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Masters Degrees (Medical Social Work)

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This two-year, full-time course is for graduates wishing to train and qualify as social workers. The course meets current Department of Health and GSCC requirements for social work training and integrates academic and practice learning. Read more
This two-year, full-time course is for graduates wishing to train and qualify as social workers.

The course meets current Department of Health and GSCC requirements for social work training and integrates academic and practice learning. There is a focus on the applied social science knowledge base of social work and on the development of social work knowledge, skills and values. Further, the course reflects the multidisciplinary practice context, with opportunities for shared, inter-professional learning with education, nursing, medical and occupational therapy students.
The course runs in partnership with local agencies providing social and caring services and with users of services and carers.

UCAS code L508 please note that applications should be made via UCAS, http://www.ucas.com

Professional accreditation
Information from GSCC
Social work is a regulated profession. As a social work student you will be expected to register with the GSCC, the social work profession's regulator, and adhere to the standards set out in the Code of Practice for Social Workers.
As well as regulating individual social workers and students, the GSCC also regulate the performance of social work courses, the reports of which are published on their website, so you can check to see how each university is performing.

Course structure
Year 1 introduces core skills, theories and approaches for social work practice in its inter-professional context and fosters a critical understanding of key law, policy and human growth across the lifespan. Year 2 focuses on more complex and accountable practice together with the development of more specialised skills and knowledge. There is also a focus on research in social work and the critical use of evidence to underpin own practice.
Learning in practice is supported by periods of study at the university, by directed study (with a range of learning materials) and by small group practice tutorials facilitated by social work-qualified university staff.
Students are required by the General Social Care Council (GSCC) to spend at least 200 days engaged in practice learning. Each student will experience at least two practice settings, statutory social work tasks involving legal interventions and provide services to at least two user groups.

Areas of study
The course includes learning on the following areas:
- social work theories and methods
- core social work skills
- social work values, ethics and anti-oppressive practice
- legal and policy frameworks
- applied social science (social policy, psychology and sociology) for social work practice
- inter-professional learning and practice
- approaches to working with risk, assessment and safeguarding
- contemporary developments and issues in social work
- research methods and the place of research evidence in social work practice.

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Effective social work demands a strong bond and understanding between professionals of different disciplines so that users of social work services receive the best possible care. Read more
Effective social work demands a strong bond and understanding between professionals of different disciplines so that users of social work services receive the best possible care. This Masters degree combines perspectives from social care, health, education and other relevant disciplines to ensure you can work effectively in the multi-disciplinary environment of today’s social work.

The programme emphasises effective practice and the practical relevance of theory in practice learning placements. You will have the opportunity to benefit from the knowledge and experience of a range of academics, practitioners, employers, policy makers, service users and carers who have backgrounds in social care, social work, health education and other cognate disciplines.

If you are a graduate from a relevant discipline, who is able to recognise the perspective of service users, their families and carers, and who can demonstrate a clear commitment to becoming a social worker, then this Masters degree is for you. Upon successful completion of the course, you will gain eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) as a qualified social worker.

What will I study?

The programme is underpinned by the national requirements for social work education and training as agreed by the Health and Care Professions Council and The College of Social Work. The degree therefore requires you to demonstrate an understanding of, for example: Human growth, development, mental health and disability; Assessment, planning, intervention and review; Communication skills with children, adults and those with particular communication needs; Social work law and policy; Partnership-working and information-sharing across professional disciplines and agencies; Safeguarding; Working with conflict.

In Year 1, you will examine the historical and contemporary functions of social work in society and consider the legal and social policy frameworks within social work practice. You will be introduced to a range of sociological and psychological theories and social policies in order to understand some of the social problems and issues faced by individuals, families and communities in contemporary society. The concepts of social inclusion and exclusion will also be considered. Upon the successful completion of an assessment exercise, designed to ensure that you are fully prepared for direct practice, you will undertake a practice placement.

Year 2 is designed to develop your competency to practice in specialist social work contexts. It will also enhance your research skills. You will adopt a global perspective on social work and focus on issues such as race, diversity and equality. A second practice placement will be undertaken and you will complete a period of independent research, culminating in the submission of a dissertation.

How will I study?

Academic-based learning will be delivered through lectures, tutorials, seminars and workshops.

You will spend 170 days in practice learning placements supported by 30 days of assessed social work practice skills across the programme. These placements are organised and monitored by the University. You will undertake supervised and assessed work whilst on placement, all of which will contribute to the outcome of your degree.

How will I be assessed?

The programme is assessed through a combination of essays, presentations, text analysis, group work, portfolios, carers’ assessments, video/audio diaries, role plays and examinations. Practice learning will also be assessed, using a range of techniques.

Who will be teaching me?

You can expect input from staff with expertise and knowledge of a range of health and social services settings, together with high quality and emergent research profiles. Contributors to the programme also include people who have direct experience of services, expert practitioners, magistrates, politicians, senior managers and policy makers.

What are my career prospects?

A Masters degree in Social Work is your entry to a range of career opportunities in working with children, adults and communities. You will be able to work within the statutory, voluntary, private and charitable sectors.

Upon successful completion of the programme, you will gain eligibility to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council.

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This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. Read more
This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice.

The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future.

Why choose this course?

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'.

-Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision.
-Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices.
-Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future.
-Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access.
-Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public.

This course in detail

MA in Social Sculpture students take five compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2, Social Sculpture 1 and 2 and a Major Project - in which they develop their particular concerns.

PGDip in Social Sculpture students take four compulsory modules - Creative Strategies 1 and 2 and Social Sculpture 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

Our teaching methods include:
-Seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture.
-Team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research.
-Feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work.
-Staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations.
-Regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns.
-Introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice.
-Introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities.
-Induction sessions with subject librarians.

The learning methods include:
-Regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work.
-Social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations.
-Presentations of practical research.
-The researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations.
-Private research and study.
-Presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice.

Careers and professional development

In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies.

A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice.

Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists.

These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices.

Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics.

The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research.

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Show you have the right skills to be an expert in social care! Our challenging and dynamic programme draws on the wide range of practice and research experience provided by our teaching team, giving you the knowledge needed to become a confident, accomplished and highly employable social worker. Read more
Show you have the right skills to be an expert in social care! Our challenging and dynamic programme draws on the wide range of practice and research experience provided by our teaching team, giving you the knowledge needed to become a confident, accomplished and highly employable social worker. We place a strong focus on contemporary debate surrounding social work and social justice highlighted throughout the course, helping you get actively involved in the development of future practice.

As well as in-depth academic study, you'll benefit from practice-based learning with 170 days of the total course spent in placements, spread out over the two years of the course. Our innovative learning techniques, including video recording and web-based technologies, will ensure your social work skills are honed to the highest level. We believe that all social work students should have an informed and applied understanding of social justice, helping you use your passion to help people, as well as opening up new areas of employment for your career.

Course outline

This programme was developed in partnership with a range of key stakeholders, including social work service users and carers, and representatives from social work agencies. We offer an intensive programme of study that combines a level 7 academic award with a qualification in social work. It is studied over two years full-time.

You'll critically discuss how social work theory, core skills and key professional concepts facilitate understanding of individuals within the environment. By evaluating a comprehensive range of theories and evidence bases of social work practice, you'll demonstrate effective use of supervision whilst adopting and applying a critically reflective approach to practice. We'll show you how to articulate and justify your professional role confidently within a range of practice contexts, helping you make the transition from student to newly-qualified social worker.

Graduate destinations

Students who have completed this course have gone onto work as social workers, practitioners and managers in the social care field.

Other admission requirements

Successful completion of a related foundation degree or HND - to include GCSE in English at grade C or above and Level 2 in Mathematics.

Applicants from courses based at institutions other than University of Cumbria will be assessed on their suitability depending upon the modules they have studied.

GCSE minimum grade C in English language and maths or equivalent. Associated experience and knowledge of current issues within and affecting social work is also required. Equivalent qualifications other than those listed above may be accepted. Students are selected according to the entry level criteria laid out in the College of Social Work's Professional Capabilities Framework. All places are offered subject to successful interview and numeracy test, as well as Disclosure and Barring Service clearance (DBS formerly CRB), medical fitness to practise and proof of qualifications.

Fitness to practise and health requirements

All offers of a place are subject to satisfactory health screening. Further information will be provided following the offer of a place.

Please note that Professional Bodies such as the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) have certain requirements regarding health and character status of applicants and their ability to meet the required core professional competencies and to practise safely without direct supervision. Please read the NMC (https://www.nmc.org.uk/education/becoming-a-nurse-or-midwife/when-studying-to-be-a-nurse-or-midwife/) and HCPC information (http://www.hcpc-uk.org/audiences/studentsandapplicants/disabledguide/) to find out more. Please ask us for advice and/or support as early as possible in the application process if you have any questions about this requirement.

For more information about core competencies and medical fitness to train please click this link (http://www.heops.org.uk/guide.php). There are fitness standards provided here for most programmes of study: health professions, social work and teaching.

In some instances, an applicant may be invited to attend a professional practice panel to discuss any recommended reasonable adjustments, and whether or not core professional competencies are achievable.

In order to be admitted and continue on the course, students must be deemed as medically fit for both practice and theory by the Occupational Health Department. If you have any concerns about a health condition/issue and its impact on your ability to undertake the course please contact the Occupational Health Department as early as possible in the application process.

Telephone - 01253 657950
E-mail -

Disclosure and Barring Service check

If you are offered a place we require you to comply with an Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) background clearance check. Read the DBS policy (https://www.cumbria.ac.uk/media/university-of-cumbria-website/content-assets/public/er/documents/admissions/disclosure/DBSPolicy.pdf)

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Whether you want to get ahead in your career faster, or improve your knowledge, a Monash postgraduate degree can give you a distinct advantage. Read more
Whether you want to get ahead in your career faster, or improve your knowledge, a Monash postgraduate degree can give you a distinct advantage.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/social-work-qualifying-3969?domestic=true

Overview

The Master of Social Work (Qualifying) curriculum meets AASW requirements and builds on Monash Social Work areas of strength, especially in gender studies, sustainability, child wellbeing and health. The degree includes considerable emphasis on community engagement and leadership, and provides opportunities to work with organisations to complete projects and research. The Master of Social Work (Qualifying) is a coursework degree with theoretical, skills development and supervised professional practice units. The course provides opportunities for group-based research and integration of theory and practice. Theoretical content builds on knowledge acquired by graduates in previous higher education, while social work skills components and professional practice units introduce students to contemporary social work practice.

Career opportunities

Our graduates have an excellent record in gaining employment. Social work has been identified as one of the fastest growing professions and it provides a wide range of employment opportunities. For example, Monash graduates find work as family counsellors, child protection workers and school counsellors. They work in hospitals and community health centres, mental health services and palliative care programs. They work in youth services, neighbourhood houses and in services for migrants and refugees. They work with youth and adult offenders, and with people who have drug and alcohol problems. They also work in community development, in policy development and in management in human service organisations.

Professional recognition (Australian)

The areas covered in the curriculum meet Australian Association of Social Workers (AASW) accreditation requirements, including 1000 hours of supervised professional practice. The fieldwork program is well-developed and makes use of extensive partnership arrangements.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/medicine

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Faculty is also home to a number of leading medical and biomedical research institutes and groups, and has contributed to advances in many crucial areas: in vitro fertilisation, obesity research, drug design, cardiovascular physiology, functional genomics, infectious diseases, inflammation, psychology, neurosciences and mental health.

Notwithstanding the relatively short history of our University, the Faculty is ranked in the top 50 in the world for its expertise in life sciences and biomedicine by the Times Higher Education and QS World University 2012 benchmarks.

Courses offered by the Faculty include medicine, nursing, radiography and medical imaging, nutrition and dietetics,emergency health studies, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and social work. A range of research and coursework postgraduate programs is also offered.

The Faculty takes pride in delivering outstanding education in all courses, in opening students to the possibilities offered by newly discovered knowledge, and in providing a nurturing and caring environment.

Further details may be found at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/about.html

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/social-work-qualifying-3969?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The PGCert is only available to qualified social workers currently employed by local authorities. It prepares experienced and qualified social workers, registered with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) to undertake the statutory role of Mental Health Officer (MHO). Read more

Why this course?

The PGCert is only available to qualified social workers currently employed by local authorities.

It prepares experienced and qualified social workers, registered with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) to undertake the statutory role of Mental Health Officer (MHO).

In undertaking the role of MHO, candidates are able to contribute positively to care and treatment of those experiencing mental disorder by ensuring an approach that recognises the impact of social as well as medical circumstances on their lives.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/mentalhealthsocialwork/

Key aim

The purpose is to train social workers for the role of MHO.

This is as defined in Section 32 of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003, and as qualified by the direction of the Scottish Ministers (Requirements for appointment as Mental Health Officers) Direction (January 2009).

In 2007, the SSSC published a new set of standards and practice competencies for MHO training. This stated that the certificate must be:
- provided by a university, within a programme provider partnership
- delivered at SCQF Level 11, which equates with Masters level
- be approved by the SSSC as a specialist course

The delivery partnership

A partnership was established to develop and deliver the new Postgraduate Certificate in Mental Health Social Work Award. It involves:
- the University of Strathclyde
- Glasgow Caledonian University
- 13 local authorities in the West of Scotland, represented by the Scottish Social Services Council Learning Network West

The University of Strathclyde is the administering university for the award.
You’ll be registered with us for the duration of the course, and will be subject to our rules and requirements.

You’ll study

The course is taught over the period of an academic year, normally August to June. You’ll complete two modules.

Work placement

An assessed period of practice is integral to each of the two modules on this course. The assessed practice runs through each module and runs from September to December in Module 1 and February to May in Module 2. The practice experience can only be undertaken in the candidates’ employing local authority supervised by a suitably qualified member of staff (Practice Assessor), supported by the course team.

Course awards

The course has been externally evaluated and assessed as producing Mental Health Officers who are competent to practice from the perspective of the local authorities who employ the candidates on completion of the award. In addition, the candidates, despite the intensity of the workload, praised the experience of undertaking the course. The course is the only MHO award in Scotland where recruitment remains high.

Open days and events

Workshops to prepare candidates for applying to the programme are provided in January each year. This includes an overview of the programme as well as a detailed explanation of what an application for the programme should contain. Information and selection handbooks are circulated to all local authorities in December each year to prepare candidates for the event.

Entry requirements

- Applicants must:
1. Be nominated by their employing local authority, be supported by their employing local authority and be provided with appropriate learning opportunities.

2. Hold a professional social work qualification recognised by SSSC. These include:
- BA (Hons) Social Work
- Diploma in Social Work (DipSW)
- Certificate of Qualification in Social Work (CQSW) together with its predecessor qualifications
- Certificate in Social Service (CSS)

If you trained abroad, a letter of comparability with the CQSW or a letter of verification issued by SSSC (or another registering Council in the UK) will be required.

3. Normally have a minimum of two years post-qualifying experience. You should be able to demonstrate that you've improved and extended the level of competence acquired when you qualified.

4. Satisfy the programme provider that you have the capacity to achieve the Mental Health Officer standards, that you can be competently demonstrated as eligible to be appointed as a Mental Health Officer, and can achieve the award at SCQF Level 11 by:
- critically reviewing your professional development since qualifying as a social worker. This should include issues of effective communication with adults who have individual communication support needs, and working with professional tensions, challenges and conflicts. Also included should be evidence from workload of challenging discrimination and demonstrating an understanding of what's meant by this

- analysing interest in, and motivation for, undertaking mental health work including the extensive networking and collaborative practice involved

- showing developed skills in empowering clients. This should be particularly in relation to developing their understanding of their rights to legal support and advocacy, and their views about how their needs may be more effectively met through complex decision making processes

- exploring current awareness of the Mental Health Officer role, the complexity of the power/control issues involved and how you would use Mental Health Officer training in your current work setting

Selection for the programme is a collaborative process across the provider partnership and consists of:
- application
- interview (if applicable)
- selection decision phases

These will verify your:
- eligibility in relation to registration as a social worker with the SSSC
experience
- preparedness and capacity for the specialist role
- eligibility for the programme of study within the universities

The process will also provide feedback to you and your agency about any further preparation or experience necessary before the programme starts.

Final decision on acceptance to the course within the parameters of the minimum standards described lies with the Joint Course Management Committee.

Careers

Successful graduates from this programme will immediately be appointed as Mental Health Officers (MHOs) by their local authority, negating the requirement to seek employment as an MHO.

This appointment can lead candidates into promoted posts, eg senior practitioner and management roles. As the role of the MHO is a statutory requirement for local authorities, graduates become members of a small but essential workforce that aims to promote the rights of people with mental disorders as well as ensuring appropriate access to treatment when required.

The MHO workforce is currently under resourced and, as such, qualified MHOs are in high demand across Scotland, obtaining the award, therefore, enhances the employability of all graduates.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science
• Medical Imaging
• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging
• Radiation Protection
• Radiotherapy Physics
• Research Methods
• Advanced Radiotherapy
• Specialist Radiotherapy
• Advanced Radiation Safety
• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.
The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.

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The MA Medical Ethics & Law programme at King's College London examines in depth the ethical and legal questions raised by medical practice and science. Read more
The MA Medical Ethics & Law programme at King's College London examines in depth the ethical and legal questions raised by medical practice and science. The programme was founded in 1978, and is an important part of the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, the first of its kind in the UK.

This is a time of great interest in medical ethics and law. Huge questions are raised by advances in fields such as genetics and assisted reproduction. In a changing moral climate, debates about conflicts between mother and fetus, or about physician-assisted suicide, are very much alive. There are challenging questions about psychiatry, about the allocation of scarce medical resources, about the boundaries of the market in medicine, and about the law and ethics of medical research. The programme aims to study the methods of reasoning and analysis in ethics and law, and to examine selected areas of health care and medical pratice from these perspectives. It also seeks to further the understanding of those whose work brings them into contact with medical ethics and law and those who wish to embark on further study and research.

Key benefits

- In-depth philosophical analysis and the most up-to-date legal scholarship applied to a very wide range of medical issues.

- The programmme discusses controversial issues such as euthanasia and abortion with a balanced approach.

- Supported by the UK's first centre of Medical Law and Ethics and its distinguished team of academic staff members, teaching is conducted in small seminar groups of less than 30 to encourage active student participation.

- Applicants with a particular focus on medical law may want to consider the Medical Law pathway as part of the MA Medical Ethics & Law programme.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-ethics-and-law-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Study in depth the ethical and legal questions raised in the context of medicine including genetics; assisted reproduction; abortion; assisted suicide and euthanasia; advance decisions; autism; psychiatric ethics and mental health law; medical research; organ donations and the allocation of scarce resources.

- Course purpose -

For medical/legal professionals, graduates of a relevant discipline, those going on to research and for anyone wanting to think about and discuss some of the hardest human decisions. To study the methods of reasoning and analysis in ethics and law; to examine selected areas of health care and medical practice from a further perspective of medical ethics and law; to assist those involved in teaching or intending to teach in these areas.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year and to write the examinations for each module in January or May of that year. Coursework will be required for some modules and Dissertations are due by late August the same year. Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with Dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Enhancement of existing career; more specialised area of law; personal development. Many alumni go on to work in policy-related positions including positions at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, the Human Tissue Authority, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and the Department of Health. We also have a number of alumni who have worked or are working in the BMA Ethics Department, for the GMC, Progress Educational Trust, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, the King's Fund, and medical defence societies. A number of alumni are teaching ethics and/or law in medical schools. Students who go on to doctoral-level study also find academic positions in law schools and research centres.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project. Read more
Study the ethical and legal issues that arise in medical and healthcare practice, and produce a significant piece of independent research work in your Major Project.

Overview

Medical law and ethics is a fascinating field of study as advances in research and new technologies shift the boundaries of medicine. New health issues are continually emerging and patient rights are increasingly taking centre stage. Complex medico-legal dilemmas are arising in healthcare practice and in the relationships between patients and healthcare professionals. You’ll find that many of the issues we cover on this course are highly topical.

Over the course of two years, you’ll explore the moral problems faced by medical and healthcare professionals, learn about issues that may raise legal liability in these areas, and reflect upon the legal, social and ethical context in which healthcare law is situated.

Our optional modules will allow you to tailor the course to your own particular interests. You’ll be able to explore these in greater depth in your Major Project, by undertaking a significant piece of independent research in your chosen topic.

You’ll benefit from working with students from medical, healthcare and legal backgrounds who will bring different experiences and viewpoints to the subject.

Delivered in short, intensive blocks of teaching, this part-time course is accessible to busy medical and legal professionals. It's taught jointly by staff from by Anglia Law School and our Faculty of Medical Science, reflecting its inter-professional ethos.

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/part-time/medical-law-and-ethics

Careers

If you’re working in the medical or healthcare fields and want to move into a more senior position, our course will help to enhance your CV. By developing specialist academic expertise in the field of medical law you’ll broaden your knowledge and understanding of the legal and ethical context in which you work.

Our course will also provide a sound basis for continuing your studies at PhD level, particularly if you have a law degree.

Modules & assessment

Year one, core modules:
Applied Ethics in the Medical and Healthcare Context
Medical and Healthcare Law

Year two, core modules:
Major Project

Year two, optional modules:
Integrated Governance and Compliance Frameworks in Healthcare Communities
Legal and Ethical Issues Throughout Life
Medical Law and Ethics in the Care of Older People

Assessment

You’ll show your understanding of the modules through written coursework. Meanwhile, the Major Project will let you draw on your own professional background and/or personal interests to produce an original, extended piece of writing.

Where you'll study

Whether you aim to work in the creative industries or the social sciences, the legal profession or public service, the Faculty of Arts, Law & Social Sciences will provide you with the skills and knowledge you need for professional life.

Our lively, diverse community and ambitious academic environment will broaden your horizons and help you develop your full potential - many of our courses give you the chance to learn another language, study abroad or undertake work placements as you study.

If you’re interested in art, music, drama or film, check out our packed programme of events. Together with our partners in the creative and cultural industries, we’re always working to enrich the cultural life of the university and the wider community.

Our research is groundbreaking and internationally recognised, with real social impact. We support the Cultures of the Digital Economy Research Institute (CoDE), whose projects include interactive music apps and documenting lifesaving childbirth procedures, as well as nine international research clusters, such as the Centre for Children's Book Studies and the Labour History Research Unit.

In the Research Excellence Framework 2014, six of our subject areas were awarded world-leading status: Law; Art and Design; English Language and Literature, Communication, Cultural and Media Studies; History; Music, Drama, Dance and Performing Arts.

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Surrey’s longstanding excellent reputation and first-rate facilities combine to provide a postgraduate diploma that will prepare you for an exciting career as a physician associate. Read more
Surrey’s longstanding excellent reputation and first-rate facilities combine to provide a postgraduate diploma that will prepare you for an exciting career as a physician associate.

You will be taught by Academics who are internationally recognised for their expertise in medical and who possess a wealth of experience and knowledge.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

This programme of study, skills development and placement experience allows you to build upon a first degree in biosciences, life sciences or health sciences in order to function as a qualified physician associate.

The programme teaches you to assess, diagnose and manage medical problems competently, consulting with patients presenting with a variety of specified conditions on behalf of, and under supervision of, a senior experienced doctor.

By the end of the programme, you will be able to deliver holistic medical care and treatment to a standard defined by the National Examination for Physician Associates, which will enable you to work in either Primary or Secondary Care.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The programme consists of eight taught modules.

On successful completion of the programme, students will receive a Post Graduate Diploma in Physician Associate Studies, but will also need to sit a National Examination comprising a written paper and OSCE examination, set by the Faculty of Physician Associates at the Royal College of Physicians, in order to be able to practise in the NHS.

On passing the National Examinations, the graduate can be registered on the National Register (currently a Voluntary Register but awaiting accreditation and appointment of a Regulatory Body). The graduate can only work as a physician associate in the NHS if he/she is on this National Register. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Case Based Life Course Medicine
-Case Based Life Course Medicine 2
-Case Based Life Course Medicine 3
-Case Based Life Course Medicine 4
-Clinical Medicine – Mother and Child, and Psychiatry
-Clinical Medicine – Emergency Care and Surgery
-Clinical Medicine – Medicine and General Practice (1)
-Clinical Medicine – General Practice (2) and Elective

WHAT IS A PHYSICIAN ASSOCIATE?

Physician associates support doctors in the diagnosis and management of patients. As a physician associate, you might work in a GP surgery or be based in a hospital, but wherever you work, you'll have direct contact with patients.

You’ll be trained to perform a number of day-to- day tasks including:
-Taking medical histories
-Performing examinations
-Diagnosing illnesses
-Analysing test results
-Developing management plans

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Following successful graduation from this Diploma course, you will need to sit the National Assessment for Physician Associates, set by the Faculty of Physician Associates at the Royal College of Physicians, London.

Passing the National Assessment will allow you to be put onto the National Register for Physician Associates, so that you can practise clinically in the UK.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The overarching educational aim of the programme is to train graduates with a first degree in Biosciences, Life Sciences or Health Sciences, or suitable approved programme, to Post Graduate Diploma level, to function as a qualified physician associate (on passing the National Examination).

Physician associates will be able to:
-Deliver holistic medical care and treatment under defined levels of supervision, in acute and primary care settings in the National Health Service.
-Work effectively with patients and multi-disciplinary healthcare teams from diverse backgrounds.
-Use a patient-centred approach, and be expert communicators, ensuring patient safety at all times
-Promote health and wellbeing on an individual and population basis
-Engage in reflective practice, work within the limits of their competence and engage actively in lifelong learning and professional development

This training includes the necessary knowledge, skills and professional attitudes needed to work to the medical model, demonstrating safe medical practice, medical competence, compassion, reflective and critical thinking in diagnostic reasoning and clinical management.

Graduates will be able to assess, diagnose and manage medical problems competently, consulting with patients presenting with a variety of specified conditions on behalf of, and under supervision of a senior experienced doctor.

They will be able to understand and demonstrate the principles of safe and effective prescribing.

Graduates will be trained to a standard defined by the National Examination for Physician Associates that will enable them to work as physician associates in the National Health Service, with appropriate accreditation and regulation once these have been decided and implemented.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-Demonstrate knowledge of core competencies to medical conditions met during the two year course (in Primary and Secondary Care placements and coursework), as listed in the Competence and Curriculum Framework for the Physician Assistant, 2012.
-Ability to summarise the structure and function of the normal human body throughout the life course
-Ability to describe the pathological basis of core medical conditions throughout the life course
-Ability to describe the wider determinants of health on the individual and society
-Demonstrate application of knowledge and skills in a patient-centred manner for the management of core medical conditions throughout the life course, applying knowledge effectively through clinical reasoning and professional judgement in situations of complexity and uncertainty and in the context of the individual patient’s needs and wishes
-Demonstrate ability to request and interpret common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for a specified range of common clinical conditions, having demonstrated a comprehensive and critical awareness of the research evidence, national and local guidelines
-Demonstrate ability to act safely and promptly in a number of specified acute medical emergencies, taking measures to avoid clinical deterioration of the patient and making a comprehensive and appropriate referral
-Analyse and interpret evidence to the range of medical presentations detailed in the List of Patient Presentations and the Case Matrix
-Demonstrate competence in performing the full core set of clinical procedural skills (taught in both years)
-Demonstrate professional insight, knowledge of self, and reflective practice in the approach to patients and to clinical medicine
-Demonstrate knowledge of national guidelines and relevant protocols in clinical medicine, and of the structure and function of healthcare in the UK
-Demonstrate a common core set of skills, knowledge and values that promote equality, respect diversity, help promote more effective and integrated services and acknowledge the rights of children, young people and their families, and vulnerable groups
-Describe the ethical and legal responsibilities of healthcare professionals and demonstrate their application to daily clinical practice

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Interpreting evidence/ determining the requirement for additional evidence – demonstrate ability to interpret findings from a consultation, select interpret and act upon appropriate investigations
-Clinical reasoning and judgement in diagnosis and management – demonstrate ability to formulate a reasonable differential diagnosis, based on data presented and in order of likely diagnoses
-Show ability to recognise when more information is needed, and have a reasonable idea where to find it
-Show ability to seek help if the clinical situation is beyond student/ clinician’s level of competence
-Therapeutics and prescribing – using the British National Formulary as needed, demonstrate understanding of prescribing in clinical setting, under medical supervision. Write accurate and legible prescriptions, or demonstrate accurate use of a computer to generate prescriptions for review and signature by a supervising clinician
-Understand issues that can affect patient compliance with medication and demonstrate strategies to negotiate and improve compliance
-Common core skills and knowledge when working with children, young people and families – demonstrate effective communication and recognise when to take appropriate action in safeguarding
-Awareness of guiding principles and current developments in the NHS
-Public Health – demonstrate how to apply the principles of promoting health and preventing disease, and how to assess community needs in relation to services provided

Professional practical skills
-The patient relationship – demonstrate ability to develop and maintain clinician/ patient relationships, communicating effectively and appropriately with patients and carers
-Explain the boundaries to the PA-patient professional relationship and what they signify
-Perform a holistic assessment, identifying and prioritising problems, and facilitate patient/carer involvement in management, planning and control of health and illness
-Demonstrate ability to provide useful and appropriate health education
-History taking and consultation skills – demonstrate ability to take an appropriate, focussed, and patient-centred history, including the triple diagnosis (physical, psychological and social), and demonstrate how to elicit patients’ ideas, concerns and expectations
-Examination – demonstrate ability to perform an appropriate focussed clinical examination, including a mental state examination if indicated
-Clinical planning and procedures – demonstrate ability to formulate and implement appropriate management plans in collaboration with the patient, the supervising doctor and the multi-professional team
-Demonstrate ability to perform the list of specified core procedural skills safely and competently
-Risk management – demonstrate ability to recognise potential clinical risk situations and take appropriate action. Participate in clinical governance and clinical audit. Demonstrate safe and effective monitoring and follow-up of patients in liaison with acute and primary care/ community teams
-Maintenance of good practice - critically evaluate own performance and practice, identifying learning needs
-Demonstrate how to use evidence, guidelines and audit (including significant event analysis) to benefit patient care and improve professional practice
-Moving and Handling – demonstrate appropriate manual handling techniques for a variety of situations, using any appropriate aids provided

Key / transferable skills
-Professional behaviour and probity
-Showing integrity and sensitivity
-Recognising and working within own limits of professional competence
-Maintaining effective relationships with colleagues
-Documentation and information management – maintaining timely and relevant medical records
-9Teamwork – understand and value the roles of the health and social care teams, demonstrate communication across team boundaries effectively, including handing over patient care
-Time/ resources management – understand and manage own constraints and those of the NHS
-Ethical and legal issues – demonstrate understanding of patients’ rights, competency, confidentiality, informed consent, care of vulnerable patients and how to respond to complaints
-Equality and diversity – demonstrate understanding of people’s rights in accordance with the Equality Act 2010, act with respect towards all patients, colleagues and students, and know how to take action if patients are being abused

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Medical anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and behaviours associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups. Read more
Medical anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and behaviours associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups. Despite the name conventionally given to this area of study, medical anthropology is not simply concerned with practices of healing or systems of diagnosis and treatment such as biomedicine. It deals with the more informal systems of health care that exist worldwide (such as self-treatment, folk healers, shamans, traditional birth attendants, and alternative practitioners), as well as those associated with professional Western science-based medicine and caring practices. Additionally, medical anthropology is also concerned with issues which relate to different cultural views of the 'self' in health and disease, as well as shared beliefs, images and practices associated with perceptions of the human body and mind.

The Brunel MSc addresses the above issues in a lively and challenging way. It was the first taught master's degree dedicated to medical anthropology in Europe; and it is the largest MSc medical anthropology programme in the UK. We have the largest number of dedicated and internationally known medical anthropology staff in the country teaching the degree; and around 330 students have graduated with an MSc in medical anthropology from Brunel University. They are now working all over the world in a variety of settings.

Course Content: Modules are subject to variation and students are advised to check with the School on whether a particular module of interest will be running in their year of entry. At the time of printing modules were drawn from the following areas:

Compulsory Modules: Medical Anthropology in Clinical & Community Settings; Anthropology of Biomedicine & Psychiatry; Anthropology & Global Health; Ethnographic Research Methods 1 & 2.
Optional Modules: Kinship & New Directions in Anthropology; Anthropology of Disability & Difference; Anthropology of the Person; Anthropology of the Body.
Plus two unassessed reading modules: History and Theory of Social Anthropology; Issues in Social Anthropology

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITY
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009) who taught on this course from 1990, The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations. The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (eg, analysis of a short field exercise), and a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Recent examples of dissertations by students taking this course include:
The Management of Alzheimer's disease.
The relationships between nurses and doctors in managing primary care.
Private experiences and public encounters: selfhood and personhood amidst the chaos of homelessness.

Here's what some of our former students have to say:

Birgit: “When I came back from a mission with Médecins sans Frontières in Mozambique, where I had worked on an HIV/AIDS programme, I searched for training opportunities and found out about Medical Anthropology at Brunel. I was thrilled – the subject matter described exactly what I had experienced in project work: divergent perceptions of sickness and health from a Western medical perspective and from a ‘traditional’ point of view.

The difficulties communicating essential health messages threatened the aim of prevention, and a great need was felt to better understand local ideas of mother-child health in the HIV/AIDS epidemic. I was attracted by the perspective to learn how to conduct qualitative studies on health-related issues, and fascinated by the stance to comprehend ‘culture’ not as a normative and static condition, but as a constant process of negotiation and renewal.

I had the great opportunity to return to Mozambique for the dissertation fieldwork, studying traditional concepts of child nutrition and child health. I could pursue questions that were crucial in my past project work, and which were essential to the success of HIV/AIDS prevention. Writing transformed into something very unexpected, especially when working on the dissertation. It became an opportunity to think things through, to contextualize, discuss, explore and explain conclusions. Investigation and writing were two separate and still corresponding parts of an intense learning process. This process also taught me about ethical dilemmas in anthropological enquiry, about methodological constraints and limitations of inference, and it raised questions on what both tradition and human agency may mean.“

Julia: Whilst retaining our core values the NHS is being challenged to adopt new ways of commissioning and delivering quality services that are patient-focused and safe. So where does Medical Anthropology come into this change agenda?

It was not until I started my Masters that I really began to undertstand the concepts of culture, disease and illness, and how fundamental these are in influencing the NHS organisation. The course has challenged me to think differently and has transformed the way I plan and deliver patient-centred care, how I interact with colleagues and how I in turn educate professionals within our organisaiton.

I cannot recommend the course too highly, from the content of the modules to the excellent support of all the staff in the department. I have been provileged to have had this transformational learning opportunity.

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- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree. - Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree.

- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world

- People with professional experience in medical practice who have an interest in cross-cultural understandings of health and illness.

- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics in the anthropology of medicine.

- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

- The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

As one might expect of study at SOAS, our programme is unique in that we take a cultural and phenomenological approach to the anthropology of medicine. That is, we stress a truly cross-cultural method, one which unites all medical systems in a unified comparative perspective. This allows students to grasp the underlying principles and questions common to all therapeutic systems. Given the diversity of the School’s courses, students may choose options which strengthen either the humanities or the development studies aspects of their interests.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/

Structure

- Core course: Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Medical Anthropology and the candidate’s supervisor.

- In addition, all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

- Students without previous experience of anthropology must take the foundation course, Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit).

Option Courses - Group A and Group B:

Students then choose TWO 0.5 unit courses from the Group A and B lists.

- AT LEAST ONE of the two 0.5 unit courses normally must come from Group A
- Students not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology may then select their fourth unit (either a single 1.0 unit course or two 0.5 unit courses) from the Option Courses list.
- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures
- In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Cultural Understandings of Health (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Medical Anthropology and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 230kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/file93566.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- All students are introduced to the types of problem and areas of questioning which are fundamental to the anthropology of medicine.

- Students new to the discipline are given knowledge of the general principles of anthropological enquiry

- All students develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the theoretical approaches which help form an anthropological perspective.

- All students gain an understanding of the practical methods by which this perspective is applied in field research.
All students will be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be familiar with the foundational literature on the basis of which medical anthropology is linked to and emerges from broader disciplinary concerns.

- Students will have knowledge of the intersections linking medical anthropology to related fields, such as social studies of science, studies in bioethics, and critical approaches to public health

- Students will be familiar with the numerous ethnographic studies of health and illness.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to deploy an ethnographic kind of questioning – one directed toward teasing out of complex situations the sets of particular norms or principles which condition or shape them.

- As anthropologists, they will be trained to look for the specifically social in everything (even & especially in the “natural”)

- Students will learn how to form an anthropological problem – that is to distinguish an anthropological problem from a mere topic or area of interest.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Personal drive: Students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning

- Students will develop research skills: including location and adjustment to differing types of library collection, as well as locating organizations and people who hold significant information

- Listening & understanding: Students will be able to assimilate complex arguments quickly on the basis of listening – and to discuss or disagree constructively with points made by others.

- Planning and problem solving: students will be able to set targets and achieve them, and will be able to work well to deadlines.

- Working in a group: students will learn to lead by contributing to the development of consensus.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language.

Transferable skills:

- Students will develop an ability to begin from a general question or issue and develop an appropriate research model and method.
- Ability to clearly represent a concise understanding of a project/problem and its solution.
- An ability to recognize and appreciate for what it is an unconventional approach or an unfamiliar idea
- An ability creatively to resolve conflict while working in a team; being able to see the other person’s point of view
- An ability to work and feel at ease in multicultural or cross cultural environments.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme has been developed to prepare clinicians and health and care professionals for their role as clinical educators and assessors. Read more
This programme has been developed to prepare clinicians and health and care professionals for their role as clinical educators and assessors. It is intended to develop skills in providing education within the working environment. It provides inter-professional working opportunities for the study of key aspects of medical education. It is useful for any medical, health or social care professional with an interest in developing their education knowledge and skills.

Programme structure

This programme is offered on a modular basis to fit in with existing commitments. Modules can also be studied on an individual basis. Some of the modules require minimal attendance, and have a large e-learning component; others require some attendance (typically 4 taught days spread out over several months) together with independent study.

Why choose this course?

-This programme has been developed in response to an evolving NHS and healthcare climate where clinicians are increasingly providing education and support within the working environment. The programme will equip medical and healthcare practitioners with knowledge and skills for developing outstanding educational expertise.
-You will study and explore aspects of educational theory and practice with particular emphasis on adult, clinical and work based learning. There is also an option to study simulation as an educational tool in our very well equipped clinical simulation centre - one of the largest in Europe.
-This programme provides the opportunity to experience a range of teaching and learning techniques, such as blended learning and psychomotor skills training, and the teaching approaches of a range of very experienced clinical educators.
-This programme leads to the award of MSc Health and Medical Education with interim awards of Postgraduate Diploma Health and Medical Education or Postgraduate Certificate Health and Medical Education.

Careers

This postgraduate programme offers the opportunity for clinicians working in positions where teaching and training is a requirement, to update and enhance their knowledge and skills. This is identified in the Gold Guide (DoH 1997), which specifies that those involved in the provision and management of postgraduate medical training programmes must have required competencies in the range of educational issues covered by the programme.

The programme

-Develops the critical skills required to become a knowledgeable and competent practitioner in work based learning in health and medical educational settings.
-Raises awareness and fosters critical problem solving regarding the wider contextual factors affecting educational issues in the workplace
-Fosters the advanced skills required for multi-professional and inter-professional working.
-Provides networking and peer support

Teaching methods

A variety of teaching methods are used during the programme including seminars, group work, e-learning, and work-based learning. The programme is well supported by expert educationalists; academics with expertise in work based and health based education; doctors and nurses with expertise in competency assessment; and key opinion leaders in the field so that it maintains links with practice and the ability to reflect current trends in educational practice and work based learning.

The course is intensive with a limited amount of classroom based teaching, and requires you to be a self-directed learner and make full use of the e-support provided and of the Virtual Learning Environment - StudyNet.

Structure

Optional Modules
-Clinical Supervision in Medical Practice
-Core Competencies in Medical Practice
-Evidence Based Practice
-Health Disciplines Project
-Health Technology and Innovation
-Health and Medical Education in the Workplace
-Leadership in Practice
-Technology Enhanced Learning
-Work Based Learning

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Study in depth the legal questions raised in the context of medicine including genetics; assisted reproduction; abortion; assisted suicide and euthanasia; advance decisions; autism; psychiatric ethics and mental health law; medical research; organ donations and the allocation of scarce resources. Read more
Study in depth the legal questions raised in the context of medicine including genetics; assisted reproduction; abortion; assisted suicide and euthanasia; advance decisions; autism; psychiatric ethics and mental health law; medical research; organ donations and the allocation of scarce resources.

Key benefits

- The most up-to-date legal scholarship applied to a very wide range of medical issues.

- The programmme discusses controversial issues such as euthanasia and abortion with a balanced approach.

- Supported by theUK's first Centre of Medical Law and Ethics and its distinguished team of academic staff members, teaching is conducted in small seminar groups of less than 30 to encourage active student participation.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-law-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Examines in depth the legal questions raised by medical practice and science. The Medical Law pathway forms a part of the MA Medical Law & Ethics programme, which was founded in 1978, and is an important part of the Centre of Medical Law and Ethics, the first of its kind in the UK.

This is a time of great interest in medical ethics and law. Huge questions are raised by advances in fields such as genetics and assisted reproduction. In a changing moral climate, debates about conflicts between mother and fetus, or about physician-assisted suicide, are very much alive. There are challenging questions about psychiatry, about the allocation of scarce medical resources, about the boundaries of the market in medicine, and about the law and ethics of medical research.

- Course purpose -

For medical/legal professionals, graduates of a relevant discipline, those going on to research and for anyone wanting to think about and discuss some of the hardest human decisions. To study the methods of reasoning and analysis in law and to examine selected areas of health care and medical practice from a further perspective of medical law.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time students are required to complete the programme over one academic year and to write the examinations for each module in January or May of that year. Coursework will be required for some modules and Dissertations are due by late August the same year. Part-time students are required to complete the programme over two academic years, with Dissertations due by late August of the second/final year of study.

Career prospects

Enhancement of existing career; more specialised area of law; personal development. Many alumni go on to work in policy-related positions including positions at the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, the Human Tissue Authority, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics and the Department of Health. We also have a number of alumni who have worked or are working in the BMA Ethics Department, for the GMC, Progress Educational Trust, the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, the King's Fund, and medical defence societies. A number of alumni are teaching ethics and/or law in medical schools. Students who go on to doctoral-level study also find academic positions in law schools and research centres.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Advances in biomedical technology, changing moral attitudes, and developments in law, combine to generate difficult ethical, legal, policy challenges for those involved in the delivery of healthcare. Read more

Overview

Advances in biomedical technology, changing moral attitudes, and developments in law, combine to generate difficult ethical, legal, policy challenges for those involved in the delivery of healthcare. This programme provides an opportunity to gain a deeper and more systematic understanding of these issues and to explore the moral problems faced by healthcare professionals and those involve in healthcare management and policy. It also aims to provide a foundation for pursuing further study at doctoral level for those interested in doing so.

Applications are welcome from people with a professional or other serious interest in Medical Ethics and Law, including (but not limited to) doctors, nurses, health care managers, intercalating medical students, radiographers, chaplains, charity and voluntary workers, social workers, hospice directors, medical and pharmaceutical researchers, dentists, veterinary practitioners and health care educators. While the programme is primarily aimed at healthcare professionals, it is open to anyone who is suitably qualified and who can demonstrate sufficient academic aptitude.

The MA in Medical Ethics and Law is run by the Centre for Professional Ethics and School of Law at Keele University. It is one of England’s longest established master’s programmes in this subject area, having first been presented in 1987.

The programme is available part-time, full-time, by modular study, and by intercalation within a medical degree. It is taught in short, intensive blocks to make it accessible to those in full-time employment and from across the country and beyond.

Teaching staff also work at the forefront of research in medical ethics, which helps to give the course a contemporary edge. In the recent 2014 REF, staff from Keele's Healthcare Law and Bioethics cluster who teach on the MA were part of Keele's Philosophy submission, which was ranked first in the country for its Impact work. The impact submission was based on staff's work in the field of Biomedical ethics, with 80% of this work judged as being world-leading and the remaining 20% as being of internationally excellent.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/medicalethicsandlaw/

Course Aims

This course aims to deepen students’ understanding of health care ethics and law, and to enhance their ability to think systematically about the moral and legal issues that health care professionals may face in the course of their work. It also aims to provide a foundation for pursuing further study at doctoral level for those interested in doing so.

Undertaking an MA in ethics will not give you a list of answers to moral problems. What our courses can do is help you to work out answers for yourself, answers that are worth having because they’re based on the best ethical thinking and reasoning we can manage, answers you can justify, to yourself and others. The MA course will give you an introduction to a number of different (rival) moral theories - all of which have their strengths and their weaknesses - as well as providing you with a range of analytical tools with which to assess different ethical and legal claims. It will also help you to communicate ethical and legal arguments to others in a clearer way.

Although ethical issues are rarely out of the headlines, much public 'debate' about ethics in the media is (with occasional honourable exceptions) of very poor quality. Our courses will help you to construct, categorise and criticise different ethical arguments and to spot common fallacies. Ethics at Keele is a participatory activity, not a spectator sport!

Teaching & Assessment

Teaching for the four taught modules is delivered in short intense blocks, enabling those in full-time employment to do the course part-time and to fit it around the demands of their work wherever they are based. Each student is assigned a personal supervisor from the outset, whom they can contact for help or advice at any time during the course.

We regard high levels of student participation in discussion as particularly important for teaching and learning in this area, and employ teaching techniques which encourage this wherever possible. Students come from a wide range of backgrounds and report that meeting and exchanging ideas with others who work in different fields and in different parts of the country is one of the major benefits of the course.

From time to time, experts from outside Keele are invited to speak on the course; this provides an insight into academic work in healthcare ethics and law taking place in other institutions and professional perspectives. In addition, Keele's Centre for Law, Ethics and Society hosts a wide range of seminars, workshops and lectures, which students are welcome to attend.

Each of the four taught modules is assessed through a 5,000-word essay. The essay question is chosen from a list reflecting the main themes of the module, enabling students to focus on the issues that are most interesting to them or relevant to their work. For each essay, students submit a plan (required for modules 1 and 2; optional for modules 3 and 4), on which feedback is provided. In addition, students receive written feedback on each of their essays, aimed at helping them to improve their performance as they progress through the programme, and have the opportunity to discuss the feedback with their supervisor.

For the dissertation module, students are allocated a supervisor to provide support and advice during the writing process, and attend a one-day Research Methods Workshop in Semester 1.

Additional Costs

Students not living within daily travelling distance of Keele will need to arrange accommodation during the teaching blocks.

Although recommended readings are available in the library or on-line, students may wish to purchase some books for themselves.

We do not anticipate any other additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Mills & Reeve Dissertation Prize

The Mills & Reeve Dissertation Prize is awarded each year to the student who produces the best dissertation. The winner receives a cash prize of £100 sponsored by the law firm Mills & Reeve, and an invitation to lunch at the firm.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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