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Masters Degrees (Medical Research)

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The aims of the MRes Medical Research are to. Provide robust education on research to compliment and support research exposure and experience for academically gifted medical and dental trainees, and research registrars;. Read more
The aims of the MRes Medical Research are to:
• Provide robust education on research to compliment and support research exposure and experience for academically gifted medical and dental trainees, and research registrars;
• Develop independent researchers of the future, able to compete for a Research Training Fellowship leading to a PhD and further postdoctoral research;
• Contribute to the NHS drive to develop the vibrant academic community essential for first class healthcare.

Academic Clinical Fellows at Brighton and Sussex Medical School will be automatically accepted on the course. Applications from other NHS research registrars, doctors in the pharmaceutical industry, and others employed in a setting where medical research is a core function of their day-to-day activity will also be considered. In order to maintain the high research degree completion rate of BSMS, non-ACF applicants will only be accepted if they can demonstrate: an ongoing research programme in which they are currently involved; award of a research grant; or employer support for a locally-funded research project intended for publication.

Course structure and content
The course requires 80 taught credits and a 100 credit research dissertation.

The taught modules (20 credits each) are:
• Research Methods and Critical Appraisal
• Epidemiology
• Essential Statistics for Health and Medical Research.
It is recommended that the final taught module be Evidence-Based Practice; alternatively, students may take any module from those offered by the Universities of Brighton and Sussex, with the approval of the Course Leader.

The dissertation (100 credits) requires a 16-20,000 word research dissertation which includes literature review, background, methodology, project management and governance, ethics, methods, results and discussion chapters. In addition, students are required to undertake a viva on their project, identify an appropriate journal for publication of their work and produce an article in the correct format to submit.

Students on the programme experience lectures, large and small group discussion and individual tutorials. To ensure that students are able to put their learning into context, each is employed in a setting where research forms a significant part of their activity. Students are encouraged to bring work-based difficulties and experiences to the group work to enhance the relevance of the content to day-to-day clinical and research activity.

Staff provide direction within the lectures and seminars with much learner autonomy evident in the group work and assessment. Learning is supported further by the use of StudentCentral and the usual visual aids and handouts. Students are expected to support their learning by the use and critical appraisal of primary sources of information.

Group work on the statistical module gives hands-on experience of working with, analysing and reporting data on computers as well as interpretation of worked examples from published and/or local research. Workshops on research ethics and governance are provided to support students through regulatory processes effectively.

Learning beyond the classroom comprises scientific, clinical and research reading as well as practical development and application of research skills. Students are expected to develop further academic, transferable, communication skills through robust scientific writing, presentations and written reports. Engagement with a research project at a very early stage is mandatory to ensure that autonomy in the whole research process of project management and governance can be learnt. Students are also given the opportunity to learn through teaching/facilitating on their chosen topic, particularly if research focuses on education.

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This course has been designed to develop future research leaders who are able to complete a PhD, conduct independent research and be future principal investigators. Read more
This course has been designed to develop future research leaders who are able to complete a PhD, conduct independent research and be future principal investigators.

It is aimed at doctors, academic clinical trainees and other researchers across a range of fields. Robust education and training is provided in quantitative and qualitative research and data analysis methods.

Learning beyond the classroom comprises scientific, clinical and research reading as well as the practical development and application of research skills. Students will engage with a research project at a very early stage and will gain autonomy in research project management and governance. There is an opportunity to learn through teaching on the chosen topic, particularly if the research topic focuses on education. A series of Research Skills workshops is provided to further develop students’ research abilities.

KEY AREAS OF STUDY

• Research methods and critical appraisal
• Essential statistics for health and medical research
• Evidence-based practice
• Clinical trials management
• Advanced research skills
• Epidemiology

COURSE STRUCTURE

Modules are assessed by 3,000 word written assignments which are centred on case studies or a relevant topic agreed between the student and the module leader. In addition there is a 16,000 word dissertation and 3,000 word draft paper for publication.

PG Cert:

MDM10 Research Methods and Critical Appraisal (20 credits)
MDM66 Essential Statistics for Health and Medical Research (20 credits)

PLUS

MDM34 Evidence Based Practice (20 credits)

OR

MDM112 Clinical Trials Management (20 credits)

MRes:

MDM10 Research Methods and Critical Appraisal (20 credits)
MDM66 Essential Statistics for Health and Medical Research (20 credits)

PLUS two of the following modules:

MDM34 Evidence-Based Practice (20 credits)
MDM112 Clinical Trials Management (20 credits)
MDM141 Advanced Research Skills (20 credits)
MDM12 Epidemiology (20 credits)

PLUS

MDM100 Research Dissertation (100 credits)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The course is a stepping stone to PhD studies and collaborative or independent research in the future. Course graduates will be research-literate, research-skilled and equipped to be research-active in their careers.

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Your programme of study. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to develop your career in academic research within a medical environment and you need the research methodology to do this, Medical Research Skills will enable you to provide wide ranging research techniques to not only improve and widen your career and employability, but make a name for yourself within your chosen field of expertise. You can also undertake medical research toward spin-out innovation as a direct result of your research within a university environment after graduating. The PG Cert is and ideal start to ensuring you are equipped with plenty of research breadth and ideal if you are studying within Aberdeenshire, Angus, and Moray and possibly in most of Scotland to fit around your medical work. The course is available over 24 months part time.  

You learn by self directed learning and practical classes using real life examples to ensure multidisciplinary learning, exposure to leading academics and clinical experts to provide rigour in your research, and insight into actual situations in a clinical environment. You get opportunities to network and attend seminars and events run by the medical school.

This programme will provide training in generic research skills within a clinical context. The rationale is to equip Aberdeen AFP doctors with fundamental research skills that will enable them to pursue a clinical academic career. Clinical academia is a strongly competitive environment. Thus the need for doctors to have a keen and active interest, along with the appropriate research training and portfolio, has never been greater. The University of Aberdeen College of Life Sciences and Medicine recognises this and is offering this unique opportunity to further develop your clinical academic profile and standing.

Courses listed for the programme

Year 1

Research Skills

Year 2

Research Skills and Scientific Writing

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • This is the first programme of its kind in the UK to provide generic research skills in a clinical context
  • You will be taught by renowned researchers with full medical and research careers in one of the top 10 medical schools in the UK
  • You gain access to valuable research networks and opportunities whilst you learn

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Part Time
  • 24 months
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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The Medicine MRes is a strongly research-based programme, which gives you the training and opportunity to develop as a scientist or scientifically-literate clinician. Read more

The Medicine MRes is a strongly research-based programme, which gives you the training and opportunity to develop as a scientist or scientifically-literate clinician.

It can help you to gain:

  • a comprehensive understanding of the concepts and techniques relevant to medical research
  • the ability to critically and creatively evaluate current issues in medicine and health.

You’ll get experience in formulating new hypotheses and exploring the causes and consequences of diseases by conducting rigorous scientific research in a laboratory or with patients.

A nine-month research project helps you to develop specialised knowledge, as well as design and undertake a substantial piece of publishable research. You’ll be based in one of our internationally-renowned institutes and be supervised by leading experts in their field. You can choose from a range of research opportunities in applied health, cancer and pathology, cardiovascular, genes and development, medical education and musculoskeletal topics.

We invite you to view our list of research projects 2017-18. Please contact the supervisory team before applying to the course and in your application state your three preferred research projects.

More information

The School of Medicine is a major international centre for research and education. Our ambition is to improve health and reduce health inequalities, locally and globally, through excellent research and its translation into healthcare practice, and the education of future scientific and clinical leaders who will advocate and practise an evidence-based approach.

Course content

The taught modules are designed to stimulate a deep and critical knowledge of research. The optional modules allow you to develop a comprehensive knowledge of different approaches to medical research.

The Paper Criticism module enables you to develop subject-specific skills, such as an understanding of the ethical issues of medicine and knowledge of the current requirements for the governance of medical research and its publication. You apply your knowledge of research methods to published papers and enhance your critical skills.

The Analytic Research module provides a critical awareness of research planning and methods and develops your research skills. It includes topics on the structure of analytic research investigations; the analysis of the data obtained in analytic studies, especially the metrics used; the problems resulting from bias and confounding and how they are dealt with; basic statistics of precision and comparison;dealing with unequal duration of follow-up in cohort studies; and critical appraisal of published research.

The Capturing and Handling Data in Research module is an introduction to the collection and handling of health research data. It will include topics on: social inclusion in research; sampling from populations; types of data; collecting data through questionnaires; how scales and tests are used to collect data; and how data are collected and described using various fractions such as rates, ratios, risks and odds; recording quantitative and qualitative data in suitable formats; using computers in the analysis of data; the importance of the statistics that summarise quantitative data; and an introduction to the analysis of quantitative and qualitative data. Critical appraisal of published research will underpin theory.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Analytic Research 15 credits
  • Intervention Research 15 credits
  • Capturing and Handling Data in Research 15 credits
  • Research Project in Medicine 120 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medicine MRes in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

There are few formal lectures in the MRes programme. Most of your time is devoted to planning and conducting the research project, usually working with a small team of researchers or healthcare professionals.

Interactive tutorial sessions are shared with students on other Masters programmes in the School of Medicine, intercalating medical students and health professionals.

Assessment

There is one examination in May for the Paper Criticism module. Other modules are assessed by the submission of coursework, workbooks, reports and reviews.

Exit awards of Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Research (120 credits) or Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Research (60 credits) are available for this programme.

Career opportunities

The Master of Research in Medicine is for people who want to pursue a lifelong career in academic medicine research.

For medical students, the addition of the Medicine MRes on your CV is an advantage when applying for Academic Foundation Posts and Specialist Training Posts in the NHS.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management. Read more

Our MSc in Medical Imaging Science covers a multidisciplinary topic of central importance in diagnosis, treatment monitoring and patient management.

It is also a key tool in medical research and it is becoming increasingly possible to relate imaging studies to genetic traits in individuals and populations. Novel imaging biomarkers of disease can enable more rapid and precise diagnosis and inform decision making in drug discovery programmes.

As medical imaging involves knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology, physics, mathematics and computation, our course is suitable if you want to expand your disciplinary horizons and pursue a career in an image-related field in clinical medicine, medical research, or technological research or development.

You will cover the basic science and technology behind the principal imaging modalities currently used in medicine and medical research, as well as advanced imaging methods, clinical and research applications, imaging biomarkers and computational methods.

You will learn how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. You will also receive training in computational and quantitative methods of image analysis or in the interpretation of clinical images from different imaging modalities.

This course comprises both a taught component and a research project, giving you the skills and knowledge required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical or scientific research, or technical development.

Aims

We aim to provide you with:

  • with a systematic understanding of the scientific basis of the major medical imaging modalities;
  • a broad understanding of the principal clinical applications of medical imaging and its role in diagnosis, monitoring and therapy;
  • an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of medical imaging for deriving quantitative anatomical and physiological data;
  • knowledge of how advanced imaging techniques are applied in medical research and drug discovery;
  • the experience to plan, implement and complete a research project;
  • generic transferrable skills required in a multidisciplinary scientific or clinical research environment;
  • the knowledge and skills required for a career in an image-related field in clinical practice, clinical research, scientific research or technical development.

Special features

Excellent facilities

Benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Learn from experts

Manchester has an imaging and image computing research group with a strong international reputation. Our research groups and facilities are staffed by scientists conducting research in novel imaging and image analysis methods, and clinicians who apply these methods in clinical practice.

Flexible learning

Learn when it suits you thanks to options for either full-time or part-time study.

Multidisciplinary learning

Study alongside physicists, engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists, chemists, biologists and clinicians working in hospitals and research-dedicated imaging facilities.

Teaching and learning

As this course aims to produce graduates equipped to pursue either clinically or technically-focused careers in imaging, it is important to provide an adequate knowledge base. For this reason, much of the teaching takes the form of lectures.

However, in most course units, this is supplemented by group discussions and practical exercises. Other than the introductory units, most course units provide you with an understanding of research methods by requiring submission of a critical review of appropriate research literature or clinical material, either as a report or presentation.

Where appropriate, practical imaging exercises are provided, requiring you to cooperate in acquiring images and analysing results.

All units require a considerable component of independent research and study.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment will occur in a variety of forms.

Summative assessment takes the form of written assignments, examinations, oral presentations and online quizzes. Written assignments and presentations, as well as contributing to summative assessment, have a formative role in providing feedback, particularly in the early stages of course units.

Online quizzes provide a useful method of regular testing, ensuring that you engage actively with the taught material. As accumulation of a knowledge base is a key aim of the course, examinations (both open-book and closed-book) form an important element of summative assessment.

In addition, formal assessment of your research and written communication skills is achieved via the dissertation. This is a 10,000 to 15,000-word report, written and organised to appropriate scientific standards, describing the design, execution and results of the research project.

Course unit details

The MSc requires students to pass 180 credits composed of eight course units of 15 credits each and a 60-credit research project.

We provide course units in Human Biology and Introductory Mathematics and Physics to bring students up to the required level in these topics.

Semester 1: Compulsory units

  • Scientific Skills
  • Mathematical Foundations of Imaging
  • Radioisotope Imaging (PET/SPET)
  • Non-radioisotope Imaging (MRI, CT, US)

Semester 2: Compulsory units

  • Advanced MR Imaging
  • Advanced PET Imaging
  • Quantitative Imaging into Practice (Imaging Biomarkers for Healthcare and Research)

Semester 2: Elective units (select one)

  • Imaging in Clinical Diagnosis
  • Medical Image Analysis and Mathematical Computing

Semester 3:

  • Research project

Facilities

You will benefit from research-dedicated imaging facilities at several hospital sites and a dedicated molecular imaging centre co-located with the Christie Hospital.

Each student will have an identified personal tutor who can provide advice and assistance throughout the course. During the research project, you will be in regular contact with your research supervisor.You will also be able to access a range of other library and e-learning facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Graduates will be in an excellent position to pursue careers in image-related fields in healthcare and research. This MSc will also form a sound basis for students who wish to proceed to PhD research in any aspect of medical imaging.

Intercalating medical students may use this qualification as a platform to pursue a clinical career in radiology.

Physical science/engineering graduates may see this as a route to imaging research or development in an academic or commercial environment.



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Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment. Read more

Our MRes Cardiovascular Health and Disease course is a research-focused master's course focusing on cardiovascular research within a unique multidisciplinary training environment.

Master of Research (MRes) degree provides preparatory training for academic research, ideal if you want to eventually progress on to a PhD and develop a research career, or if you wish to gain research skills within specialist areas before committing to a PhD. This course is also highly suited to medical students who want to intercalate.

Through this course, you will develop broad biomedical research skills, but with an emphasis on application to cardiovascular science.

It is now widely recognised by employers and research councils that unravelling the basis of cardiovascular disease and developing new therapies is a high-priority area for investment, especially since the economic burden of cardiovascular disease is increasing.

However, it is becoming increasingly clearer that a gap has opened up between the skills possessed by new graduates and the skills normally expected on entry to a research degree or an industrial research career. This MRes has been specifically designed to fill this gap for those who wish to pursue a research career in cardiovascular sciences.

Our course is suitable if you come from a medical or science background and have little or no previous research experience.

Aims

Our course is designed to provide you with:

  • specialist knowledge of the principles of the cardiovascular system in health and disease, with an emphasis on emerging technologies (taught lectures);
  • laboratory skills, research methodology and data analysis (two research projects);
  • critical analysis of scientific and medical literature (literature review);
  • intellectual skills for understanding and interpreting research problems (tutorials);
  • communication of scientific data and concepts (oral presentations and written reports).

Special features

Learn from the experts

The University is home to around 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields.

Additional course information

Research topic examples:

  • Coronary arterial contractility and endothelial function
  • Sick sinus syndrome and gene therapy
  • Can we un-stiffen arteries?
  • Cellular basis of cardiac arrhythmias
  • Elucidation of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis
  • The role of mitochondrial dysfunction in heart failure
  • Mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy
  • Cell signalling in vascular smooth muscle
  • Cellular dysfunction and EC remodelling in heart disease and ageing
  • Development of a novel therapeutic approach to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

Teaching and learning

We have nearly 40 principal investigators in cardiovascular sciences, including clinicians and basic scientists with national and international reputations in their respective fields. There is a wide spectrum of research spanning clinical trials, whole organs, tissues, cells and single molecule studies.

Contributors to this course include:

You will learn through a range of teaching methods, including seminars, workshops and tutorials, as well as through research projects (25 weeks).

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is through a combination of written reports (in journal format), literature review, problem-based learning (PBL) tutorials and oral presentations.

This range of training methods aims to promote a stimulating and dynamic learning environment. The different course units will enable the development of key transferable skills in the critical analysis of research methodologies, data interrogation, communication and time management.

Course unit details

Clinical Masterclass course unit:

The Clinical Masterclass course unit is a 15 credit unit specifically designed for intercalated medical students. The unit consists of a series of seminars, workshops and e-learning.

This unit contributes to personal and professional development in the experience, knowledge and skills training required for effective clinical practice and success, with a strong emphasis on clinical academic research.

Areas covered include:

  • advanced Good Clinical Practice (GCP)
  • research governance and the regulatory framework for research
  • the Human Tissue Act
  • practical clinical ethics
  • patient and public involvement in research
  • diversity/equal opportunities in research/cultural competence
  • research creativity and entrepreneurialism
  • leadership (practitioner, partner and leader roles)

Facilities

Most of our researchers are housed within the Core Technology Facility and AV Hill, purpose-built research centres that have state-of-the-art facilities and equipment. This close contact fosters collaboration and discussion and is an excellent environment for students.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Support Office 

Career opportunities

After this course, many students continue their studies and register for a PhD.

However, the course is also of value if you want to progress in careers in the pharmaceutical industry or clinical research.

The MRes is also ideal for MBChB intercalating students who wish to undertake directly channelled research training in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Many of the skills and training provided by the MRes are generic and will have wide application to the study of other disciplines.



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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science

• Medical Imaging

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging

• Radiation Protection

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Research Methods

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• Specialist Radiotherapy

• Advanced Radiation Safety

• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.

The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.



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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is a one year full time programme, which provides an ideal opportunity and environment in which to gain practical training in Research Methods and to join a thriving research team within Swansea University College of Medicine. The Medicine and Life Sciences course has been developed with an emphasis on providing students with a research-oriented approach to their learning. Students are able to tailor their studies towards a career in one of the College’s internationally recognised research themes:

– Biomarkers and Genes,

– Devices,

– Microbes and Immunity,

– Patient & Population Health and Informatics.

Key Features of MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is committed to supporting the development of evidence within the areas of Health, Medicine and Life Science through the training of researchers whose findings will directly inform their own understanding and that of others. The ethos of this programme is to produce graduates with the research skill and knowledge to become effective researchers, who will contribute to the body of knowledge within their chosen area of interest that will have an impact upon the health and well-being of all.

- The advantage of a MRes over other formats is that it provides a structured yet in-depth approach, taking the taught component of FHEQ Level 7 teaching as a framework for conducting research on the candidates own practice.

- Innovative and integrated curriculum that reflects the various aspects of the research process.

- Multidisciplinary teaching team with vast experience and expertise in conducting high quality research.

- Research informed teaching.

- Teaching is supported by online learning and support.

-Flexibility for you to gain specialist knowledge.

- A one year full-time taught masters programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required for a successful research career.

- This course is also available for two years part-time study.

- The opportunity to conduct an individual research project with an interdisciplinary team within a supportive environment.

- Students will be assigned a research-active supervisory team

The aim of the MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is to provide students with a broad research training to prepare them for a research career in Medical and Life Science research with emphasis on: Biomarkers & Genes, Devices, Microbes & Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. The course has been developed to enable graduates to pursue a variety of research careers in Medical and Life Sciences. The programme comprises both taught and research elements.

By the end of the Medicine and Life Sciences programme students will have:

Developed necessary skills to critically interpret and evaluate research evidence; Gained experience the in analysis and interpretation of research data; Advanced knowledge at the forefront of Medical and Life Science research, with the ability to integrate the theoretical and practical elements of research training; Developed the ability to conceptualise, design and implement a research project for the generation of new evidence that informs Health, Medicine and Life Science; Developed practical research skills by working with an interdisciplinary research team; The ability to confidently communicate research ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences; Acquired transferable skills which enhance your employability and future research career.

Modules

Modules on the Medicine and Life Sciences course may include:

PMRM01 Critical Appraisal and Evaluation

PMRM02 Data Analysis for Health and Medical Sciences

PMRM03 Research Leadership and Project Management OR any topic specific FHEQ Level 7 module from the College of Medicine ’s portfolio

Mode of delivery:

The 60 credits of the taught element will be delivered face-to-face, combining formal lecturing, seminars, and group work in addition to tutor-led practical classes. The remaining 120 credits for the research element will be available as distance learning either off or on-site. Irrespective of the location for conducting the research project, students will supported through monthly online (Skype)/or face-to-face supervisory meetings.

Course Structure

Students must complete 3 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 120 credits thesis on a research project aligned to one the College’s research theme. Each taught module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is designed in two phases:

Phase 1 – Training and Application (October – January; 60 credits)

Taught modules in Research Methods and their application to Medicine and Life Science. Personalised education and training relevant to student’s research interests. Identification of research questions and how they might be addressed.Focused on students existing knowledge and research skills.

Phase 2 – Research Project (February – September; 120 credits)

The project is selected by the student in combination with an academic supervisory team. Focussed on one of the College’s four main research themes: Biomarkers and Genes, Devices, Microbes and Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. At the end of Part 2 students submit a 40,000 word thesis worth 120 credits leading to the award of Master of Research in Medicine and Life Science.

Attendance Pattern

Students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Phase One. Attendance during Phase Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

You are also encouraged to attend the Postgraduate Taught Induction Event during the induction week and any programme associated seminars, together with Postgraduate research events.



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Our MClin Res Clinical Research course is aimed at nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other non- medical/dental healthcare professionals who want to work in clinical research, or are already working in this area and want to develop the skills needed for other positions where research plays a key role. Read more

Our MClin Res Clinical Research course is aimed at nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and other non- medical/dental healthcare professionals who want to work in clinical research, or are already working in this area and want to develop the skills needed for other positions where research plays a key role.

You will develop in-depth knowledge of the theoretical underpinnings of clinical research and skills in research methods relevant to applied research in a range of contemporary clinical practice settings.

The course is mainly delivered online, but is complemented by two compulsory four-day campus-based introductory and winter study schools, and one mid-semester study day in Semesters 1 and 2.

Most of the units that make up this course are shared with other students on master's and postgraduate research programmes at Manchester.

Aims

Our course has been designed to provide health professionals with the skills needed to manage and deliver research in clinical and health and social care settings, and to develop careers in clinical research, clinical and academic practice, or academic research with a strong clinical practice component.

The aims of the course are to:

  • enable you to further develop systematic, in-depth knowledge and critical understanding of the nature, purposes, methods and application of research relevant to clinical practice at an individual and/or organisational level;
  • contribute to building capacity and capability for research and evidence-based practice by equipping you with in-depth knowledge and essential skills to critically appraise, apply, design and undertake high quality research in a range of clinical settings;
  • enhance the quality and evidence base for clinical research, practice and service development through the provision of robust research training in a stimulating, challenging and supportive learning environment that draws on outstanding resources and research and practice expertise;
  • promote lifelong learning in students and enhance opportunities to pursue a variety of research careers and/or further research training which support and advance clinical knowledge, research and practice;
  • equip you with key transferable skills in critical reasoning and reflection, effective communication, team and multi-disciplinary working, use of IT/health informatics, logical and systematic approaches to problem-solving and decision-making.

Special features

Interdisciplinary learning

You will learn from renowned lecturers and practitioners from various fields including nursing, midwifery, physiotherapy, social work, speech and language therapy, audiology, psychology, and medicine.

Strong collaborations

We have strong links with other courses at Manchester and with experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education (MAHSE).

Teaching and learning

The course content is primarily delivered online, giving you more flexibility over how you learn. You will also attend two four-day introductory and winter study schools and two mid-semester study days, allowing you to learn face-to-face and meet other students and staff at Manchester.

We use digital technology to ensure our supervision of and communications with students meet the high standards required for the learning process to work. This includes:

  • individual and group web-based audio-visual tutorials;
  • web-based collaboration areas and discussion boards
  • shared digital documents;
  • online, phone and face-to-face support from supervisors and academic advisors;
  • peer support through course-specific discussion boards and face-to-face meetings.

Find out more about postgraduate teaching and learning at Manchester.

Coursework and assessment

We will assess your progress using a variety of summative assessment methods that enable the integration of theory and practice. They also build on the continuous formative assessment exercises that come with each individual unit, which include interactive, stimulating online exercises with regular self-assessment and feedback.

Course unit details

Our MClin Res  comprises six taught units (90 academic credits in total) and a 90-credit dissertation unit comprising a thesis derived from the undertaking of a supervised, clinical research project.

The PGDip Clin Res  comprises six taught units from (90 academic credits in total) and a mini-dissertation (30 academic credits).

The PGCert Clin Res  comprises four taught units (60 academic credits in total).

Year 1

Full-time study

Six taught units in the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Research design
  • Managing research in the clinical setting OR Foundations of research
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Part-time study

Four taught units from the following areas:

  • Research design
  • Managing research in the clinical setting OR Foundations of research
  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Year 2

Part-time study

Two taught units from the following areas, plus a dissertation:

  • Critical appraisal and evidence synthesis
  • Quantitative research design and analysis
  • Qualitative research design and analysis
  • Statistics

Course collaborators

We collaborate with other courses at Manchester and with experts from the Manchester Academic Health Science Centre (MAHSC) and the Manchester Academy for Healthcare Scientist Education(MAHSE).

Facilities

We are based in Jean McFarlane Building, which houses seminar rooms, IT facilities, clinical and interpersonal skills laboratories, and lecture theatres.

The University of Manchester also offers extensive library and online services to help you get the most out of your studies.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

This course is predominantly aimed at health professionals from a range of disciplines who wish to enhance their skills and knowledge in clinically focused research.

It is aimed at those who wish to pursue clinical/academic research careers eg research nurses, clinical trials coordinators and principal investigators.

The course provides comprehensive training in research, providing an excellent foundation for students who wish to go on to study for a PhD.



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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The new Dementia MSc is offered jointly by the UCL Division of Psychiatry and Institute of Neurology and tackles one of the biggest global health problems facing society today. Read more

The new Dementia MSc is offered jointly by the UCL Division of Psychiatry and Institute of Neurology and tackles one of the biggest global health problems facing society today. It provides research-oriented and cutting-edge training in the study of dementia and its scientific basis, led by international leaders in the science and practice of dementia. Two specialised pathways, in mental health and in neuroscience, are offered.

About this degree

The mental health pathway focuses on equipping students with advanced knowledge of the prevention, detection and management of the dementias using epidemiological, psychosocial and clinical trial approaches, and is aimed at graduates wishing to explore or begin a research career in dementia. More information about the neuroscience pathway is also available.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists five or six core modules (90 or 120 credits), one or two optional modules (if only five core modules are taken) and a dissertation/report (60 credits).

Core modules

  • Current Research in Dementia (15 credits)
  • Advanced Treatment and Management of Dementia (15 credits)
  • Core Principles of Mental Health Research (30 credits)
  • Statistical Methods in Mental Health (15 credits)
  • Clinical Neuroscience of Neurodegenerative Diseases (15 credits)
  • Clinical Mental Health (30 credits - core for students who do not have either research or clinical experience in the field of dementia)

Optional modules

  • Students who take five core modules will select 30 further credits of optional modules. Students who take six core modules will select 15 further credits of an optional module. Optional modules have either a neuroscience, research methods, or quality improvement in health care component and are the following:
  • Practical Neuroscience of Dementia (15 credits, Institute of Neurology)
  • Higher Functions of the Brain (15 credits, Institute of Neurology)
  • Epidemiological and Social Methods in Mental Health (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Biological Research in Mental Health (15 credits)
  • Quality Improvement in Health Care (15 credits, UCL Medical School)
  • Other optional modules may be selected from any available in the UCL Division of Psychiatry or elsewhere at UCL, with permission from the Programme Director

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a report of up to 8,000 words, presented as a paper ready to submit to a medical, psychiatric or dementia-specialist journal.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered though a combination of lecture/seminar series and practical interactive workshops, with supportive online learning material. Assessment methods include two unseen examinations, coursework including designing questionnaires and protocols and analysing data in dementia research, writing a critical literature review, giving talks and presentations, and a final report in the format of a journal paper.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Dementia: Causes, Treatments and Research (Mental Health) MSc

Careers

This is a new programme and no information on graduate destinations is therefore available. Previous MSc-level graduates of the Division have had a strong track record of publishing papers based on their dementia research projects in peer reviewed journals, and have moved on to academic posts and PhD studies. For clinicians, the course will allow them to participate fully in collaborative studies and begin their research career as independent investigators in dementia research.

Employability

This unique and exciting programme will equip graduates with advanced knowledge of the prevention and treatment of dementia, and strong practical research skills in order to undertake doctoral research in the field. They will acquire in-depth understanding of the current status and direction of research for the treatment and care of people with dementia and their families, providing them with a strong foundation for doctoral studies, and applications for nationally funded fellowships. They will complete original research in their specific field of interest, learning about dementia research directly from experts working in clinical and research areas in dementia.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL has exceptional research strength in dementia, from laboratory to the community, including genetics, neuroscience of neurodegeneration, prevention and treatment. Students will be taught by leading international dementia researchers at the cutting-edge of their fields; more details are available at UCL Dementia Strategy. Optional modules give students access to other renowned departments at UCL e.g. the UCL Institute of Neurology, and the UCL Medical School.

The programme is strongly focused on active student participation, encouraging learning through participating in research and enquiry and developing the practical skills needed to embark on a research career in dementia. The wide range of research interests within our division and the UCL Institute of Neurology allows us to offer a programme that integrates biological and psychological approaches of dementia.

Students will be offered opportunities to get involved in the work of internationally significant research groups in dementia in a stimulating, friendly and supportive environment.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Division of Psychiatry

83% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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An MSc is generally accepted as being highly desirable for starting and developing a career in Medical Statistics. The MSc in Statistics with Applications in Medicine is also an excellent preparation for embarking on a PhD project in Statistics or Medical Statistics. Read more

An MSc is generally accepted as being highly desirable for starting and developing a career in Medical Statistics. The MSc in Statistics with Applications in Medicine is also an excellent preparation for embarking on a PhD project in Statistics or Medical Statistics.

The MSc in Statistics with Applications in Medicine, taught by one of the largest and strongest Statistics groups in the UK, will provide you with a sound Masters-level training in Statistical methodology, with an emphasis on practical problems arising in the context of collecting and analysing Medical data. Several modules are delivered by Medical Statisticians, who can provide data and case studies from their own day to day work at Southampton General Hospital and the Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit.

While studying for your degree, you will develop key transferrable skills, such as written and oral communication, the use of and some programming in Statistical software, time management, and basic research skills. 

Programme objectives are:

  • to give you knowledge of statistical theory and methods at an advanced level
  • to train you for a career as a statistician, particularly in areas related to medicine
  • to give you experience of applications of statistical methods
  • to enable you to develop oral and written communication skills

Careers:

Past graduates have joined major pharmaceutical companies, research teams at the Medical Research Council, university-based medical research units, contract research organisations, government, the financial sector, or have continued with further study to become successful PhD students.

Introducing your course

The ever-increasing amount and range of patient data presents the pharmaceutical industry and medical research institutions with significant challenges and great opportunities. Medical Statisticians design and analyse clinical trials for new treatments; they help to identify the genes responsible for disease and they developing methodology to enable advances in personalised medicine. 

Their work underpins scientific breakthroughs that will be life-saving for many. In the MSc in Statistics with Applications in Medicine you will examine new developments in challenging medical data problems through the study of clinical trials, statistical genetics and epidemiological methods.

Overview

The full-time MSc is completed over a 12-month period. There are two semesters of taught material, which account for 60 ECTS credits, followed by the MSc project in summer, which accounts for 30 ECTS credits.

The programme structure allows you to select options ranging from the more theoretical aspects of Statistics, including a module on research topics, to those which cover material focussed on practical applications of Statistics in a clinical setting. This is complemented by modules on research skills, a Medical Statistics seminar series providing insight into the role of Medical Statisticians in various different careers (which also gives opportunities for networking with the speakers), and several presentations on transferrable skills by the University Careers and Employability Service Team.

View the programme specification document for this course



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Medical Imaging is an essential component of modern medicine, playing a key role in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease. Read more

Medical Imaging is an essential component of modern medicine, playing a key role in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease. The Medical Imaging MSc covers:

  • the basic physics involved in the different imaging techniques
  • image formation, pattern recognition and applications in the field of radiology
  • current issues in a modern UK NHS radiology department.

Whilst not a clinical skills course, the teaching of the technical aspects of imaging techniques is firmly grounded and in their clinical usage. Many of our lecturers are at the forefront of research in their field and bring insights from emerging imaging techniques.

This programme is designed for recent graduates preparing for a career in medical imaging, professionals already working in the field, and medical students wishing to intercalate.

More Information

You can study this subject at a MSc, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate level.

You may transfer from your original programme to another one, provided that you do this before you have completed the programme and before an award has been made. Part-time study is also an option. 

You’ll become familiar with the range of clinical imaging techniques.

By the end of the programme you should be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the physical and mathematical aspects of image formation of several techniques;
  • Identify the anatomical and physiological properties of tissue associated with image formation and contrast for several techniques;
  • Analyse and compare the technical performance of various modalities;
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the clinical applications of each technique, the variables involved and how they can be compared;
  • Apply IT in literature searching, analysis and display of data, and report writing to enhance life-long learning in medical imaging;
  • Demonstrate enhancement of their professional skills in communication, problem-solving, learning effectively and quickly, and effective self-management;
  • Critically evaluate relevant published work, demonstrating an understanding of the underpinning principles of statistics, project design and data analysis.

Course structure

PGCert

Compulsory modules:

  • Medical Imaging Core Skills 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medical Imaging PGCert in the course catalogue

PGDip

Compulsory modules :

  • Principles for Medical Imaging Interpretation 15 credits
  • Medical Imaging Core Skills 15 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Research Methods 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Medical Imaging PGDip in the course catalogue

MSc

You’ll study modules worth 180 credits. If you study this programme part time you will study fewer modules in each year.

Compulsory modules:

  • Principles for Medical Imaging Interpretation 15 credits
  • Medical Imaging Core Skills 15 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Research Methods 15 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits 

As an MSc student, you undertake a research project in the field of Medical Imaging. New research topics are available each year and include projects in MRI, Ultrasound, X-ray and their clinical application. You'll be asked to state your preferred research project. Before projects are allocated, you are encouraged to meet potential supervisors and discuss the research work.

Learning and teaching

All modules (except for your research project) are taught through traditional lectures, tutorials, practicals and computer based sessions. We also employ blended learning, combining online learning with other teaching methods.

You’ll be taught about the underpinning science of the various imaging modalities, and we cover a range of clinical applications demonstrating the use of medical imaging in modern medicine. Many of the lecturers are at the forefront of research in their particular field and will bring insights from current clinical imaging practice and developments of new and emerging imaging techniques.

Assessment

The taught modules are assessed by coursework and unseen written examinations. Exams are held during the University exam periods in January and May.

The research project is assessed in separate stages, where you submit a 1,000-word essay (20%), a 5,000-word journal-style research article (70%) and make an oral presentation (10%).

Career opportunities

Past graduates have gone on to enter careers in medical imaging or related disciplines, such as radiology and radiography. Often students are already working in the area, and use the skills and knowledge gained in the programme to enhance their careers. Students have gone on to take lecturer or research positions, and have also chosen to take post graduate research degrees (such as a PhD). As a intercalated degree for medical students the programme is useful for students considering radiology or many other medical specialties.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

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