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Masters Degrees (Mediterranean)

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The. Master in Advanced European and International Studies - Mediterranean studies (MAEIS). provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the globalised world. Read more

The Master in Advanced European and International Studies - Mediterranean studies (MAEIS) provides an overarching and extensive view of the political, social, economic and cultural issues of the globalised world. The MAEIS is an international, interdisciplinary and itinerant programme which aims to educate the next generation of Euro-Mediterranean decision-makers. Following the slogan "Learning and living the Mediterranean", the participants rotate each trimester, moving their place of studies from Nice to Tunis and then Istanbul including a workshop in Rome. The programme is structured into three terms and is taught in English and French.

Programme

Nice

The first term (October to January) starts in the European Union, in Nice, France. It encompasses classes on the basics of the five modules (Conflict Management and Peace Making, Sustainable Development and Globalisation, Regional Integration and Transformation, Mediterranean Politics and Societies as well as Professional Skills Workshops). Studying in France helps the students to analyse the Mediterranean region and Euro-Mediterranean relations from an EU perspective. Courses will introduce to the institutional architecture of the EU and its neighbourhood policy. They will also discuss the shared risks of populism, terrorism and climate change. Mid-term exams will take place in December. The trimester concludes with a simulation exercise.

Tunis

The second term (January to April) starts off in Tunis, Tunisia. Our cooperation partner, the Université Internationale de Tunis, is famous for its integration of international students in Tunisia. Thanks to our partner, the Institut de Recherche sur le Maghreb Contemporain (IRMC), students will have access to the expertise and the library of one of the most renowned think tanks in the Maghreb. Researchers from the region will analyse transformation processes in the Southern and Eastern Mediterranean in times of globalisation. Studying in Tunisia will provide the students with a unique experience of a historic democratisation process that turns the nobelpeace-prize winning country into a role model throughout the MENA region. For non-Arab speakers an Arab language course is compulsory.

A study trip to Rome will take place during the 2nd or the 3rd term. Here, a special focus will be given to Foreign Policy Analysis (EU, Russia, US, Iran), as well as migration, poverty and food security, including visits of relevant UN institutions and conférences at our Partner, the renowned think tank, Istituto Affari INternazionali (IAI).

Istanbul

The programme concludes in Istanbul, Turkey (April to July) where the courses are organised in cooperation with our long-term partner, the Istanbul Bilgi University. Courses will deal with the changing EU-Turkey relations. Students will have the opportunity to advance in their research work, as they are free of obligations from mid-May to mid-June to work on their thesis. The programme concludes with the defence of the thesis and oral exams. With their graduation on the Bosphorus, students become part of CIFE’s worldwide Alumni network.

Teaching Modules

Conflict Management and Peace Making

The Mediterranean is a case study par excellence for Peace and Conflict Studies. Understanding and explaining questions of war and peace has been at the heart of „International Relations“ as an academic discipline – from its very beginning, after the First World War. In the last two decades Mediterranean societies have been significantly affected by inter-group violence and inter-state conflicts: from the Western Balkans to Cyprus, from Israel to Palestine, from Syria to Lybia. Mediterranean conflicts are partly characterised by external interventions. The module will focus at causes and dynamics of escalation and de-escalation, including international law and peace-making in a multiperspective approach. Theories on violence and peace will help to analyse the case studies proposed.

Sustainable development and Globalisation

The Mediterranean in the 21st century faces unprecedented economic, environmental and social challenges. As economic development exercises increased pressure on limited resources, deteriorates the environment and creates growing inequalities, Mediterranean economies struggle to find their way through these challenges. An introduction into economics as an academic discipline will set the ground for a regional analysis of sustainable development, energy policies, climate action and demographic dynamics.

Regional integration and transformation

The European Union became a model of regional integration. Nation states agreed to transform their sovereignity into a multi-level governance system sui generis to keep regional peace, increase welfare and economic power. How is the dynamic architecture of European institutions functioning – in times of both Europeanisation and Euroscepticism? And to what extent are the Arab League or the Union for the Mediterranean comparable models of regional integration?

Regional integration is primarily an elite-driven, government-sponsored transformation process. However, socio-economic and political change can be triggered by civil society and social movements, as the „Arab Spring“ has shown transregionally in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Change and continuity differ significantly in the MENA-region. Why? And which repercussions for the Union for the Mediterranean?

Mediterranean Politics and Societies

Mediterranean Politics are shaped by an interplay of different policy fields and policy actors. Theories of International Relations (i.e. Foreign Policy Analysis, Migration Theories) will help to understand the dynamics of policy making towards and in the Mediterranean region. Migration constitutes a challenging and complex policy field throughout the Mediterranean.

In a second part of this module we will approach Mediterranean societies with a generational focus upon „youth“. The current number of youth in the Mediterranean is unprecedented. Meanwhile, youth unemployment is a phenomenon that nearly all Mediterranean societies have in common. At the crossroads of theory and practice this module will identify solutions to the challenges the young generation faces in the Mediterranean.

Professional Skills Workshops

The participants will take part in negotiation and mediation trainings, simulation games and follow career workshops as well as workshops on project cycle management and intercultural communication.

Applications and Scholarships

Candidates can submit their application via the online application form. They should also include all the relevant documents, or send them by post or e-mail. An academic committee meets regularly in order to review complete applications.

A limited number of scholarships can be awarded to particularly qualified candidates. There are different funds available for this programme.

The application deadline is 15 May 2018.



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The Mediterranean, the world' s largest inland sea and the interface of Europe, Africa and western Asia, is one of the major crucibles of cultural, economic and political change in world history, a focus of scholarship for all periods between the Palaeolithic and the present, and a place where the past plays a critical role in the present, as well as in the creation of a viable future. Read more

The Mediterranean, the world' s largest inland sea and the interface of Europe, Africa and western Asia, is one of the major crucibles of cultural, economic and political change in world history, a focus of scholarship for all periods between the Palaeolithic and the present, and a place where the past plays a critical role in the present, as well as in the creation of a viable future.

About this degree

Students will develop an understanding of Mediterranean societies from earliest times through Classical antiquity until the early medieval period, and of major interpretative paradigms and principal investigative techniques - including fieldwork and archaeological science - applied to the Mediterranean. One or more specific regions will be analysed in depth from a comparative perspective, and Mediterranean societies will be studied holistically.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation/report (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Mediterranean Dynamics
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Foundations

Optional modules

From an outstanding range of Master's optional modules, students choose options to the value of 60 credits, at least one of which must be chosen from the following:

  • Mediterranean Prehistory 
  • The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
  • The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean. 

The remaining must be made up from the list below (Please note not all modules are available every year): 

  • Aegean Prehistory: major themes and current debates
  • Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
  • British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
  • Egyptian Archaeology: An Object-Based Theoretical Approach
  • Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Medieval Archaeology: Selected Topics and Current Problems
  • Middle Bronze Age to the Iron Age in the Near East: City-states and Empires
  • Museum and Site Interpretation
  • Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
  • The Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of the Near East: The Emergence of Villages and Urban Societies
  • Themes and Debates in Islamic Archaeology and Heritage
  • Themes, Thought and Theory in World Archaeology: Current Topics

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words (90 credits). Approaches that explore new connections or comparisons are strongly encouraged, and students will be able to draw on the expertise of more than 50 members of the institute's staff.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars and assessed through essays and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Mediterranean Archaeology MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are expected to pursue further studies at PhD level or embark on a wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Consultant, Archaeological Research Services (ARS) Ltd
  • PhD in Archaeology, University of Cambridge

Employability

Successful graduates will have been fully prepared to undertake research on ancient Mediterranean societies, from a comparative region/period/theme-specific perspective, and will also possess the expert background knowledge to move on to related professional work in or on the Mediterranean (subject to the particular requirements of the role). They will also have honed their transferable skills in critical analysis, debate, presentation and writing skills that are key to any future professional career.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its own outstanding library is complemented by UCL’s Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries.

This programme deploys the institute’s unparalleled research and teaching strengths in Mediterranean archaeology, which must constitute the largest single concentration of expertise anywhere in the UK.

UCL’s own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research and students may work on material from the institute’s collection as part of their assessment. Regular interaction with the British Museum, its collections and staff offers a further invaluable opportunity to add to one's learning experience. 

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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In this programme, you will learn to find the answer to these and other puzzles of Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology. The programme is part of the Archaeology Master programme and builds on the knowledge and skills obtained in a BA programme of Archaeology. Read more
In this programme, you will learn to find the answer to these and other puzzles of Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology. The programme is part of the Archaeology Master programme and builds on the knowledge and skills obtained in a BA programme of Archaeology.

Within the programme three different tracks are available. These tracks have their specific core modules, but also share courses with the other tracks within our MA programme.

The tracks are:

* Classical and Mediterranean Archaeology, with core modules The Rise of Cities and States, Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology and the Archaeology of Death.

* Bioarchaeology, with a core module of the same name.

* Maritime Archaeology with a core module of the same name.

The first semester comprises one compulsory module, Archaeology Today, and two optional modules (The Rise of Cities and States, and Mediterranean Landscape Archaeology). In the second semester you can follow two optional modules (Archaeology of Death, Advanced GIS course), or do an internship. The final stage of the MA programme is a thesis.

Why in Groningen?

- flexible structure
- all courses are taught in English
- attention to both theory and practice
- large international research projects in Italy, Greece, Egypt, Turkey, Iraq
- unique archaeobotanical and archaeozoological reference collections
- GIS and Material Culture laboratories
- close connections with Ancient History, Classics and Religious Studies
- close connections with Centre for Isotopes Research and Biology
- very low tuition fees
- a student friendly city

Job perspectives

The job opportunities for archaeologists in Europe are good. Because of the Valleta Treaty, all spatial planning projects have to take archaeological heritage into account. This has increased the work possibilities at consultancy and governmental agencies. It is also possible to find a position in the museum world or become an academic researcher.

The BA and MA programmes are strongly tied to the Groningen Institute of Archaeology (GIA), which comprises the archaeological research of the University of Groningen.

GIA research is focused on:
- Prehistoric, protohistoric and historical archaeology in the Netherlands, the Mediterranean and the Arctics.
- Bioarchaeology: archaeobotany and archaeozoology
- Material culture studies, including conservation
- Landscape archaeology, including GIS-based studies

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This postgraduate degree provides an exciting and challenging forum for you to explore the archaeology and history of the Classical Mediterranean world. Read more
This postgraduate degree provides an exciting and challenging forum for you to explore the archaeology and history of the Classical Mediterranean world. You will study and interpret evidence from the Mediterranean to gain a deeper understanding of the societies and economies that shaped classical antiquity.

Our course questions the ways in which the classical past may be reconstructed and will equip you with the analytical skills to identify the debates surrounding textual and material sources, and encourage you to interrogate current perceptions of Greek and Roman societies.

During the course, you will learn to engage more critically with archaeological issues and debates developing skills in the analysis and evaluation of data of many kinds and from many sources. We seek to equip you with a broad critical understanding of both the potential and the limitations of different forms of archaeological evidence and develop your ability to present and use your sources effectively.

You will be taught by staff with an impressive range of expertise and specialisms that are exceptional in Britain. With many ancient historians as well as classical archaeologists among our staff we are uniquely placed to explore this material and our expertise extends geographically from southern Gaul to North Africa and Syria. You can opt to take our Study Tour in the Mediterranean module which is a one-week research tour, offering you the chance to meet our expert staff face-to-face.

This Classical Mediterranean MA is ideal if you are seeking to become a researcher in Archaeology or Ancient History, or if you want to enhance your professional career in archaeology, classical studies, museum or related contexts, as well as for existing professionals in heritage or related fields who have a particular interest in this area.

If you have any questions about this course, join us for a live online chat with academic tutors and admissions staff.

Start Dates

Distance Learning: February, June and October each year.

Course Structure

Core Modules:
Text and Material Culture
Encountering the Classical World
Dissertation (MA only)

Option Modules (choose two):
Classical Landscapes
Households and Domesticity in the Ancient World
Study Tour in the Mediterranean

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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This postgraduate egree offers an intensive and challenging approach to the study of the Classical Mediterranean worlds across the Greek and Roman periods. Read more
This postgraduate egree offers an intensive and challenging approach to the study of the Classical Mediterranean worlds across the Greek and Roman periods. The course questions the traditional ways in which we reconstruct the classical past, and interrogates current understandings and perceptions of Greek and Roman societies across the Mediterranean.

Course Outline

A key part of the course is our interdisciplinary approach, drawing from both history and archaeology. We will equip you to work with different classical sources in combination, including literary texts, epigraphy, material culture, landscape studies, architecture, and visual art.

The course will enable you to reflect critically on the economic, social, political, cultural, artistic and religious developments and interactions between the various regions and powers of the Classical Mediterranean. You will develop a high level of competence in the cultures of the Greek, Hellenistic and Roman Mediterranean.

The School has a high concentration of relevant staff expertise and specialisms which is exceptional in Britain. Our expertise ranges across the classical world, including Italy, North Africa, the Aegean, Anatolia and Syria, offering you a coherent perspective of the whole Mediterranean.

This course will equip you with the skills needed to go on to conduct doctoral research or enhance your career prospects, whether in archaeology, related or other professions.

Course Structure

Core Modules:
Text and Material Culture
Dissertation (15,000 words)

Plus 3 option modules from a choice approximately 22.

(Please note: due to regular enhancement of the University’s courses, please refer to Leicester’s own website (http://www.le.ac.uk) or/and Terms and Conditions (http://www2.le.ac.uk/legal) for the most accurate and up-to-date course information. We recommend that you familiarise yourself with this information prior to submitting an application.)

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Southern Europe is a region that finds itself at the cutting edge of key global challenges. South European Studies offers the stimulating experience of studying and training in three different European countries in the region and the opportunity to acquire advanced language, research and professional skills. Read more

Southern Europe is a region that finds itself at the cutting edge of key global challenges. South European Studies offers the stimulating experience of studying and training in three different European countries in the region and the opportunity to acquire advanced language, research and professional skills.

Why This Programme

  • The programme is unique in examining Southern Europe as a distinct region with its own identity and global role. Themes include democracy and protest, migration, social and economic change, nationalism, European integration and the new trade and security challenges that are reshaping the region.
  • Multiple mobilities allow for a truly international learning experience. Immersion into South European society and culture, experience of diverse educational systems, and needs-based language training in all major South European languages offer in depth knowledge of the region.
  • Research and professional tracks are available for maximum choice in curriculum building. The research track leads to a dissertation while the professional track leads to a substantial work placement and a professional project. 
  • Consortium partners include University of Glasgow, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Aix-Marseille Université, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, LUISS Guido Carli Rome and Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa.
  • An innovative summer school offering dissertation training will be held annually over 10 days in July in Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Guest lectures and seminars are offered by scholars and policy practitioners who are leading experts in their field.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The programme is taught over 24 months and includes three mobility periods. In semester 1 you gain an overview of the subject in Glasgow, followed by a choice of mobility partner in semester 2 (Athens or Madrid). Here you will follow a geographical pathway that situates the region in its broader neighbourhood context. Semester 2 also includes an online research and training course. A summer school featuring dissertation/project workshops and meetings with the supervisory teams will be held at the end of semester 2 in Lisbon.

In semester 3 you will have the choice of four thematic pathways along the research track in Athens, Madrid, Aix-en-Provence or Rome. Alternatively, you may follow a professional track that includes a lengthy work placement available in Madrid or Aix-en-Provence. You will spend semester 4 with the same semester 3 mobility partner researching and writing your dissertation or professional project under the guidance of a supervisory team made up of members of staff from each of your chosen mobility partners. If on the professional track you will also undertake a substantial work placement in S4. Please note semesters 3 and 4 cannot be spent with the same partner as semester 2.

Teaching will be via lectures and small group seminars utilising a wealth of theoretical and methodological approaches drawn from the humanities and social sciences. Assignments and coursework include individual and group presentations, structured debates, simulation exercises and role play, reflective logs, fieldwork and study trips. Language courses in all major South European languages are available with each mobility partner over the two years of the programme.

Year 1 - semester 1

University of Glasgow – Overview

  • Research design
  • Politics and society in Southern Europe
  • Southern Europe in international affairs.

Year 1 – semester 2

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens – Greece and the Balkans

  • Contemporary Turkey: Domestic and foreign policy
  • International law and peaceful settlement of disputes in Southeast Europe
  • Nationalism in South Eastern Europe. 

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid* – Spain and the Arab world

  • Elections and electoral behaviour
  • Management and public administration
  • Political Islam in the Magreb and Mashreq 
  • Processes of democratic transition in the Arab World
  • Research seminar.

Introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences (online)

Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa – Dissertation workshops (summer school)

Year 2 – semester 3

Research track

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens – Crisis and change

  • European Union enlargement to Southeast Europe
  • Greek politics: Political economy, crisis and change
  • Interconnected histories: The Balkans and the Black Sea from the 18th to the 20th century.

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid* – Nationalism

  • Public policy analysis
  • Representation and political participation
  • Seminar in comparative politics
  • Theories of nationalism.

Aix-Marseille Université – Borders

  • Borders, territory and conflict in Euro-Mediterranean space
  • Euro-Mediterranean immigration policies
  • Nationalism, religion and identity in the Balkans
  • Patrimony, culture and sustainable development in the Mediterranean
  • Political transitions in Southern Europe
  • Writings and representations of the Mediterranean Sea

LUISS Guido Carli –Democratisation

  • Business and economics in the Mediterranean area
  • European institutions
  • European macroeconomics
  • European politics in the 20th century
  • History of South European enlargements
  • Security and migration in the Mediterranean.

Professional track

Aix-Marseille Université

  • Mediterranean economies
  • Methodologies for the professional project and the traineeship
  • Patrimony, culture and sustainable development in the Mediterranean
  • Politics, governance and institutional actors in the Euro-Mediterranean framework
  • Professional seminars
  • Project and team management.

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

  • same as research track

Year 2 – semester 4

Research track

Athens/Madrid/Aix-en-Provence/Rome – Dissertation

Professional track

Aix-Marseille Université

  • Internship report
  • Methodology for the applied research project
  • Professional project.

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

  • Contemporary political theory
  • Internship/Project
  • Research seminar.

*Additonal courses available in English and Spanish.

Career Prospects

Career prospects include the civil service, diplomacy, regional organisations such as the Union for the Mediterranean and the European Union, international organisations such as NATO and the United Nations, journalism, public opinion and market research, non-governmental organisations and charities, teaching, academic research, business, tourism and international trade.



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This course is ideal if you want to deepen your understanding of the early history of the Mediterranean by systematically including the full range of archaeological data that sometimes complement and sometimes contradict the textual. Read more

About the course

This course is ideal if you want to deepen your understanding of the early history of the Mediterranean by systematically including the full range of archaeological data that sometimes complement and sometimes contradict the textual. It creates a strong platform for future doctoral research combining these approaches. You can specialise in early history (classical antiquity) or later prehistory (Late Bronze Age-Early Iron Age), but a diachronic perspective and broad range of approaches are encouraged.

Your future

Each of our masters courses is designed to equip you with valuable employment skills and prepare you for your future career. If you’re seeking to move into an archaeology-related field from a different academic or employment background, our courses and supportive staff will help you to realise your ambitions and develop professionally.

Graduates from our MA and MSc courses successfully compete for some of the most sought-after archaeological posts in the world. Our courses help students to develop essential transferable skills, and upon graduation they are also in demand by a wide variety of employers outside of the sector.Many of our graduates decide to continue their studies, carrying out doctoral research in their chosen specialist field, equipped with a solid theoretical and practical grounding from which to develop their research.

World-leading expertise

The character and strength of research carried out by Sheffield’s Archaeology department is captured under the following broad themes. These reflect the range of our research and its cross-disciplinary, embedded nature:

Funerary Archaeology
Landscape Archaeology
Bioarchaeology
Medieval Archaeology
Cultural Materials
Mediterranean Archaeology

Specialist facilities

The Archaeology department is situated on the edge of the main campus, near to Sheffield’s city centre. The department houses world-class reference collections and facilities to support teaching, learning and research in a range of archaeological disciplines. Facilities include specialist lab space dedicated to teaching and research, dedicated study spaces, and a student common room.

Fieldwork opportunities

We offer you the opportunity to get involved in our research projects in the UK, Europe and further afield.

How we will teach and assess you

Our students come from all around the world and the content of our courses reflects this. You can expect a balanced timetable of lectures, seminars and practicals. Many of our masters courses also include a fieldwork or project work component. Our teaching staff are leading scholars in their field. Through their research and field projects they are active in generating new knowledge that feeds directly into their teaching.

Funding, scholarships and bursaries

If you accept a place on one of our courses, you may be eligible to apply for WRoCAH and University of Sheffield studentships. There are also a number of departmental and programme-specific scholarships available each year. See our website for details.

Core modules

Greeks, Romans and ‘Others’ in the Ancient World; Rethinking the Ancient Economy; Reinventing Archaeology; Research Design: Planning, Execution and Presentation; Dissertation.

Indicative optional modules

Current Issues in Aegean Prehistory; Mediterranean Landscapes; Heritage, Museum and Field: Archaeology in Practise; Roman Italy and its Hinterland; The Archaeology of Cyprus; Funerary Archaeology; Archaeobotany; Advanced Archaeobotany; Archaeozoology; A module from the Department of History; Enhanced Languages Project (Modern Language Teaching).

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This Euro-Mediterranean Master program, specialized in Neurobiology and Biotechnology, follows the European system of postgraduate studies with equivalent credit value. Read more

This Euro-Mediterranean Master program, specialized in Neurobiology and Biotechnology, follows the European system of postgraduate studies with equivalent credit value. The courses and evaluation procedure are identical within all partner universities. 

High-level, innovative and interdisciplinary training in Neuroscience is conducted with students studying theoretical concepts together with a broad range of experimental methods used in biotechnology and biomedicine. Individual projects in neuroscience and biotechnology are carried out, requiring the elaboration and communication of scientific data and concepts. Students will also master the competencies necessary to implement modern techniques and manage complex, experimental set-ups. 

Teaching follows standards of excellence and is provided by international experts of the consortium. This consortium offers a large variety of top-level research labs for student training. In addition, consortium partners extend this offer with opportunities in their laboratories. Throughout their study and training, students develop connections and network across Europe and the Mediterranean region.

Program structure

Semester 1 and 2: Acquisition of general concepts

  • Cellular Neurobiology
  • Functional Neuroanatomy
  • Neural Basis of Cognition
  • Mechanisms of Neurological Diseases
  • Neuropharmacology
  • Developmental Neurobiology
  • Bioinformatics and Biotechnology
  • Language and Communication

Semester 3:  Societal implications of Neuroscience, Economy & Bioethics

  • Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience
  • Integrative and System Biology
  • Medical Neuroscience and Neuroimaging

Semester 4: 

Practical training in an academic lab or a private company. Students may benefit from the consortium network in Europe and the Mediterranean region. Outside the EMN-Online consortium members, hosting labs are located in many countries worldwide including Germany, USA, Canada, Brazil, Australia, etc.

Strengths of this Master program

  • International curriculum with identical core course.
  • Open to students following initial training and lifelong learning methods.
  • Innovative teaching based on group work and flipped classroom with modern e-learning tools favoring student autonomy.
  • Development of a collaborative MOOC on the societal implications of neuroscience.
  • Specialization tracks based on the expertise of each partner in fundamental or biomedical sciences.
  • A unique, wide-range of complementary competences and methods that cover all fields of modern neuroscience, from molecular aspects to in vivo analysis.
  • A dense network of expert research labs and easy access to high-level, specialized core facilities.
  • Student R&D projects in academic and industrial fields.
  • Bilingual teaching and close collaboration between universities to promote international, mobility opportunities.

After this Master program?

Graduates will be able to continue their studies with research:

  • Application to the PhD programs currently available in the consortium member’s institutions, or in any research institution worldwide.

They may also apply for positions as the following:

  • Researcher, Service Engineer, Application Scientist, Bio-Medical Engineer, Sale Engineer, Healthcare Executive.


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The area around the Mediterranean presents many opportunities for archaeological research. This MSc allows you to explore the region through the examination of periods, geographical areas and themes. Read more

The area around the Mediterranean presents many opportunities for archaeological research. This MSc allows you to explore the region through the examination of periods, geographical areas and themes. You’ll analyse contemporary theoretical approaches, hone your skills in current methodologies and take advantage of the specialist fields and periods of study that our staff, and those in history and classics, can offer.

You’ll develop an understanding of specific regions and periods, current theories, methodologies and major research issues, all of which provide the basis for a PhD or future participation in excavation, survey and/or lab work.

Edinburgh is ideal for archaeological study and research, allowing you to benefit from national and local institutions and heritage agencies, such as the excellent collections of the National Museum, the archival and bibliographic resources of Historic Environment Scotland, and expertise and practical advice from staff in commercial companies.

Programme structure

You will complete one compulsory course and select a further five options from a wide range on offer. You will take a variety of seminar-style courses in small groups while developing your own research project, in the form of the dissertation, on an approved subject of your choice.

The compulsory course is:

  • Research Sources and Strategies in Archaeology

Option courses previously offered include those listed below (Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list).

  • Bronze Age Civilisations of the Near East and Greece
  • From Foraging to Farming: the Beginnings of Agriculture in the Mediterranean and Europe
  • Frontiers in Archaeology: Research Seminars
  • Archaeological Illustration
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The archaeology of the Byzantine empire and its neighbours AD 500-850.
  • Theoretical Archaeology
  • Principles of GIS for Archaeologists
  • Space, Place and Time: the archaeology of built environments
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy
  • Etruscan Italy, 1000 - 300 BC
  • Gallia from the Third Century BC to Augustus
  • Conflict archaeology: materialities of violence
  • Constantinople: The History of a Medieval Megalopolis from Constantine the Great to Suleyman the Magnificent

Learning outcomes

The programme will help you develop potential research interests and explore these with a view to progressing to research. You will also acquire a range of transferable intellectual and practical skills, including:

  • a good understanding of the distinctive nature of archaeology and its contribution to a critical and informed understanding of the past
  • a good understanding of theoretical and methodological debates within archaeology
  • familiarity with a number of important fieldwork studies
  • a broad knowledge of archaeological methods, techniques and practices in current use

Career opportunities

This programme equips you to go on to advanced study and provides a solid foundation for a career. You will gain practical as well as academic experience, teamworking and analytical skills, and will be able to work in a variety of contexts.

Examples of career paths available to archaeology graduates (although some may require additional training) include: higher education, heritage management and agencies, commercial archaeology, teaching, tourism industry, broadcasting and the police. An archaeology degree does not restrict you to a career in archaeology.



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The International MA Program in Maritime Civilizations offers students an exceptional opportunity to explore the history, archaeology, and fabric of maritime societies, as well as the natural environment in which they developed and the anthropogenic environments in which they currently exist. Read more

The International MA Program in Maritime Civilizations offers students an exceptional opportunity to explore the history, archaeology, and fabric of maritime societies, as well as the natural environment in which they developed and the anthropogenic environments in which they currently exist. Students enrolled in the program examine a variety of fields pertaining to maritime civilizations and the marine environment, including coastal and underwater archaeology, marine biology and ecology, maritime history, maritime geology, and geomorphology.

The interdisciplinary curriculum offers advanced knowledge and research training to students interested in exploring human interactions with the sea in a dynamic learning environment.

What you will study

Over the course of study, special emphasis is placed on harbors, ships, and seafaring as part of the maritime heritage of the Mediterranean. The program sheds light on the ecological and geomorphological dynamics in the eastern Mediterranean and their influence on the interaction between man and the sea in ancient and modern times. This program provides a balance between frontal lectures and learning that is based on ongoing, active research carried out in the field and laboratories at the Department of Maritime Civilizations and the Leon Recanati Institute for Maritime Studies.

Culminating in a capstone project, the one-year program is taught in English over three consecutive semesters from October until September. Students wishing to pursue the thesis track are encouraged to do so and will need to submit a research thesis within one year of completing their coursework.

Upon completion of the program, students will be awarded a Master of Arts in Maritime Civilizations.

Field work

Field activities are an integral part of the program. They expose students to applied science, a variety of research methods, a first-hand acquaintance with the sea and an introduction to the challenges of marine studies. The curriculum includes field trips as well as field-based courses and research. Students will also be required to participate in a summer internship program, during which they will work on a field project under the guidance of a faculty mentor.

Courses

Core Courses

  • Marine and Coastal Research Methods
  • Mediterranean Maritime Civilizations (A): the Bronze and Iron Ages
  • The Mediterranean Sea: Ecology, Geology, and Oceanography

Seminars

  • Interdisciplinary Seminar
  • Seminar on Global Sea Level Changes and Their Effect on Human Civilizations
  • Seminar on Sea Trade and Interregional Interactions in the Mediterranean: From the Bronze Age to the End of the Iron Age

Field Trips to the Coastal Sites of Israel 

Elective Courses

  • International Law of the Sea
  • Mediterranean Fisheries and Aquaculture: Past, Present, and Future
  • Mediterraenan Maritime Civilizations (B): from Archaic Greece to the Ottoman Empire
  • Scientific Applications in Maritime Archaeology
  • Ship and Marine Installations: A Model-Building Workshop
  • The Historiography of the Mediterranean

Summer Projects include: Coastal and Marine Geology, Biology, and Ecology; and Coastal and Underwater Archaeology

This is a sample curriculum. For more information on the course curriculum and course descriptions please click here

Scholarships

This program is approved for MASA scholarship. Information on scholarships and financial aid can be found here.



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The Research Master’s programme in Archaeology is the most diverse in the Netherlands. Benefit from our extensive experience and reputation in archaeological research. Read more

The Research Master’s programme in Archaeology is the most diverse in the Netherlands. Benefit from our extensive experience and reputation in archaeological research.

Choose Archaeology at Leiden University:

Our research master's programme offers interesting regional and thematic specialisation possibilities. It stimulates extra-talented and motivated students by exposing them to cutting edge research and making them part of it.

The programme helps you to find your own place in the wide world of archaeological careers, and equips you with all the 21st century professional and transferable skills you need.

Our research facilities and labs, field schools and excavation projects, experimental archaeology projects and the national research schools (ARCHON, OIKOS) offer excellent opportunities for every prospective researcher.

Research possibilities in 2018-2019:

Human Origins

Australopithecus africanus, one of our many ancestors

Interdisciplinary studies of the human past

This programme provides an in-depth interdisciplinary introduction in the European Palaeolithic record and its wider setting, from the Early Pleistocene to the Late Pleistocene.

  • Study the archaeology of Prehistoric hunter-gatherers, from the earliest stone tools in East Africa, 2.6 million years old, to the end of the last ice age.
  • Focus on Neanderthal behaviour, and explore research questions, methods of analysis and theoretical perspectives in Palaeolithic archaeology.

Prehistoric Farming Communities

A view of past communities

The programme aims to develop a detailed and coherent view of past communities.

  • Focus on the later prehistory of Europe, especially on communities bordering the North Sea (Scandinavia, the Low Countries, France, Great Britain and Ireland).
  • Explore research topics such as Beaker cultures and settlements of the Bronze and Iron Ages, cultural identity, and burial ritual and (selective) deposition.

Town and Country in the Mediterranean Region and the Near East

The cradle of civilisation

This programme focuses on a region that has enormous culture-historical significance, and is a cradle of civilisation from Prehistory up to the Early Medieval period.

  • Study various key developments, such as the origins of farming and sedentary life, as well as the emergence of complex urbanised societies and writing, as they occurred first in this region and spread subsequently.
  • Participate in current research projects. These projects focus on the Near East (modern Iraq, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria and Turkey) and Egypt, as well as the Mediterranean.

Religion and Society in Native American Cultures

Leiden Archaeology researchers used high-tech imaging to reveal rare precolonial Mexican manuscript hidden from view for 500 years

Study the past in connection to the present

The programme offers an interdisciplinary context, where archaeology, anthropology, sciences, history, linguistics, landscape and heritage studies come together.

  • Gain a broad knowledge of and deep insight into Native American cultural history, focusing on the relationships between religious worldview and social agency.
  • Participate in field schools related to long-term research projects, such as excavations in the Caribbean or Nicaragua,including studies of material culture and physical anthropology.

Bioarchaeology

Fragments of a sabre-toothed cat skull where recenty excavated

Combine archaeology with hard science

Discover our four research disciplines, together covering an extensive geographical area and time range.

  • Opt for Archaeobotany and investigate changes in vegetation and environment during the past 2.6 million years, as well as the taphonomy of plant macrofossils in lacustrine and fluvial depositional settings.
  • Focus on Archaeo/Palaeozoology and dive into Eurasia in the period from the Early Pleistocene to the Holocene. Biostratigraphical studies, palaeo-ecological studies, as well as taphonomical studies are carried out.
  • Study Human Osteoarchaeology and analyse human remains from international archaeology contexts as well as behavioural and social facets of mortuary practices in past societies.
  • Explore Isope Archaeology and work on the analysis and interpretation of stable isotopes of human and faunal remains from archaeological contexts. Learn how to carry out dating projects, including radiocarbon dating as well as other dating methods.

Archaeological Heritage in a Globalising World

A new and exciting interdisciplinary approach

The programme focuses on the role of the past in the present. Explore the various aspects of recent developments in international politics, cultural tourism, the use of social media, and the revitalisation of local traditions and regional identities.

  • Develop the practical skills to translate academic research and social knowledge into strategies for heritage management, and pursue individual initiatives.
  • Benefit from our close association with the Center for Global Heritage and Development, an interdisciplinary cooperation between three high-ranking universities: Leiden University, Erasmus University Rotterdam and Delft Technical University. This allows for a partnership between archaeology, social sciences, humanities and natural sciences.

The Transformation of the Roman World

Europe on the starting blocks

This programme offers an introduction to advanced studies of Europe and the Mediterranean in Late Roman and Post-Roman times (c. 300-900 AD).

  • Analyse the economic recovery of North-Western Europe in Merovingian and Carolingian times, exchange networks in the Mediterranean, and agrarian innovation and water management in Jordan.
  • Study burial sites, the fate of Roman towns in the early Middle Ages, and centres of Christianity.

Master of Arts or Master of Science

Students who choose the Bioarchaeology track receive a Master of Science degree in Archaeology. For the other research tracks you receive a Master of Arts degree in Archaeology.



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The Master in Intercultural Business Communication is an interdisciplinary study programme offering knowledge and skills to support the communication of market actors (enterprises and non-profit organisations). Read more
The Master in Intercultural Business Communication is an interdisciplinary study programme offering knowledge and skills to support the communication of market actors (enterprises and non-profit organisations). Particular attention is paid to the command of languages, contemporary modes of business administration, including internet marketing and international strategies, and key soft skills of intercultural dialogue and intercultural relations. The objective is to provide robust knowledge of the specificities of conducting business in the Euro-Mediterranean region and beyond as well as to develop communication and intra-personal skills of individuals allowing them to assume managerial responsibilities with confidence.

Information on studying in Slovenia can be found at the following website, provided by the Slovenian government.

Information on study programmes and studying in Slovenia

?Unique features of the programme


Ability to communicate and operate effectively in the Euro-Mediterranean and broader area not only because of a good command of the language, but also because of being equipped with soft skills of communicating in an intercultural and interreligious environment;
An international and intercultural study environment that stimulates curiosity and tolerance;
A mobility option, where students conduct a one-semester study exchange programme at the partner institution – the University of Urbino Carlo Bo
Diverse international faculty from reputed EU and Mediterranean universities;
Modern, active teaching methods and field work;
Ample possibilities to organise and conduct internships;
A combination of methods, exploring also distance learning as a tool of growing significance;
Small classes, allowing team work, close interaction with instructors and most effective uptake of knowledge.


* The students who will take part in the study mobility at the University of Urbino Carlo Bo over one semester, gaining a minimum of 24 ECTS, will receive a master’s degree certificate also from the University of Urbino Carlo Bo. In order to participate, students are required to have the knowledge of the Italian language at least at the level B1, as the courses will be conducted in Italian.

?Mobility option 

The students who will take part in the study mobility at University of Urbino Carlo Bo over one semester, gaining a minimum of 24 ECTS, will receive a master’s degree certificate also from the University of Urbino Carlo Bo. In order to participate, students are required to have the knowledge of the Italian language at least at the level B1, as the courses will be conducted in Italian.

Career progressions

The graduates are qualified to be hired for managerial positions in intercultural business environments, public and private, profit and non-profit institutions and organisations and are prepared for independent entrepreneurial endeavours.

A master’s degree demonstrates a high level of knowledge in a specific field. But the most important is how you use that certificate. With the master’s degree in IBC at EMUNI, you will enhance your employability in the business sector, international organisations, as an entrepreneur or as a member of the civil society. The master’s will just as well provide a step into continuous training, including an academic career. In advancing your career, the EMUNI’s nature of being also a hub of regional dialogue and a network will provide you with vast opportunities. By being part of EMUNI’s events and projects, you will be able to discover various career options well before graduating. In addition, by conducting a placement or an internship that you are likely to organise with EMUNI’s contacts, you will be able to use your new found skills to their full potential. 

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This is a programme geared towards preparing you for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars. Read more

This is a programme geared towards preparing you for higher research into the interaction of the classical world with the Near East - partly through direct research training, and partly through modules taught by experts in their field in small-group seminars.

The relationship between the classical world and neighbouring civilisations is among the most important and most rapidly expanding areas of classical scholarship, and we have particular strength in this field: we offer tuition in Akkadian, and can draw on the resources of the Oriental Museum in Durham and the expertise pooled in the Centre for the Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and the Near East. The programme lasts for one year full-time (two years part-time).

Course Structure

You will take modules to a total of 180 or 190 credits. The structure of the course is as follows:

  • Core research training module (30 credits)
  • Language module in an ancient or modern language relevant to research in the area of Classics or the study of the Mediterranean and Near East (20-40 credits)
  • Core module for Greece, Rome and the Near East (30 credits)
  • 15,000-word Dissertation (60 credits)
  • Optional modules (30-40 credits)

MA modules are 30 credits; you may substitute two undergraduate (20 credit) modules for one MA module. You may also take up to 40 credits of modules offered by other Departments (subject to approval).

Not all modules will be offered every year, and new modules (both elective and core) are added regularly.

Core Modules

  • Classical Research Methods and Resources
  • Compulsory language module (Latin for research/Ancient Greek for research/another ancient language/modern language)
  • Core module for Greece, Rome and the Near East (in 2016-17, options were Akkadian or The Queen of the Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra’s Civilization)
  • Dissertation.

Optional Modules

Optional modules are offered according to the current research interests of members of staff. In recent years, optional modules available in the Department have included:

  • Akkadian
  • Ancient Philosophers on Necessity, Fate and Free Will
  • Ancient Philosophers on Origins
  • Animals in Graeco-Roman Antiquity
  • Forms After Plato
  • Greek Text Seminar on Homeric Epic
  • Greek Sacred Regulations
  • Latin Love Elegy
  • Latin Text Seminar on Roman Epic
  • Life and Death on Roman Sarcophagi
  • Monumental Architecture of the Roman East
  • Religious Life in The Roman Near East
  • Rewriting Empire: Eusebius of Caesarea and the First Christian History
  • The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought
  • The Queen of the Desert: Rise and Decline of Palmyra’s Civilization
  • The Roman Republic: Debates and Approaches.

 Course Learning and Teaching

The MA in Greece, Rome and the Near East is principally conceived as a research training programme which aims to build on the skills in independent learning acquired in the course of the student’s first degree and enable them to undertake fully independent research at a higher level. Contact time with tutors for taught modules is typically a total of 5 hours per week (rising to 7 for someone beginning Latin or ancient Greek at this level), with an emphasis on small group teaching, and a structure that maximises the value of this time, and best encourages and focuses the student’s own independent study and preparation. On average, around 2 hours a week of other relevant academic contact (research seminars, dissertation supervision) is also available.

At the heart of the course is a module focused on the range of research methods and resources available to someone working in the field of Classics. This is run as a weekly class, with a mixture of lectures and student-led discussions. Three or four further elective modules deal with particular specialised subjects. You must choose one module involving work with a relevant foreign language (ancient or modern; beginners modules in each language and specialised text seminars for those who have already studied Greek and Latin are offered every year), and one dealing directly with research on interaction between the ancient Mediterranean and the ancient Near East. All the modules offered will form part of the current research activity of the tutor taking the module. Numbers for each module are typically very small (often no more than five or six in a class). Typically, classes are two hours long and held fortnightly, and discussion is based on student presentations. (Modules for those beginning ancient Latin or Greek are typically more heavily subscribed, but their classes also meet more often: 3 hours per week.) All students write a 15,000-word dissertation, for which they receive an additional five hours of supervisory contact with an expert in their field of interest.

All staff teaching on the MA are available for consultation by students, and advertise office hours when their presence can be guaranteed. The MA Director acts as academic adviser to MA students, and is available as an additional point of contact, especially for matters concerning academic progress. MA students are strongly encouraged to attend the Department’s two research seminar series. Although not a formal (assessed) part of the MA, we aim to instil the message that engagement with these seminars across a range of subjects is part of the students’ development as researchers and ought to be viewed as essential to their programme. In addition, MA students are welcomed to attend and present at the ‘Junior Work-in-Progress’ seminar series organised by the PhD students in the Department. Finally, the student-run Classics Society regularly organises guest speakers – often very high-profile scholars from outside Durham.



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The end of classical antiquity in the Mediterranean and the Middle East witnessed the formation of polities, institutions and ideologies which define and continue to influence our world to the present day. Read more

The end of classical antiquity in the Mediterranean and the Middle East witnessed the formation of polities, institutions and ideologies which define and continue to influence our world to the present day.

By combining a diverse, yet cognate range of research interests, this programme offers an exceptional selection of linguistic and disciplinary expertise in the study of the late antique, Islamic and Byzantine worlds, embracing archaeology, art history, history, languages and literatures, and auxiliary disciplines such as palaeography, numismatics, and sigillography. It presently provides training in the following source languages: Greek, Latin, Arabic, and/or Hebrew.

This programme provides you with excellent preparation for graduate research in historical, archaeological, literary or art-historical topics focusing on the Mediterranean and western Asia from late antiquity into the early middle ages.

You will have access to the expertise of academics who are all passionate about their area of study. Drawn from several schools across the University and brought together in the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, the team comprises specialists in the various branches of late antique, Islamic and Byzantine studies.

Programme structure

The MSc comprises seminars, language classes and tutorials, which will include seminar discussion and debate, presentation to peers, directed and independent reading, as well as interactive language teaching. You will complete one compulsory course and select a further two language courses and an additional three options from a wide range on offer.

The compulsory course is:

  • Approaches to the Long Late Antiquity.

Option courses previously offered include those listed below. Option courses change from year to year and those available when you start your studies may be different from those shown in the list:

  • Elementary Greek (PG) 1 and Elementary Greek (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Greek (PG) 1 and Intermediate Greek (PG) 2
  • Elementary Latin (PG) 1 and Elementary Latin (PG) 2
  • Intermediate Latin (PG) 1 and Intermediate Latin (PG) 2
  • Arabic 1A and Arabic 1B for MSc LAIBS
  • Byzantine Archaeology: The archaeology of the Byzantine empire and its neighbours AD 500-850.
  • Archaeology of the Roman Economy
  • Mosques, Palaces and Gardens in the Golden Age of Islam
  • Mystical Islam
  • The Qur'an - Islam's Holy Book
  • A Topic in Late Antique and Byzantine History, e.g.: Popular Culture in Late Antiquity; The Mediterranean in the Fifth Century; Centre and Periphery in the Age of Constantine VII Porphyrogennetos
  • Constantinople: The History of a Medieval Megalopolis from Constantine the Great to Süleyman the Magnificent
  • Topics in Byzantine Literary History
  • Debating Marriage between Antiquity and the Middle Ages
  • Latin Text Seminar
  • Greek Text Seminar
  • Byzantine Text Seminar
  • Greek Palaeography
  • The Latin Manuscript

Learning outcomes

The programme emphasises acquisition of essential language skills for original research and close work with key historical and/or literary sources of evidence and grounding in the issues surrounding them.

You will gain an appreciation of the associated material cultures, including issues surrounding its recovery, survival and curation, which will prepare you for future academic research and prospective careers in aspects of museums and heritage management.

Career opportunities

Our students view the programme and a graduate degree from Edinburgh as an advanced qualification valued and respected by many employers. Those interested in long-term academic careers consider the MSc as preparation for a PhD.

The MSc provides a toolkit of transferable skills in organisation, research and analysis that will be highly prized in any field of work. It can form a stepping stone to many careers, such as further academic research, museum and art curation, literary translation or analysis, education or public heritage. Graduates of related programmes are putting their skills to use as tutors, archivists, writers and conference coordinators for employers including the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB).



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The Comparative Art and Archaeology MA at UCL is a wide-ranging and challenging programme designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the major problems, theories and approaches in the sociological and anthropological interpretation of the art of pre-modern societies. Read more

The Comparative Art and Archaeology MA at UCL is a wide-ranging and challenging programme designed to provide students with a sophisticated understanding of the major problems, theories and approaches in the sociological and anthropological interpretation of the art of pre-modern societies.

About this degree

Students are encouraged to think critically and work independently, from a broadly comparative perspective, across the boundaries of regional and period specialisation which have traditionally characterised the study of art. They develop subject-specific, research-oriented skills relevant to their development as practising analysts within the history, anthropology or archaeology of art.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules

All students are required to take the following: 

  • Nature, Culture and the Languages of Art: theories and methodologies of art interpretation
  • Social and Material Contexts of Art: comparative approaches to art explanation

Optional modules

Students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's module options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree the most popular choices include: 

  • Ancient Italy in the Mediterranean
  • Archaeology of Buddhism
  • Archaeology of Egypt and the Near East: a Comparative Approach
  • Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
  • Cities, States and Religion in Ancient India
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
  • Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
  • Maya Art, Architecture and Archaeology
  • Social Complexity in Early China: from the Neolithic to the Early Empire
  • Society and Culture in Ancient Egypt
  • Technology in Society: archaeology and ethnography in the Andes
  • The Mediterranean World in the Iron Age
  • The Transformation of the Roman Mediterranean

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures and presentations. Some optional modules include site visits to museums. Assessment is through essays, coursework, oral examination and the dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Comparative Art and Archaeology MA

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have progressed to PhD studies while others have developed careers in museums, other professional cultural heritage organisations, as well as art and archaeology-related publishing and television. A high level of success has been achieved by students going on to fully funded PhD research at the University of Oxford, UCL, University of California Berkeley, and Stanford, funded by the AHRC, the Chilean government, Japanese Government, UCL, and the Ministry of Education of Taiwan. Other students have secured positions in the museums and heritage sector, for example at the Petrie Museum at UCL and the Museum for Asian Civilizations in Singapore.

Employability

Successful graduates will have been fully prepared to undertake research on the art history and archaeology of early civilizations, from a comparative or region/period/theme-specific perspective, and will also possess the expert background knowledge to move on to related professional work in art history, archaeology and cultural heritage (subject to the particular requirements of a given position).

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study.

We are international in outlook, with students and staff from over 40 countries, and involvement in field research projects around the globe. The teaching staff for this programme bring together a range and depth of expertise that is arguably unparalleled at other institutions.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Institute of Archaeology

73% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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