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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is a one year full time programme, which provides an ideal opportunity and environment in which to gain practical training in Research Methods and to join a thriving research team within Swansea University College of Medicine. The Medicine and Life Sciences course has been developed with an emphasis on providing students with a research-oriented approach to their learning. Students are able to tailor their studies towards a career in one of the College’s internationally recognised research themes:

– Biomarkers and Genes,
– Devices,
– Microbes and Immunity,
– Patient & Population Health and Informatics.

Key Features of MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is committed to supporting the development of evidence within the areas of Health, Medicine and Life Science through the training of researchers whose findings will directly inform their own understanding and that of others. The ethos of this programme is to produce graduates with the research skill and knowledge to become effective researchers, who will contribute to the body of knowledge within their chosen area of interest that will have an impact upon the health and well-being of all.

- The advantage of a MRes over other formats is that it provides a structured yet in-depth approach, taking the taught component of FHEQ Level 7 teaching as a framework for conducting research on the candidates own practice.
- Innovative and integrated curriculum that reflects the various aspects of the research process.
- Multidisciplinary teaching team with vast experience and expertise in conducting high quality research.
- Research informed teaching.
- Teaching is supported by online learning and support.
-Flexibility for you to gain specialist knowledge.
- A one year full-time taught masters programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required for a successful research career.
- This course is also available for two years part-time study.
- The opportunity to conduct an individual research project with an interdisciplinary team within a supportive environment.
- Students will be assigned a research-active supervisory team

The aim of the MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is to provide students with a broad research training to prepare them for a research career in Medical and Life Science research with emphasis on: Biomarkers & Genes, Devices, Microbes & Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. The course has been developed to enable graduates to pursue a variety of research careers in Medical and Life Sciences. The programme comprises both taught and research elements.

By the end of the Medicine and Life Sciences programme students will have:

Developed necessary skills to critically interpret and evaluate research evidence; Gained experience the in analysis and interpretation of research data; Advanced knowledge at the forefront of Medical and Life Science research, with the ability to integrate the theoretical and practical elements of research training; Developed the ability to conceptualise, design and implement a research project for the generation of new evidence that informs Health, Medicine and Life Science; Developed practical research skills by working with an interdisciplinary research team; The ability to confidently communicate research ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences; Acquired transferable skills which enhance your employability and future research career.

Modules

Modules on the Medicine and Life Sciences course may include:

PMRM01 Critical Appraisal and Evaluation

PMRM02 Data Analysis for Health and Medical Sciences

PMRM03 Research Leadership and Project Management OR any topic specific FHEQ Level 7 module from the College of Medicine ’s portfolio

Mode of delivery:

The 60 credits of the taught element will be delivered face-to-face, combining formal lecturing, seminars, and group work in addition to tutor-led practical classes. The remaining 120 credits for the research element will be available as distance learning either off or on-site. Irrespective of the location for conducting the research project, students will supported through monthly online (Skype)/or face-to-face supervisory meetings.

Course Structure

Students must complete 3 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 120 credits thesis on a research project aligned to one the College’s research theme. Each taught module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is designed in two phases:

Phase 1 – Training and Application (October – January; 60 credits)

Taught modules in Research Methods and their application to Medicine and Life Science. Personalised education and training relevant to student’s research interests. Identification of research questions and how they might be addressed.Focused on students existing knowledge and research skills.

Phase 2 – Research Project (February – September; 120 credits)

The project is selected by the student in combination with an academic supervisory team. Focussed on one of the College’s four main research themes: Biomarkers and Genes, Devices, Microbes and Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. At the end of Part 2 students submit a 40,000 word thesis worth 120 credits leading to the award of Master of Research in Medicine and Life Science.

Attendance Pattern

Students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Phase One. Attendance during Phase Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

You are also encouraged to attend the Postgraduate Taught Induction Event during the induction week and any programme associated seminars, together with Postgraduate research events.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Every day we are hearing of ground breaking advances in the field of tissue engineering which offer tremendous potential for the future of regenerative medicine and health care. Staff at Swansea University are active in many aspects of tissue engineering.

Key Features of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

We are actively researching many aspects of tissue engineering including the following areas:

- Characterisation and control of the stem cell niche
- Mechanical characterisation of stem cells and tissues
- Production of novel scaffolds for tissue engineering
- Electrospinning of scaffold materials
- Cartilage repair and replacement
- Bone repair and replacement
- The application of nanotechnology to regenerative medicine
- Wound healing engineering
- Reproductive Immunobiology
- Bioreactor design

As an MSc By Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine student, you will join one of the teams at Swansea University working in tissue engineering and use state of the art research equipment within the Centre for NanoHealth, a collaborative initiative between the College of Engineering and Swansea University Medical School.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Aim of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine programme

The aim of this MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine is to provide you with a solid grounding within the field of tissue engineering and its application within regenerative medicine.

This will be achieved through a year of research in a relevant area of tissue engineering identified after discussion with Swansea academic staff. Working with two academic supervisors you will undertake a comprehensive literature survey which will enable the formulation of an experimental research programme.

As a student on the MSc by Research Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine course, you will be given the relevant laboratory training to undertake the research program. The research will be written up as a thesis that is examined. You will also be encouraged to present your work in the form of scientific communications such as journals and conference poster presentation.

The MSc by Research in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine will equip you with a wealth of research experience and knowledge that will benefit your future career in academia or the health care industries.

Recent MSc by Research theses supervised in the area of Tissue Engineering at Swansea University include:

- Quality assurance of human stem cell/primary cell bank
- The development of electrospinning techniques for the production of novel tissue engineering scaffolds.
- The incorporation of pulsed electromagnetic fields into wound dressings.
- The application of pulsed electromagnetic fields for improved wound healing.
- The use of nanoparticles in the control of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds.
- The control of bacterial adhesion at surfaces relevant to regenerative medicine.
- The production of micro-porous particles for bone repair

Facilities

The £22 million Centre for Nanohealth is a unique facility linking engineering and medicine, and will house a unique micro-nanofabrication clean room embedded within a biological research laboratory and with immediate access to clinical research facilities run by local NHS clinicians.

Links with industry

The academic staff of the Medical Engineering discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London also offers the opportunity for collaborative research.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

World-leading research

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

Highlights of the Engineering results according to the General Engineering Unit of Assessment:

Research Environment at Swansea ranked 2nd in the UK
Research Impact ranked 10th in the UK
Research Power (3*/4* Equivalent staff) ranked 10th in the UK

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The MSc in Applied Health Research equips you with the skills necessary to design, implement and publish healthcare research. You gain an in-depth understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the healthcare context. Read more
The MSc in Applied Health Research equips you with the skills necessary to design, implement and publish healthcare research.

You gain an in-depth understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the healthcare context. You also learn the principles and practices of evaluating health services and understand the theories and application of health economics. You acquire the skills necessary to critically understand the concepts, theories and empirical application of epidemiology. The programme is set in a multi-disciplinary context and promotes best practice and interdisciplinary collaboration in healthcare research.

The programme is for practising health professionals or managers wanting to develop their analytical and research skills, or recent graduates looking for a career in health and social care research.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/754/applied-health-research

About the Centre for Health Services Studies (CHSS)

CHSS is a funded research centre in Kent's School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR). CHSS is a centre of research excellence which undertakes high quality research into a wide range of health systems and health services issues at local, national and international levels.

CHSS also supports and advises health care staff to develop and undertake research projects. CHSS collaborates with a wide range of partners in Kent, the UK and in other countries to improve the links between research, policy and practice. Led by Stephen Peckham, CHSS’s key strength is the diverse expertise and skills of our researchers. Our staff carry out research in the fields of Primary Care, Public Health, Public Policy, Health Psychology, Palliative Care, Statistics, Public Engagement, Clinical Trials and Health Economics.

Course structure

The MSc in Applied Health Research is designed to be studied over one year full-time or two years part-time. There are three compulsory modules, plus four optional modules. To be awarded a MSc in Applied Health Research students are required to obtain 180 M level credits including the dissertation module which comprises 60 credits.

The programme is divided into 2 stages.

Stage 1 comprises taught modules totalling 120 credits. Postgraduate students are required to obtain 60 credits of core modules, and 60 credits from a choice of optional modules.

Stage 2 students are required to obtain 60 credits through a compulsory dissertation module. You must successfully complete each module in order to be awarded the specified number of credits for that module. One credit corresponds to approximately ten hours of 'learning time' (including all classes and all private study and research). Thus obtaining 180 credits in an academic year requires 1,800 hours of overall learning time.

- Compulsory modules are currently:

Introduction to Applied Health Research; Quantitative Methods in Health Research and Qualitative Methods in Health Research.

With the agreement of the programme director, students will be able to take an elective/wild module as an optional module from across the School (with the appropriate credit volume).

At Stage 2, students are required to complete a 12-15,000 word dissertation on a subject of their choice.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO900 - Introduction to Applied Health Research (20 credits)
SO954 - Qualitative Methods in Health Research (20 credits)
SO955 - Quantitative Methods in Health Research (20 credits)
SO813 - Sociology of health, illness and medicine (20 credits)
SO950 - Evaluation and Research in Health Services (20 credits)
SO951 - Epidemiology and Public Heath (20 credits)
SO952 - Statistics in Applied Health Research (20 credits)
SO953 - Introduction to Health Economics (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment for Stage 1 is through: oral presentations; written assignments; seminar contribution; online discussion; reflective learning logs; coursework assignments.

Stage 2 will be assessed by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster the intellectual and professional development of health practitioners and trainee health researchers to develop their knowledge, equip them with analytical and research skills, and extend and deepen their reasoning capabilities to undertake applied research in the NHS and other health care settings

- provide a challenging, high-quality focused learning environment that is competitive with other universities within the region

- offer the opportunity to develop multidisciplinary approaches within an ethical framework that supports best practice within applied health research

- attract outstanding students from within the region, irrespective of race, background, gender and physical disability

- help students develop links from outside of the region and work collaboratively in health research to support their professional practice and in their research careers

- equip students with research skills to strengthen local health and social care economies

- where feasible, give students the opportunity to develop and enhance their knowledge and skills of health and social care settings within Europe and elsewhere

- enable health practitioners and health researchers to develop skills in higher level reflection in relation to work-based practice

- provide experienced health practitioners and health researchers with opportunities to gain interdisciplinary perspectives through collaborative inter/ multidisciplinary exchange

- develop the critical and analytical capabilities of health practitioners and health researchers in relation to project management, data analysis and interpretation of data

- provide supervision for health practitioners and health researchers to undertake research that builds a culture of critical evaluation and enquiry in the practice environment

- develop opportunity for self-directed learning and reflection

- enable health practitioners and health researchers from a diverse range of educational backgrounds to access and participate in learning which seeks to capture reflection on experience gained in every day organisational practice.

Careers

Completion of the MSc Applied Health Research will provide you with the skills and practical experience necessary to develop your career in advanced research in the health and social care research context.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. Read more
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. The MRes in Translational Medicine provides high quality graduates with the research rigour, the innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution and so develop a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific medical/dental and veterinary graduates.

Translational Medicine allows experimental findings in the research laboratory to be converted into real benefit for the health and well-being of the patient, through the development of new innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches.

The main objective of the MRes Programme in Translational Medicine is to provide high quality candidates with the research rigour, innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution. Students will receive expert training in all aspects of translational medicine including how new experimental findings are translated into treatments for patients; the experimental steps in the process, the development of innovative solutions, management and leadership skills and an appreciation of marketing and financial aspects of translational medicine through interaction with business leaders and scientists from Biotech and Pharmacy

This research intensive programme incorporates a 38 week research project in an area selected by the student in consultation with the research project co-ordinator. student selected area.

QUB has an international reputation in translational medicine, achieved through the recognised metrics of high impact peer review publications, significant international research funding, the generation of exploitable novel intellectual property and the establishment of successful spin-out biotech companies. This ethos of innovation was recently recognised with the award of the Times Higher Education Entrepreneurial University of the Year.

This unique course offers students the chance to choose one of these three research streams with the indicated specialist modules:

-

Precision Cancer Medicine

This stream provides students with a unique opportunity to study cancer biology and perform innovative cancer research within the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Prospective students are immersed in this precision medicine milieu from Day 1, providing for them the opportunity to understand the key principles in discovery cancer biology and how these research advances are translated for the benefit of cancer patients. The strong connectivity with both the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also opening up potential doors for the student's future career.

-

Cardiovascular Medicine

This stream contains two complementary modules which significantly build on the foundation provided by undergraduate medicine or biomedical science to provide students with an advanced insight into current understanding of cardiovascular pathobiology and an appreciation of how this knowledge is being applied in the search for novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical management of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Students who select the Cardiovascular Medicine Stream will be taught and mentored within the Centre for Experimental Medicine which is a brand new, purpose-built institute (~7400m2) at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus. This building represents a significant investment (~£32m) by the University and boasts state-of-the-art research facilities which are supported by a world-leading research-intensive faculty, ensuring that all of our postgraduate students are exposed to a top quality training experience.

-

Inflammation, infection and Immunity

This stream exposes students to exciting concepts and their application in the field of infection biology, inflammatory processes and the role of immunity in health and disease. There will be detailed consideration of the role of the immune system in host defence and in disease. There is a strong emphasis is on current developments in this rapidly progressing field of translational medicine. Students learn how to manipulate the inflammatory/immune response and their interaction with microbes to identify, modify and prevent disease. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of clinical trials for new therapeutics, and the basic approach to designing a trial to test novel methods to diagnose/prevent or treat illness.

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. Read more
Recognising the need for the development of a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific, medical/dental and veterinary graduates, we are offering a research intensive, student-oriented MRes in Translational Medicine. The MRes in Translational Medicine provides high quality graduates with the research rigour, the innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution and so develop a cohort of appropriately qualified scientific medical/dental and veterinary graduates.

Translational Medicine allows experimental findings in the research laboratory to be converted into real benefit for the health and well-being of the patient, through the development of new innovative diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches.

The main objective of the MRes Programme in Translational Medicine is to provide high quality candidates with the research rigour, innovation culture and the leadership skills to be at the forefront of this translational revolution. Students will receive expert training in all aspects of translational medicine including how new experimental findings are translated into treatments for patients; the experimental steps in the process, the development of innovative solutions, management and leadership skills and an appreciation of marketing and financial aspects of translational medicine through interaction with business leaders and scientists from Biotech and Pharma

This research intensive programme incorporates a 38 week research project in an area selected by the student in consultation with the research project co-ordinator. student selected area.

QUB has an international reputation in translational medicine, achieved through the recognised metrics of high impact peer review publications, significant international research funding, the generation of exploitable novel intellectual property and the establishment of successful spin-out biotech companies. This ethos of innovation was recently recognised with the award of the Times Higher Education Entrepreneurial University of the Year.

This unique course offers students the chance to choose one of these three research streams with the indicated specialist modules:

-

Precision Cancer Medicine

This stream provides students with a unique opportunity to study cancer biology and perform innovative cancer research within the Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology (CCRCB). Prospective students are immersed in this precision medicine milieu from Day 1, providing for them the opportunity to understand the key principles in discovery cancer biology and how these research advances are translated for the benefit of cancer patients. The strong connectivity with both the biotech and biopharmaceutical sectors provides a stimulating translational environment, while also opening up potential doors for the student's future career.

-

Cardiovascular Medicine

This stream contains two complementary modules which significantly build on the foundation provided by undergraduate medicine or biomedical science to provide students with an advanced insight into current understanding of cardiovascular pathobiology and an appreciation of how this knowledge is being applied in the search for novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical management of cardiovascular disease, which remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Students who select the Cardiovascular Medicine Stream will be taught and mentored within the Centre for Experimental Medicine which is a brand new, purpose-built institute (~7400m2) at the heart of the Health Sciences Campus. This building represents a significant investment (~£32m) by the University and boasts state-of-the-art research facilities which are supported by a world-leading research-intensive faculty, ensuring that all of our postgraduate students are exposed to a top quality training experience.

-

Inflammation, infection and Immunity

This stream exposes students to exciting concepts and their application in the field of infection biology, inflammatory processes and the role of immunity in health and disease. There will be detailed consideration of the role of the immune system in host defence and in disease. There is a strong emphasis is on current developments in this rapidly progressing field of translational medicine. Students learn how to manipulate the inflammatory/immune response and their interaction with microbes to identify, modify and prevent disease. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of clinical trials for new therapeutics, and the basic approach to designing a trial to test novel methods to diagnose/prevent or treat illness.

Read less
Upon graduation from the Master’s Programme in Translational Medicine (TRANSMED) you can be expected to. -Be fluent in medical sciences and clinical practice from the point of view of a researcher. Read more
Upon graduation from the Master’s Programme in Translational Medicine (TRANSMED) you can be expected to:
-Be fluent in medical sciences and clinical practice from the point of view of a researcher.
-Be familiar with up-to-date translational research methodologies.
-Be adept at scientific reasoning and critical analysis of scientific literature.
-Acknowledge the regulatory and ethical aspects of biomedical and clinical research.
-Have mastered scientific and medical terminologies.
-Have excellent communication and interpersonal skills, enabling you to find employment in an international and interdisciplinary professional setting.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The TRANSMED studies are built upon three core educational themes:
Development of Research Skills
These include an introduction to current methodologies, which are further developed during a training period in a research group; research ethics: principles of clinical investigation; and writing of research or grant proposals.

Studies in Human Disease
These range from normal human physiology and anatomy, and basic biomedical courses, to more specialised studies covering various topics pertinent to the specialist option. You supplement these studies with clinical rounds, during which you have an opportunity to study selected patient cases in hospital wards, under the supervision of a clinician mentor.

Development of Communication Skills
These are promoted throughout the curriculum, through utilisation of interactive approaches and discussions, problem-based learning and oral presentations. The multidisciplinary TRANSMED community encompasses a wide range of educational backgrounds and provides ample opportunities for direct interactions with medical students, science and clinical teachers to enable you to practice and adopt interdisciplinary communication skills. At the end of the course of study, your communication skills will be evaluated in the final exam, during which you will orally present your research plan to expert examiners.

Selection of the Majors

The major of the programme is Translational medicine. During your first study year you can choose any of the five available specialisation options. These options and their specific goals are:
Neuroscience and Psychobiology
-To acquire knowledge on research methodology and state-of-the-art information in systems and cognitive neuroscience, as well as in clinical neuropsychology.
-To learn to produce new scientific information in the fields of psychobiology of human life, health, and stress, and to transfer the results between basic research and clinical settings.

Cancer
-To acquire basic knowledge of the principles of neoplastic growth, cancer progression and dissemination.
-To acquire basic understanding of the interplay between different cell types during neoplastic growth.
-To acquire knowledge of major research methodologies and disease models in cancer biology.

Regenerative Medicine
-To understand the principles of developmental and stem cell biology and regenerative pharmacology as the basis of regenerative therapies.
-To be familiar with the major technologies applied in regenerative medicine, including tissue engineering, cell and organ transplantation and transplantation immunology.
-To understand the ethical principles of clinical translation of basic research and application of regenerative medicine therapies.

Metabolic Disorders
-To be able to understand the basic metabolic pathways.
-To understand the pathophysiology of metabolic disorders such as diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and obesity.
-To be able to use genetic knowledge as a basis for prediction, diagnosis and treatment of metabolic disorders.

Cross-Disciplinary Translational Medicine
-To achieve a broad understanding of topics and methods in the field of Translational medicine.

Programme Structure

The scope of the programme is 120 credits (ECTS) and can be completed within two academic years (60 ECTS / year).

The Master of Science in Translational medicine degree includes 60 ECTS of advanced and 60 ECTS of other studies. Both of these include both obligatory and optional studies.

The majority of the advanced studies are related to the chosen specialist option and include:
-Master’s thesis (30 ECTS)
-Placement in a research group for learning advanced methods in your selected field of study
-Methodological and human health and disease-related courses
-Clinical rounds in Helsinki University Central Hospital (HUCH) clinics
-Final examination in your field of specialisation

The other studies include e.g.
-Article analysis, scientific writing and presentation
-Biomedicine and introductory courses in research methods
-Career planning and orientation
-Individual study coaching and personal study plans
-Research ethics

You can select the optional courses based on your personal interests, or to support your chosen specialisation option. You can also include courses from other suitable Master’s programmes at the University of Helsinki, such as:
-Life Science Informatics
-Genetics and molecular biosciences
-Neuroscience
-Human Nutrition and Food Behaviour

You can also include studies in other universities under the flexible study right-agreement (JOO).

Career Prospects

The Master of Science in Translational medicine degree provides excellent opportunities to apply for and attend postgraduate studies. Currently, 50% of TRANSMED graduates are continuing their studies in doctoral programmes, either at the University of Helsinki or abroad.

TRANSMED graduates are also highly valued in the private sector. Around 35% of graduates have been employed directly by bioindustry, pharma or other health sector enterprises either in Finland or abroad. Titles include product manager, product specialist, personalised health care manager etc. All such enterprises usually recruit both at the graduate (MSc) and postgraduate (PhD) levels.

The health and health technology sectors represent a rapidly emerging field, and one of the areas with a growing importance as the population ages and the costs of new therapies steadily increase. Thus, the demand for well-trained specialists in the field of translational medicine is likely to increase in the near future, providing excellent career prospects globally.

Internationalization

The Translational Medicine major is only available in this international programme, making the programme attractive to both Finnish and international students. Indeed, opportunities for personal interaction with students from different cultures are an integral feature of the studies. During your studies, you can also volunteer to act as a tutor for the incoming international students.

The international research community in The Academic Medical Centre Helsinki actively participates in teaching in TRANSMED. You complete the research group practice for your Master’s thesis in multicultural research groups.

It is also possible to complete your Master’s thesis work or research group placement abroad, or to include coursework done at a foreign university.

Research Focus

The specialisation options of the programme – Neuroscience and psychobiology, Cancer, Regenerative medicine, Metabolic disorders, and Cross-disciplinary translational medicine – are closely aligned with the research focus areas of the Faculty of Medicine: malignancy, inflammation, metabolism, degenerative processes as well as psychiatric disorders and their mechanisms. You therefore have an opportunity to learn from, and be supervised by, the leading experts and professors in their fields.

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The MRes offers exciting opportunities to develop advanced scientific, research and transferable skills required to become an independent researcher. Read more

Course Description

The MRes offers exciting opportunities to develop advanced scientific, research and transferable skills required to become an independent researcher.

The MRes is organised by the Centre for Human Development, Stem Cells & Regeneration (CHDSCR) which undertakes fundamental research into early development and stem cells, together with applied translational research targeting the NHS and patient benefit.

Through research projects totalling 32 weeks, you will develop a broad range of laboratory skills and work in different research environments. You will be supervised by internationally recognised academic researchers. In addition to providing broader training in scientific research, the course will develop your transferable skills including time and project management, public speaking, critical appraisal and scientific writing, thus aiding employability for a variety of careers.

Key Information

The intake for this MRes is 15-20 students.

What does this MRes provide?

During the one year, full time programme that commences in September/October, MRes students undertake taught modules in Research Skills in Biomedical Sciences, Stem Cells, Development & Regenerative Medicine, and Advanced Scientific Skills. Students also undertake two research projects totalling 32 weeks, to develop a broad range of laboratory skills and gain experience of working in different research environments. Students are supervised by internationally recognised Academic researchers in the CHDSCR.

Why study this MRes at the University of Southampton?

The University of Southampton is consistently ranked in the top 10 national and the top 100 international Universities. We are a world leading research intensive university, with a strong emphasis on education and are renowned for our innovation and enterprise. The CHDSCR is a Centre for excellence and strategic importance. Students work within vibrant and thriving interdisciplinary research programmes that harness the translational strength of the University, together with an outstanding clinical infrastructure and enterprise to translate pioneering developmental and stem cell science for patient benefit.

Who should apply?

High-achieving Biological/Biomedical Science graduates interested in developing further laboratory based research skills and subject specific knowledge before committing to a PhD programme, or a career in academia, industry, government policy or science journalism.

How will this MRes enhance your career prospects?

In addition to providing broader training in the intellectual basis of scientific research in Stem Cells, Development and Regenerative Medicine, the course will develop your transferable skills including time and project management, public speaking, critical appraisal and scientific writing, thus aiding employability for a variety of careers.

What will you learn in the modules?

i) Stem Cells, Development & Regenerative Medicine module
Students are introduced to core concepts through a series of facilitator-led workshops focussing on key research publications. Students critically appraise primary research papers and develop the skills required to understand, critique and interpret research findings. Integral to these workshops is the requirement for students to present their thoughts and participate in group discussions with both their peers and academic facilitators.

ii) Research Skills in Biomedical Sciences (RSBS) module
A combination of taught and practical sessions are used to introduce students to the core concepts underlying statistical analysis and study design that support students in handling their own data and critically appraising data published by others.

iii) Advanced Scientific Skills module
A series of taught and practical sessions introduce students to additional core concepts used in Biomedical Sciences such as the analysis and critical appraisal of large data sets. In addition, key principles required to relay research to both a scientific and lay audience are introduced. Students write both a scientific and lay abstract for a published primary paper and give a research presentation suitable for a lay audience. Thus, students develop the skills required to communicate their research to both scientists and non-specialists.

iv) Research Project modules
In the two research projects, students are introduced to a range of laboratory skills gaining valuable practical experience of research methodology, experimental design, data interpretation, viva voce, scientific writing, oral and poster presentations.

What teaching and learning methods will be used?

A variety of methods are used including lectures, research seminars, small group discussions, journal club presentations, analysis of large data sets and in depth research projects which incorporate the evaluation and presentation of research findings within the field of stem cell biology. A range of summative and formative assessment methods are used to assess student performance. These include oral presentation, poster presentation, written assignments/critical review, viva voce, laboratory proficiency, analysis of large datasets, lay/scientific abstracts and preparation of a research proposal.

What are the entry requirements for this MRes?

The minimum classification normally expected for a degree entrant is at least a second class upper division (1st or 2:1) in Biological/Biomedical Sciences or a closely related subject from any approved University.

Qualifications from non-UK institutions must be of an equivalent standard to those of UK Universities. Before commencing the course, non-UK applicants should obtain an overall IELTS score of 7.0, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component.

What are the fees for this MRes?

Home/EU: £5,900 tuition fee + £5,100 bench fee

Overseas: £18,800 tuition fee + £5,100 bench fee

Scholarships

The University of Southampton offers a number of Scholarships. Please refer to: http://www.southampton.ac.uk/uni-life/fees-funding/international-fees-funding/funding-by-country.page

To Apply

Please click on the “Apply Now” button on our website
Please state Faculty of Medicine in the drop down menu as this Programme is delivered by the Faculty of Medicine. Or click on the link below

https://studentrecords.soton.ac.uk/BNNRPROD/bzsksrch.P_Login?pos=7009&majr=7009&term=201617#_ga=1.107238786.1658067525.1460548452

To register interest, or for further Programme information please contact:

Programme Leader: Dr Franchesca Houghton
Deputy Programme Leader: Dr Rahul Tare

Email:

For general enquiries please contact:

Email:

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

This Master's degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience aims to equip students with the skills necessary for research careers across a range of scientific areas.

Key Features of Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience

Performance:

- One of four Psychology departments to achieve a 100% 4* rating (maximum score possible) for the reach and significance of its work in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Based on this measure Psychology at Swansea was ranked 14th (out of 82) in the UK
- Top third ranking for UK Psychology Departments (2016 Complete University Guide)
- Joint 12th UK ranking for Psychology (Graduate prospects)
- The MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is unique and novel in the range of modules and techniques the programme offers

Teaching and Employability:

- Teaching is carried out by highly-respected, research active, professionals conducting research across a range of cognitive neuroscience research areas and publishing in top international journals
- Students benefit from state-of-the-art technology with over twenty general purpose research rooms and numerous specialised testing facilities
- Ability to offer international students mentoring throughout the course

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is at the intersection of cognitive science, brain imaging, and clinical neuroscience.

It is considered one of the most significant areas of contemporary science and it is beginning to transform the understanding of both normal and damaged brain function.

The importance of cognitive neuroscience has been recognised by the Welsh Government which created the multi-centre Wales Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, drawing together the psychology departments at Swansea, Cardiff and Bangor Universities.

A core aspect of the provision for MSc Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience will also be collaboration with the College of Medicine at Swansea University.

Modules

Modules on the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience may include:

Theoretical Issues in Cognitive Neuroscience
Practical Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience
Statistical Methods
Computing skills
Generic Research Skills
Special Research Skills
Neuropsychology
Introduction to Research Programming
Psychology of Ageing

Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience Course Structure

The full-time master's degree for Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience is studied over one year and involves attending University for two full days a week (Monday and Tuesday).

The part-time degree in Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience, which is studied over two years, normally involves attending the University for one full day a week.

Taught modules are provided in the first two semesters, with a final high credit-bearing empirical research project with a strong cognitive neuroscience component typically undertaken over the summer.

Sessions may be arranged occasionally on other days of the week (e.g. visiting clinician talks/workshops and employability sessions).

Who should apply?

The Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course is suitable for:

- anyone looking for a valuable academic foundation for future doctoral training
- anyone looking to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science
- UK and international psychology graduates seeking positions as researchers in psychology, cognitive neuroscience or related fields.
- psychology graduates aiming to secure a PhD by research in a psychology, cognitive neuroscience, or a related discipline
- graduates from other disciplines such as Biology, Neuroscience, and Medicine who wish to develop further skills related to psychology and cognitive neuroscience

Career Prospects

Students have successfully used the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience qualification to gain positions on PhD research programmes. Others have successfully gained employment as Research Associates/ Officers, as well as working in Teaching positions, the Business Sector and in Administration.

On completion of the Research Methods in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience course students should also be able to demonstrate their employability across a range of disciplines within cognitive neuroscience and related fields, including psychology, computing, neuroscience, medicine and computer science.

Staff Expertise

Many of the College of Human and Health Sciences team are leaders in their specialist fields of research. They undertake novel and original research in a variety of areas, including clinical and health psychology, brain injury, sleep, cognition, neuroscience and developmental psychology.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.

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This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Read more
This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Taught units provide intensive training in research methodology, experimental design, statistical analyses and data interpretation. Skills training in verbal and written communication is also emphasised.

The core of the programme is an eight-month research project, conducted within one of the University of Bristol's internationally recognised research groups in either the Faculty of Health Sciences or the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences. Opportunities will be available in laboratory or clinical-based investigations.

The programme is suitable for medical, dental and veterinary students interested in pursuing a research-intensive intercalation option after three years of study. It is also suitable for graduates in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and bioscience subjects who wish to develop their research skills.

Programme structure

This programme is delivered by research scientists and clinicians through lectures, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials.

Unit 1: Introduction to Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit introduces a variety of research methods used in basic and applied clinical research including: finding and reading relevant research information; presenting research results; basic statistical analysis; data interpretation; ethics; public engagement; and commercialising research.

Unit 2: Further Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit aims to develop further knowledge and practical experience in statistical analyses, experimental design and laboratory methods and includes training in the use of a statistical software package and practical experience in several laboratory techniques.

Unit 3: Project Proposal in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit involves planning and writing a research project proposal (4500 words), which includes a literature review, aims, impact, research plan, ethical considerations, contingency plans, timetable and references.

Unit 4: Research Club in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit aims to develop your ability to present, critically evaluate and discuss scientific findings by contributing to journal clubs, attending and summarising research seminars and presenting your own research.

Unit 5: Research Project in Health Sciences Research (120 credits).
During this unit you will gain extensive experience in scientific/clinical research by conducting an independent project related to an area of interest to you. You will write up your research in the form of a thesis (10,000 words), and present and discuss your work in a viva and research symposium.

Careers

This programme is suitable for those with a clinical or biosciences background who wish to develop their research skills before embarking on a research/clinical career in academia or the pharmaceutical industry. It provides the ideal foundation for further studies leading to a PhD.

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The overall aims of the programme are to. - provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;. Read more
The overall aims of the programme are to:

- provide professionally relevant teaching and learning informed by research in an integrated clinical and research environment;
- develop and create a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine able to pursue and develop their roles in a rapidly-changing and challenging environment of genomic medicine;
- prepare healthcare professionals for the adoption of genomic technologies and the increasing use of genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care, and with the required knowledge, skills and capability to have a positive personal impact on the work of others;
- develop a cohort of doctors and other professionals allied to medicine with an understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities relevant to genomic medicine;
- encourage a commitment to intellectual challenge and evidence-based clinical practice informed by the latest conceptual and theoretical knowledge of genomic medicine;
- develop students' intellectual, practical and transferable skills related to genomic medicine;
encourage critical thinking related to genomic medicine;
- conduct systematic research relevant to their professional practice.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvmgmpgnm

Learning Outcomes

The over-arching learning outcomes are:

- Knowledge and understanding -

- To enhance the students’ knowledge and critical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine relevant to their present and future roles.
- To develop students’ knowledge and understanding of genomic medicine informed by research in a rapidly-changing integrated clinical and research environment.
- To enable deployment of new knowledge in their clinical practice, and to have a positive personal impact on the work of others in their clinical team and wider service.
- To develop an understanding of genomic technologies and to be able to use genomic information as part of the diagnostic and treatment pathway.
- To develop students’ knowledge so that they have the confidence to lead service improvement for safe and high quality patient care.
- To update and extend students’ understanding of research methodologies and clinical opportunities.
- To demonstrate knowledge, abilities and skills to engage in focused, professionally-relevant, independent learning, and through the production of a dissertation.

- Skills and other attributes -

- The skills necessary to locate, read, interpret and analyse primary and secondary sources of material enabling the development of a conceptual and theoretical understanding of recent developments in genomic medicine.
- Skills to evaluate current scholarship and research critically and to place this knowledge within the context of their own situation and practice as clinical leaders.
- The ability to formulate a research topic relevant to their clinical context, to collect and analyse primary and/or secondary sources of data, and to undertake professionally relevant research.
- The facility to communicate the results of their ideas, research and its conclusions in a written form acceptable as a work of scholarship potentially publishable in a professional or academic journal.

Format

The MPhil comprises either:

- eight modules, plus a research project and associated dissertation of 10-12,000 words, or
- ten modules, plus a literature-based research project and associated dissertation of 5-6,000 words.

Students must complete seven Core Modules and one/three further modules chosen from a range of Option Modules, with additional between-module reflection, study and assignment work.

The modules are structured as follows:

- Core Module 1: An introduction to human genetics and genomics
- Core Module 2: Omics techniques and the application to genomic medicine
- Core Module 3: Genomics of common and rare disease
- Core Module 4: Molecular pathology of cancer and application in cancer diagnosis, screening, and treatment
- Core Module 5: Application of genomics to infectious disease
- Core Module 6: Pharmacogenetics and stratified healthcare
- Core Module 7: Bioinformatics, interpretation, and data quality assurance in genome analysis

Option modules will be selected from the following list. Not all options may be offered every year.

- Option Module 1: Ethical, Legal and Social Implications in applied genomics (ELSI) **
- Option Module 2: Counselling skills for genomics
- Option Module 3: Professional and research skills
- Option Module 4: Advanced Bioinformatics – from genomes to systems
- Option Module 5: Epigenetics and epigenomics
- Option Module 6: Expanding the content of the MPhil in genomic medicine with a workplace-based module

Each core module will involve around 30 hours of contact time, including lectures, group work and online teaching.

Placements

The research project element of the course may be undertaken in a number of scientific institutions, within and without the University. This may include the University's School of Clinical Medicine, the School of Biological Sciences, the European Bioinformatics Institute, Welcome Trust Sanger Institute and, subject to approval, other suitable research institutions.

Assessment

Students must submit a dissertation of 5-6,000 words or 10-12,000 words, depending on the options selected. This will be worth 1/6th or 1/3rd of the overall mark for the course, respectively.

For each of the taught modules, students must complete summative assignments of 2500-3500 words or equivalent (except where other methods of module assessment are indicated in individual module descriptions)

Each student is allocated a named supervisor, who will meet regularly with the student to discuss progress and provide feedback and support as required. Written supervision reports are accessed via the online supervision system. Students are given feedback on the assessments conducted at the end of each module.

All students will meet with the programme director on a termly basis to discuss progress and to provide their feedback on the course.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Funding is available from Health Education England to pay course fees for NHS employees wishing to apply for this course. Prospective students wishing to apply for HEE funding should refer to the application process published by HEE at http://www.genomicseducation.hee.nhs.uk/msc-funding-info/and ensure that access to this funding is approved before applying for the course.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Sports Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Sports Science at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Swansea University has a flourishing research environment looking at elite sports performance and exercise health and medicine.

Key Features of MSc by Research in Sports Science

Sport and Exercise Science research at Swansea University takes place in the Applied Sports, Technology, Exercise and Medicine (A-STEM) research centre. Engaging in research, teaching and third mission activity that spans the artificial boundaries between traditional disciplines. Swansea University is unique as the only research-intensive university in the UK where Sport and Exercise Science is located in Engineering.

Research activity in Sport and Exercise Science is in two main areas:

Elite Sports Performance
Exercise Medicine and Health

Our research spans the areas of, science, technology, health and medicine applied to sport, exercise and health settings with children, older people, clinical groups and elite international sports people. Importantly, sport and exercise science research is applied in nature and populates teaching, third mission activities and work-related learning opportunities. It has impact on elite sport, students, industry, patients and the general public.

MSc by Research in Sports Science typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

The A-STEM Research Centre has developed its own laboratories that rank alongside the most prestigious and well known universities in the UK.

Find out more about the facilities used by Sports Science students and Researchers at Swansea University.

Swansea University also has a proud reputation for sporting excellence and outstanding sporting facilities. See a 365 degree panoramic of the Sports Village: including the Wales National Pool, Gym, Indoor Courts, Running Track, Astroturf and Indoor Track.

Links with Industry

In addition to teaching and research, academic staff are actively engaged with applied practice and consultancy in sport and exercise settings.
 
Our well-established links include organisations such as:
 


Diabetes UK
Haemaflow
Swansea NHS Trust
Carmarthenshire NHS Trust

UK Sport
Sport Wales
Welsh Rugby Union
International Rugby Board (IRB)

We also work with elite sports teams including:


Scarlets Rugby
Ospreys Rugby
Swansea City AFC
West Ham United AFC
British Bobsleigh
British Bobskeleton
British Cycling
Wales 7s Rugby

Our staff also regularly consult in exercise settings with populations with chronic disease, including diabetes, cardiac rehabilitation and renal care.

Research

Sport and exercise science research occurs within the world-leading Applied Sports Technology Exercise Medicine (A-STEM) Research Centre.

Significant research in diabetes and health as well as sedentary behaviour, physical activity, fitness, fundamental movement skills in childhood obesity is undertaken by a number of clinical exercise science staff.

Our elite sport performance group is leading a project supported by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government to position Wales at the forefront of Science, Technology and Medicine in elite sport and to promote its wider application in health and education. This project represents a unique collaboration of leading Welsh academics, businesses and sport, with the overall objective of enhancing their respective performances.

Fundamental links integrating engineering and sport and exercise science research are being developed by the Sports Visualisation Group who analyse video material to rapidly produce data for immediate analysis of sports performance. Recently the Engineering Behaviour Analytics in Sport and Exercise (E-BASE) research group was set up to investigate the use of advanced sensor and processing technology to quantify training and activity in sport and clinical populations respectively.

We have international research links and projects with universities in Southern and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USE, Italy and Austria.

Student quote

I chose Swansea University to study my MSc Sports Science by Research because Swansea has a great reputation for sports and exercise research and the A-STEM research project is an exciting environment to be part of. Swansea also has great funding opportunities for postgraduate study and it is a really friendly and supportive university.

Zoe Marshall, Sports Science, MSc by Research

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Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship. Read more
Oxford Brookes University is the home of the Centre for Medical Humanities, which is renowned nationally and internationally for its innovative and cutting-edge scholarship.

The MA History (History of Medicine) is a distinctive strand within our MA History. The strands offers you the unique chance to focus specifically on the social, scientific and cultural history of medicine, as well as the relationship between medicine and the humanities (history, philosophy, sociology, literature and art) through a course of research training. It also gives you the flexibility to pursue taught modules in other aspects of history if you wish.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/history-of-medicine/

Why choose this course?

- You will benefit from being taught by a team of nationally and internationally recognised scholars. We are all active researchers and we include all aspects of our own research on the course, teaching specialist modules in our areas of expertise and supervising dissertations in our specialist subjects.

- The knowledge and expertise you gain is grounded in the latest scholarship within the field.

- You will have the opportunity to conduct advanced research on a dissertation subject of your choice.

- The course provides an excellent preparation for students intending to continue with PhD research. It will also be of interest to health care professionals and to graduates in history or the social sciences seeking further personal development.

- All classes are held in the evening. There are no exams - assessment is by written work only.

We welcome further enquiries – please contact the MA Subject Co-ordinator, Dr Viviane Quirke, or the History Programme Administrator, Poppy Hoole, email:

Teaching and learning

The MA course is taught through small-group seminars, workshops and individual tutorials. Assessment is entirely by written work. There are no examinations.

Specialist facilities

Oxford Brookes is home to the Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH). The Centre was established in early 2015. It marks an exciting expansion and diversification of the work previously conducted through the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society which over the past 15 years has been the beneficiary of substantial support from both Oxford Brookes University and the Wellcome Trust. The CMH is building on this track record of outstanding research and grant successes, innovative teaching, career development and public outreach. Engaging with the expanding field of medical humanities, the CMH brings historians of medicine together with scholars from History, History of Art, Philosophy, Social and Life Sciences as well as Anthropology and Religion. It thus aims to foster genuine interdisciplinary collaboration amongst staff and students through a range of new research and teaching initiatives, which reflect the new concerns with the relationship between medicine and the humanities in the twentieth first century.

Students have access to Oxford Brookes University’s special Welfare collection, as well as numerous local medical archive resources. They also have access to the world famous Bodleian Library, a copyright library, which houses all books published in the United Kingdom and Ireland. In addition to the Bodleian and its unparalleled collection of books and rare historical manuscripts, there are affiliated libraries such as Rhodes House, home to the Bodleian Library of Commonwealth and African Studies, and the Vere Harmsworth Library of the Rothermere American Institute, where students will find one of the finest collections of publications on the Political, Economic and Social History of the United States from colonial times to the present.

Oxford is a lively centre for events, exhibitions, seminars and open lectures in various specialist areas of history, which staff and students at Brookes regularly attend.

It is also an easy bus or train ride to London for convenient access to a wider resource of historical materials. These include various seminars and lecture series offered by the University of London and the Institute of Historical Research. In addition, The National Archives at Kew, The British Library and other specialised libraries will be of particular interest to students.

Oxford is also within easy reach of other archival collections in Birmingham, Cambridge, Reading and Bristol.

Careers

Students who have completed an MA have developed a variety of careers. A significant number have gone on to undertake PhD study and secondary school history teaching. Others have taken up careers in archive management; law; accountancy; local government and the civil service as well as GCHQ - all jobs which require excellent research and analysis skills.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

The department boasts a wealth of research expertise and is home to two important research centres:

- Centre for Medical Humanities (CMH)
The centre seeks to promote the study of medical humanities. , It is one of the leading research groups of its kind in the UK and has research links with a wide network of associates, both national and international. The centre also provides associate status opportunities to researchers from outside the University who wish to advance their studies and gain experience in the field.

- Centre for the History of Welfare
The centre provides a base for collaboration between all those with an interest in the history of welfare both within Oxford Brookes and across the wider academic and professional communities. It acts as a focus for research in this field. It aims to support and disseminate research which makes connections between historical research and current welfare policy, and thereby fosters links between historians of welfare and policy makers.

Research areas and clusters

Our thriving research and postgraduate culture will provide you with the ideal environment in which to undertake a research degree on a broad range of topics from 16th century to the present day, and to engage in interdisciplinary research. Research skills are developed in preparation for your dissertation and provide a potential pathway to PhD study.

You will have the opportunity to work alongside scholars of international standing as well as receiving comprehensive training in research methods. Principal research areas in which our teaching staff specialise include:
- History of fascism
- History of race
- Social history
- History of crime, deviance and the law
- History of religion from the Reformation onwards

As well as meeting to discuss and analyse central texts in the field, each group undertakes a number of activities. This includes organising work-in-progress seminars, and offering support and feedback for external grant applications.

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This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Read more
This one-year programme (two years part-time) is designed to give a deeper understanding of historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. Research training includes historical methods, philosophical analysis and socio-cultural models, providing an interdisciplinary environment for those interested in progressing to a PhD or those simply interested in HPSM studies.

Former students have gone on to attract major doctoral funding awards and jobs in the media, government and NGOs. The core teaching staff are attached to the Department of Philosophy, the Northern Centre for the History of Medicine (co-run with Newcastle University) and the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health. Modules are taught via lectures, seminars, personal tutorials and workshops. The diversity of staff research interests allows you to focus your research on a wide variety of topics, including historical, philosophical and/or cultural aspects of biology, biomedical ethics, the body, the environment, gender, medical humanities, medicine, and the physical sciences.

Programme Structure

Core Modules:
-Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine
-Dissertation (Philosophy, Health, or History)

Optional Modules:
Students choose a total of three optional modules, with at least one from List A and one from List B. The module titles below are those offered in 2015/16. Not all the modules will necessarily run every year.
List A:
-History of Medicine
-Science and the Enlightenment
-Ethics, Medicine and History
-Gender, Medicine and Sexuality in Early Modern Europe
-Gender, 'Sex', Health and Politics

List B:
-Philosophical Issues in Science and Medicine
-Phenomenology and the Sciences of Mind
-Current Issues in Metaphysics
-Philosophy of Social Sciences
-Ethics of Cultural Heritage

Learning and Teaching

The MA in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (HPSM) provides the opportunity for in-depth engagement with historical, philosophical and cultural issues in science and medicine from antiquity to the present day. In the process, students develop critical abilities and independent research skills in an interdisciplinary environment that prepare them for further postgraduate study and for a wide range of careers where such skills are highly prized.

Students select three topic modules from two lists of usually five historical and five philosophical options. They are also required to take a Research Methods in the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine module and to complete a double-module dissertation in the Department of Philosophy, the Department of History, or the School of Medicine, Pharmacy and Health.

Topic modules are typically taught via seven two-hour seminars, two one-to-one tutorials, and a workshop at the end of the module. Seminars incorporate staff-led discussion of topics, student presentations and small group discussions, in the context of a friendly, supportive environment. Seminars serve to (i) familiarise students with topics, positions and debates, (ii) help them to navigate the relevant literature, (iii) refine their oral and written presentation skills and (iv) further develop their ability to independently formulate, criticise and defend historical and philosophical positions. Students are expected to do approximately four hours of reading for each seminar. In consultation with the module leader students decide upon an essay topic, and the most appropriate supervisor available for their topic is allocated. At this point, they begin a more focused programme of reading and independent study, and also benefit from the one-to-one supervisions with the expert supervisor. These supervisions provide more focused teaching, tailored to a student’s chosen essay topic. Supervisions further enable students to develop and refine their own historiographical or philosophical positions, convey them clearly and support them with well constructed arguments. In the workshop students present a draft of their essay and receive further feedback from their peers as well as staff.

The core modules of the programme are the Research Methods module and the double-module Dissertation. The former consists of nine seminars, each of 2 hours duration and a feedback session. They introduce students to relevant methodologies and approaches in the history of medicine, history of science, philosophy of science, and medical humanities, as well as to HPSM resources in the University Library, research tools, MA-level essay composition and format, and other research-related matters. They also include focused advice and discussion concerning dissertation proposals, which students are required to submit as part of this module.

Having completed the three topic modules and the research methods module, students start work on their dissertations. The nature of the dissertation will vary depending upon the topic studied and the department in which the module is undertaken. Students are offered up to six one-to-one tutorials of up to an hour each, with a supervisor who will be an expert in their chosen field. The supervisions help to further refine skills acquired during the academic year (such as presenting and defending an argument in a clear, structured fashion) and to complete a substantial piece of high quality independent research.

In addition to this core teaching, students benefit from a range of activities, including an MA Dissertation Workshop, research seminars of the Centre for the History of Medicine and Disease, and regular meetings of EIDOS, the Philosophy Department’s postgraduate society. They are welcomed as full participants in the Department’s research culture, and are thus strongly encouraged to attend a range of other events, including weekly Research Seminars, and occasional Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures, conferences, workshops and reading groups. The programme director remains in regular contact with the students throughout the year and is available to discuss any issues that might arise (personal or academic).

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Do you want to become a leader in clinical research? The MClinRes covers the whole research process from initial question generation through to designing, managing and undertaking research and the dissemination and implementation of findings. Read more
Do you want to become a leader in clinical research? The MClinRes covers the whole research process from initial question generation through to designing, managing and undertaking research and the dissemination and implementation of findings. Learn from a team of experts in clinical research, drawn from a wide range of disciplines including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, optometry, dietetics and medicine as well as representatives from patient and public support groups.

Key features

-Progress your career and become a leader in clinical research with a programme that provides both theoretical and first hand practical experience of the whole research process from developing a clinically relevant question through to implementation of research in clinical practice.
-Aligns with key Health Education England and NIHR objectives to develop clinical academics and increase research capacity in nurses, midwives, allied healthcare professionals and healthcare scientists.
-Learn from nurses, midwives, allied healthcare professionals and healthcare scientists actively involved in the management and delivery of relevant clinical research, with national and international reputations in their specialist areas.
-Experts drawn from across Plymouth University, other higher education institutes, the Research Design Service, the National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (NIHR CLAHRC) and the Peninsula Clinical Trials Unit.
-Strong input from patient and public support groups, NHS staff, managers and commissioners in developing and running the programme so that its content reflects the current needs of the NHS.
-You’ll be encouraged to join the Institute of Health and Community, and will be mentored and supervised by experienced clinical academics on your own research project. Specific research supervisors relevant to your profession and area of interest are allocated within two weeks of the start of the programme.
-The MClinRes is specifically designed to help you gain future funding to further your clinical academic career. The programme specifically aims to progress you along the new NIHR clinical academic training programme for registered non-medical/dental healthcare professionals.
-An additional module on research management and mentorship, provided at the end of the programme, supports you in publishing and disseminating your research findings, presenting at national and international locations and applying for NIHR internships and fellowships.
-Make the most of our blended learning approach, which combines short study blocks and distance learning technologies with face-to-face teaching, enhancing the learning process by allowing time for reflection.
-Benefit from an enriched student experience – you will share core and optional modules with health and social care students studying across faculty MSc pathways. Students and alumni have been involved in the programme management, design and recruitment.
-Choose from three award pathways – PgCert, PgDip, MClinRes. A range of assessments are used across modules designed to link your knowledge and skills to your area of practice.

Course details

The MClinRes will be delivered by blended learning, in one year full time or on a part time basis.

Pathways in this programme will include four core modules: applying evidence to practice, project design for research, applied qualitative research methods and applied quantitative research methods, as well as the research dissertation. Choose a 20 credit optional module from the diverse array on offer in the Faculty of Health and Human Sciences. The core modules build on each other providing skills in literature searching and implementing findings to the workplace; designing research protocols; understanding applied qualitative and quantitative methods and undertaking a clinically-relevant research project.

To gain a postgraduate certificate, you’ll need to earn 60 credits by studying three core modules worth 20 credits each. To gain a postgraduate diploma you will need to earn 120 credits by studying the four core modules, the optional module and an additional module from the MSc Advanced Professional Practice. To be awarded the full MClinRes masters, you’ll need to earn a total of 180 credits - you’ll study the same modules as the postgraduate diploma, with the extra 80 credits coming from your research dissertation.

Core modules
-MCR702 Applied Quantitative Research Methods
-ADV702 Applying Evidence to Practice
-MCR704 Research Management and Mentorship
-ADV715 Project Design for Research
-MCR701 Applied Qualitative Research Methods
-MCR703 Research Dissertation
-MCR706 Systematic Review

Optional modules
-ADV710 Pathomechanics and Rehabilitation of Gait and Balance
-ADV703 Occupation as the Focus of Contemporary Practice
-ADV712 Supported Independent Study
-ADV739 Rehabilitation: Cognition, Perception and Behaviour
-ADV737 Neurological Rehabilitation: Sensorimotor Disorders
-ADV708 Injection Therapy for Health Professionals (Botulinum Toxin)
-ADV709 Injection Therapy for Health Professionals (Corticosteroid)
-ADV735 Advancing the Management of Long Term Conditions

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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