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Masters Degrees (Medical Radiation Physics)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medical Radiation Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The Medical Radiation Physics course builds on the highly successful research partnerships between the College of Medicine and Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) Health Board, including the Institute of Life Science and Centre for NanoHealth initiatives, and ongoing work in Monte Carlo-based radiotherapy modelling and dosimeter development, body composition, tissue characterisation and novel modes of the detection of disease with state-of-the-art CT and MRI facilities.

Key Features of the MSc in Medical Radiation Physics

On the Medical Radiation Physics MSc, you will gain the necessary knowledge and understanding of fundamental aspects of the use of radiation in medicine, in order that you are conversant in medical terms, human physiology and radiation mechanisms.

A direct link to clinical practice is provided through hands-on instruction with equipment used routinely in the hospital setting, which will prepare you for research in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer-based modelling, research methodology and the ethical dimensions associated with medical research.

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM).

The Medical Radiation Physics programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

Part-time Delivery mode

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc in Medical Radiation Physics scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Timetables for the Medical Radiation Physics programme are typically available one week prior to each semester.

Modules

Modules on the Medical Radiation Physics course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

• Introduction to the Practice of Medical Physicists and Clinical Engineers

• Nanoscale Simulation

• Physics of the Body

• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Radiology

• Research Methods

• Radiation Protection

• Radiation Physics

• Radiotherapy Physics

• Medical Imaging

• Advanced Radiotherapy

• MSc Research Project

Accreditation

The Medical Radiation Physics course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM). IPEM is the professional body that works with physical science, engineering and clinical professionals in academia, healthcare services and industry in the UK and supports clinical scientists and technologists in their practice through the provision and assessment of education and training.

Links with industry

The close proximity of Swansea University to two of the largest NHS Trusts in the UK outside of London, as well Velindre NHS Trust (a strongly academic cancer treatment centre), offers the opportunity for collaborative research through student placements.

The academic staff of this discipline have always had a good relationship with industrial organisations, which are the destination of our medical engineering graduates. The industrial input ranges from site visits to seminars delivered by clinical contacts.

Careers

The Medical Radiation Physics course will prepare you for research and clinical practise in a rapidly changing field, including tuition in computer modelling, human engineering and the medico-legal issues they imply. It will enable you to develop the potential to become leaders, defining and influencing medical practise.

For a medical physicist career path, the role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, offering a uniquely diverse career. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science
• Medical Imaging
• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging
• Radiation Protection
• Radiotherapy Physics
• Research Methods
• Advanced Radiotherapy
• Specialist Radiotherapy
• Advanced Radiation Safety
• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.
The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.

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Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement C
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Skills (Euromasters)
-Outreach and Public Engagement
-Euromaster Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

In the second year of the programme the outcomes are linked closely to a unique 8-month research project (two months preparation and research skills development, 5 months research, and 1 month reporting), students will apply their acquired research skills to an individual research project in a Research Group.

During the first two months of year two of the programme students will further extend their self-confidence in their practical, analytical and programming abilities; their ability to communicate; realise that they can take on responsibility for a task in the Research Group and see it through.

An important element is the assignment of responsibility for a substantial research project which is aimed to be of a standard suitable for publication in an appropriate professional journal.

It is expected that the student will approach the project in the manner of a new Research Student, e.g. be prepared to work beyond the normal working day on the project, input ideas, demonstrate initiative and seek out relevant information.

Thereby the students will acquire proficiency in research skills, including (but not limited to) careful planning, time scheduling, communication with colleagues and at workshops, keeping a detailed notebook, designing and testing equipment, taking and testing data and analysis.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

During the Research Project as a whole it is expected that the students will further develop communication skills through participation in group meetings, preparation of in-house reports, giving oral presentations and show initiative in acquiring any necessary new skills.

The oral presentation at the end of the Research Project is a chance to show their oral presentation skills and ability to think independently.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development.

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

During their 60-credit Research Project students will gain further practical, analytical or programming abilities through working on a more extended investigation. This may be an experiment- or modelling-based project, for which the student will be encouraged to propose and set in place original approaches.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Established in 1972, Surrey's MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection is one of the UK’s longest running programmes in the field of nuclear science and its applications. Read more
Established in 1972, Surrey's MSc in Radiation and Environmental Protection is one of the UK’s longest running programmes in the field of nuclear science and its applications.

The programme is taught by a combination of world-leading nuclear physics academics and leading experts from the UK’s radiological protection and nuclear industries.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Our programme will give you a thorough grounding in the radiation and environmental protection aspects of nuclear physics.

This includes in-depth knowledge of radiation protection and showing you how the technical and organisational procedures of the discipline may be applied to the broader concept of environmental protection.

The substantial practical element of this programme enables you to relate taught material to real-world applications. Formal lectures are complemented with work in specialist radiation laboratories that were recently refurbished as part of a £1m upgrade to our facilities.

Here you will work with a wide range of radioactive sources and radiation detectors. There is also an extended project in the spring and an eleven-week MSc dissertation project in the summer.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Nuclear Power & Non-ionising Radiation
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Protection
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Research Project and Dissertation

RESEARCH-LED TEACHING

The programme material is taught by a combination of academics from the Department of Physics at Surrey and specialists provided by industrial partners. The Surrey academics are part of the Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics which houses the largest academic nuclear physics research group in the UK.

In addition to the formal lectures for taught modules, the programme provides a wide range of experimental hands-on training. This includes a nine-week radiation physics laboratory which takes place in the specialist radiation laboratories within the Department of Physics at the University of Surrey.

These were recently refurbished as part of a £1 million upgrade to the departmental teaching infrastructure. Within the Department, we also have a common room and a departmental library, which contains copies of earlier MSc dissertations.

As well as the laboratory training, you will also undertake a research project at the beginning of the Spring semester as a precursor to the eleven-week research dissertation project which makes up the final part of the MSc.

There are many opportunities for both the spring research project and summer dissertation project to be taken in an external industrial environment.

CAREERS

The programme has produced over 500 UK and overseas graduates, many of whom have gone on to well-paid positions in companies in the nuclear and radiation sectors. In the UK we need to decommission old reactors and build new ones to provide a low-carbon source of energy.

This, together with, for example, the importance of radioisotopes in fields such as medicine, means that the career prospects of our graduates are excellent.

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and radiation detection, and related industries.

The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context.

This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Knowledge and understanding
-A systematic understanding of Radiation and Environmental Protection in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project in Radiation and / or Environmental Protection
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data pertaining to radiation detection
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Radiation and Environmental Protection in a professional context

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them. Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data. -Graduates should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline of radiation protection
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non- specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development. Ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Key / transferable skills
-Identify and resolve problems arising from lectures and experimental work
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self-study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Overview. The Master of Medical Physics is the entry level qualification that medical physicists have as clinical physical scientists. Read more
Overview
The Master of Medical Physics is the entry level qualification that medical physicists have as clinical physical scientists. It provides you with the tools to apply your knowledge and training to many different areas of medicine including the treatment of cancer, diagnostic imaging, physiological monitoring and medical electronics.

Our postgraduate medical physics program is designed to meet the growing global demand for graduate physical scientists with the specialised knowledge, skills and expertise to work within a clinical setting in the highly scientific and technical environment of medical physics. The University of Sydney Medical Physics Program offers you a wide variety of coursework units of study in radiation physics, nuclear physics, radiation dosimetry, anatomy and biology, nuclear medicine, radiotherapy physics, medical imaging physics, image processing, radiation biology, health physics and research methodology.

Sydney advantage
This program is offered through the School of Physics, which has access to world-class teaching and research facilities and provides highly experienced teaching and research staff in this discipline area through the Institute of Medical Physics and affiliated teaching hospitals and research institutes.

Program expectations
You will learn the latest knowledge and techniques enabling you to find employment in the areas of medical physics applied to the treatment of cancer, medical imaging, physiological monitoring and medical electronics.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/

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This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Read more
This programme pathway is designed for students with a developing interest in radiation physics, both ionising and non-ionising, that underpins many of the imaging and treatment technologies applied in modern medicine. Students gain an understanding of scientific principles and practices that are used in hospitals, industries and research laboratories through lectures, problem-solving sessions, a research project and collaborative work.

Degree information

Students study the physics theory and practice that underpins modern medicine, and learn to apply their knowledge to established and emerging technologies in medical science. The programme covers the applications of both ionising and non-ionising radiation to the diagnosis and treatment of human disease and disorder, and includes research project, workplace skills development and computational skills needed to apply this theory into practice.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of seven core modules (105 credits), one optional module (15 credits), and a research project (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of eight modules (120 credits) is offered.

Core modules
-Clinical Practice
-Medical Imaging (Ionising)
-Ultrasound in Medicine
-Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Biomedical Optics
-Research Project
-Professional Skills module
-Treatment with Ionising Radiation
-Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions & Dosimetry

Optional modules
-Biomedical Engineering
-Computing in Medicine
-Programme Foundations for Medical Image Analysis

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project within the broad area of Physics and Engineering in Medicine which culminates in a report up to 10,000 words, a poster and an oral examination.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, tutorials, assignments and a research project. Lecturers are drawn from UCL and from London teaching hospitals including UCLH, St. Bartholomew's, and the Royal Free Hospital. Assessment is through supervised examination, coursework and assignments, a research dissertation and an oral examination.

Careers

A large percentage of graduates from the MSc continue on to PhD study, often in one of the nine research groups within the department, as a reult of the skills and knowledge they acquire on the programme. Other graduates commence or resume training or employment within the heaalthcare sector in hospitals or industry, both within the UK and abroad.

Employability
Postgraduate study within the department offers the chance to develop important skills and acquire new knowledge through involvement with a team of scientists or engineers working in a world-leading research group. Graduates complete their study having gained new scientific or engineering skills applied to solving problems at the forefront of human endeavour. Skills associated with project management, effective communication and teamwork are also refined in this high-quality working environment.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The spectrum of medical physics activities undertaken in UCL Medical Physics & Biomedical Engineering is probably the broadest of any in the United Kingdom. The department is widely acknowledged as an internationally leading centre of excellence and students on this programme receive comprehensive training in the latest methodologies and technologies from leaders in the field.

The department operates alongside the NHS department which provides the medical physics and clinical engineering services for the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, as well as undertaking industrial contract research and technology transfer. The department is also a collaborator in the nearby London Proton Therapy Centre, currently under construction.

Students have access to a wide range of workshop, laboratory, teaching and clinical facilities in the department and associated hospitals. A large range of scientific equipment is available for research involving nuclear magnetic resonance, optics, acoustics, X-rays, radiation dosimetry, and implant development.

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Apply your physics background. A career in medical physics offers you the opportunity to use your physics background to provide people with life-changing options every day. Read more
Apply your physics background
A career in medical physics offers you the opportunity to use your physics background to provide people with life-changing options every day. Medical physicists play a critical role at the cutting-edge of patient healthcare, overseeing effective radiation treatment, ensuring that instruments are working safely, and researching, developing and implementing new therapeutic techniques.

The Medical Physics Programs at the University of Pennsylvania prepare students to bridge physics and clinical medicine, overseeing clinical applications of radiation and creating the cutting-edge medical technologies of tomorrow. The master’s degree and post-graduate certificate programs combine the resources of one of the world’s top research universities and most prestigious medical schools, offering you unmatched opportunities to shape your own path.

Unsurpassed resources and a rich array of options
Access to Penn’s outstanding facilities creates a unique opportunity for you to sample four subspecialties of medical physics, including radiation oncology, diagnostic imaging, nuclear medicine and health physics. Whether you enter a residency, seek employment directly after the program, go on to a PhD, earn an MBA or change career directions with your PhD, you’ll have the resources at your fingertips to build the career most compelling to you.

Our research facilities—all of which are located on campus, within a 10-minute walk—include the state-of-the art Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine; the Roberts Proton Therapy Center, the largest and most advanced facility in the world for this form of cancer radiation; and the Smilow Center for Translational Research, which brings Penn scientists and physicians together to collaborate on research projects.

Preparation for professional success
Our programs, accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Educational Programs (CAMPEP), are grounded in providing the highest standard of patient care. Our students have numerous opportunities to gain hands-on experience at some of the most advanced medical imaging and therapy facilities in the world, through part-time clinical work, residencies, practicum training and much more. It is for this reason that our degree and certificate programs enjoy a high placement rate for our students, year after year. Faculty from Penn’s CAMPEP-accredited residency program participate in professional development to make our students competitive for medical physics residency programs.

We welcome you to contact a member of our program team to learn more about the possibilities that await you in the Medical Physics Programs at Penn.

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The Medical Physics and Bioengineering MRes provides structured training in this diverse and multi-disciplinary field and students may subsequently progress to an MPhil/PhD as part of a Doctoral Training Programme. Read more
The Medical Physics and Bioengineering MRes provides structured training in this diverse and multi-disciplinary field and students may subsequently progress to an MPhil/PhD as part of a Doctoral Training Programme.

See the website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/taught/degrees/medical-physics-bioengineering-mres

Key Information

- Application dates
All applicants:
Open: 5 October 2015
Close: 29 July 2016

English Language Requirements

If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency.
The English language level for this programme is: Standard
Further information can be found on http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements .

International students

Country-specific information, including details of when UCL representatives are visiting your part of the world, can be obtained from http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/international .

Degree Information

The programme covers all forms of ionising and non-ionising radiation commonly used in medicine and applies it to the areas of imaging and treatment. The programme involves Master's level modules chosen from a wide range offered by the department and a research project. Good performance in the MRes will lead to entry into the 2nd year of the Doctoral Training Programme where the research project is continued.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of four optional modules and a research project.

- Core Modules
There are no core modules for this programme.

- Options
Students choose four optional modules from the following:
Ionising Radiation Physics: Interactions and Dosimetry
Medical Imaging
Clinical Practice
Treatment with Ionising Radiation
Medical Electronics and Control
Bioengineering
Optics in Medicine
Computing in Medicine
Medical Devices and Applications
Foundations and Anatomy and Scientific Computing
Image Processing
Computational Modelling in Biomedical Imaging
Programming Foundations for Medical Image Analysis
Information Processing in Medical Imaging
Image-Directed Analysis and Therapy

- Dissertation/report
All students undertake a research project.

Further information on modules and degree structure available on the department web site Medical Physics and Bioengineering MRes http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medphys/prospective-students/phd/dtp

Funding

Scholarships relevant to this department are displayed (where available) below. For a comprehensive list of the funding opportunities available at UCL, including funding relevant to your nationality, please visit the Scholarships and Funding website http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/scholarships .

Careers

Our graduates typically find work in academia, the NHS, and in industry

Why study this degree at UCL?

The department is one of the largest medical physics and bioengineering departments in Europe, with links to a large number of active teaching hospitals. We have arguably the widest range of research of any similar department, and work closely with other world-leading institutions.

Students on the programme will form part of an interactive network of researchers across many disciplines and will benefit from the strengths of UCL in the healthcare field.

Student / staff ratios › 144 staff including 110 postdocs › 107 taught students › 135 research students

Application and next steps

- Applications
Students are advised to apply as early as possible due to competition for places. Those applying for scholarship funding (particularly overseas applicants) should take note of application deadlines.

- Who can apply?
The programme is suitable either for students wishing to study for a stand-alone MRes in Medical Physics & Bioengineering or for students planning progression to a Doctoral Training Programme.

What are we looking for?
When we assess your application we would like to learn:
- why you want to study Medical Physics and Bioengineering at graduate level
- why you want to study Medical Physics and Bioengineering at UCL
- what particularly attracts you to this programme
- how your personal, academic and professional background meets the demands of a challenging programme
- where you would like to go professionally with your degree

Together with essential academic requirements, the personal statement is your opportunity to illustrate whether your reasons for applying to this programme match what the programme will deliver.

For more information see the Applications page http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/apply .

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The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. Read more

Mission and goals

The aim of the MSc programme in Nuclear Engineering is to prepare engineers with the skills necessary to design, build and operate power generation plants, radioactive waste treatment plants, systems using radiation for industrial and medical applications, etc. The educational programme, therefore, gives emphasis to topics referring to energy applications, i.e. fission and fusion plants, nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Topics applied also in non-energy applications are accounted for, as in medical and industrial applications of radiation, material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to the nuclear field.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Career opportunities

The graduates in Nuclear Engineering, thanks to the MSc multidisciplinary training, can easily be employed in the nuclear sector (e.g. industries operating in nuclear power plants design, construction and operation, in nuclear decommissioning and nuclear waste processing and disposal, in design and construction of radiation sources, in centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), as well as in other areas such as the energy industry, the medical sector, the health, safety and environment sector (e.g. engineering companies, hospitals, consultancy and risk analysis firms) and also research centers and universities.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Nuclear_Engineering.pdf
In this Course emphasis is given to energetic applications, e.g. those referring to fission and fusion plants, the nuclear fuel, materials and safety. Also nonenergetic applications are accounted for, i.e. medical and industrial applications of radiation; radiation detection and measurements; nuclear electronics for radiation detection; radiochemistry; radiation protection and material physics, plasma physics and nanotechnologies with a strong link to their impact in the nuclear field. Graduates in Nuclear Engineering can find employment not only in the nuclear sector (industries operating in electro-nuclear power generation, nuclear plant dismantling, nuclear waste processing and disposal, design and construction of radiation sources, institutes and centers for nuclear fusion and high-energy physics), but also in other areas operating in the field of hightechnology, engineering companies, companies for industrial, medical and engineering advice, hospitals, companies for risk analysis, etc.

Subjects

1st year subjects
Fission reactor physics, nuclear measurements and instrumentation, nuclear plants, nuclear and industrial electronics, reliability safety and risk analysis, solid state physics.

2nd year subjects (subjects differentiated by three specializations)
- Nuclear plants
Nuclear technology and design, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear Material Physics. Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport, Statistical Physics.

- Nuclear Technology
Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear technology and design, Reliability, Safety and Risk Analysis A+B, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

- Physics for Nuclear Systems
Subjects: Nuclear technology and design, Nuclear Material Physics, Medical applications of radiation, Applied Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear material physics, Fission Reactor Physics II + Radioactive Contaminants Transport.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/nuclear-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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This taught Masters is designed to provide you with an advanced programme of study in Medical Physics. It provides an understanding of the application of physics and technology to a range of disciplines within medical physics at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
This taught Masters is designed to provide you with an advanced programme of study in Medical Physics. It provides an understanding of the application of physics and technology to a range of disciplines within medical physics at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. We have expertise in traditional areas like ionising radiation, but also specialist sections in PET Scanning, Ophthalmology, Urology, Informatics and leading researchers in MRI.

Why this programme

-A key strength of this programme is that you will be taught mostly by physicists working in the NHS. It will quip you for employment in a clinical environment.
-Due to the large size of the NHS medical physics department in Glasgow, all mainstream areas of medical physics are covered along with some specialised fields.
-The programme is accredited with the Institute of Physics & Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), the UK professional body for medical physicists.
-The department has access to 1.5, 3 and 7 Tesla MRI, Pet Scanning, a cyclotron, dedicated SPECT and has its own radiosotope dispensary.
-Your lecturers are operating at the forefront of the profession with a balance of research and clinical practice, perfect for studying Medical Science.
-The research component of this programme allows you to develop valuable skills for practising and interpreting research.
-We draw on expert resources within the wider university for anatomy, statistics and the two optional courses.

Programme structure

You will attend lectures, seminars and tutorials, take part in e-learning and undertake a research project.

Core courses
-Radiation physics
-Anatomy and physiology
-Statistics and experimental techniques
-Medical imaging physics
-Programming
-Scientific management
-Clinical medical imaging
-Radiotherapy
-Clinical measurement
-Research dissertation

Optional courses
-Advanced data analysis
-Problem solving

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in the NHS, private healthcare and equipment manufacturers. This is the course followed by the NHS trainees in Scotland so it is highly attuned to preparing the successful student for employment.

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The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner

Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study. The different learning outcomes of the potential awards may be summarised as follows:

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

Why not discover more about the subject in our video?

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner
-Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes
-Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
The Masters in Physics. Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist. Read more
The Masters in Physics: Nuclear Technology provides an understanding of the application of nuclear processes and technology to energy generation, medical physics and environmental monitoring, and at a level appropriate for a professional physicist.

Why this programme

-The University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy is ranked 2nd in Scotland (Complete University Guide 2016).
-You will gain theoretical, experimental and computational skills necessary to analyse and solve advanced physics problems relevant to the theme of Nuclear Technology, providing an excellent foundation for a career of scientific leadership.
-With a 93% overall student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014, the School of Physics and Astronomy combines both teaching excellence and a supportive learning environment.
-You will benefit from direct contact with our group of international experts who will teach you cutting-edge physics and supervise your projects.

Programme structure

Modes of delivery of the MSc Physics: Nuclear Technology include lectures, seminars and tutorials and allow students the opportunity to take part in lab, project and team work.

Core courses include
-Advanced data analysis
-Detection and analysis of ionising radiation
-Environmental radioactivity
-Imaging and detectors
-Nuclear power reactors
-Research skills
-Extended project

Optional courses include
-Advanced electromagnetic theory
-Advanced nuclear physics
-Computational physics laboratory
-Dynamics, electrodynamics and relativity
-Energy and environment
-Medical imaging
-Nuclear and particle physics
-Numerical methods
-Plasma theory and diagnostics (alternate years starting 2015-16)
-Relativistic quantum fields
-Statistical mechanics

The programme in Physics: Nuclear technology lasts 1 year and contains a minimum of 180 credits. You will undertake a minimum of 120 credits in Semesters 1 and 2 and be assessed on these courses either via continuous assessment, or unseen examination in the May/June examination diet, or a combination thereof. The remaining 60 credits will take the form of an extended MSc project, carried out on a specific aspect of theoretical, computational or experimental physics which has current or potential application in the areas of nuclear technology, nuclear energy, radiation detection or environmental monitoring. You will conduct this project while embedded within a particular research group – under the direct supervision of a member of academic staff.

Your curriculum will be flexible and tailored to your prior experience and expertise, particular research interests and specific nature of the extended research project topic provisionally identified at the beginning of the MSc programme. Generally, however, courses taken in Semester 1 will focus on building core theoretical and experimental/computational skills relevant to the global challenge theme, while courses taken in Semester 2 will build key research skills (in preparation for the extended project).

Industry links and employability

-The School of Physics and Astronomy is highly active in research and knowledge transfer projects with industry. Our Masters students have regular opportunities to engage with our industrial collaborators through informal visits, guest lectures and workshops.
-You will also benefit from our membership of the Scottish Universities Physics Alliance. The alliance brings together internationally leading physics research across Scotland to form the largest physics grouping in the UK.
-Our staff and students come from all around the world providing a truly global experience. The School of Physics and Astronomy is committed to providing an equitable environment for study and work, in line with the principles of Project Juno of the Institute of Physics. This was recognised in 2011 by the award of Juno Champion status. We also have a strong programme of talks and seminars given by experts from the UK and abroad, which will give you the chance of broadening your knowledge in many other areas of physics and astronomy.
-This programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics. Accredited MSc programmes automatically meet the master's level education requirement for Chartered Physicist (CPhys) status. To fully meet the educational requirements for CPhys, graduates must also possess an IOP accredited undergraduate degree or equivalent.

Career prospects

Career opportunities in academic research, based in universities, research institutes, observatories and laboratory facilities; industrial research in a wide range of fields including energy and the environmental sector, IT and semiconductors, optics and lasers, materials science, telecommunications, engineering; banking and commerce; higher education.

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