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The aim of the course is to provide individuals with the opportunity to explore and analyse the emerging trends in clinical innovation. Read more
The aim of the course is to provide individuals with the opportunity to explore and analyse the emerging trends in clinical innovation. This exciting field is developing rapidly and the programme aims to enhance student knowledge and skills to allow them to actively contribute to the rapidly evolving fields of diagnostics and medical device development and the management of clinical innovation.

The Programme has been developed in line with the needs of organisations in the life science and healthcare sectors and is built around a set of core modules and a variety of optional modules, allowing students to tailor their programme to meet their own educational needs and interests.

Graduates from the programme will be knowledgeable in the process of innovation, making them highly attractive to potential employers in research, industrial, commercial and healthcare establishments.

This course is for life science and healthcare graduates; individuals working in or hoping to work in the life science, medical technology and pharmaceutical industries.

The course has been developed to provide life science and healthcare graduates with advanced knowledge, understanding and skills allowing them to contribute to the rapidly evolving fields of diagnostics, therapeutics, medical device development and the management of clinical innovation.

Distinctive features:

• The Programme has been developed in conjunction with industrial partners in the life science and healthcare sectors

• There is the opportunity to tailor the programme to meet your own educational needs and interests.

Structure

PgCert:

The Postgraduate Certificate (PgCert) consists of three Core modules (3 x 20 credits):

• Research Skills and Environment
• Innovation in the Clinical Sciences
• Clinical Research/Trials Management

Students who have obtained a minimum of 60 credits at Level 7, only where these include the award of credit for each of the core modules, shall be eligible EITHER to receive the award of Postgraduate Certificate in Medical Research and Innovation OR to continue their studies towards the Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Research and Innovation. 

PgDip:

The Postgraduate Diploma consists of six modules - the three Core modules (3 x 20 credits) from the PgCert plus a fourth Core module (20 credits) and a further 40 credits made up of Application and Specialisation option modules.

Core modules:

• Same modules as PgDip PLUS Data Analysis for Biomedical Research

Entry to the dissertation stage of the MSc in Medical Research and Innovation is dependent upon successful completion of the Cardiff University Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Research and Innovation (successful completion of 120 credits including credit for the all required/core modules) within the previous three years.  It is not possible to register at the outset for the MSc.

MSc:

The full MSc (Certificate, Diploma and dissertation stages) are completed part-time over three academic years. The MSc consists of 180 credits at level 7 (Masters level), of which 120 are contained in six ‘taught’ modules, and the remaining 60 credits are contained in the research dissertation project.

Core modules:

• Same modules as PgDip PLUS Dissertation: Medical Research and Innovation.

The dissertation, which shall normally be of not more than 20,000 words and supported by such other material as may be considered appropriate to the subject, shall embody the results of his/her period of project work. The subject of each student’s dissertation shall be approved by the Chair of the Board of Studies concerned or his/her nominee.

The dissertation shall be assigned 60 credits and, in combination with the taught stage(s), shall be weighted 50% for the purpose of calculating the final mark.

Teaching

All taught modules will be delivered online.  The programme is designed so that the learning outcomes are achievable through the combination of online learning and your application of the knowledge and skills gained within your current workplace – normally a laboratory, industrial or clinical/healthcare research setting.

Your studies will be supported by online learning materials, online tutor groups and discussions, formative assessments and feedback. All students will be assigned a personal tutor, who will support their academic development.

Career Prospects

Graduates from the programme will be skilled and knowledgeable in the whole process of innovation in the biomedical sciences, making them highly attractive to potential employers in research, industrial, commercial and healthcare establishments.
 

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The aims of the MRes Medical Research are to. Provide robust education on research to compliment and support research exposure and experience for academically gifted medical and dental trainees, and research registrars;. Read more
The aims of the MRes Medical Research are to:
• Provide robust education on research to compliment and support research exposure and experience for academically gifted medical and dental trainees, and research registrars;
• Develop independent researchers of the future, able to compete for a Research Training Fellowship leading to a PhD and further postdoctoral research;
• Contribute to the NHS drive to develop the vibrant academic community essential for first class healthcare.

Academic Clinical Fellows at Brighton and Sussex Medical School will be automatically accepted on the course. Applications from other NHS research registrars, doctors in the pharmaceutical industry, and others employed in a setting where medical research is a core function of their day-to-day activity will also be considered. In order to maintain the high research degree completion rate of BSMS, non-ACF applicants will only be accepted if they can demonstrate: an ongoing research programme in which they are currently involved; award of a research grant; or employer support for a locally-funded research project intended for publication.

Course structure and content
The course requires 80 taught credits and a 100 credit research dissertation.

The taught modules (20 credits each) are:
• Research Methods and Critical Appraisal
• Epidemiology
• Essential Statistics for Health and Medical Research.
It is recommended that the final taught module be Evidence-Based Practice; alternatively, students may take any module from those offered by the Universities of Brighton and Sussex, with the approval of the Course Leader.

The dissertation (100 credits) requires a 16-20,000 word research dissertation which includes literature review, background, methodology, project management and governance, ethics, methods, results and discussion chapters. In addition, students are required to undertake a viva on their project, identify an appropriate journal for publication of their work and produce an article in the correct format to submit.

Students on the programme experience lectures, large and small group discussion and individual tutorials. To ensure that students are able to put their learning into context, each is employed in a setting where research forms a significant part of their activity. Students are encouraged to bring work-based difficulties and experiences to the group work to enhance the relevance of the content to day-to-day clinical and research activity.

Staff provide direction within the lectures and seminars with much learner autonomy evident in the group work and assessment. Learning is supported further by the use of StudentCentral and the usual visual aids and handouts. Students are expected to support their learning by the use and critical appraisal of primary sources of information.

Group work on the statistical module gives hands-on experience of working with, analysing and reporting data on computers as well as interpretation of worked examples from published and/or local research. Workshops on research ethics and governance are provided to support students through regulatory processes effectively.

Learning beyond the classroom comprises scientific, clinical and research reading as well as practical development and application of research skills. Students are expected to develop further academic, transferable, communication skills through robust scientific writing, presentations and written reports. Engagement with a research project at a very early stage is mandatory to ensure that autonomy in the whole research process of project management and governance can be learnt. Students are also given the opportunity to learn through teaching/facilitating on their chosen topic, particularly if research focuses on education.

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This course has been designed to develop future research leaders who are able to complete a PhD, conduct independent research and be future principal investigators. Read more
This course has been designed to develop future research leaders who are able to complete a PhD, conduct independent research and be future principal investigators.

It is aimed at doctors, academic clinical trainees and other researchers across a range of fields. Robust education and training is provided in quantitative and qualitative research and data analysis methods.

Learning beyond the classroom comprises scientific, clinical and research reading as well as the practical development and application of research skills. Students will engage with a research project at a very early stage and will gain autonomy in research project management and governance. There is an opportunity to learn through teaching on the chosen topic, particularly if the research topic focuses on education. A series of Research Skills workshops is provided to further develop students’ research abilities.

KEY AREAS OF STUDY

• Research methods and critical appraisal
• Essential statistics for health and medical research
• Evidence-based practice
• Clinical trials management
• Advanced research skills
• Epidemiology

COURSE STRUCTURE

Modules are assessed by 3,000 word written assignments which are centred on case studies or a relevant topic agreed between the student and the module leader. In addition there is a 16,000 word dissertation and 3,000 word draft paper for publication.

PG Cert:

MDM10 Research Methods and Critical Appraisal (20 credits)
MDM66 Essential Statistics for Health and Medical Research (20 credits)

PLUS

MDM34 Evidence Based Practice (20 credits)

OR

MDM112 Clinical Trials Management (20 credits)

MRes:

MDM10 Research Methods and Critical Appraisal (20 credits)
MDM66 Essential Statistics for Health and Medical Research (20 credits)

PLUS two of the following modules:

MDM34 Evidence-Based Practice (20 credits)
MDM112 Clinical Trials Management (20 credits)
MDM141 Advanced Research Skills (20 credits)
MDM12 Epidemiology (20 credits)

PLUS

MDM100 Research Dissertation (100 credits)

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The course is a stepping stone to PhD studies and collaborative or independent research in the future. Course graduates will be research-literate, research-skilled and equipped to be research-active in their careers.

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This programme will provide training in generic research skills within a clinical context. The rationale is to equip Aberdeen AFP doctors with fundamental research skills that will enable them to pursue a clinical academic career. Read more
This programme will provide training in generic research skills within a clinical context. The rationale is to equip Aberdeen AFP doctors with fundamental research skills that will enable them to pursue a clinical academic career. Clinical academia is a strongly competitive environment. Thus the need for doctors to have a keen and active interest, along with the appropriate research training and portfolio, has never been greater. The University of Aberdeen College of Life Sciences and Medicine recognises this and is offering this unique opportunity to further develop your clinical academic profile and standing.

COURSES
Year 1
Research Skills

Year 2
Research Skills and Scientific Writing

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The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based. Read more
The MPhil degree offered by the Department of Oncology is a 12 month full time programme and involves minimal formal teaching; students are integrated into the research culture of the Department and the Institute in which they are based.

Each student conducts their MPhil project under the direction of their Principal Supervisor, with additional teaching and guidance provided by a Second Supervisor and often a Practical Supervisor. The role of each Supervisor is:

- Principal Supervisor: takes responsibility for experimental oversight of the student's research project and provides day-to-day supervision.
- Second Supervisor: acts as a mentor to the student and is someone who can who can offer impartial advice. The Second Supervisor is a Group Leader or equivalent who is independent from the student's research group and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives.
- Practical Supervisor: provides day-to-day experimental supervision when the Principal Supervisor is unavailable, i.e. during very busy periods. The Practical Supervisor is a senior member of the student's research team and is appointed by the Principal Supervisor before the student arrives. For those Principal Supervisors who are unable to monitor their students on a daily basis, we would expect that they meet semi-formally with their student at least once a month.

The subject of the research project is determined during the application process and is influenced by the research interests of the student’s Principal Supervisor, i.e. students should apply to study with a Group Leader whose area of research most appeals to them. The Department of Oncology’s research interests focus on the prevention, diagnosis and treatments of cancer. This involves using a wide variety of research methods and techniques, encompassing basic laboratory science, translational research and clinical trials. Our students therefore have the opportunity to choose from an extensive range of cancer related research projects. In addition, being based on the Cambridge Biomedical Research Campus, our students also have access world leading scientists and state-of-the-art equipment.

To broaden their knowledge of their chosen field, students are strongly encouraged to attend relevant seminars, lectures and training courses. The Cambridge Cancer Cluster, of which we are a member department, provides the 'Lectures in Cancer Biology' seminar series, which is specifically designed to equip graduate students with a solid background in all major aspects of cancer biology. Students may also attend undergraduate lectures in their chosen field of research, if their Principal Supervisor considers this to be appropriate. We also require our students to attend their research group’s ‘research in progress/laboratory meetings’, at which they are expected to regularly present their ongoing work.

At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation (of 20,000 words or less), followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Course objectives

The structure of the MPhil course is designed to produce graduates with rigorous research and analytical skills, who are exceptionally well-equipped to go onto doctoral research, or employment in industry and the public service.

The MPhil course provides:

- a period of sustained in-depth study of a specific topic;
- an environment that encourages the student’s originality and creativity in their research;
- skills to enable the student to critically examine the background literature relevant to their specific research area;
- the opportunity to develop skills in making and testing hypotheses, in developing new theories, and in planning and conducting experiments;
- the opportunity to expand the student’s knowledge of their research area, including its theoretical foundations and the specific techniques used to study it;
- the opportunity to gain knowledge of the broader field of cancer research;
- an environment in which to develop skills in written work, oral presentation and publishing the results of their research in high-profile scientific journals, through constructive feedback of written work and oral presentations.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cvocmpmsc

Format

The MPhil course is a full time research course. Most research training provided within the structure of the student’s research group and is overseen by their Principal Supervisor. However, informal opportunities to develop research skills also exist through mentoring by fellow students and members of staff. To enhance their research, students are expected to attend seminars and graduate courses relevant to their area of interest. Students are also encouraged to undertake transferable skills training provided by the Graduate School of Life Sciences. At the end of the course, examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation, followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of their MPhil course, students should:

- have a thorough knowledge of the literature and a comprehensive understanding of scientific methods and techniques applicable to their own research;
- be able to demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their field;
- the ability to critically evaluate current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems;
- be able to act autonomously in the planning and implementation of research; and
- have developed skills in oral presentation, scientific writing and publishing the results of their research.

Assessment

Examination for the MPhil degree involves submission of a written dissertation of not more than 20,000 words in length, excluding figures, tables, footnotes, appendices and bibliography, on a subject approved by the Degree Committee for the Faculties of Clinical Medicine and Veterinary Medicine. This is followed by an oral examination based on both the dissertation and a broader knowledge of the chosen area of research.

Continuing

The MPhil Medical Sciences degree is designed to accommodate the needs of those students who have only one year available to them or, who have only managed to obtain funding for one year, i.e. it is not intended to be a probationary year for a three-year PhD degree. However, it is possible to continue from the MPhil to the PhD in Oncology (Basic Science) course via the following 2 options:

(i) Complete the MPhil then continue to the three-year PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for a further THREE years, after completion of their MPhil they may apply to be admitted to the PhD course as a continuing student. The student would be formally examined for the MPhil and if successful, they would then continue onto the three year PhD course as a probationary PhD student, i.e. the MPhil is not counted as the first year of the PhD degree; or

(ii) Transfer from the MPhil to the PhD course:

If the student has time and funding for only TWO more years, they can apply for permission to change their registration from the MPhil to probationary PhD; note, transfer must be approved before completion of the MPhil. If granted permission to change registration, the student will undergo a formal probationary PhD assessment (submission of a written report and an oral examination) towards the end of their first year and if successful, will then be registered for the PhD, i.e. the first year would count as the first year of the PhD degree.

Please note that continuation from the MPhil to the PhD, or changing registration is not automatic; all cases are judged on their own merits based on a number of factors including: evidence of progress and research potential; a sound research proposal; the availability of a suitable supervisor and of resources required for the research; acceptance by the Head of Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department of Oncology does not have specific funds for MPhil courses. However, applicants are encouraged to apply to University funding competitions: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding and the Cambridge Cancer Centre: http://www.cambridgecancercentre.org.uk/education-and-training

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MSc in Applied Health Research equips you with the skills necessary to design, implement and publish healthcare research. You gain an in-depth understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the healthcare context. Read more
The MSc in Applied Health Research equips you with the skills necessary to design, implement and publish healthcare research.

You gain an in-depth understanding of qualitative and quantitative research methods in the healthcare context. You also learn the principles and practices of evaluating health services and understand the theories and application of health economics. You acquire the skills necessary to critically understand the concepts, theories and empirical application of epidemiology. The programme is set in a multi-disciplinary context and promotes best practice and interdisciplinary collaboration in healthcare research.

The programme is for practising health professionals or managers wanting to develop their analytical and research skills, or recent graduates looking for a career in health and social care research.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/754/applied-health-research

About the Centre for Health Services Studies (CHSS)

CHSS is a funded research centre in Kent's School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR). CHSS is a centre of research excellence which undertakes high quality research into a wide range of health systems and health services issues at local, national and international levels.

CHSS also supports and advises health care staff to develop and undertake research projects. CHSS collaborates with a wide range of partners in Kent, the UK and in other countries to improve the links between research, policy and practice. Led by Stephen Peckham, CHSS’s key strength is the diverse expertise and skills of our researchers. Our staff carry out research in the fields of Primary Care, Public Health, Public Policy, Health Psychology, Palliative Care, Statistics, Public Engagement, Clinical Trials and Health Economics.

Course structure

The MSc in Applied Health Research is designed to be studied over one year full-time or two years part-time. There are three compulsory modules, plus four optional modules. To be awarded a MSc in Applied Health Research students are required to obtain 180 M level credits including the dissertation module which comprises 60 credits.

The programme is divided into 2 stages.

Stage 1 comprises taught modules totalling 120 credits. Postgraduate students are required to obtain 60 credits of core modules, and 60 credits from a choice of optional modules.

Stage 2 students are required to obtain 60 credits through a compulsory dissertation module. You must successfully complete each module in order to be awarded the specified number of credits for that module. One credit corresponds to approximately ten hours of 'learning time' (including all classes and all private study and research). Thus obtaining 180 credits in an academic year requires 1,800 hours of overall learning time.

- Compulsory modules are currently:

Introduction to Applied Health Research; Quantitative Methods in Health Research and Qualitative Methods in Health Research.

With the agreement of the programme director, students will be able to take an elective/wild module as an optional module from across the School (with the appropriate credit volume).

At Stage 2, students are required to complete a 12-15,000 word dissertation on a subject of their choice.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO900 - Introduction to Applied Health Research (20 credits)
SO954 - Qualitative Methods in Health Research (20 credits)
SO955 - Quantitative Methods in Health Research (20 credits)
SO813 - Sociology of health, illness and medicine (20 credits)
SO950 - Evaluation and Research in Health Services (20 credits)
SO951 - Epidemiology and Public Heath (20 credits)
SO952 - Statistics in Applied Health Research (20 credits)
SO953 - Introduction to Health Economics (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment for Stage 1 is through: oral presentations; written assignments; seminar contribution; online discussion; reflective learning logs; coursework assignments.

Stage 2 will be assessed by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- foster the intellectual and professional development of health practitioners and trainee health researchers to develop their knowledge, equip them with analytical and research skills, and extend and deepen their reasoning capabilities to undertake applied research in the NHS and other health care settings

- provide a challenging, high-quality focused learning environment that is competitive with other universities within the region

- offer the opportunity to develop multidisciplinary approaches within an ethical framework that supports best practice within applied health research

- attract outstanding students from within the region, irrespective of race, background, gender and physical disability

- help students develop links from outside of the region and work collaboratively in health research to support their professional practice and in their research careers

- equip students with research skills to strengthen local health and social care economies

- where feasible, give students the opportunity to develop and enhance their knowledge and skills of health and social care settings within Europe and elsewhere

- enable health practitioners and health researchers to develop skills in higher level reflection in relation to work-based practice

- provide experienced health practitioners and health researchers with opportunities to gain interdisciplinary perspectives through collaborative inter/ multidisciplinary exchange

- develop the critical and analytical capabilities of health practitioners and health researchers in relation to project management, data analysis and interpretation of data

- provide supervision for health practitioners and health researchers to undertake research that builds a culture of critical evaluation and enquiry in the practice environment

- develop opportunity for self-directed learning and reflection

- enable health practitioners and health researchers from a diverse range of educational backgrounds to access and participate in learning which seeks to capture reflection on experience gained in every day organisational practice.

Careers

Completion of the MSc Applied Health Research will provide you with the skills and practical experience necessary to develop your career in advanced research in the health and social care research context.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation, as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of social and public policy is a particularly flexible and valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have pursued careers in academia, journalism, local and central government, charities and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science
• Medical Imaging
• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging
• Radiation Protection
• Radiotherapy Physics
• Research Methods
• Advanced Radiotherapy
• Specialist Radiotherapy
• Advanced Radiation Safety
• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.
The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medicine and Life Sciences at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is a one year full time programme, which provides an ideal opportunity and environment in which to gain practical training in Research Methods and to join a thriving research team within Swansea University College of Medicine. The Medicine and Life Sciences course has been developed with an emphasis on providing students with a research-oriented approach to their learning. Students are able to tailor their studies towards a career in one of the College’s internationally recognised research themes:

– Biomarkers and Genes,
– Devices,
– Microbes and Immunity,
– Patient & Population Health and Informatics.

Key Features of MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is committed to supporting the development of evidence within the areas of Health, Medicine and Life Science through the training of researchers whose findings will directly inform their own understanding and that of others. The ethos of this programme is to produce graduates with the research skill and knowledge to become effective researchers, who will contribute to the body of knowledge within their chosen area of interest that will have an impact upon the health and well-being of all.

- The advantage of a MRes over other formats is that it provides a structured yet in-depth approach, taking the taught component of FHEQ Level 7 teaching as a framework for conducting research on the candidates own practice.
- Innovative and integrated curriculum that reflects the various aspects of the research process.
- Multidisciplinary teaching team with vast experience and expertise in conducting high quality research.
- Research informed teaching.
- Teaching is supported by online learning and support.
-Flexibility for you to gain specialist knowledge.
- A one year full-time taught masters programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required for a successful research career.
- This course is also available for two years part-time study.
- The opportunity to conduct an individual research project with an interdisciplinary team within a supportive environment.
- Students will be assigned a research-active supervisory team

The aim of the MRes in Medicine and Life Sciences is to provide students with a broad research training to prepare them for a research career in Medical and Life Science research with emphasis on: Biomarkers & Genes, Devices, Microbes & Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. The course has been developed to enable graduates to pursue a variety of research careers in Medical and Life Sciences. The programme comprises both taught and research elements.

By the end of the Medicine and Life Sciences programme students will have:

Developed necessary skills to critically interpret and evaluate research evidence; Gained experience the in analysis and interpretation of research data; Advanced knowledge at the forefront of Medical and Life Science research, with the ability to integrate the theoretical and practical elements of research training; Developed the ability to conceptualise, design and implement a research project for the generation of new evidence that informs Health, Medicine and Life Science; Developed practical research skills by working with an interdisciplinary research team; The ability to confidently communicate research ideas and conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences; Acquired transferable skills which enhance your employability and future research career.

Modules

Modules on the Medicine and Life Sciences course may include:

PMRM01 Critical Appraisal and Evaluation

PMRM02 Data Analysis for Health and Medical Sciences

PMRM03 Research Leadership and Project Management OR any topic specific FHEQ Level 7 module from the College of Medicine ’s portfolio

Mode of delivery:

The 60 credits of the taught element will be delivered face-to-face, combining formal lecturing, seminars, and group work in addition to tutor-led practical classes. The remaining 120 credits for the research element will be available as distance learning either off or on-site. Irrespective of the location for conducting the research project, students will supported through monthly online (Skype)/or face-to-face supervisory meetings.

Course Structure

Students must complete 3 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 120 credits thesis on a research project aligned to one the College’s research theme. Each taught module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

The Medicine and Life Sciences programme is designed in two phases:

Phase 1 – Training and Application (October – January; 60 credits)

Taught modules in Research Methods and their application to Medicine and Life Science. Personalised education and training relevant to student’s research interests. Identification of research questions and how they might be addressed.Focused on students existing knowledge and research skills.

Phase 2 – Research Project (February – September; 120 credits)

The project is selected by the student in combination with an academic supervisory team. Focussed on one of the College’s four main research themes: Biomarkers and Genes, Devices, Microbes and Immunity, and Patient & Population Health and Informatics. At the end of Part 2 students submit a 40,000 word thesis worth 120 credits leading to the award of Master of Research in Medicine and Life Science.

Attendance Pattern

Students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Phase One. Attendance during Phase Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

You are also encouraged to attend the Postgraduate Taught Induction Event during the induction week and any programme associated seminars, together with Postgraduate research events.

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The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. Read more
The MA in Anthropological Research Methods (MaRes) may be taken either as a free standing MA or as the first part of a PhD [e.g. as a 1 + 3 research training program]. In either case, the student completes a program of research training that includes the Ethnographic Research Methods, Statistical Analysis and the Research Training Seminar as well as a language option. All MaRes students are assigned a supervisor at the start of the year, who will help the student choose other relevant course options. Candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words of assessed work. All students write an MA dissertation, but for students progressing on to a PhD, the MA dissertation will take the form of a research report that will constitute the first part of the upgrade document for the PhD programme.

The MaRes is recognised by the ESRC.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/

Aims and Outcomes

The MA is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the ESRC’s research training guidelines. It is intended for students with a good first degree (minimum of a 2.1) in social anthropology and/or a taught Masters degree in social anthropology. Most students would be expected to progress to PhD registration at the end of the degree. By the end of the program students will:

- Have achieved practical competence in a range of qualitative and quantitative research methods and tools;
- Have the ability to understand key issues of method and theory, and to understand the epistemological issues involved in using different methods.

In addition to key issues of research design, students will be introduced to a range of specific research methods and tools including:

- Interviewing, collection and analysis of oral sources, analysis and use of documents, participatory research methods, issues of triangulation research validity and reliability, writing and analysing field notes, and ethnographic writing.

- Social statistics techniques relevant for fieldwork and ethnographic data analysis (including chi-square tests, the T-test, F-test, and the rank correlation test).

Discipline specific training in anthropology includes:

- Ethnographic methods and participant observation;
- Ethical and legal issues in anthropological research;
- The logistics of long-term fieldwork;
- Familiarisation with appropriate regional and theoretical literatures;
- Writing-up (in the field and producing ethnography) and communicating research results; and
- Language training.

The Training Programme

In addition to optional courses that may be taken (see below), the student must successfully complete the following core course:

- Research Methods in Anthropology (15 PAN C011).

This full unit course is composed of Ethnographic Research Methods (15 PAN H002, a 0.5 unit course) and Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research (15PPOH035, a 0.5 unit course hosted by Department of Politics and International Studies).

MA Anthropological Research Methods students and first year MPhil/PhD are also required to attend the Research Training Seminar which provides training in the use of bibliographic/online resources, ethical and legal issues, communication and team-working skills, career development, etc. The focus of the Research Training Seminar is the development and presentation of the thesis topic which takes the form of a PhD-level research proposal.

Dissertation

MA/MPhil Students meet regularly with their supervisor to produce a systematic review of the secondary and regional literature that forms an integral part of their dissertation/research proposal. The dissertation, Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology (15 PAN C998), is approximately 15,000 words and demonstrates the extent to which students have achieved the key learning outcomes during the first year of research training. The dissertation takes the form of an extended research proposal that includes:

- A review of the relevant theoretical and ethnographic literature;
- An outline of the specific questions to be addressed, methods to be employed, and the expected contribution of the study to anthropology;
- A discussion of the practical, political and ethical issues likely to affect the research; and
- A presentation of the schedule for the proposed research together with an estimated budget.

The MA dissertation is submitted no later than mid-September of the student’s final year of registration. Two soft-bound copies of the dissertation, typed or word-processed, should be submitted to the Faculty of Arts and Humanities Office by 16:00 and on Moodle by 23:59 on the appropriate day.

Exemption from Training

Only those students who have clearly demonstrated their knowledge of research methods by completing a comparable program of study in qualitative and quantitative methods will be considered for a possible exemption from the taught courses. All students, regardless of prior training, are required to participate in the Research Training Seminar.

Programme Specification 2013/2014 (msword; 128kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthresmethods/file39765.docx

Teaching & Learning

This MA is designed to be a shortcut into the PhD in that two of its components (the Research Methods Course and the Research Training Seminar, which supports the writing of the dissertation) are part of the taught elements of the MPhil year. Students on this course are also assigned a supervisor with whom they meet fortnightly as do the MPhil students. The other two elements of the course are unique to each student: and might include doing one of the core courses from the other Masters degrees (Social Anthropology, Anthropology of Development, Medical Anthropology, Anthropology of Media, Migration and Diaspora, or Anthropology of Food), as well as any options that will build analytical skills and regional knowledge, including language training. The MaRes can also be used to build regional expertise or to fill gaps in particular areas such as migration or development theory.

The dissertation for the MaRes will normally be assessed by two readers in October of the following year (that is, after the September 15th due date). Students who proceed onto the MPhil course from the MA will then have the first term of the MPhil year to write a supplementary document that reviews the dissertation and provides a full and detailed Fieldwork Proposal. This, along with research report material from the original MA dissertation, is examined in a viva voce as early as November of the first term of the MPhil year by the same examiners who have read the dissertation. Successful students can then be upgraded to the PhD in term 1 and leave for fieldwork in term 2 of the first year of the MPhil/PhD programme. This programme is currently recognised by the ESRC and therefore interested students who are eligible for ESRC funding can apply under the 1+3 rubric. (ESRC)

Destinations

Students of the Masters in Anthropological Research Methods develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live. Read more

About the course

Brunel was the first university in Europe to establish a Master's degree in Medical Anthropology. Since then we have continued to develop our programme to reflect the changing world in which we live.

In short, Medical Anthropology can be described as the study of cultural beliefs and practices associated with the origin, recognition and management of health and illness in different social and cultural groups.

Literally hundreds of students – doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, social workers and other medical professionals among them – can testify to the quality of our programme, having used it either to enhance their professional practice, to change career or to develop their research interests for future studies.

Anthropology at Brunel is well-known for its focus on ethnographic fieldwork: as well as undertaking rigorous intellectual training, all our students are expected to get out of the library and undertake their own, original research – whether in the UK or overseas – and to present their findings in a dissertation. Students take this opportunity to travel to a wide variety of locations across the world – see “Special Features” for more details.

Attendance for lectures full-time: 2 days per week - for 24 weeks
Attendance for lectures part-time: 1 day per week - for 24 weeks (in each of 2 years)

Aims

The degree aims to equip students with a broad, general understanding of anthropology and how it might be applied to medical and health-related problems.

You will develop a deeper understanding of how people’s ideas about the world, as well as the structural constraints within which they find themselves, have an impact on their understanding and experience of health, sickness and disease.

You’ll achieve this through close study of key texts in medical anthropology, the original fieldwork experiences of your lecturers, and through designing and undertaking your own research project.

If you’ve wondered about some or all of the questions below – all of which are addressed in the degree – this could be the course for you:

How does poverty contribute to the profiles of diseases such as diabetes and tuberculosis?
Why are some diseases, such as leprosy or AIDS/HIV, feared and stigmatized?
Why do some biomedical interventions seeking to control infectious and non-infectious diseases work, and others fail?
What might stop some patients seeking conventional treatments for cancers and other conditions – even when they are offered for free – despite the apparent efficacy of the medicines available?
How does one make the distinction between the healthy and the pathological? Is being ‘disabled’, for example, always a negative state, or might some consider it just another, equally valid, way of being?
What are the effects of political, economic and other social conditions on people’s experiences of what, from a biomedical perspective, might be considered the same diseases?
How and why is it appropriate to combine insights emerging from clinical and epidemiological research with ethnographic understandings of health, illness and disease?

The Brunel Medical Anthropology MSc addresses these issues and more in a lively and challenging way, through a programme of lectures, class discussions, and your own – personally directed – final dissertation research project.

Course Content

The main objectives of the course are to provide a rigorous grounding in key topics and perspectives in medical anthropology, and to equip candidates with a range of research skills to enable them to complete research successfully.

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Full-time

Compulsory modules:

Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health
Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings

Optional modules:

The Anthropology of the Body
Anthropology of the Person
Kinship, Sex and Gender
Anthropological Perspectives of Humanitarian Assistance
Anthropological Perspectives of War
Ethnicity, Culture and Identity

Part-time

Year 1

Medical Anthropology in Clinical and Community Settings
Compulsory Reading Module: Political and Economic Issues in Anthropology
Compulsory Reading Module: Contemporary Anthropological Theory
The Anthropology of Global Health
Applied Medical Anthropology in the Arena of Global Health

Year 2

Dissertation in Medical Anthropology
Ethnographic Research Methods 1
Ethnographic Research Methods 2
and optional modules

Assessment

Assessment is by essay, practical assignments (e.g. analysis of a short field exercise) and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. This dissertation is based upon fieldwork undertaken by the candidate. There are no examinations.

Special Features

All our degrees (whether full- or part-time) combine intensive coursework, rigorous training in ethnographic research methods, and a period of fieldwork in the summer term (final summer term if part-time) leading to up to a 15,000 word dissertation.

Students are free to choose their own research topic and geographic area, in consultation with their academic supervisor. In all cases, the dissertation research project provides valuable experience and in many cases it leads to job contacts – forming a bridge to a future career or time out for career development.

In recent years, students have undertaken fieldwork in locations across the world, including India, Mexico, Bolivia, Papua New Guinea, China, Nepal, Peru, Morocco, and New Zealand as well as within the UK and the rest of Europe.

Special scholarships

Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund
Set up to honour the life and work of leading light in international medical anthropology Professor Cecil Helman (1944-2009), the Doctor Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund provides fieldwork support for between two and four students on our MSc Medical Anthropology course.

Dr Helman taught at Brunel University London from 1990, and became a Professor of Social Sciences in 2005. In 2004, he was awarded the American Anthropological Association’s career achievement award, and the following year he won the Royal Anthropological Institute's Lucy Mair medal.

As well as leading the way in Medical Anthropology, Dr Helman exercised his artistic talents through his paintings, poems, fables, and short fiction – all of which revolved around a theme of the human side of medicine and the narratives that surrounded the doctor-patient relationship.

Scholarship
The Cecil Helman Scholarship Fund offers between two and four students up to £1,000 to help them to complete field research for their dissertations.

Selection
The scholarship will be awarded to MSc Medical Anthropology students who demonstrate excellent academic performance and the ability to undertake an original field research project.

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Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement C
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Skills (Euromasters)
-Outreach and Public Engagement
-Euromaster Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

In the second year of the programme the outcomes are linked closely to a unique 8-month research project (two months preparation and research skills development, 5 months research, and 1 month reporting), students will apply their acquired research skills to an individual research project in a Research Group.

During the first two months of year two of the programme students will further extend their self-confidence in their practical, analytical and programming abilities; their ability to communicate; realise that they can take on responsibility for a task in the Research Group and see it through.

An important element is the assignment of responsibility for a substantial research project which is aimed to be of a standard suitable for publication in an appropriate professional journal.

It is expected that the student will approach the project in the manner of a new Research Student, e.g. be prepared to work beyond the normal working day on the project, input ideas, demonstrate initiative and seek out relevant information.

Thereby the students will acquire proficiency in research skills, including (but not limited to) careful planning, time scheduling, communication with colleagues and at workshops, keeping a detailed notebook, designing and testing equipment, taking and testing data and analysis.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

During the Research Project as a whole it is expected that the students will further develop communication skills through participation in group meetings, preparation of in-house reports, giving oral presentations and show initiative in acquiring any necessary new skills.

The oral presentation at the end of the Research Project is a chance to show their oral presentation skills and ability to think independently.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development.

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Read more
This programme aims to provide you with a firm foundation in biomedical research by enhancing your knowledge, understanding and critical awareness of the scientific method and practical experience in an area related to your interests. Taught units provide intensive training in research methodology, experimental design, statistical analyses and data interpretation. Skills training in verbal and written communication is also emphasised.

The core of the programme is an eight-month research project, conducted within one of the University of Bristol's internationally recognised research groups in either the Faculty of Health Sciences or the Faculty of Biomedical Sciences. Opportunities will be available in laboratory or clinical-based investigations.

The programme is suitable for medical, dental and veterinary students interested in pursuing a research-intensive intercalation option after three years of study. It is also suitable for graduates in medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and bioscience subjects who wish to develop their research skills.

Programme structure

This programme is delivered by research scientists and clinicians through lectures, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials.

Unit 1: Introduction to Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit introduces a variety of research methods used in basic and applied clinical research including: finding and reading relevant research information; presenting research results; basic statistical analysis; data interpretation; ethics; public engagement; and commercialising research.

Unit 2: Further Research Methods in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit aims to develop further knowledge and practical experience in statistical analyses, experimental design and laboratory methods and includes training in the use of a statistical software package and practical experience in several laboratory techniques.

Unit 3: Project Proposal in Health Sciences Research (20 credits).
This unit involves planning and writing a research project proposal (4500 words), which includes a literature review, aims, impact, research plan, ethical considerations, contingency plans, timetable and references.

Unit 4: Research Club in Health Sciences Research (10 credits).
This unit aims to develop your ability to present, critically evaluate and discuss scientific findings by contributing to journal clubs, attending and summarising research seminars and presenting your own research.

Unit 5: Research Project in Health Sciences Research (120 credits).
During this unit you will gain extensive experience in scientific/clinical research by conducting an independent project related to an area of interest to you. You will write up your research in the form of a thesis (10,000 words), and present and discuss your work in a viva and research symposium.

Careers

This programme is suitable for those with a clinical or biosciences background who wish to develop their research skills before embarking on a research/clinical career in academia or the pharmaceutical industry. It provides the ideal foundation for further studies leading to a PhD.

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Within the health and care professions, the demand for evidence-based practice has led to an increasing need for high-quality. research to underpin practice. Read more
Within the health and care professions, the demand for evidence-based practice has led to an increasing need for high-quality
research to underpin practice. A Master of Clinical Research will provide graduates with the education and experience necessary in order to plan and undertake health-related, or clinically-based research.

This multi-disciplinary course aims to provide a broad, foundational research training for nurses, midwives and other
health and care professionals who wish to develop careers in clinical or academic research as well as those who may wish to continue on to doctoral studies. The course will focus on preparing students to undertake projects relevant to their practice through the development of skills and knowledge in research methodologies, project management, research governance and evidence-based practice.

Teaching, learning and assessment

The course will comprise of two 30-credit taught modules - Research Methods and Applied Research - plus an extended research project. These modules will focus on research methodologies, quantitative and qualitative data analysis, research
ethics, patient and public involvement, research governance, project management and disseminating research. The two taught modules will incorporate a range of teaching and learning activities which will be underpinned by the assumption that the adult learners on this course will already possess transferable skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice. Considerable use will be made of the virtual learning environment through which students will be supported to develop their autonomy and self-direction in terms of learning further. Central to this will be the development of a community of practice through which students will support each
other to develop their research skills. Within this context, students will have the opportunity to engage with diverse teaching and learning activities which can include lectures, tutorials, asynchronous online discussions, collaborative working towards group presentations and/or seminar production, case study analysis, individual presentations and directed study. A key aspect of course is the research project. Assessment of the project will be staged, providing students with opportunities for formative feedback throughout. The final assessment will focus on the dissemination of the study findings in such a way as to have the maximum possible influence on practice.

Teaching hours and attendance

Research Methods classes run weekly during semester one and may be accessed either face-to-face or by distance learning. Applied Research classes run fortnightly over semesters one and two and are delivered face-to-face. During the research project, you will have up to 20 hours of one-to-one support from your supervisor.

Modules

30 credits: Research Methods / Applied Research
120 credits: Extended Research Project.

Careers

A non-medical clinical academic has been defined as a nurse, midwife or allied health professional who concurrently undertakes both clinical practice and research. A key aspect of their research is that it is focused on providing effective, quality healthcare services. Clinical academics will work within, and contribute to, an environment that will lead the way in achieving excellence in healthcare and health outcomes through evidence-based practice.

The introduction of our Master of Clinical Research, intended to support the development of clinical academics, will contribute to meeting this need. The Non- Medical Allied Health Professions (NMAHP) Clinical Academic Research Career Framework recommends this type of MRes education for those in the early stages of a clinical academic career and therefore the course will fit well with identified training needs of the NMAHP professions. Graduates may go on to develop research in their own practice areas, or continue to doctoral level studies.

Quick Facts

■■ This course provides students with the skills to develop a career in clinical or academic research.
■■ Students can focus their studies on their own area of clinical interest while working in highly supportive peer groups.
■■ The extended research project allows students to address questions that are clinically relevant.

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The full time MSc Medical Imaging. International programme provides a coherent pathway of study relevant to contemporary medical imaging practice. Read more
The full time MSc Medical Imaging: International programme provides a coherent pathway of study relevant to contemporary medical imaging practice.

It is designed to be of particular interest to international students, with a qualification in diagnostic radiography or medical technology, who are currently working in the area of medical imaging and who wish to enhance their knowledge so as to contribute to improve medical imaging services. It is designed to support healthcare professionals develop their knowledge, understanding and theoretical skills related to medical imaging required for a professional who aspires to work at an advanced level of practice.

Education within the clinical environment is not a component of the course and on successful completion students will not be eligible to apply for Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) registration.

The programme is delivered by the Radiography academic team within the School of Allied Health professions and Sport in partnership with clinical and scientific experts working within specialised areas of medical imaging to ensure the curriculum remains appropriately diverse and clinically relevant, and alongside the part time MSc Medical Imaging programme for UK students.

This full-time MSc pathway is a modular programme encompassing a range of academic modules related to medical imaging, and research. Upon successful completion of the MSc Medical Imaging: International, students will have the knowledge and understanding necessary to work at an advanced level of practice within their chosen medical imaging discipline and apply research informed learning to international health communities to inform health service practice and delivery.

The role of higher education within the UK is not only to develop the learning and critical thinking skills of students but to provide students such as yourself with the opportunity to study for an award which will support your current and future career prospects within a dynamic and evolving healthcare environment.

Why Bradford?

The MSc Medical Imaging: International programme is aligned with the Faculty of Health’s SSPRD framework, a multidisciplinary framework for continuing professional development. The framework provides an opportunity to study alongside students from a range of healthcare disciplines to provide an enriched learning experience.

The programme is delivered by the experienced Radiography academic team within the School of Allied Health Professions and Sport in partnership with clinical and scientific experts working within specialised areas of medical imaging to ensure the curriculum remains appropriately diverse and clinically relevant, and alongside the part time MSc Medical Imaging programme for UK students.

This full-time MSc pathway is a modular programme encompassing a range of academic modules related to medical imaging, and research. Upon successful completion of the MSc Medical Imaging: International, students will have the knowledge and understanding necessary to work at an advanced level of practice within their chosen medical imaging discipline and apply research informed learning to international health communities to inform health service practice and delivery.

There is now some flexibility in module choice for MSc Medical Imaging: International. Applicants have a choice to study 2 out of 3 optional modules which support their experience and knowledge. They will then have 3 core modules which are compulsory.
The ethos of sustainable development is a fundamental feature of the programme with students encouraged to develop autonomous learning skills and the ability to apply critical thinking to clinical practice.

Modules

-Current Topics in Medical Imaging
-Preparing for a Systematic Review
-Pursuing a Systematic Review
-Computed Tomography
-Magnetic Resonance Imaging
-Principles of Reporting

Learning activities and assessment

When you have completed the programme you will be able to;
-Develop a detailed knowledge and understanding of the literature that relates to your specialist field of practice
-Critically analyse and synthesise the research evidence that informs the development of policy and service delivery in your specialist field of practice
-Evaluate and critically apply theoretical concepts and where appropriate, for your field of practice, master practical skills for the management of complex issues within your field of practice
-Reflect upon and demonstrate knowledge of values, ethical thinking, equality awareness, inclusive practice and demonstrate mastery within your specialist field or practice
-Develop and demonstrate the ability to articulate sound arguments using a variety of formats including written and oral communication skills
-Demonstrate management and leadership through effective communication, problem solving, and decision making
-Demonstrate the ability to become an autonomous learner through independent study and critical reflection on continuing development needs
-Demonstrate the ability to use IT skills to gather and synthesise information , to access course materials
-Demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of different theoretical constructs underpinning research and/or project management methodologies.
-Design, undertake and report on either a systematic review, a piece of empirical research, work based or management project that contributes to or extends the body of knowledge for your field of practice

The MSc Medical Imaging assessments allows students flexibility to direct assessments to their area of developing practice and have been praised by external examiners for their relevance to current clinical practices. Assessments range from: portfolios demonstrating advanced practice skills; case studies; presentations; critical evaluations of imaging practices; examinations in image appearances and imaging technology; and a final research project.

Students need to achieve a mark of 40% for each assessment for each module.

Career support and prospects

The theoretical knowledge gained in the imaging modalities of Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and/or principles of medical image reporting will compliment the skills of critical reflection and research that developing practitioners and academics will use in advancing their careers.

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Is your passion linked to the human system? Are you interested in the workings of the brain, or would you be the one that bridges the different understandings of fundamental biological processes and health & disease in humans? Your choice might be Medical Biology!. Read more

Passion for the human system

Is your passion linked to the human system? Are you interested in the workings of the brain, or would you be the one that bridges the different understandings of fundamental biological processes and health & disease in humans? Your choice might be Medical Biology!

Where studying Biology starts with a fascination for life, Medical Biology shares this trait and specifies it towards the human system. The Master's in Medical Biology in Nijmegen focuses strongly on molecular and cellular life processes at the cutting edge of fundamental biology and medical scientific research.

Our programme is unique because it is a combination of fundamental research and the translation of its findings into clinical applications. This is facilitated by our close cooperation with the University Medical Centre.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology

Specialisations within the Master's in Medical Biology

At the beginning of the first year, all students follow an orientation course before they choose one of the three Master's specialisations:
- Clinical Biology
- Medical Epigenomics
- Neuroscience
- Science in Society
- Science, Management and Innovation

Career prospects

This programme provides you with the qualifications you need to start working on your PhD and in the field of communication, business and management or education. Medical biologists often continue their research careers in universities, research institutes, pharmaceutical companies and public health authorities. On graduation, our students quickly take up positions as researchers or analysts in government departments, research organisations and medical or pharmaceutical companies.

What medical biologists do:
- Researchers at universities or in companies
- Supervisors of clinical trials
- Consultants
- Lecturers
- Teachers

Where medical biologists work:
- Research/education
- Health care
- Business services
- Industry
- Government
- Trade

Our approach to this field

Other Master's specialisations
The Master's programme has a strong emphasis on research, especially during the first year, but allows you to broaden your horizons towards the fields of Management, Communication and Education during the second year. This way, you have the opportunity to experience whether these specialisations might suit you when you start looking for a job. There are four Master's specialisations which you can choose from:
- Research trains students for fundamental and applied research. This specialisation is required for people pursuing a PhD position or a position in industrial or institutional research.
- Science, Management and Innovation prepares students for a management position as an academic professional. It prepares students for a career in science related business and administration and for innovation and enterprise from an academic perspective.
- Science in Society trains students in the direction of science communication, which prepares them for a career in communication research, applications and media.
- Education prepares students to become a (first degree) teacher (this variant is only available in Dutch).

Our research in this field

Experts
Education is closely linked to on-going research within the:
- Institute for Water and Wetlands Research;
- Institute of Neuroscience;
- Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences.

Nijmegen's biologists are experts in the fields of animal physiology at system level as well as at cellular and molecular level. But they also are top researchers in the fields of human health, disease and development.

- Personal tutor
The programme offers you many opportunities to follow your own interests under the guidance of a personal tutor. Each time you start a research internship you will select a research group and be allocated a supervisor. Together you will decide which research to carry out and the specialisations and subject choices that most effectively support it. In practice you will be occupied for four days a week with your own research and one day will be devoted to lectures.

- The Nijmegen approach
The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the working, exploring and studying people that you will meet there. No wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology

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