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Masters Degrees (Medical Journalism)

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This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are. Read more
This programme explores the links between the humanities and medicine from a humanities point of view. Among the questions it considers are: What can the humanities contribute to healthcare? How do they differ from the sciences? And what can they tell us about illness?

Key benefits

- Unrivalled central London location, giving immediate access to important medico-historical and cultural resources, including libraries, galleries, archives and museums, e.g. The Wellcome Collection and Library, the Hunterian Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the British Library.

- World class expertise in a breadth of subject areas, including: History of Psychiatry, Literature & Medicine, Philosophy of Medicine and Mental Disorder, Medical Portraiture, Nursing and Film, Bioethics.

- Taught at the Wellcome-funded Centre for the Humanities & Health, which supports the research activities of internationally renowned scholars in the field; has a vibrant and active post-graduate and post-doctoral community; and hosts a lively programme of seminars, conferences and events.

- Close links between the School of Arts & Humanities and one of the largest Schools of Biomedicine in Europe.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/medical-humanities-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The Medical Humanities constitute a growing field of scholarship productive of powerful, innovative analyses of health care issues today. The chief educational aims of this course are to explore the foundations of the field and teach analytical and critical skills that enable students to address questions such as:

Does studying the humanities make us more humane? How are the humanities different from the sciences? What new angles do they offer on old ethical dilemmas? What is health? What is illness? What kind of evidence about illness does literature provide? What is narrative and how embedded are narrative ways of thought in health care practice?

Students who take this course will come away from it with a strong sense of how a variety of humanities disciplines conceive of health and illness and of the contributions these can make to health care. The disciplines involved include Philosophy, Literature, Film, Psychiatry, Art History and Nursing.

- Course purpose -

The MSc in Medical Humanities incorporates the previous King's MA Literature and Medicine programmes. The course allows students to choose a broader range of modules within their degree, interact with a wider range of students, and gain a firm footing in the medical humanities by following common core modules. Students will come from a wide variety of academic and health backgrounds: biosciences such as medicine, nursing, psychology; from health law and social work and humanities trainings in philosophy, film and/or literary studies. They will develop further skills in visual, bioethical, literary, historical and philosophical analyses of health care.

- Course format and assessment -

Seminar-based teaching; dissertation workshops; assessment by coursework.

Career Prospects:

The programme will appeal to medical and health professionals; students of health policy; those who wish to pursue further academic study in medicine and/or the humanities or those hoping to study on a Medical Humanities PhD programme and considering careers in journalism or bioethics.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Read more
Health humanities seeks novel ways of understanding health and illness in society, and how methods from the humanities and social studies may be brought to bear on biomedicine, clinical practice, and the politics of healthcare. Experiences and portrayals of health and illness in literature, film and contemporary culture are also studied.

Degree information

The programme enables students to approach issues relating to health and illness from both a historical and contemporary perspective and from a variety of a disciplines, including anthropology, history, philosophy, sociology, science and technology studies, global health, literature and film studies. Students will also learn to work in an interdisciplinary manner.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), elective modules of 15 or 30 credits each (up to a total of 60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), two core modules (60 credits) and two electives (60 credits) is also offered. A Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), two core modules is also offered.

Core modules
-Illness
-Madness

Optional modules - students may choose from the list of recommended modules below, or other relevant modules in UCL, with the approval of the convenors.
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Classical Chinese Medicine
-Clinically Applied Cultural Psychiatry
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Cultural Memory
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disease in History
-German Literature and Psychology
-Global Health and Development: Emerging Policy Debates
-Global Justice and Health
-Health Inequalities Over the Lifecourse
-Health Policy and Reform
-Medical Anthropology
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science, Technology, and Identity
-Social Value and Public Policy, Health and the Environment
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to present
-Medicine on Screen

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is through essays and a dissertation. There is no unseen examination.

Careers

This MA provides an exceptional foundation for those hoping to undertake PhD research and pursue an academic career, ranging from interdisciplinary work in the health humanities to a broad spectrum of more specialised disciplines, such as medicine, the philosophy of medicine, history of medicine, medical sociology or medical anthropology, among others. It is also a suitable preparation for a range of careers including science and medical journalism, bioethics, healthcare policy, NGOs and museum and heritage.

Employability
The programme gives students the opportunities to work in an interdisciplinary manner, and to engage in debate and develop their presentation skills. Students will gain experience of writing essays and training in conducting original research and applying the appropriate methodology. There are many additional activities available, both within the UCl Health Humanities Centre and the Institute of Advanced Studies, and the wider UCL community, to help students develop employability skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Health Humanities MA is based in UCL's new Health Humanities Centre which draws together world-leading researchers from different disciplines including medicine and health in history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and cultural and film studies.

Leading clinicians at UCL's acclaimed Medical School and Division of Psychiatry, who are engaged in humanities and social science research, are also actively involved with the centre. The centre was formed through the merger of the Centre for Philosophy, Justice and Health and the Centre for the History of Psychological Disciplines.

UCL Health Humanities Centre forms part of the new UCL Institute of Advanced Studies, which showcases and fosters multidisciplinary research within the humanities and the social sciences, with an active programme of events and visiting international scholars.

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This programme explores the histories of science, technology and medicine (HSTM) through a wide range of case studies, from the emergence of professional scientific disciplines such as physics and biology, to the growth of `Big Science' in the Cold war era, to the complex history of the National Health Service. Read more
This programme explores the histories of science, technology and medicine (HSTM) through a wide range of case studies, from the emergence of professional scientific disciplines such as physics and biology, to the growth of `Big Science' in the Cold war era, to the complex history of the National Health Service. We focus on the integrated understanding of HSTM through consideration of sites, institutions, and schools of thought and practice, and pay particular attention to how scientists and medics have communicated with non-specialist audiences.

The taught course consists of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Reflecting CHSTM¿s established research strengths, studies focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century cases. Students will gain experience in historical essay-writing before researching and writing an extensive dissertation on a specialised topic, supervised by experienced researchers.

This MSc is appropriate for students from any disciplinary background. It works both as an advanced study course for students with undergraduate experience in HSTM, and as a conversion route for students from other backgrounds (often in the sciences, but also including general history, social policy, and other fields).

The HSTM pathway is the most appropriate for students who have wide-ranging interests across the field, or are interested in the histories of the physical sciences or the life sciences in particular. If you wish to focus on biomedicine or healthcare, you may prefer the Medical Humanities pathway. If you are particularly interested in contemporary science communication or policy, you should consider the parallel Science Communication MSc programme.

Aims

-To explore the histories of theories, practices, authority claims, institutions and people, spaces and places, and communication in science, technology and medicine, across their social, cultural and political contexts.
-To provide an opportunity and open access to study particular topics of historical and contemporary significance in depth encourage and support the development of analytical skills in understanding the changing form and function of science, technology and medicine in society.
-To encourage and support the development of transferable writing and presentational skills of the highest standard, and thereby prepare students for further academic study or employment.
-To provide a comprehensive introduction to research methods in the history of science, technology and medicine, including work with libraries, archives, databases, and oral history.
-To enable students to produce a major piece of original research and writing in the form of a dissertation.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures and small-group seminar discussions built around readings and other materials. We emphasise the use both of primary sources, and of current research in the field. Most students will also visit local museums and other sites of interest to work on objects or archives. All students meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor. Progression is developed through the Faculty's online-delivery Electronic Graduate Training Programme.

Coursework and assessment

Assessment is mostly based on traditional essay-format coursework submission. The HSTM pathway includes one examination based on a precirculated paper. All MSc students undertake a research dissertation (or optionally, for Medical Humanities students, a portfolio of creative work) counting for 60 of the 180 credits.

Career opportunities

Many of our students go on to PhD research in related areas, or to careers in fields including museums, libraries and archives; teaching; technical authorship and editing; science policy work; research administration; journalism and the media.

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The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. Read more

About the course

The course helps you develop the skills to communicate science effectively to a general audience. We’ll teach you about the latest topics in science and how to communicate these to the media and beyond. A major part of your studies will be writing for the media. In our newsroom, you’ll learn the principles of clear, compelling and concise storytelling. You’ll also work on a group project to plan, organise and deliver your own science exhibition.

Your career

The MSc puts you in an enviable position. Employers in science and technology, the medical and pharmaceutical industries, cultural industries, the science policy sector, education and the media will see your potential.

If you decide on a research career in science, your masters will enable you to communicate your own research effectively.

The course is now five years old. Our graduates have already gone on to careers in the pharmaceutical industry, with medical and educational charities, in a variety of science communication roles.

About us

This course is taught by experts from the faculties of science, social science and medicine, giving you access to world-leading scientists and media practitioners in the field of science communication and journalism. They include fertility expert Professor Allan Pacey who has considerable experience of TV and film, and Dr Louise Robson, a biomedical scientist who works with schools.

Our combined experience covers science communication via newspapers and magazines, radio and television, websites and social networks as well as writing articles and books.

Facilities

You’ll be based in the Science Communication Lab on the main University campus. Much of the practical work is done there and in the Department of Journalism Studies where you’ll have access to all the latest equipment for print, web and broadcast journalism.

Our print facilities include networked computers with Adobe Indesign, Incopy and Photoshop. For broadcasting we have access to radio and TV studios, digital TV editing suites and DV and HD camcorders. We also have multimedia and web authoring software including Dreamweaver and Adobe Premiere.

Core modules

Developing Communication Skills; Topical Science; Dissertation; Ethics and Regulation; Writing for the Media; Communicating with the Media; Online Journalism Studies; Research Methods.

Teaching and assessment

Research in science and journalism informs our teaching. There are lectures, tutorials and seminars. You’ll also do project work, attend masterclasses and go on placements. You’re assessed on coursework, essays, a portfolio, practical exercises and a dissertation.

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The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. Read more
The Philosophy, Politics and Economics of Health MA aims to equip students with the skills necessary to play an informed role in debates concerning distributive justice and health. It explores the central ethical, economic and political problems facing health policy in the UK and globally, especially in relation to social justice.

Degree information

The programme covers relevant areas of moral and political theory, comparative policy analysis, and health economics, to allow students to come to a wide understanding of background issues, history and constraints, in order to be able to make a positive contribution to current debates in this field.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of three core modules (45 credits), five optional modules (75 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits). A Postgraduate Diploma of 120 credits is available, consisting of three core modules (45 credits), and five optional modules (75 credits).

Core modules
-Philosophy Politics and Economics of Health
-Health Policy and Reform
-Key Principles of Health Economics

Optional modules
-Bioethics Governance
-Comparative Human Rights Law
-Law and Governance of Global Health
-Global Justice and Health
-Illness
-Madness
-Conflict, Humanitarianism and Health
-Ethics and Regulation of Research
-Contemporary Political Philosophy
-Normative Ethics
-Public Ethics
-Health Inequalities over the Life-course
-From Imperial Medicine to Global Health, 1860s to Present
-Death, Dying and Consequences
-Disability and Development
-Introduction to Deafhood
-Global Health and Development
-Anthropology and Psychiatry
-Medical Anthropology
-Modules from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the Course Director and timetabling constraints.
-Or any other suitable module from other UCL Master's-level programmes, subject to approval from the course Director and timetabling constraints

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of up to 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is taught through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials. Student performance is assessed through examinations, presentations and coursework (depending on the options chosen), and the dissertation.

Careers

Graduates have gone on to funded research in bioethics and in health policy, and to jobs in the health service, law, journalism, as well as medical education.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Journal development manager, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
-Doctorate of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
-Health Policy Adviser, Doctors of the World UK
-PhD Critical Theory, University of Brighton
-Policy Officer, WHO (World Health Organization) and studying Medicine, The University of Western Australia

Employability
The programme gives students the ability to think precisely and rigorously about complex problems in health systems and beyond; to work with others to explore solutions; and to write cogently and concisely. Public and private sector health employers and NGOs particularly prize these skills in graduates. The skills that the course teaches also provide an ideal springboard to further academic study.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA is the only Master's programme in the world of its type. The compulsory modules provide necessary core skills, while the wide range of options enables students to further their own particular interests.

UCL is at the forefront of research in interdisciplinary research and teaching in philosophy, health humanities and global health through units such as the Health Humanities Centre, the Institute for Global Health and the Institute of Health Equity. The programme draws on highly regarded researchers in a range of UCL departments, and students benefit by instruction from some of the leaders in their fields.

Students further benefit from UCL's location in London, which is one of the world centres of philosophical activity, home of a number of internationally renowned journals - Philosophy; Mind & Language; Mind - and which enjoys regular visiting speakers from across the world. London has over 60 active philosophers making it one of the largest and most varied philosophical communities in the world.

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This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. Read more
This new Masters programme offers innovative and hands-on training in the fascinating field of science communication. You will learn how to communicate scientific, research and findings effectively, and how to articulate complex scientific and technological concepts to engage a variety of audiences. The course will show you how to balance the excitement of scientific discovery and development of innovative delivery methods with an accurate representation of the facts and data that underpin it.

The taught aspects of the course combine practical skills of science journalism, medical writing and SciArt, (the interdisciplinary study of science and art), with theoretical learning about the history and philosophy of science and the study of science communication as an academic discipline.

You will also have the opportunity to work on live science communication projects with external organisations. The programme will give you the necessary analytical and communication skills to be a successful science communicator – in person as well as in writing.

Features and benefits of the course

-A course run by internationally-recognised science communication experts and practitioners.
-An innovative mix of taught and hands-on classes, seminars and workshops that enable students to develop their own skills as science communicators.
-Support and expertise in helping students to build up a portfolio of science communication activities
-Specialisms offered in a range of science communication areas including medical writing, journalism and SciArt.
-Opportunities to work with external organisations to develop genuine and effective science communication strategies.
-A personalised and supportive network designed to enhance your employment prospects.

Assessment details

Assessment on this programme will be innovative, stimulating, focussed and above all relevant to your studies. It will take into account your knowledge and employability prospects, with presentations, portfolios and live projects all contributing to ensuring that you have a useful and varied body of work to present to potential employers upon graduation.

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This MA is a specialised qualification for those wishing to pursue a career in history working in broadcasting or in film, in museums, heritage or in journalism. Read more
This MA is a specialised qualification for those wishing to pursue a career in history working in broadcasting or in film, in museums, heritage or in journalism.

You will be equipped with professional skills of historical interpretation and communication and provided with an opportunity to work alongside practitioners in the field, including museum curators, public archivists, publishers and TV and radio producers. We welcome a variety of guest lecturers and collaborate with a number of external partner institutions such as the National Trust, London Metropolitan Archives and ancestry.co.uk.

This is a unique gateway to the heritage sector and to the popular media, a new MA for historians keen to engage in the modern world.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mapublichistory.aspx

Why choose this course?

- You will have the opportunity to network with producers and representatives from production companies and develop links within the industry.

- You will be entitled to become members of the Institute of Historical Research, an excellent research library, which is housed in Senate House of the University of London. Every evening, many seminars meet at the Institute; here internationally known historians, postgraduate students, visiting historians or local scholars give papers and discussion follows.

- Our unique course units are taught by industry professionals who are well connected and up-to-date with the latest techniques.

- This is a unique gateway which provides students with the knowledge and skill base from which they can proceed to careers in the knowledge economy, the creative industries and the heritage industry.

- Provision is made for students pursuing continuing professional development programmes and part-time study.

Department research and industry highlights

Noted for depth, breadth and innovation, the research output of Royal Holloway historians ranges from ancient to contemporary times, from Britain and Europe to America, the Middle and Far East and Australia, and from political history to economic, social, cultural, intellectual, medical, environmental, and gender history. In particular, the History Department has special strengths in social, cultural, and gender history, and in the history of ideas - with research that covers a notable range of countries, periods, and approaches.

We have a number of research centres:
- Bedford Centre for the History of Women
- 1970s Network
- Research Centre for the Holocaust and Twentieth-Century History
- Hellenic Institute
- Centre for the Study of the Domestic Interior.

Course content and structure

You will study five core units and produce a Project Dissertation.

Core course units:
Studying and Communicating the Past
You will be introduced to the range of skills and resources you need to understand and deploy as a historian. The unit includes guest talks by specialists and practitioners.

History Past and Present: Definitions, Concepts and Approaches
This is a wide-ranging methodology unit that explores the development of history as a discipline and considers the question ‘who and what is history for?’

The Public Communication and Understanding of History
This is an introduction to writing for popular media (journalism, TV and radio). The unit will include outside lecturers and a visit to a BBC/independent production company to meet working producers.

Pathways to the Past
This unit has been developed in collaboration with a number of external partner institutions and considers public history in the contemporary world through popular history books, films, exhibitions and national and local memorials

The Voice of the Public: Oral History in Public History
You will be introduced to the theory and practice of oral history and develops the skills necessary to conduct and record an audio oral history interview to current broadcast and archive standards.

The Public History Project Dissertation
This gives you the opportunity to either research a specific issue or engage with a specific partner institution to produce an exhibition, piece of oral history, a publishable article or radio programme.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- a systematic understanding and knowledge of issues of knowledge transfer and public engagement

- critical awareness of current issues related to public history, heritage and citizenship

- theoretical insights and methodological techniques relevant to the development and interpretation of historical knowledge in the public presentation of the past and to the evaluation of current research and scholarship in the field

- tools of analysis to tackle issues and problems of the representation of the past.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

This course fully prepares graduates for careers in heritage, media, journalism and education. Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including working for an MP, as a Heritage Officer, teaching and marketing. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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*Please note that it is our intention to transform this programme into a new programme Biology of Cardiovascular Disease from September 2017 onwards. Read more
*Please note that it is our intention to transform this programme into a new programme Biology of Cardiovascular Disease from September 2017 onwards. The option to focus on areas other than cardiovascular disease then will be limited.*

The Master's in Biology of Disease focuses on the translation of disease into a scientifically secure experiment/model, in order to study its underlying mechanisms and reveal potential therapies.

The Master's programme in Biology of Disease offers the opportunity to study disease mechanisms in the broadest sense via internships in pre-clinical and clinical research in medical, biomedical, biological, industrial and veterinary labs; and to focus on more than one clinical specialty enabling you to conduct research projects on different subjects and diseases. Alternatively this programme offers the possibility to focus on cardiovascular research.

This two year research programme comprises theoretical courses, elective courses, seminars, a major and minor research project, and the writing of a Master's thesis. The core component of this two year research programme consists of independently planning and conducting the two research projects, which will take 15 months in total. The minor research project may be completed elsewhere in the Netherlands or abroad; or it may be replaced by a specific profile: Management, Teaching and Communication or Drug Regulatory Sciences. Graduates of this programme are prepared for PhD studies (approximately 65% choose for this option); or to take on a position in the medical-technical or pharmaceutical industry, or in science journalism.

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Cardiovascular diseases remain a major cause of death and ill health worldwide. Read more
Cardiovascular diseases remain a major cause of death and ill health worldwide. This established MSc programme, taught by scientists and clinicians who are leaders in their field, offers students the opportunity to learn about topical areas in cardiovascular science, preparing them for further research or a career in industry.

Degree information

Students will develop a detailed knowledge of molecular and cellular cardiovascular science, animal models of cardiovascular disease, microvascular biology and mechanisms by which the heart and vasculature function in health and disease, as well as laboratory and statistical methods. They will gain valuable research skills and an awareness of the ethical, legal and social aspects of developments in cardiovascular disease.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of five core modules (90 credits), two optional modules (30 credits) and the research project (60 credits).

Core modules
-Cardiovascular Diseases
-Animal Models of Cardiovascular Disease
-Congenital Heart Disease - Fundamentals
-Heart and Circulation (30 credits)
-Basic Statistics for Medical Science

Optional modules - 30 credits of optional modules drawn from the following:
-Genetics of Cardiovascular Disease
-Clinical Application of Pharmacogenetic Test
-Drug Discovery II
-Microvascular Biology
-An introduction to Molecular Laboratory Methods in Cardiovascular Research
-Clinical Cardiology (open to clinicians only)

Clinical Cardiology is an academic MSc module rather than a standard clinical placement. The emphasis is to appreciate the impact of advances in cardiovascular science upon clinical practice.

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000-12,000 words and an oral presentation (60 credits).

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, presentations, tutorials, journal clubs, a quiz, statistical and laboratory practicals and anatomical examination of human congenital heart disease specimens. Assessment is through written and oral examinations, coursework essays, case reports, journal club and other oral presentations and the dissertation.

Careers

All graduates of this programme will be well placed for a PhD in this field and a career in research, and will have a sound basis for entry into the pharma industry.

Basic scientists may use the MSc as a stepping stone to MBBS studies. The programme also provides an excellent training for related fields such as scientific journalism and in areas requiring critical appraisal of complex data.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Lecturer, Lahore Medical & Dental College
-Doctor, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
-GDL (Graduate Diploma in Law), BPP
-PhD Cardiac Electrophysiology, University of Surrey
-PhD Cardiovascular Science, University College London (UCL)

Employability
In addition to the academic insight into Cardiovascular Science, this programme supports the development of a wide range of skills which students will use at work. Oral and written communication skills are enhanced. Writing essays and the research project dissertation involves searching the literature, selection and interpretation of publications, and organisation of complex ideas into the final report.

Learning activities in the Statistics module develop quantitative analytical skills. Student develop group and independent projects. They gain insight into research planning and time management. They are supported by a personal tutor and informed by careers events and the UCL Careers Service.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science brings together world-leading scientists and clinicians working in cardiovascular research to conduct innovative research for the prevention and treatment of diseases of the heart and circulation, and provide world-class teaching and training, and forward-thinking policy development.

UCL has one of the largest, most dynamic cardiovascular research bases in the UK. This interdisciplinary programme is taught in collaboration with UCLH, the Institute of Ophthalmology, the Institute of Child Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital and Barts Heart Centre, offering students access to a world-leading community at the forefront of cardiovascular research.

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Our Psychology MA is a new course designed to offer advanced study in psychology with an emphasis on both research excellence and critical writing skills. Read more
Our Psychology MA is a new course designed to offer advanced study in psychology with an emphasis on both research excellence and critical writing skills. Following two semesters of academic study, students write a stand-alone literature review in an area of psychology that particularly appeals to them. This may be an idea or theory that the graduate is already developing, or may be in an area that they become interested in during the course. An academic supervisor will help students to develop their ideas and hone their writing skills, providing support for the literature review. Students can choose to follow a general programme or specialise in the following areas by choosing particular options in semesters one and two.

Read the course leaflet.

View the MA Psychology modules.

During the first two Semesters of this course, content modules are split between core research foundation courses providing an in depth knowledge of how psychological experiments are designed, carried out, analysed and written up, as well as a focus on evaluating scientific research and writing with an appropriate scientific style, and courses offering a variety of subject matters that students can choose from. Courses are taught by the highest calibre research academics and we provide an excellent teaching and learning environment through the use of innovative teaching tools, media and environments. Some courses integrate both undergraduate and graduate classes and so provide a rich and vibrant atmosphere for learning and social interactions.

The course is especially recommended to graduates who want to:

pursue a career in psychology-related humanities, the health-care professions and social-sciences such as scientific journalism, business management, occupational psychology, marketing and medical care;
give their CV an additional boost
explore a particular area of psychology in detail through researching and writing a literature review.
It should be noted that the course does not qualify a student for PhD study at Bangor Psychology, but that should not deter students from applying to psychology departments in other universities and for PhD study in other disciplines. For example, our MA graduates have pursued PhD study in Sociology, Business and Marketing, and Medical History and Humanities.

Programme Aims
To provide post-graduate foundation in psychology and psychological research;
To evaluative psychological research methodology, experimental design and analysis;
To provide the conceptual tools necessary for insight into psychological processes and meanings within several key domains of psychology that the student selects;
To enable students to develop a critical and evaluative understanding of different approaches to psychological study;
To develop key skills in psychological research such as scientific writing, critical analysis of research and communicating research in psychology;
To enable students to produce a substantial written thesis demonstrating their ability to understand, evaluate and integrate psychological research into a coherent body.
Content and Structure
This course consists of taught components along with a literature review. Semesters one and two involve both core modules and a selection of content modules. During the second semester, students work, with the support of an academic supervisor, to identify a theory, model or research question that they wish to explore through their review. This is then completed during the third semester.

Core modules for Semester 1: Issues in Qualitative & Quantitative + 3 Options.
Core modules for Semester 2: Project Proposal, Communicating Research in Psychology + 2 Options.
Students choose the five optional content modules based on their areas of interest (see module list).
Teaching and Learning Assessment
Teaching occurs via lectures, seminars and tutorials given by research experts in the School. All teachers are actively engaged in research programmes. Assessment methods include written exams, essays, oral presentations and a research thesis.

Literature Review
The thesis is the key component of this course allowing the student to demonstrate their learning, knowledge and understanding. Each student focuses on a specific research question or theory and, along with their supervisor, they will develop their ideas, review the relevant literature and write a thesis.

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Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career. Read more
Our MSc in Science Communication combines professional practice, policy studies and cross-disciplinary theory and skills, to offer an academically stimulating experience and a solid grounding for a career.

Developed by academic staff from The University of Manchester's Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the programme will feature masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in print, broadcast and online journalism, museums and science centres, public policy and advocacy, specialist public relations and editorial services, project and event management, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

Aims

Science communication deals with the communication of scientific ideas, practices and issues to diverse audiences. Students on this programme will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?
The course considers these questions among others through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and feeds the discussion back into its approach to practical skills.

Special features

This programme provides a framework that enables to students to enhance their academic and 'real world' learning at the same time. By bringing practitioners into the classroom, and enabling students to participate in the many forms of science communication that are happening in Manchester, students gain a good sense of the range of science communication activity, and of the personal, intellectual and professional skills that will support them as they set off in their careers.

Applicants may informally request from the Course Director, or may be sent, examples of study materials to enable them to test their ability to engage effectively with the course.

Teaching and learning

Teaching includes a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements, for individual students and for groups. Students will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, with professional literatures, and with mass media products about science, technology and medicine. Students will learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events. Participation and volunteering will be encouraged so that students can further their own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff, and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Coursework and assessment

All modules are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. Students should expect assessments, which are written and spoken, and use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

Students may choose their own topic or medium for the many of the assessments. There is a small taught element which is assessed through a formal exam. Assessed work also includes a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional.
The final assessment piece is a substantial piece of original research (the dissertation).

Career opportunities

This programme is intended for students interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering who are seeking to work in journalism, science policy, science publishing, medical, environmental and other related campaigning and advocacy groups, public relations in the public and private sectors, museums and science centres, science festivals, or other public engagement fields. It also provides an appropriate grounding for PhD-level research in science communication studies.

Past MSc graduates who took our former science communication pathway in History of Science, Technology and Medicine have gone on to a wide range of relevant posts, including:
-Public Engagement Officer, Centre for Life, Newcastle
-Senior Policy Analyst, Department of Energy and Climate Change
-Director, Scientia Scripta (science-focused copywriting agency)
-Assistant Curator of Technology and Engineering, Science Museum
-Education Assistant, Catalyst Science Centre, Widnes
-Junior Consultant, Six Degrees PR
-Technical Author, Calrec Audio
-Researcher, Pioneer Productions (TV)

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IN BRIEF. Train for a career in the newly emerging industries of the post-genomic eraWork at the interface between biology and chemistryExcellent career prospectsPart-time study optionInternational students can apply. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Train for a career in the newly emerging industries of the post-genomic eraWork at the interface between biology and chemistryExcellent career prospectsPart-time study optionInternational students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Following completion of the Human Genome Project, the pharmaceutical industry is preparing for a revolution in cancer and inherited disorder therapies. This course is training a new generation of bioscientists to meet challenges at the interface between biology and chemistry, and to apply pharmaceutical and analytical knowledge directly to improve quality of life.

The course develops a broad knowledge and conceptual base in the field of drug design and discovery, with an emphasis on new developments and advances in drug identification, understanding drug pharmacology and novel therapeutics, and appreciating how these topics interact with bioscience businesses and enterprise.

This programme is designed to enable you to gain systematic knowledge and critical awareness of current problems and new insights regarding the analysis of biomolecules. There is particular reference to drug design and discovery, along with a comprehensive and critical understanding of applied techniques and their current application in research in the field of biomolecule analysis and drug design.

This course is aimed at students who wish to acquire the specialised skills needed to design drugs for the 21st century. It is ideal for anyone with primarily either a chemistry or biochemistry based undergraduate degree wishing to broaden their knowledge base. The part-time route is well suited to those who already work in industry as it is possible to carry out research projects within the place of work. Prospective students must be committed to developing their skills and knowledge for a career in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology sectors.

TEACHING

Teaching is through:

  • Lectures to provide thorough grounding in the techniques of biomolecule characterisation and drug design.
  • Practical sessions and workshops to demonstrate techniques and methods used in biomolecule characterisation and drug design, and provide a structured opportunity for you to practice techniques and methods in analytical biosciences and drug design.
  • Guided reading that will recommend texts, key articles and other materials in advance of, or following, lecture classes.  
  • The research project which will enable you to practice the application of appropriate, and selected, bioscientific techniques in an academic or industrial context, and demonstrate research methodologies and skills appropriate to and valuable with biomolecule characterisation and drug design. During your research project You will be supervised by expert staff who are actively engaged in international research programmes.

ASSESSMENT

There are eight taught 15 credit modules each of which have only one assessment (100%). Each exam is 2 hours.

EMPLOYABILITY

Although particularly relevant to those looking for a career in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, this course will also equip you for a career in research, teaching and many other professions including cosmetic science, animal health, food science, medical laboratory research, patent law, scientific journalism and health and safety.

LINKS WITH INDUSTRY

Research projects may be carried out at other institutions (recently Universities in Bremen or France and the Paterson Institute, UK). We also invite visiting lecturers to share their expertise on the subject areas.

FURTHER STUDY

After completion of this course you may wish to specialise in a chosen subject area in one of the School’s two main research centres: Ecosystems and Environment Research Centre (EER) or Biomedical Research Centre (BRC).



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On this established and well respected course, you gain the knowledge, skills and attributes needed to be an effective sport and exercise science practitioner and/or researcher. Read more

On this established and well respected course, you gain the knowledge, skills and attributes needed to be an effective sport and exercise science practitioner and/or researcher. You develop strong technical, analytical, practical and professional skills, alongside specialist skills in • biomechanics and performance analysis • physiology and nutrition • strength and conditioning.

The course enables you to

  • develop your understanding of science
  • develop your ability to apply theory to practice in sport and exercise
  • work towards British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accreditation, (at the discretion of BASES, graduates are able to apply for exemption from some elements of the BASES supervised experience accreditation scheme)
  • conduct independent research, for which you can seek publication through our project module
  • gain experience as a sport or exercise science consultant

We offer a first-class suite of research and teaching laboratories alongside excellent facilities offered by our partnership venue at the English Institute of Sport, Sheffield. Our laboratories are all British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES) accredited.

The four overarching themes in the programme are

  • analysis of performance
  • improving performance
  • research methods and data analysis in both research and applied practice
  • professional practice

Many of the teaching staff support elite athletes as part of their work and undertake research in sport and exercise. We benefit from the expertise of our staff in the Centre for Sport and Exercise Science (CSES). The team for sport performance have worked successfully with athletes competing at the Olympics, Paralympics, and Winter Olympics. They have provided, or are currently providing, sport science research and consultancy services at elite level for the • Amateur Boxing Association • Amateur Swimming Association (diving and swimming) • British Cycling • British Speed Skating Association • British Skeleton-Bob Team • English Bowls Association • English Golf Union • Royal Yachting Association • GB table tennis • GB volleyball.

You benefit from CSES' activities as they allow us to keep course content at the cutting edge, based on our knowledge and experience of sport and exercise science delivery. You can also benefit from a work-based learning programme to help develop your experience of working in multidisciplinary teams, supporting athletes and coaches.

During the course you use a mix of traditional and online learning resources to ensure the course is flexible and can fit in with your existing commitments.

The quality of our provision was rated 24/24 by the Higher Education Council.

Sheffield Hallam are a Skills Development Partner of the Chartered Institute for Managing Sport and Physical Activity.

Professional recognition

This course is designed to meet some of the needs of the British Association of Sport and Exercise Science (BASES), and the United Kingdom Strength and Conditioning Association accreditation.

Course structure

The masters award is achieved by successfully completing 180 credits.

Core modules

  • Analysis and evaluation of performance: technical and tactical (15 credits)
  • Analysis and evaluation of performance: functional and metabolic (15 credits)
  • Inter-professional practice in sport and exercise science (15 credits)
  • Work-based learning in sport and exercise science (15 credits)
  • Research methods (15 credits)
  • Data analysis (15 credits)
  • Project (60 credits)

Optional modules

30 credits from:

  • Improving performance: strength and conditioning (15 credits)
  • Improving performance: physiology and nutrition (15 credits)
  • Applied performance analysis (15 credits)
  • Applied movement analysis (15 credits)
  • Human factors in sports engineering (15 credits)

Assessment

  • laboratory reports
  • project/ethics proposal
  • needs analysis
  • qualitative data analysis
  • managing projects
  • problem solving exercises
  • group work
  • oral presentations
  • poster presentations
  • case study defence or report
  • quantitative data analysis examination
  • project file
  • abstract writing
  • article prepared for publication (MSc only)
  • reflective portfolio
  • technology-based communication package

Employability

As a graduate you benefit from the skills and experience gained from the employability modules and our connections with industry.

Previous graduates have gone into careers as • developers for suppliers of sport equipment • sport science officers • advisors for national governing bodies and the English Institute of Sport • coaches • developing corporate wellness programmes in the health and fitness industry • advisors to local authorities and local health trusts • strength and conditioning coaches • sport and exercise nutritionists • researchers • technicians • university lecturers.

The course's strong focus on research skills provides an ideal platform for further study at PhD level. It is also an important first step into employment and can open many other doors into further training.

Sport scientists

Sport scientists support athletes or sports clubs, they generally provide advice and support, designed to monitor and improve sport performance, alongside a team of specialists including coaches, psychologist, performance managers and medical staff. Areas of expertise include • strength and conditioning • physiology • nutrition and analysis of movement and tactical performance.

Exercise scientists

Exercise scientists are more concerned with improving a person's health and helping them recover from illness through a structured programme of physical activity and other health-based interventions. They are also involved with preventative treatments and work closely with GPs and primary care trusts or private healthcare organisations. Exercise scientists might be employed by local authorities to run community based health and exercise initiatives.

It may be possible to move into a particular clinical area, such as cardiology, or work as a health promotion specialist for a local authority or healthcare trust. Our close links with the National Centre for Sport and Exercise medicine, part of which is based in Sheffield, will provide additional opportunities to those wishing to pursue careers in this area.

Other careers

Other careers also include • the pharmaceutical industry • the armed and uniformed services • journalism • teaching. If you are thinking about an academic career, many universities with sport-related courses require staff to have a higher degree.



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This course is offered jointly by Cardiff University School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, and Techniquest, a science discovery centre based in Cardiff. Read more
This course is offered jointly by Cardiff University School of Social Sciences, Cardiff University School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, and Techniquest, a science discovery centre based in Cardiff. 

The course aims to offer knowledge and expertise relating to the organisation and funding of scientific research, the reporting of scientific innovation and controversy, and the role of citizens, experts and the media in decision making.

You will receive practical, hands-on training in presenting science via news media or directly to audiences ranging from school children to the general public.

Distinctive features

This is innovative, interdisciplinary degree based on collaboration between internationally respected academics and a leading science discovery centre.

The programme has strong links to a wide range of media and science organisations including National Museum Wales, Wales Gene Park, local and national media, science communication centres, and policy makers in regional, national and European institutions.

It offers excellent opportunities to develop expertise in an area of increasing importance for policy, industry and scientific communities.

The course offers students the opportunity to take a mixture of research-led and vocationally orientated modules in order to engage with current debates about topics such as: the organisation and funding of scientific research; the reporting of scientific innovation and controversy; and the role of citizens, experts and the media in decision-making about science and technology

Structure

This is a one-year full-time programme.

The MSc in Science Media and Communication is organised around a sequence of five 20-credit specialist modules, one 20-credit option and one 60-credit supervised dissertation on a relevant topic of your choice.

A 20-credit module comprises 200 hours of study, including about 30 hours of contact time, and the MSc as a whole, 1800 hours of study.

Core modules:

Media, Science and Health
International News Production 1
Research Design For Masters Students
Introduction to Science, Technology and Society
Public Engagement with Science and Technology
Dissertation

Teaching

Modules employ a diverse range of teaching including lectures, seminars, group and individual tutorials, and independent guided study. All modules within the programme make use of Cardiff University’s Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) Learning Central, on which you will find course materials, links to related materials and information on assessment.

You will be expected to attend lectures, seminars and tutorials as set out in the timetable for MSc students. These sometimes sit outside the regular pattern of university attendance and may include day, evening and weekend study and on occasion may fall outside the standard semester dates. You will also be expected to undertake independent study in preparation for lectures, seminars and assessments. 

The Presenting Science module offered by Techniquest (subject to availability in any given year) has limited places and involves presenting work to live audience including school children and the general public. As a result, there is an audition at the start of each year, at which students will be selected for the module. Those students who are not selected for this module will need to take an alternative module to complete their taught programme.

Assessment

Taught modules are assessed in ways that reflect their particular learning outcomes. So, as appropriate to the module, and across the programme as a whole, the following in-course assessments are used:

Essay assignments
Portfolios
Fieldwork reports
Oral presentations
News reports, documentaries, posters
A dissertation or extended project.

Career Prospects

This course is particularly suitable for those interested in pursuing careers in science communication, and the interface of scientific knowledge and the public domain. These include: policy research; political communication, public relations, government agencies; statutory and voluntary organisations; ‘think tanks’, museums and schools; and the mass media.

Some previous graduates have gone on to study for higher degrees, whilst others are, or have been, employed in museums, schools, advertising agencies, medical research charities, government department, NGOs, television companies and science communication organisations.

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One of the great attractions of Jewish Studies at King's is its diversity as it covers Biblical Studies, Rabbinics, Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations and Modern Jewish Thought. Read more
One of the great attractions of Jewish Studies at King's is its diversity as it covers Biblical Studies, Rabbinics, Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations and Modern Jewish Thought. It offers students the opportunity to combine the academic study of Jewish sources from antiquity to the modern period with intense explorations of their significance for contemporary issues and debates in multi-religious societies. You will find a vibrant, supportive, and intellectually inspiring framework in this exciting MA.

Key benefits

- In unique collaborations with Leo Baeck College and with the London School of Jewish Studies, we offer a wide range of subjects.

- Cooperation with other subject areas (Biblical Studies, Abrahamic Religions, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies), and with other departments at King's (History), enables us to introduce students to a variety of methods and to encourage interdisciplinary approaches.

- Diverse choices: Whether students want to explore the topical and methodological richness of Jewish Studies or would like to expand their expertise in one of our core areas, such as Biblical Studies, Rabbinics, Jewish-Christian and Jewish-Muslim relations or Modern Jewish Thought, they will find a vibrant, supportive, and intellectually inspiring framework in the three institutions participating in this MA programme.

- Research seminars and international workshops offer students the chance to discuss innovative research with leading scholars in the field. Please see our latest list of research seminars.

- Our collaboration with other departments in the Department of Theology & Religious Studies (Biblical Studies, Sacred Traditions & The Arts, Middle East & Mediterranean Studies), with other departments at King's (History, Spanish, Portuguese & Latin American Studies) and with other colleges in London allow students to familiarise themselves with a wide range of themes, methods and interdisciplinary approaches

- Modern Hebrew is offered through the Modern Language Centre at King's.

- Superb location, with access to important social, cultural, material and textual resources, such as the Judaica collections of King's College London's own Maughan Library, the British Library, the British Museum, the London Museum of Jewish Life, and a range of synagogues.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/jewish-studies-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

"Identities and Communities in Flux: Texts & Methods in Jewish Studies" is our core module: it invites students to explore how Jewish communities and individuals in ancient, medieval and modern times negotiated (and continue to negotiate) identities and boundaries in multi-religious societies. It also introduces students to a range of research fields – biblical and rabbinical literature; intellectual, social, and cultural history; philosophy – and to key methodological approaches and questions in Jewish Studies.

From Abraham to Zionism, from Maimonides to Medical Ethics, from Jewish-Christian interaction to contemporary Halakhah, you will be exposed to perspectives, cutting edge and traditional, on Jews, Jewishness, and Jewish thought and practice.
The programme has become a forum for students and scholars of a wide range of Jewish and non-Jewish backgrounds who work together, initiate new projects and cooperate with other departments and institutions at King's, in London and beyond.

All students take modules which foster their Hebrew language skills (Biblical or Modern), whether they just start to learn the language or are already at an advanced level.

- Course purpose -
To provide teaching and research training in Jewish Studies, offered by King’s College London.

- Course format and assessment -
Taught core and optional modules assessed by coursework essays plus a dissertation, and, for language modules, examinations.

Career Prospectss:

Students pursue a variety of careers, including teaching, journalism and further research.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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