s how:

Written examinations
Briefing reports and essays
Oral presentations
The giving of expert testimony
A research dissertation

Student Destinations

The work of forensic psychologists is varied. Depending on where practitioners work, it can range from criminal investigations to organisational change, from work with offenders to work with staff who work with offenders, and from matters of civil justice such as child access to operational emergencies such as hostage incidents.

Accredited by the BPS, our Master’s degree is recognised as providing the next important step towards eventual chartered status as a forensic psychologist. Following successful completion of this course, you will usually go on to do a minimum of two years full-time supervised practice in an employment setting.

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

Clinical psychologist
Forensic psychologist
Educational psychologist
Counsellor
Health planning analyst

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