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Masters Degrees (Medical Technology)

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The medical technologies sector is seeing unprecedented growth, with an increasing need for trained professionals with a skill set combining scientific proficiency with entrepreneurial and business flair. Read more
The medical technologies sector is seeing unprecedented growth, with an increasing need for trained professionals with a skill set combining scientific proficiency with entrepreneurial and business flair. This innovative programme, in partnership with the UCL Institute of Healthcare Engineering, offers a unique graduate pathway into this flourishing sector.

Degree information

This programme combines medical device scientific research and development with training in translation techniques, enterprise and entrepreneurship. Students will learn about entrepreneurial finance and gain knowledge in business management, while carrying out technical research that will give them a solid grounding in medical device development. The programme provides the essential skills to move forward in the medical device sector.

Students take modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), two optional modules (30 credits), and a dissertation/report (120 credits).

Core modules
-Two skill modules with an emphasis on entrepreneurship based in UCL School of Management.

Optional modules
-Two scientific modules will be chosen from a wide range of appropriate MSc modules across UCL

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project culminating in a dissertation of a maximum of 20,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, problem classes, workshops, and projects. Assessment of taught components is through unseen written examinations or by assessed coursework. Assessment of the project is by dissertation and viva.

Careers

It is anticipated that on completion of this programme students will either embark on a career in either industry or academic research. This MRes forms the first year of a doctoral training programme in Medical Device Innovation. An industrial career in this expanding area could lie anywhere on the spectrum of working within large multinational medical technology companies to setting up your own enterprise in a medical device need area that you have identified.

Employability
This programme offers a unique opportunity to combine an understanding of medical device engineering with enterprise skills. You will gain an understanding of the innovation pipeline concept, through development, to bringing a product to the marketplace. This skill set is key to being at the forefront of the emerging medical device market as the balance of power shifts from pharmaceuticals to medical technologies.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Healthcare Engineering provides a unique source of coherent entrepreneurship training for medical technology graduate students in the UK, alongside a vibrant multidisciplinary biomedical engineering research community engaged in developing new medical devices to transform medicine.

Our entrepreneurial training is delivered by the UCL School of Management, and is complemented by seminars and networking events bringing together researchers, clinicians and industrialists.

Where students are sponsored by an industrial partner, they will spend time with that partner. Links are also being built with Yale University and students may have the opportunity to spend short periods of time there.

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As a student of Medical Technology Quality you will develop the tools and competencies to be an effective professional and leader in the field. Read more
As a student of Medical Technology Quality you will develop the tools and competencies to be an effective professional and leader in the field. You will learn the fundamentals of quality for the medtech industry, medtech regulatory impact, development and implementation of quality systems, design and manufacturing process development and validation and the overall management of quality for the industry.

Program Highlights

Offered at the Twin Cities Graduate Center in Maple Grove.
Courses offered weekday evenings and Saturday mornings.
Designed in collaboration with medtech industry professionals.
Coursework includes real-world examples and projects.
$63,567 is the average salary for medtech workers in Minnesota.
Medtech employees earn on average 40% more than their counterparts in other industries

Program Distinctions

Courses are taught by industry experts with practical experience and leadership working in regulatory and related fields.
The industry's most senior and experienced executive leaders in clinical research serve on the program's industry advisory board.
The annual medtech networking and job fair is the largest of its kind featuring 15-20 medtech industry companies.

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This course offers the academic training required for a career in scientific support of medical procedures and technology. The course is coordinated through the Medical Physics Departments in St. Read more
This course offers the academic training required for a career in scientific support of medical procedures and technology. The course is coordinated through the Medical Physics Departments in St. James's Hospital and St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin.

Students enter via the M.Sc. register. This course covers areas frequently known as Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering. It is designed for students who have a good honours degree in one of the Physical Sciences (physics, electronic or mechanical engineering, computer science, mathematics) and builds on this knowledge to present the academic foundation for the application of the Physical Sciences in Medicine.

The course will be delivered as lectures, demonstrations, seminars, practicals and workshops. All students must take a Core Module. Upon completion of this, the student will then take one of three specialisation tracks in Diagnostic Radiology, Radiation Therapy or Clinical Engineering. The running of each of these tracks is subject to a minimum number of students taking each track and therefore all three tracks may not run each year.

Core Modules

Introduction to Radiation Protection andamp; Radiation Physics (5 ECTS)
Imaging Physics andamp; Technology (5 ECTS)
Introduction to Radiotherapy and Non-Ionising Imaging (5 ECTS)
Basic Medical Sciences (5 ECTS)
Introduction to Research Methodology and Safety (5 ECTS)
Medical Technology and Information Systems (5 ECTS)
Seminars (5 ECTS)
Specialisation Track Modules (Diagnostic Radiology)

Radiation Physics and Dosimetry (5 ECTS)
Medical Informatics and Image Processing (5 ECTS)
Ionising and Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (5 ECTS)
Imaging Physics and Technology 2 (10 ECTS)
Specialisation Track Modules (Radiation Therapy)

Radiation Physics and Dosimetry (5 ECTS)
Principles and Applications of Clinical Radiobiology (5 ECTS)
External Beam Radiotherapy (10 ECTS)
Brachytherapy and Unsealed Source Radiotherapy (5 ECTS)
Specialisation Track Modules (Clinical Engineering)

The Human Medical Device Interface (5 ECTS)
Principle and Practice of Medical Technology Design, Prototyping andamp; Testing (5 ECTS)
Medical Technology 1: Critical Care (5 ECTS)
Medical Technology 2: Interventions, Therapeutics andamp; Diagnostics (5 ECTS)
Medical Informatics and Equipment Management (5 ECTS)
Project Work and Dissertation (30 ECTS)

In parallel with the taught components, the students will engage in original research and report their findings in a dissertation. A pass mark in the assessment components of all three required sections (Core Module, Specialisation Track and Dissertation) will result in the awarding of MSc in Physical Sciences in Medicine. If the student does not pass the dissertation component, but successfully passes the taught components, an exit Postgraduate Diploma in Physical Sciences in Medicine will be awarded. Subject areas include

Radiation Protection and Radiation Physics
Imaging Physics and Technology
Basic Medical Sciences
Medical Technology Design, Prototyping and Testing
Medical Informatics
Image Processing
External Bean Radiotherapy
Brachytherapy and Unsealed Source Radiotherapy
The Human-Medical Device Interface
The course presents the core of knowledge for the application of the Physical Sciences in Medicine; it demonstrates practical implementations of physics and engineering in clinical practice, and develops practical skills in selected areas. It also engages students in original research in the field of Medical Physics / Engineering. The course is designed to be a 1 year full-time course but is timetabled to facilitate students who want to engage over a 2 year part-time process.

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What's the Master of Biomedical Engineering about? . The Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering provides students with a state-of-the-art overview of all areas in biomedical engineering. Read more

What's the Master of Biomedical Engineering about? 

The Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering provides students with a state-of-the-art overview of all areas in biomedical engineering:

  • Biomechanics
  • Biomaterials
  • Medical sensors and signal processing
  • Medical imaging
  • Tissue engineering

The teaching curriculum builds upon the top-class research conducted by the staff, most of whom are members of the Leuven Medical Technology Centre. This network facilitates industrial fellowships for our students and enables students to complete design projects and Master’s theses in collaboration with industry leaders and internationally recognized research labs.

Biomedical engineers are educated to integrate engineering and basic medical knowledge. This competence is obtained through coursework, practical exercises, interactive sessions, a design project and a Master’s thesis project.

Structure

Three courses provide students with basic medical knowledge on anatomy and functions of the human body. The core of the programme consists of biomedical engineering courses that cover the entire range of contemporary biomedical engineering: biomechanics, biomaterials, medical imaging, biosensors, biosignal processing, medical device design and regulatory affairs.

The elective courses have been grouped in four clusters: biomechanics and tissue engineering, medical devices, information acquisition systems, and Information processing software. These clusters allow the students to deepen their knowledge in one particular area of biomedical engineering by selecting courses from one cluster, while at the same time allowing other students to obtain a broad overview on the field of biomedical engineering by selecting courses from multiple clusters.

Students can opt for an internship which can take place in a Belgian company or in a medical technology centre abroad. 

Through the general interest courses, the student has the opportunity to broaden his/her views beyond biomedical engineering. These include courses on management, on communication (e.g. engineering vocabulary in foreign languages), and on the socio-economic and ethical aspects of medical technology.

A design project and a Master’s thesis familiarize the student with the daily practice of a biomedical engineer.

International

The Faculty of Engineering Science at KU Leuven is involved in several Erasmus exchange programmes. For the Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering, this means that the student can complete one or two semesters abroad, at a number of selected universities.

An industrial fellowship is possible for three or six credits either between the Bachelor’s and the Master’s programme, or between the two phases of the Master’s programme. Students are also encouraged to consider the fellowship and short courses offered by BEST (Board of European Students of Technology) or through the ATHENS programme.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty.

Strengths

The programme responds to a societal need, which translates into an industrial opportunity.

Evaluation of the programme demonstrates that the objectives and goals are being achieved. The mix of mandatory and elective courses allows the student to become a generalist in Biomedical Engineering, but also to become a specialist in one topic; industry representatives report that graduates master a high level of skills, are flexible and integrate well in the companies.

Company visits expose all BME students to industry. Further industrial experience is available to all students.

Our international staff (mostly PhD students) actively supports the courses taught in English, contributing to the international exposure of the programme.

The Master’s programme is situated in a context of strong research groups in the field of biomedical engineering. All professors incorporate research topics in their courses.

Most alumni have found a job within three months after graduation.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Career perspectives

Biomedical engineering is a rapidly growing sector, evidenced by an increase in the number of jobs and businesses. The Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering was created to respond to increased needs for healthcare in our society. These needs stem from an ageing population and the systemic challenge to provide more and better care with less manpower and in a cost-effective way. Industry, government, hospitals and social insurance companies require engineers with specialised training in the multidisciplinary domain of biomedical engineering.

As a biomedical engineer, you'll play a role in the design and production of state-of-the-art biomedical devices and/or medical information technology processes and procedures. You will be able to understand medical needs and translate them into engineering requirements. In addition, you will be able to design medical devices and procedures that can effectively solve problems through their integration in clinical practice. For that purpose, you'll complete the programme with knowledge of anatomy, physiology and human biotechnology and mastery of biomedical technology in areas such as biomechanics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, bio-instrumentation and medical information systems. The programme will help strengthen your creativity, prepare you for life-long learning, and train you how to formalise your knowledge for efficient re-use.

Careers await you in the medical device industry R&D engineering, or as a production or certification specialist. Perhaps you'll end up with a hospital career (technical department), or one in government. The broad technological background that is essential in biomedical engineering also makes you attractive to conventional industrial sectors. Or you can continue your education by pursuing a PhD in biomedical engineering; each year, several places are available thanks to the rapid innovation taking place in biomedical engineering and the increasing portfolio of approved research projects in universities worldwide.



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Rapid growth in the global medical devices industry demands an innovative fusion of biomedical, materials sciences, manufacturing, and engineering knowledge - and the University of Auckland is responding to the challenge. Read more

Rapid growth in the global medical devices industry demands an innovative fusion of biomedical, materials sciences, manufacturing, and engineering knowledge - and the University of Auckland is responding to the challenge.

This programme is aimed primarily at engineers and health professionals to provide them with the necessary broad range of knowledge in the various technologies underpinning medical devices.

Programme overview

The programme is funded by the Tertiary Education Commission of New Zealand, and is a collaboration between the Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland and the Medical Technology Association of New Zealand.

The programme is normally two semesters and will accommodate part-time enrolments. To best meet the needs of participants with different backgrounds, including those coming from industry, the programme is provided as both a research masters and a taught masters. 

All students complete two core courses that give an overview of technology and practices related to medical devices.

Students have a choice of completing a 90-point research portfolio or a smaller 60-point research project. In both cases the research is a significant component of the study programme and will involve working with a research group or being seconded to industry for a supervised research project that provides specialisation in a particular aspect of medical device technology. For participants without a medical background, a clinical secondment will be used to strengthen the experiential component of their learning.

Participants enrolled in the 90-point research portfolio will prepare a written thesis, while participants enrolled in the 60-point project will prepare a written project report. Both are examined following the standard the University of Auckland processes.

The taught masters option provides a wide variety of courses that participants can draw upon to best address their own areas of interest. Courses are lecture-based and delivered as modules, each taught by the University’s research specialists ensuring participants meet the multidisciplinary requirements of medical devices technology.

Employment opportunities

Graduates of the programme will be equipped with the technical, medical, ethical, regulatory and business knowledge required for innovation in medical devices and technologies, filling the large demand for these skills in the global and domestic medical devices industry.

The programme works closely with New Zealand medical devices companies such as Fisher & Paykel Healthcare and members of Medical Technology Association of New Zealand.

There are over 130 medical devices companies in New Zealand and many of our graduates are employed by these companies.



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Programme Aims. Read more

Programme Aims

This award is offered within the Postgraduate Scheme in Health Technology, which aims to provide professionals in Medical Imaging, Radiotherapy, Medical Laboratory Science, Health Technology, as well as others interested in health technology, with an opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills.

The award in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (MIRS) is specially designed for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy and has the following aims.

A. Advancement in Knowledge and Skill

  • ​To provide professionals in Medical Imaging and Radiotherapy, as well as others interested in health technology, with the opportunity to develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills;
  • To develop specialists in their respective professional disciplines and enhance their career paths;
  • To broaden students' exposure to a wider field of health science and technology to enable them to cope with the ever-changing demands of work;
  • To provide a laboratory environment for testing problems encountered at work;
  • To equip students with an advanced knowledge base in a chosen area of specialisation in medical imaging or radiotherapy to enable them to meet the changing needs of their disciplines and contribute to the development of medical imaging or radiation oncology practice in Hong Kong; and
  • To develop critical and analytical abilities and skills in the areas of specialisation that are relevant to the professional discipline to improve professional competence.

B. Professional Development

  • ​To develop students' ability in critical analysis and evaluation in their professional practices;
  • To cultivate within healthcare professionals the qualities and attributes that are expected of them;
  • To acquire a higher level of awareness and reflection within the profession and the healthcare industry to improve the quality of healthcare services; and
  • To develop students' ability to assume a managerial level of practice.

C. Evidence-based Practice

  • ​To equip students with the necessary skill in research to enable them to perform evidence-based practice in the delivery of healthcare service and industry.

D. Personal Development

  • ​To provide channels through which practising professionals can continuously develop themselves while at work; and
  • To allow graduates to develop themselves further after graduation.

Characteristics

The Medical Imaging and Radiation Science award offers channels for specialisation and the broadening of knowledge for professionals in medical imaging and radiotherapy. It will appeal to students who are eager to become specialists or managers in their areas of practice. Clinical experience and practice in medical imaging and radiotherapy are integrated into the curriculum to encourage more reflective observation and active experimentation.

Programme Structure

To be eligible for the MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (MScMIRS), students are required to complete 30 credits:

  • 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits)
  • 3 Core Subjects (9 credits)
  • 5 Elective Subjects (15 credits)

Apart from the award of MScMIRS, students can choose to graduate with one of the following specialisms:

  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Computed Tomography)
  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
  • MSc in Medical Imaging and Radiation Science (Ultrasonography)

To be eligible for the specialism concerned, students should complete 2 Compulsory Subjects (6 credits), a Dissertation (9 credits) related to that specialism, a specialism-related Specialty Subject (3 credits), a Clinical Practicum (3 credits) and 3 Elective Subjects (9 credits).

 Compulsory Subjects

  • Research Methods & Biostatistics
  • ​Multiplanar Anatomy

Core Subjects

  • Advanced Radiotherapy Planning & Dosimetry
  • Advanced Radiation Protection
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Computed Tomography *
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Magnetic Resonance Imaging *
  • Advanced Technology & Clinical Application in Nuclear Medicine Imaging
  • Advanced Topics in Health Technology
  • Advanced Ultrasonography *
  • Clinical Practicum (CT/MRI/US)
  • Dissertation
  • Digital Imaging & PACS
  • Imaging Pathology

 * Specialty Subject

Elective Subjects

  • Bioinformatics in Health Sciences
  • Professional Development in Infection Control Practice


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Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global. Read more

Our MSc History of Science, Technology and Medicine taught master's course focuses on a broad range of mostly 19th and 20th century case studies, from the local to the global.

We will explore key debates such as:

  • Why does Britain have a National Health Service?
  • Can better science education cure economic problems?
  • How did epidemic disease affect the colonial ambitions of the European powers?
  • Why do we end up depending on unreliable technologies?

Your studies will pay particular attention to the roles of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and to the changing ways in which scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

You will learn through lectures, seminars and tutorials and gain experience of historical essay-writing, before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc focuses on humanities skills, but may be taken successfully by students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in the history of science, technology and medicine, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds, often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields.

The History of Science, Technology and Medicine pathway is appropriate if you have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular.

If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the MSc Science Communication course.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts;
  • provide opportunities to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth, and to support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society;
  • encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment;
  • provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history;
  • enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Special features

Extensive support

Receive dedicated research support from the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine , the longest-established centre for the integrated study of the field.

Extra opportunities

Take up optional classes and volunteering opportunities shared with the parallel MSc Science Communication course at Manchester, including science policy, science media, museums and public events activities.

Explore Manchester's history

Manchester is the classic 'shock city' of the Industrial Revolution. You can relive the development of industrial society through field trips and visits.

Convenient study options

Benefit from flexible options for full or part-time study.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field.

Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives.

All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. 

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission.

All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) accounting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Course unit details

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1 course units (credits)

  • Major themes in HSTM (30 credits)
  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 2: two optional course units (30 credits each) from the below list, or one from the below plus 30 credits of course units from an affiliated programme:

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

plus:

  • Dissertation in the history of science, technology and/or medicine (60)

Course structure (part-time)

Part-time students study alongside full-timers, taking half the same content each semester over two years.

You are required to complete 180 credits in the following course units to be awarded this MSc:

Semester 1: Major themes in HSTM (30 credits).

Semester 2: one optional course unit (30 credits each) from

  • Shaping the sciences
  • Making modern technology
  • Medicine, science and modernity

Semester 3:

  • Theory and practice in HSTM and Medical Humanities (15)
  • Research and communication skills (15)

Semester 4: one further optional course unit (30) from CHSTM as seen above, or 30 credits of course units from an approved affiliated programme.

Plus:

  • Dissertation in HSTM (60 credits) across second year and during the summer

Facilities

All MSc students have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of the dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office nearby.

The Centre is located within a few minutes' walk of the University of Manchester Library , the largest non-deposit library in the UK.

Resources for student research projects within the University include the object collections of theManchester Museum , also nearby on campus, and the John Rylands Library special collections facility in the city centre.

CHSTM also has a close working relationship with other institutions offering research facilities to students, notably the Museum of Science and Industry .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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The 100% online Masters in Biopharmaceutical medicine has been designed in extensive collaboration with Industry to provide graduates with a range of cutting-edge skills in Biopharmaceutical Science and Medical Biotechnology thereby making them highly employable within the Biotechnology, Biopharmaceutical and Medical Biotechnology Industries. Read more

100% online master in Biopharmaceutical medicine

The 100% online Masters in Biopharmaceutical medicine has been designed in extensive collaboration with Industry to provide graduates with a range of cutting-edge skills in Biopharmaceutical Science and Medical Biotechnology thereby making them highly employable within the Biotechnology, Biopharmaceutical and Medical Biotechnology Industries.

Biopharma study

Biopharma is the study of producing biological drugs and biological medicinal products, including monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, gene therapies, cell therapies etc.

Forefront of medical technology

This Masters in Bio Pharmaceutical science is for you, if you wish to make a difference and be at the forefront of medical technology, involved in the manufacture of novel medicines from living cells, immunodiagnostics, bioanalytics, process validation and process optimization. Medical Biotechnology and Biopharmaceutical Processing are among the fastest growing industry sectors internationally at present. And this Masters provides a strong industry focus on the latest developments in biopharmaceutical manufacturing including full product characterisation, single use technologies, PAT and QbD.

Biopharmaceutical career opportunities

This MSc has been specifically designed to meet the requirements of the biopharma industry. It is suitable for Science and Engineering graduates who wish to up-skill or cross-skill for a career in biopharmaceuticals. A wide range of career options exist for graduates of this MSc, including employment in the biotechnology, pharmaceutical and medical devices industries. Recent graduates are employed in companies such as Pfizer, MSD, Lilly, Amgen, Janssen and Takeda. Post-graduates may also find employment more broadly within the Healthcare sector and in areas of Research and Development.

100% Online master in Biopharmaceutical medicine

The MSc is delivered 100% online; however it is possible to choose electives that will get you extensive hands-on practical experience at the award winning NIBRT facility in Dublin, in an environment that replicates the most modern industrial bioprocessing facility. NIBRT, the National Institute for Bioprocessing Research and Training, is a world-class institute that provides training and research solutions for the bioprocessing industry and undertakes leading edge research in key areas of bioprocessing in collaboration with industry.

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Non-Medical Prescribing for Allied Health Professionals Course Overview. The Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing aims to prepare Allied Health Professionals to practice within current non-medical prescribing legislation. Read more

Non-Medical Prescribing for Allied Health Professionals Course Overview

The Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing aims to prepare Allied Health Professionals to practice within current non-medical prescribing legislation.

There will be two cohorts per year (subject to sufficient interest and professional body approval), starting in March and September each year. The Spring cohort will run every Wednesday from March to November (No lectures during August) and the Autumn cohort will be taught every Tuesday from September to the following March. 

Professional body approval from the Healthcare Professions Council has been granted for Independent prescribing for Chiropodists/podiatrists, physiotherapists and therapeutic radiographers and for Supplementary prescribing, diagnostic radiographers. 

The Non-Medical Prescribing course is not available to international students.

Who should apply for the Non-Medical Prescribing programme?

  • Physiotherapists
  • Radiographer’s 
  • Chiropodists/Podiatrists
  • Dieticians

All of whom are looking to develop prescribing practice within a clinical setting.

Non-Medical Prescribing Course Structure

The Non-Medical Prescribing course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills and competency required to undertake the role of an independent or supplementary non-medical prescriber. The course has been designed for allied health professionals to develop prescribing practice within a clinical setting. 

The Non-Medical Prescribing programme comprises of two core modules: SHGM05 -Clinical Assessment and Decision Making in Non-Medical Prescribing which is 40 credits at level 7 and SHGM06 - Pharmacology principles and practice which is 20 credits at level 7. Both of these modules must be successfully completed to gain this qualification in Non-Medical Prescribing for Allied Health Professionals.

The Non-Medical Prescribing programme is taught at the St. David’s Park site in Carmarthen. Teaching takes place one day a week over the academic year. You are also required to have 96 hours of clinical practice with a designated medical mentor from which you will need to evidence the learning that has occurred.

Staff Expertise

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Allied Health Professionals teaching team:

  • are very experienced in delivering prescribing programmes
  • have a wide range of relevant skills, experience and qualifications
  • are members of a range of prescribing forums and groups
  • have well established links with health board Non-Medical Prescribing Leads throughout the region 

Teaching and Employability

  • Established and reputable links with the NHS, Social Services, and many private sector companies
  • Up-to-the-minute teaching which is responsive to employer demand
  • Successful completion can increase career development and promotion opportunities for the student as an advanced practitioner within their field of speciality  
  • Studies show that non-medical prescribing to be safe, clinically and cost effective.

Funding

  • Applicants to the Non-Medical Prescribing course may be eligible for funding support 
  • The Non-Medical Prescribing programme has the possibility of being funded by the Welsh Government, so the student may not need to pay any fees. Please speak to the programme director for further information.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience. 

Facilities 

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives Course Overview. The Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing aims to prepare nurses and midwives to practice within current non-medical prescribing legislation. Read more

Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives Course Overview

The Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing aims to prepare nurses and midwives to practice within current non-medical prescribing legislation.

There will be two cohorts per year (subject to final professional body approval), starting in March and September each year. The Spring cohort will run every Wednesday from March to November (No lectures during August) and the Autumn cohort will be taught every Tuesday from September to the following March. 

Unfortunately the Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives course is not available to international students.

Who should apply for the Non-Medical Prescribing programme?

Nurses or midwives who wish to develop prescribing practice within a clinical setting.

Non-Medical Prescribing Course Structure

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills and competency required to undertake the role of an independent or supplementary non-medical prescriber. The Non-Medical Prescribing course has been designed for multiple disciplines to learn together to develop prescribing practice within a clinical setting. 

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives programme comprises of two core modules: SHGM26 -Clinical Assessment and Decision Making in Non-Medical Prescribing which is 40 credits at level 7 and SHGM27 - Pharmacology principles and practice which is 20 credits at level 7. Both of these modules must be successfully completed to gain this qualification.

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives programme is taught at the St. David’s Park site in Carmarthen. Teaching takes place one day a week over the academic year. It is a professional requirement that you also have 96 hours of clinical practice with a designated medical mentor from which you will need to evidence the learning that has occurred.

Staff Expertise

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives teaching team:

  • are very experienced in delivering prescribing programmes
  • have a wide range of relevant skills, experience and qualifications
  • are members of a range of prescribing forums and groups
  • have well established links with health board Non-Medical Prescribing Leads throughout the region 

Teaching and Employability

  • Established and reputable links with the NHS, Social Services, and many private sector companies
  • Up-to-the-minute teaching which is responsive to employer demand
  • Successful completion can increase career development and promotion opportunities for the student as an advanced practitioner within their field of speciality  
  • Studies show that non-medical prescribing to be safe, clinically and cost effective.

Funding

  • Applicants to the Non-Medical Prescribing course may be eligible for funding support 
  • The Non-Medical Prescribing for Nurses and Midwives programme has the possibility of being funded by the Welsh Government, so the student may not need to pay any fees. Please speak to the programme director or education lead for your area of work for further information.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience. 

Facilities 

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation. Read more
This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation.

Why this programme

◾You will examine human anatomy and reconstruct it in a real-time 3D environment for use in education, simulation, and training.
◾You will have access to the largest stereo 3D lab in Europe, and its state-of-the-art facilities such as laser scanner (for 3D data acquisition), stereo 3D projection, full body motion capture system, haptic devices and ambisonic sound.
◾You will also have access to the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow, one of the largest in Europe.
◾The programme has excellent industry connections through research and commercial projects and there are possible internship opportunities. You will benefit from guest lectures by practitioners, researchers and experts from industry.
◾This programme is accredited by the Institute of Medical Illustrators.

Programme structure

You will split your time between the Glasgow School of Art (Digital Design Studio) and the University of Glasgow (Laboratory of Human Anatomy). The programme is structured into three stages.

Stage one: digital technologies applied to medical visualisation (delivered by the Digital Design Studio at the Glasgow School of Art)

Core courses
◾3D modelling and animation
◾Applications in medical visualisation
◾Volumetric and 3D surface visualisation
◾Core research skills for postgraduates.

Stage two: human anatomy (delivered by the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow).

Core courses
◾Introduction to anatomy
◾Structure and function of the human body
◾Cadaveric dissection techniques.

In stage three you will complete a self-directed final project, supported throughout with individual supervision.

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist within the commercial healthcare device manufacturer, the public and private healthcare sectors, as well as in academic medical visualisation research. Students with medical, biomedical, anatomy, or health professional backgrounds will be able to gain 3D visualisation skills that will enhance their portfolio of abilities; students with computer science or 3D graphics background will be involved in the design and development of healthcare related products through digital technology, eg diagnostic and clinical applications, creating content involving medical visualisation, simulation, cardiac pacemakers, and biomechanically related products for implantation, such as knee, hip and shoulder joint replacements.

Here are some examples of roles and companies for our graduates:
◾Interns, Clinical Assistants and Clinical Researchers at Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems
◾Research Prosector (GU)
◾3D printing industry
◾Demonstrators in Anatomy
◾PhD studies - medical history, medical visualisation
◾Medical School
◾Dental School
◾Digital Designer at Costello Medical
◾Lead Designer at Open Bionics
◾Founder of Axial Medical Printing Ltd
◾Digital Technician at University of Leeds
◾Digital Project Intern at RCPSG
◾Researcher and Factual Specialist at BBC
◾Graduate Teaching Assistants
◾Freelance Medical Illustration
◾Numerous successful placements on PhD programmes (medical visualisation, anatomy, anatomy education, medical humanities)
◾MBChB, BDS courses

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Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists Course Overview. The Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing aims to prepare pharmacists to practice within current non-medical prescribing legislation. Read more

Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists Course Overview

The Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing aims to prepare pharmacists to practice within current non-medical prescribing legislation.

There will be two cohorts per year (subject to sufficient interest and professional body approval), starting in March and September each year. The Spring cohort will run every Wednesday from March to November (No lectures during August) and the Autumn cohort will be taught every Tuesday from September to the following March. Please contact the Non-Medical Prescribing programme manager on to discuss which cohort may be more appropriate for you.

Unfortunately the Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists course is not available to international students.

Who should apply for the Non-Medical Prescribing programme?

Pharmacists who wish to develop prescribing practice within a clinical setting.

Non-Medical Prescribing Course Structure

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists course is designed to develop the knowledge, skills and competency required to undertake the role of an independent non-medical prescriber. The course has been designed for multiple disciplines to learn together to develop prescribing practice within a clinical setting. 

The full Postgraduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists programme comprises one 40 credit module, SHGM22 Non-medical prescribing and one 20 credit module, Pharmacology principles and practice (NMC) SHGM23. The non-medical prescribing qualification annotated by the General Pharmaceutical Healthcare Council can be achieved by successful completion of a stand-alone 40 credit module, ‘Non-medical prescribing’ - SHGM22. Students wishing to complete the full Post Graduate Certificate in Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists must also complete an optional 20 credit module, Pharmacology principles and practice (NMC) SHGM23.

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists programme is taught at the St. David’s Park site in Carmarthen. Teaching takes place one day a week over the academic year.

Staff Expertise

The Non-Medical Prescribing for Pharmacists teaching team:

  • are very experienced in delivering prescribing programmes
  • have a wide range of relevant skills, experience and qualifications
  • are members of a range of prescribing forums and groups
  • have well established links with health board Non-Medical Prescribing Leads throughout the region 

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience. 

Facilities 

In addition, students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.



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The increasing impact of genetics in healthcare and the development of newer sophisticated technologies requires contributions from research scientists, clinical laboratory scientists and clinicians to investigate the causes of, and therefore permit optimal management for, diseases for which alterations in the genome, either at the DNA sequence level or epigenetic level, play a significant role. Read more
The increasing impact of genetics in healthcare and the development of newer sophisticated technologies requires contributions from research scientists, clinical laboratory scientists and clinicians to investigate the causes of, and therefore permit optimal management for, diseases for which alterations in the genome, either at the DNA sequence level or epigenetic level, play a significant role. Collaboration between staff from the University of Glasgow and the NHS West of Scotland Genetics Service enables the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics to provide a state-of-the-art view of the application of modern genetic and genomic technologies in medical genetics research and diagnostics, and in delivery of a high quality genetics service to patients, as well as in design of targeted therapies.

Why this programme

◾This is a fully up-to-date Medical Genetics degree delivered by dedicated, multi-award-winning teaching and clinical staff of the University, with considerable input from hospital-based Regional Genetics Service clinicians and clinical scientists.
◾The full spectrum of genetic services is represented, from patient and family counselling to diagnostic testing of individuals and screening of entire populations for genetic conditions: eg the NHS prenatal and newborn screening programmes.
◾The MSc Medical Genetics Course is based on the south side of the River Clyde in the brand new (2015) purpose built Teaching & Learning Centre, at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospitals (we are located 4 miles from the main University Campus). The Centre also houses state of the art educational resources, including a purpose built teaching laboratory, computing facilities and a well equipped library. The West of Scotland Genetic Services are also based here at the Queen Elizabeth Campus allowing students to learn directly from NHS staff about the latest developments to this service.
◾The Medical Genetics MSc Teaching Staff have won the 2014 UK-wide Prospects Postgraduate Awards for the category of Best Postgraduate Teaching Team (Science, Technology & Engineering). These awards recognise and reward excellence and good practice in postgraduate education.
◾The close collaboration between university and hospital staff ensures that the Medical Genetics MSc provides a completely up-to-date representation of the practice of medical genetics and you will have the opportunity to observe during clinics and visit the diagnostic laboratories at the new Southern General Hospital laboratory medicine building.
◾The Medical Genetics degree explores the effects of mutations and variants as well as the current techniques used in NHS genetics laboratory diagnostics and recent developments in diagnostics (including microarray analysis and the use of massively parallel [“next-generation”] sequencing).
◾New developments in medical genetics are incorporated into the lectures and interactive teaching sessions very soon after they are presented at international meetings or published, and you will gain hands-on experience and guidance in using software and online resources for genetic diagnosis and for the evaluation of pathogenesis of DNA sequence variants.
◾You will develop your skills in problem solving, experimental design, evaluation and interpretation of experimental data, literature searches, scientific writing, oral presentations, poster presentations and team working.
◾This MSc programme will lay the academic foundations on which some students may build in pursuing research at PhD level in genetics or related areas of biomedical science or by moving into related careers in diagnostic services.
◾The widely used textbook “Essential Medical Genetics” is co-authored by a member of the core teaching team, Professor Edward Tobias.
◾For doctors: The Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians’ Training Board (JRCPTB) in the UK recognises the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics (which was established in 1984) as counting for six months of the higher specialist training in Clinical Genetics.
◾The Medical Council of Hong Kong recognises the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics from University of Glasgow in it's list of Quotable Qualifications.

Programme structure

Genetic Disease: from the Laboratory to the Clinic

This course is designed in collaboration with the West of Scotland Regional Genetics Service to give students a working knowledge of the principles and practice of Medical Genetics and Genomics which will allow them to evaluate, choose and interpret appropriate genetic investigations for individuals and families with genetic disease. The link from genotype to phenotype, will be explored, with consideration of how this knowledge might contribute to new therapeutic approaches.

Case Investigations in Medical Genetics and Genomics

Students will work in groups to investigate complex clinical case scenarios: decide appropriate testing, analyse results from genetic tests, reach diagnoses where appropriate and, with reference to the literature, generate a concise and critical group report.

Clinical Genomics

Students will take this course OR Omic Technologies for Biomedical Sciences OR Frontiers in Cancer Science.

This course will provide an overview of the clinical applications of genomic approaches to human disorders, particularly in relation to clinical genetics, discussion the methods and capabilities of the new technologies. Tuition and hands-on experience in data analysis will be provided, including the interpretation of next generation sequencing reports.

Omic technologies for the Biomedical Sciences: from Genomics to Metabolomics

Students will take this course OR Clinical Genomics OR Frontiers in Cancer Science.

Visit the website for further information

Career prospects

Research: About half of our graduates enter a research career and most of these graduates undertake and complete PhDs; the MSc in Medical Genetics and Genomics facilitates acquisition of skills relevant to a career in research in many different bio-molecular disciplines.

Diagnostics: Some of our graduates enter careers with clinical genetic diagnostic services, particularly in molecular genetics and cytogenetics.

Clinical genetics: Those of our graduates with a prior medical / nursing training often utilise their new skills in careers as clinical geneticists or genetic counsellors.

Other: Although the focus of teaching is on using the available technologies for the purpose of genetic diagnostics, many of these technologies are used in diverse areas of biomedical science research and in forensic DNA analysis. Some of our numerous graduates, who are now employed in many countries around the world, have entered careers in industry, scientific publishing, education and medicine.

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Major advances in medical technology, increased expectations, and changing moral attitudes have combined to generate many complex ethical and legal problems in the fields related to medical ethics and palliative care. Read more

Overview

Major advances in medical technology, increased expectations, and changing moral attitudes have combined to generate many complex ethical and legal problems in the fields related to medical ethics and palliative care. Individuals who care for patients with life-threatening illnesses can face particularly pressing and difficult moral choices. The course provides an opportunity to gain a deeper and more systematic understanding of these issues, and to explore the moral problems health care professionals working in these areas may face.

Teaching is delivered in short intense blocks, enabling those in full-time employment to do the course part-time and fit it around the demands of their work wherever they are based. The course is taught in Liverpool by lecturers from Keele’s Centre for Professional Ethics (PEAK) and the Learning & Teaching Department of the Marie Curie Palliative Care Institute. From time to time, law lecturers from Keele University may provide specialist input, and external expert speakers may also be invited to speak on the course. This is an exciting joint venture uniting academic and practical expertise.

Students come from a wide range of backgrounds within the field of health care and many diverse geographical locations. Past and current students have reported that meeting and exchanging ideas with others who work in different fields and in different parts of the country is one of the major benefits of the course.

The Medical Ethics and Palliative Care teaching team have many years experience of teaching postgraduate applied ethics courses. We are aware of the special problems and challenges which may face mature students and those combining study with full-time work, and therefore we do our utmost to offer a supportive and stimulating environment for learning. Each student is assigned a personal supervisor from the teaching team, whom they can contact for help or advice at any time during the course.

Teaching staff also work at the forefront of research in medical ethics, which helps to give the course a contemporary edge. In the recent 2014 REF, staff from Keele's Healthcare Law and Bioethics cluster who teach on the MA were part of Keele's Philosophy submission, which was ranked first in the country for its Impact work. The impact submission was based on staff's work in the field of Biomedical ethics, with 80% of this work judged as being world-leading and the remaining 20% as being of internationally excellent.

See the website - https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalethicsandpalliativecare/

Course Content

The MA in Medical Ethics and Palliative Care involves both taught sessions and a chance for students to write a dissertation on a topic of their choosing related to the course. Teaching occurs in four three-day modules that run between October and April. This innovative structure has proved particularly popular with health care professionals in full-time employment as it allows students to combine study with full-time work, family and other commitments. It also enables students who are based in all areas of the UK and beyond to attend. Contact between students and staff, and between students, is facilitated between modules to create a distinctive student community.

The MA requires the successful completion of 180 M Level credits, made up of four 30-credit taught modules and a 60-credit dissertation. It can be taken either full-time or part-time. When taken part-time the four taught modules are completed in the first year, with the dissertation being completed in the second year. When taking this route there are no specific attendance requirements during the second year apart from a one-day research skills workshop – you may meet your supervisor at mutually convenient times, keep in touch via email or phone, or use a combination of methods.

When taken full-time, the course is completed within one year with the dissertation being submitted at the start of September.

Some students may not want to do the whole course. An alternative route is to leave after completing the four taught modules. Successful completion of these will lead to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Ethics and Palliative Care.

Teaching & Assessment

Each teaching block is followed by an assignment. For module one this is made up of three short written tasks, whilst for each of modules 2, 3 and 4 the assignment consists of a 4,000-word essay. All modules must be passed in order to proceed to the dissertation.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Health Care Technology (HCT) is a unique Master’s programme in Europe and Estonia is the first country to start teaching Health Care Technology in such an all-inclusive form. Read more

Health Care Technology (HCT) is a unique Master’s programme in Europe and Estonia is the first country to start teaching Health Care Technology in such an all-inclusive form. HCT focuses on combination of academic and practical skills and the lecturers are mostly from the industry, bringing the latest knowledge and experience to the students.

HCT Master’s program has two specialities: 1) Health care technology (HCT) and 2) Occupational Health Science and Ergonomics (OHSE).

HCT speciality is for people who are interested in healthcare management combined with information technology and innovation. Not just creating new eHealth applications, but making sure it is humanly, financially, economically viable.

Occupational Health and Ergonomics (OHSE) speciality is for people who are interested in health and safety management, ergonomics and designing innovative workplaces, promoting work life quality, productivity and employees’ wellbeing.

Key features

  • Programme teaches to understand how healthcare, IT, medicine, occupational health work together
  • Two specialisations: Health Care Technology major and Occupational Health Science and Ergonomics major
  • Lectures will take place mainly in Tallinn Tech Mektory building, the innovation centre with different labs and classes. Additionally, students have site visits to get the first-hand experience with different healthcare and medical organisations
  • Mandatory internship that can be done abroad 

Future career options

An HCT alumni works in healthcare organisation managements, in IT development companies that develop healthcare applications and systems, laboratory management, rehabilitation management and as academics in the university. A OHSE alumni works in variety of organisations, private and state, in management of health and safety, working life quality, ergonomics, occupational health services and as academics in the university.

Course outline

The idea to create Health Care Technology programme was born because of high demand on the market for Health Care Specialists. After discussions and brainstorming amongst The Institute of Clinical Medicine and industry partners, the Master's programme was created. For the HCT major to be more effective, the students will attend apprenticeship in the following medical or health care companies:

OHSE major students will attend apprenticeship in different manufacturing companies, state organisations and occupational health services.

The aim of Health Care Technology major is to prepare e-Health technology specialists who have acquired the know-how for working in different health care sector organisations and have the knowledge about the client and patient centred approach and manner of behaviour characteristics of the modern health care system.

Tallinn University of Technology is the first university to start teaching Health Care Technology in this all-inclusive form. Theory lectures are combined with practical studies in our medical and health care industry partner organisations, teaching students how to use their freshly learnt skills and how to put them to work.

Health Care Technology programme professors are from Estonia as well as from Europe and North America, covering Estonian and international experience in different levels and angles of health care. Estonia is well known for its technological inventions in e-Health and their successful implementation, making it a lucrative country to study and work in technological fields.

Faculty

School of Information Technologies (former Faculty of Information Technology) was founded in 1965. The faculty trains specialists in the main fields of information and communications technology (ICT) at bachelor, master and doctoral level. High-quality knowledge based teaching and training is based on international research and development activities, and tight cooperation with ICT industry. There are more than 2100 students annually learning in the faculty, which employs 150 faculty members, lecturers, researchers and engineers.

Curriculum

Structure of curriculum



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