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Masters Degrees (Medical Instrumentation)

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The MSc in Electronics with Medical Instrumentation aims to produce postgraduates with an ability to design and implement medical instrumentation based systems used for monitoring, detecting and analysing biomedical data. Read more
The MSc in Electronics with Medical Instrumentation aims to produce postgraduates with an ability to design and implement medical instrumentation based systems used for monitoring, detecting and analysing biomedical data. The course will provide ample opportunity to develop practical skill sets. The student will also develop an in-depth understanding of the scientific principles and use of the underlying components such as medical transducers, biosensors and state-of-the-art tools and algorithms used to implement and test diagnostic devices, therapeutic devices, medical imaging equipment and medical instrumentation devices.

The course broadens the discussion of medical equipment and its design by investigating a range of issues including medical equipment regulation, user requirements, impacts of risk, regulatory practice, legislation, quality insurance mechanisms, certification, ethics and ‘health and safety’ assessment. The course will enable a student with an interest in medical electronics to re-focus existing knowledge gained in software engineering, embedded systems engineering and/or electronic systems engineering and will deliver a set specialist practical skills and a deeper understanding of the underlying principles of medical physics. A graduate from this course will be able to immediately participate in this multi-disciplined engineering sector of biomedical and medical instrumentation systems design.

Course structure

Each MSc course consists of three learning modules (40 credits each) plus an individual project (60 credits). Each learning module consists of a short course of lectures and initial hands-on experience. This is followed by a period of independent study supported by a series of tutorials. During this time you complete an Independent Learning Package (ILP). The ILP is matched to the learning outcomes of the module. It can be either a large project or a series of small tasks depending on the needs of each module. Credits for each module are awarded following the submission of a completed ILP and its successful defence in a viva voce examination. This form of assessment develops your communication and personal skills and is highly relevant to the workplace. Overall, each learning module comprises approximately 400 hours of study.

The project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development project. For part-time students, this can be linked to their employment. It is undertaken in two phases. In the first part, the project subject area is researched and a workplan developed. The second part involves the main research and development activity. In all, the project requires approximately 600 hours of work.

Further flexibility is provided within the structure of the courses in that you can study related topic areas by taking modules from other courses as options (pre-requisite knowledge and skills permitting).

Prior to starting your course, you are sent a Course Information and Preparation Pack which provides information to give you a flying start.

MSc Electronics Suite of Courses

The MSc in Electronics has four distinct pathways:
-Robotic and Control Systems
-Embedded Systems
-System-on-Chip Technologies
-Medical Instrumentation

The subject areas covered within the four pathways of the electronic suite of MSc courses offer students an excellent launch pad which will enable the successful graduate to enter into these ever expanding, fast growing and dominant areas. With ever increasing demands from consumers such as portability, increased battery life and greater functionality combined with reductions in cost and shrinking scales of technologies, modern electronic systems are finding ever more application areas.

A vastly expanding application base for electronic systems has led to an explosion in the use of embedded system technologies. Part of this expansion has been led by the introduction of new medical devices and robotic devices entering the main stream consumer market. Industry has also fed the increase in demand particularly within the medical electronics area with the need of more sophisticated user interfaces, demands to reduce equipment costs, demands for greater accessibility of equipment and a demand for ever greater portability of equipment.

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The MSc Design for Medical Technologies is aimed at providing the key knowledge and experience to allow you to pursue a career in bioengineering, healthcare or biotechnology. Read more
The MSc Design for Medical Technologies is aimed at providing the key knowledge and experience to allow you to pursue a career in bioengineering, healthcare or biotechnology. The course will expose you to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies, as well as exploring the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation.

Why study Design for Medical Technologies at Dundee?

The unique environments of medicine and biotechnology offer exacting challenges in the design of high technology products for use in these fields. Engineers and product designers involved in the development of new biomedical instrumentation, surgical tools or biotechnology products must understand the constrictions placed on them by this environment. As a result, bioengineering has been established as the fusion of engineering and ergonomics with a deep understanding of medical science.

Benefits of the programme include:
Knowledge and understanding of medical and surgical engineering and technology
Skills in research methods, communications, teamwork and management
Appreciation of entrepreneurship and the global 'Medtech' industry
Participation in research activities of world renowned research groups
Preparation for careers in industry, academia and commerce

What's great about Design for Medical Technologies at Dundee?

The University of Dundee is one of the top UK universities, with a powerful research reputation, particularly in the medical and biomedical sciences. It has previously been named Scottish University of the Year and short-listed for the Sunday Times UK University of the year.

The Mechanical Engineering group has a high international research standing with expertise in medical instrumentation, signal processing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, advanced design in minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation engineering.

Links and research partnerships:

We have extensive links and research partnerships with clinicians at Ninewells Hospital (largest teaching hospital in Europe) and with world renowned scientists from the University's College of Life Sciences.

The new Institute of Medical Science and Technology (IMSaT) at the University has been established as a multidisciplinary research 'hothouse' which seeks to commercialise and exploit advanced medical technologies leading to business opportunities.

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

The structure of the MSc course is divided into two parts. The taught modules expose students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. The course gives concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students during the first semester of the course.

What you will study

The three taught modules are:
Imaging and Instrumentation for Medicine and Surgery (30 Credits)
Biomechanics and Biomedical (30 Credits)
Advanced Medical and Surgical Instrumentation (30 Credits)

These modules are followed by the biomedical research project (90 credits).

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework and examination, plus research project.

Careers

The MSc Design for Medical Technologies is aimed at providing the key knowledge and experience to allow you to pursue a career in bioengineering, healthcare or biotechnology. This opens up a vast range of opportunities for employment in these industries as a design, development or product engineer, research scientist, sales and marketing manager or Director of a start-up company. The programme also provides the ideal academic grounding to undertake a PhD degree leading to a career in academic research.

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We worked with industry professionals to develop an MSc Applied Instrument and Control programme that is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC). Read more

We worked with industry professionals to develop an MSc Applied Instrument and Control programme that is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC). It covers both the latest developments in the field and the industry knowledge we've gained through years of experience.

You'll acquire a specialised skillset and expertise that's highly desirable to employers, making you a competitive candidate for rewarding careers in many industries, with oil and gas pathways available. The programme draws on relevant case studies with real-world implications, so you'll gain practical knowledge that you can apply on the job from day one.

The programme also fulfils the Engineering Council's further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

  • Gain a solid foundation in measurement science and control theory
  • Practise data acquisition and instrument networking
  • Study analysis of systems for condition monitoring
  • Investigate fault detection and control system design
  • Complete a hands-on project in the industry for experiential learning

At GCU, you'll find a welcoming community of people like yourself - hardworking, career-focused individuals with the vision and discipline to pursue meaningful work. We'll help you develop the tools to be successful, in your career and in your life.

We hope you'll use those tools to make a positive impact on your community and contribute to the common good through everything you do.

What you will study

The curriculum has been developed in consultation with industry and can be broadly grouped in three areas: the introduction of new facts and concepts in measurement and control; the application of facts and concepts to real measurement problems and systems; and subjects which are of general importance to the professional engineer, for example safety and safety management and management ethics and project planning.

Students complete eight taught modules - four in trimester A and four in trimester B; and a Masters project in trimester C.The MSc project will be carried out at the student's workplace; this can be in an area relevant to the company's production/maintenance function, thus providing maximum benefit to both the company and the individual.

Control Systems

Consolidates advanced classical and modern control design techniques emphasising the practical considerations in applying control design in an industrial environment. The appropriateness and difficulties encountered in applying various design techniques in practice will be explored. In particular system sensitivity, robustness and nonlinearity will be studied.

Data Acquisition and Analysis

Develops the ability to evaluate, in a given situation, the most appropriate strategy for acquiring data and understand the merits of this strategy with respect to other approaches. A range of modern time and frequency domain analysis techniques will also be discussed.

Industrial Case Studies

Following on from the foundation in measurement and instrumentation provided by the Measurement Theory and Devices module, students will now be equipped to study in depth instrumentation in industrial processes. This module will cover aspects of designing sensor systems for industrial measurements, instrument control, system troubleshooting and optimisation in industrial applications.

Distributed Instrumentation

Develops the ability to evaluate, in a given situation, the most appropriate strategy for acquiring and transmitting data and understand the merits of this strategy with respect to other approaches. A wide range of different instrument communication and networking techniques will be studied. In addition the module provides practical experience of hardware setup and software development, relating to these techniques.

Industrial Process Systems

Identification and system modelling from real data play an important role in this module. This approach thus leads to more complex and realistic models that can be used to design more robust and reliable controllers that take into account problematic physical effects such as time-delays and sensor noise. The module will cover more advanced aspects of control design such as feed forward and multivariable control.

Measurement Systems

A range of advanced measurement systems will be studied in depth. Sensors, signal processing, low-level signal measurements, noise-reduction methods and appropriate measurement strategies will be applied to industrial and environmental applications. The influence of environmental factors and operation conditions will be considered in relation to the optimisation of the measurement system.

Measurement Theory and Devices

Adopts a generalised approach to measurement theory and devices, allowing students to become familiar with the characteristics of measurement systems in terms of the underlying principles. In this way, the students will be able to develop a systems approach to problem solving. They should find this methodology to be a considerable benefit to them when they have to apply their expertise to solving more complex industrial measurement problems.

Professional Practice

Develops the students' ability to select, develop and plan an MSc research project, to research and critically analyse the literature associated with the project and to present research findings effectively, it will also provide students with the ability to apply a competent process of thinking to project planning and give them a critical understanding of safe and ethical working.

Accreditation

The programme is accredited by the Institute of Measurement and Control (InstMC) as meeting the Engineering Council’s further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Graduate prospects

The MSc Applied Instrumentation and Control offers graduates a highly focused skillset that's valuable to an extremely wide range of industries - any business that benefits from the measurement of process variables and environmental factors. For instance, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, optics and optoelectronics, medical instrumentation and more.

Across these industries, you might focus on computer-controlled instrumentation systems, process instrumentation, technical management and sales, process control and automation, sensor development and manufacturing, instrument networking, industrial development or test and measurement systems.

You might also pursue a career with a company that designs and manufactures measurement systems.



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Your programme of study. If you want to study Medical Physics with applications in nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, electronics and MRI University of Aberdeen has an world renowned historic reputation within major global innovation in this health area. Read more

Your programme of study

If you want to study Medical Physics with applications in nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, electronics and MRI University of Aberdeen has an world renowned historic reputation within major global innovation in this health area. Did you know the first MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) scanner was invented at Aberdeen over 30 years ago? Major innovations to this technology are still being researched at Aberdeen today. You learn everything you need to know as an advanced grounding in medical physics such as understanding anatomy and how cells are altered by disease. You look at the engineering behind MRI and other visual scanning techniques to understand how applications are made in areas such as nuclear, Positron, Tomography, Radio diagnosis (X-ray), MRI and Ultrasound. You understand radiation and you apply electronics and computing to medical physics. The degree ensures plenty of practical understanding and application and you learn MRI within the department that built it.

If you want to work within imaging and medical physics to pursue a medical career in hospitals, industry and healthcare and diagnose disease by different methods of imaging the degree in Medical Physics will help you towards this goal. You can also develop your own research portfolio and PhD from this MSc and work within academia to pursue innovation in the discipline.

You receive a thorough academic grounding in Medical Physics, are exposed to its practice in a hospital environment, and complete a short research project. Many graduates take up careers in health service medical physics, either in the UK or their home country. The MSc programme is accredited by the Institute of Physics & Engineering in Medicine as fulfilling part of the training requirements for those wishing to work in the NHS. You can also work as a researcher, risk manager, radiation physics specialist and within the medical device industry in product development and innovation.

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

  • Biomedical and Professional Topics in Healthcare Science
  • Imaging in Medicine
  • Radiation in Medicine
  • Computing and Electronics in Medicine
  • Generic Skills

Semester 2

  • Radiation and Radiation Physics
  • Nuclear Medicine and Post Emission Tomography
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Medical Electronics and Instrumentation
  • Medical Image Processing and Analysis
  • Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Protection

Semester 3

  • Project Programmes in Medical Physics and Medical Imaging

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • You are taught by renowned researchers with opportunity to contribute to the expanding research portfolio
  • You learn in a cutting edge medical facility adjacent to the teaching hospital including a PET-CT scanner, radiotherapy centre and linac treatment machines, plus MRI scanners
  • The MRI scanner was invented and developed at University of Aberdeen

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • 12 months or 24 months
  • Full time or Part Time
  • September start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

Your Accommodation

Campus Facilities

Find out more about living in Aberdeen and living costs



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Who is it for?. The MSc Medical Magnetic Resonance has been designed for Qualified Radiographers working in or rotating through Magnetic Resonance Imaging who wish to advance their clinical practice and understanding of this modality. Read more

Who is it for?

The MSc Medical Magnetic Resonance has been designed for Qualified Radiographers working in or rotating through Magnetic Resonance Imaging who wish to advance their clinical practice and understanding of this modality.

Objectives

This course has been designed to:

  • Enhance the professional practice and personal development of practitioners
  • Provide opportunities for discussion and shared experience between practitioners
  • Enhance critical, analytical, professional, research and communication skills and promote the ability to relate these skills to individual clinical practice
  • Further develop the skills necessary for life-long independent learning
  • Prepare you to take on the professional roles of advanced practitioners
  • Encourage autonomous planning and implementation of tasks at a professional level
  • Encourage the development of originality in the application of knowledge to clinical practice
  • Enhance your understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to interpret knowledge in your field.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mix of lectures, class discussions, seminars, presentations, case study analyses, interactive computer-based exercises, a virtual learning environment, guided independent learning and individual supervision.

You will be taught by City Academics who specialise in Computed Tomography, Radiologists, Industry Professionals and Radiographers.

Assessment

You are assessed on a range of areas including your project dissertation, exams, written assignments, oral presentations and posters.

Modules

Core and elective module diet will vary depending on which certificate is undertaken.

Core modules

Core modules in year one (certificate year) are:

  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term one
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term two.

Both these classroom modules involve two three-day blocks of teaching totalling thirty-six hours (six hours per day).

For the Postgraduate Diploma (year two) in Radiography (Medical Magnetic Resonance) the core modules of:

  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term one
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term two
  • HRM011 Introduction to Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis (30 credits) - year two, term one.

The remainder of the course will be selected from elective modules.

For the MSc Radiography (Medical Magnetic Resonance) (year three) you must obtain a minimum of 180 credits and include core modules of:

  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term one
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits) - year one, term two
  • HRM011 Introduction to Research Methods and Applied Data Analysis (30 credits) - year two, term one
  • APM002 Dissertation (60 credits) - year two, terms one and two.

The remainder of the course will be selected from elective modules.

Elective modules

  • RCM005 Evidence Based Practice (15 credits – distance learning)
  • RCM010 Student Negotiated Module 1 (15 credits – distance learning)
  • CHM003 Comparative Imaging (30 credits – distance learning)
  • CHM002 Education in the Workplace (15 credits – distance learning)
  • RCM124 Physics and Instrumentation of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits – 36 hours classroom based) only suitable for students with some CT rotation
  • RDM017 Clinical Applications of Medical Magnetic Resonance (30 credits – 36 hours, classroom based). Only suitable for students with some CT rotation.

Career prospects

The postgraduate programme in Medical Magnetic Resonance will enable you to work towards advancing your practice and support a rationale for more senior roles in the profession including specialist clinical practice, management and research.

The programme is accredited by the College and Society of Radiographers.

Previous students have gone on to take positions overseas, in research, management and advance clinical practice. Some of our students have taken their skills and continued to study to PhD level.



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The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. Read more
The programme is a full-time taught postgraduate degree course leading to the degree of MSc in Biomedical Engineering. It has an international dimension, providing an important opportunity for postgraduate engineers to study the principles and state-of-the-art technologies in biomedical engineering with a particular emphasis on applications in advanced instrumentation for medicine and surgery.

Why study Biomedical Engineering at Dundee?

Biomedical engineers apply engineering principles and design methods to improve our understanding of living systems and to create new techniques and instruments in medicine and surgery.

The taught modules in this course expose students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. The course also provides concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students during the first semester of the course.

UK qualifications are recognised and respected throughout the world. The University of Dundee is one of the top UK universities, with a powerful research reputation, particularly in the medical and biomedical sciences. It has previously been named 'Scottish University of the Year' and short-listed for the Sunday Times 'UK University of the Year'.

Links with Universities in China:

This course can be taken in association with partner universities in China with part of the course taken at the home institution before coming to Dundee to complete your studies. For students from elsewhere it is possible to take the entire course at Dundee.

What's so good about Biomedical Engineering at Dundee?

The University of Dundee has had an active research programme in biomedical engineering for over 20 years.

The Biomedical Engineering group has a high international research standing with expertise in medical instrumentation, signal processing, biomaterials, tissue engineering, advanced design in minimally invasive surgery and rehabilitation engineering.

Research partnerships:

We have extensive links and research partnerships with clinicians at Ninewells Hospital (largest teaching hospital in Europe) and with world renowned scientists from the University's College of Life Sciences. The new Institute of Medical Science and Technology (IMSaT) at the University has been established as a multidisciplinary research 'hothouse' which seeks to commercialise and exploit advanced medical technologies leading to business opportunities.

This course has two start dates - September or January, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

The structure of the MSc course is divided into two parts. The taught modules expose students to the leading edge of modern biomedical and surgical technologies. The course gives concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.

The research project allows students to work in a research area of their own particular interest, learning skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics are offered to students towards at the beginning of second semester of the course.

What you will study

The course is divided into two parts:

Part I (60 Credits):

Bioinstrumentation (10 Credits)
Biomechanical Systems (20 Credits)
Biomaterials (20 credits)
Introduction to Medical Sciences (10 Credits)
Part II (120 Credits) has one taught module and a research project module. It starts at the beginning of the University of Dundee's Semester 2, which is in mid-January:

The taught module, Advanced Medical and Surgical Instrumentation (30 Credits), exposes students to the leading edge of modern medical and surgical technologies. It will also give concepts and understanding of the role of entrepreneurship, business development and intellectual property exploitation in the biomedical industry, with case examples.
The research project (90 Credits) will allow students to work in a research area of their own particular interest and to learn skills in presentation, critical thinking and problem-solving. Project topics will be offered to students before Part II of the course. We shall do our best to provide all students with a project of their choice.
The time spent in Dundee will also give students a valuable educational and cultural experience.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework and examination, plus dissertation.

Careers

An MSc degree in Biomedical Engineering will prepare you for a challenging and rewarding career in one of many sectors: the rapidly growing medical technology industry, academic institutions, hospitals and government departments.

A wide range of employment possibilities exist including engineer, professor, research scientist, teacher, manager, salesperson or CEO.

The programme also provides the ideal academic grounding to undertake a PhD degree leading to a career in academic research.

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Why Surrey?. Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more

Why Surrey?

Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

Programme overview

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

Why not discover more about our programme in our video?

Programme structure

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation project. Part-time studemts study the same content over 2 academic years.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that all modules are compulsory, there are no optional modules, and may be subject to change.

Facilities, equipment and academic support

Common room

A student common room is available for the use of all Physics students.

Computers

The University has an extensive range of PC and UNIX machines, full internet access and email. The University has invested in resources to allow students to develop their IT skills. It also has an online learning environment, SurreyLearn. Computers are located in dedicated computer rooms. Access to these rooms is available 24 hours per day.

Prizes

Hounsfield Prize

A prize of £200 is awarded annually for the best dissertation on the Medical Physics programme. Sir Hounsfield was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1979 for his work on Computed Tomography.

Mayneord Prize

A prize of £200 in memory of Professor Valentine Mayneord will be awarded to the student with the best overall performance on the Medical Physics course. Professor Mayneord was one of the pioneers of medical physics, who had a long association with the Department and encouraged the growth of teaching and research in the field.

Knoll Prize

A prize of £300 in memory of Professor Glenn Knoll is awarded annually to the student with outstanding performance in Radiation Physics and Radiation Measurement on any of the department's MSc programmes. Professor Knoll was a world-leading authority in radiation detection, with a long association with the department

IPEM Student Prize (MSc Medical Physics)

A prize of £250 is awarded annually to a student with outstanding performance in their dissertation.

Educational aims of the programme

The programme integrates the acquisition of core scientific knowledge with the development of key practical skills with a focus on professional career development within medical physics and related industries. The principle educational aims and outcomes of learning are to provide participants with advanced knowledge, practical skills and understanding applied to medical physics, radiation detection instrumentation, radiation and environmental practice in an industrial or medical context. This is achieved by the development of the participants’ understanding of the underlying science and technology and by the participants gaining an understanding of the legal basis, practical implementation and organisational basis of medical physics and radiation measurement.

Global opportunities

We give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities and through our international research collaboration. Hence, it may be possible to carry out the dissertation project abroad.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.



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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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The MSc Medical Imaging programme is intended to provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of engineering design of advanced medical and biotechnology products and systems. Read more
The MSc Medical Imaging programme is intended to provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of engineering design of advanced medical and biotechnology products and systems. Students will also acquire a working knowledge of the clinical environment to influences their design philosophy.

Why study Medical Imaging at Dundee?

With biotechnology replacing many of the traditional engineering disciplines within the UK, this programme will allow you to develop the skills to apply your engineering or scientific knowledge to technologies that further the developments in this field. As a result, employment opportunities will be excellent for graduates, both in research and in industry.

We have an active research group, and you will be taught by leading researchers in the field.

What's so good about Medical Imaging at Dundee?

The MSc in Medical Imaging at the University of Dundee will:

Provide knowledge, skills and understanding of medical imaging technologies, particularly in modern biomedical, radiological and surgical imaging instrumentation, biomaterials, biomechanics and tissue engineering

Enhance your analytical and critical abilities, competence in multi-disciplinary research & development

Provide broad practical training in biology and biomolecular sciences sufficient for you to understand the biomedical nomenclature and to have an appreciation of the relevance and potential clinical impact of the research projects on offer

Allow you to experience the unique environment of clinical and surgical aspects in medical imaging in order to provide an understanding of the engineering challenges for advanced practice

Provide core training in electrical, microwave, magnetic, acoustic and optical techniques relevant to the life sciences interface and

Provide broad experience of analytical and imaging techniques relevant for biology, biomolecular and clinical sciences
provide core training in acoustic ultrasound technologies.

Who should study this course?

This course is suitable for students who are recent graduates of mechanical engineering courses or other related programmes.

This course has two start dates - January & September, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

The programme will involve a variety of teaching formats including lectures, tutorials, seminars, hands-on imaging classes, laboratory exercises, case studies, coursework, and an individual research project.

The teaching programme will include visits to and seminars at IMSaT and clinical departments at Ninewells Hospital and Medical School and Tayside University Hospitals Trust, including the Clinical Research Centre, the Departments of Medicine, Surgery, Dentistry and ENT, the Vascular Laboratory and Medical Physics.

A high degree of active student participation will be encouraged throughout. Taught sessions will be supported by individual reading and study. You will be guided to prepare your research project plan and to develop skills and competence in research including project management, critical thinking and problem-solving, project report and presentation.

What you will study

The course is divided into two parts:

Part I has 60 credits:

Biomechanics (20 Credits)
Biomaterials (20 Credits)
Bioinstrumentation (10 Credits)
Introduction to Medical Sciences (10 Credits)

Part II has one taught module and a research project module. It starts at the beginning of the University of Dundee's Semester 2, which is in mid-January:

Taught module: Advanced Biomedical Imaging Technologies (30 Credits).
Research project (30 Credits for diploma or 90 Credits for MSc)

How you will be assessed

The taught modules will be assessed by a combination of written examinations and coursework. The research project will be assessed by a written thesis and oral presentation.

Careers

This Master's programme provides you with the skills to continue into research in areas such as biomedical and biomaterials engineering as well as progression into relevant jobs within the Mechanical Engineering and Mechatronics industries.

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The School of Engineering and Digital Arts offers research-led degrees in a wide range of research disciplines, related to Electronic, Control and Information Engineering, in a highly stimulating academic environment. Read more
The School of Engineering and Digital Arts offers research-led degrees in a wide range of research disciplines, related to Electronic, Control and Information Engineering, in a highly stimulating academic environment. The School enjoys an international reputation for its work and prides itself in allowing students the freedom to realise their maximum potential.

Established over 40 years ago, the School has developed a top-quality teaching and research base, receiving excellent ratings in both research and teaching assessments.

We undertake high-quality research that has had significant national and international impact, and our spread of expertise allows us to respond rapidly to new developments. Our 30 academic staff and over 130 postgraduate students and research staff provide an ideal focus to effectively support a high level of research activity. There is a thriving student population studying for postgraduate degrees in a friendly and supportive teaching and research environment.

We have research funding from the Research Councils UK, European research programmes, a number of industrial and commercial companies and government agencies including the Ministry of Defence. Our Electronic Systems Design Centre and Digital Media Hub provide training and consultancy for a wide range of companies. Many of our research projects are collaborative, and we have well-developed links with institutions worldwide.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/262/electronic-engineering

Project opportunities

Some projects available for postgraduate research degrees (http://www.eda.kent.ac.uk/postgraduate/projects_funding/pgr_projects.aspx).

Research areas

- Communications

The Group’s activities cover system and component technologies from microwave to terahertz frequencies. These include photonics, antennae and wireless components for a broad range of communication systems. The Group has extensive software research tools together with antenna anechoic chambers, network and spectrum analysers to millimetre wave frequencies and optical signal generation, processing and measurement facilities. Current research themes include:

- photonic components
- networks/wireless systems
- microwave and millimetre-wave systems
- antenna systems
- radio-over-fibre systems
- electromagnetic bandgaps and metamaterials
- frequency selective surfaces.

- Intelligent Interactions:

The Intelligent Interactions group has interests in all aspects of information engineering and human-machine interactions. It was formed in 2014 by the merger of the Image and Information Research Group and the Digital Media Research Group.

The group has an international reputation for its work in a number of key application areas. These include: image processing and vision, pattern recognition, interaction design, social, ubiquitous and mobile computing with a range of applications in security and biometrics, healthcare, e-learning, computer games, digital film and animation.

- Social and Affective Computing
- Assistive Robotics and Human-Robot Interaction
- Brain-Computer Interfaces
- Mobile, Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
- Sensor Networks and Data Analytics
- Biometric and Forensic Technologies
- Behaviour Models for Security
- Distributed Systems Security (Cloud Computing, Internet of Things)
- Advanced Pattern Recognition (medical imaging, document and handwriting recognition, animal biometrics)
- Computer Animation, Game Design and Game Technologies
- Virtual and Augmented Reality
- Digital Arts, Virtual Narratives.

- Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems:

The Instrumentation, Control and Embedded Systems Research Group comprises a mixture of highly experienced, young and vibrant academics working in three complementary research themes – embedded systems, instrumentation and control. The Group has established a major reputation in recent years for solving challenging scientific and technical problems across a range of industrial sectors, and has strong links with many European countries through EU-funded research programmes. The Group also has a history of industrial collaboration in the UK through Knowledge Transfer Partnerships.

The Group’s main expertise lies primarily in image processing, signal processing, embedded systems, optical sensors, neural networks, and systems on chip and advanced control. It is currently working in the following areas:

- monitoring and characterisation of combustion flames
- flow measurement of particulate solids
- medical instrumentation
- control of autonomous vehicles
- control of time-delay systems
- high-speed architectures for real-time image processing
- novel signal processing architectures based on logarithmic arithmetic.

Careers

We have developed our programmes with a number of industrial organisations, which means that successful students are in a strong position to build a long-term career in this important discipline. You develop the skills and capabilities that employers are looking for, including problem solving, independent thought, report-writing, time management, leadership skills, team-working and good communication.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability, we offer many opportunities for you to gain worthwhile experience and develop the specific skills and aptitudes that employers value.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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What's the Master of Biomedical Engineering about? . The Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering provides students with a state-of-the-art overview of all areas in biomedical engineering. Read more

What's the Master of Biomedical Engineering about? 

The Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering provides students with a state-of-the-art overview of all areas in biomedical engineering:

  • Biomechanics
  • Biomaterials
  • Medical sensors and signal processing
  • Medical imaging
  • Tissue engineering

The teaching curriculum builds upon the top-class research conducted by the staff, most of whom are members of the Leuven Medical Technology Centre. This network facilitates industrial fellowships for our students and enables students to complete design projects and Master’s theses in collaboration with industry leaders and internationally recognized research labs.

Biomedical engineers are educated to integrate engineering and basic medical knowledge. This competence is obtained through coursework, practical exercises, interactive sessions, a design project and a Master’s thesis project.

Structure

Three courses provide students with basic medical knowledge on anatomy and functions of the human body. The core of the programme consists of biomedical engineering courses that cover the entire range of contemporary biomedical engineering: biomechanics, biomaterials, medical imaging, biosensors, biosignal processing, medical device design and regulatory affairs.

The elective courses have been grouped in four clusters: biomechanics and tissue engineering, medical devices, information acquisition systems, and Information processing software. These clusters allow the students to deepen their knowledge in one particular area of biomedical engineering by selecting courses from one cluster, while at the same time allowing other students to obtain a broad overview on the field of biomedical engineering by selecting courses from multiple clusters.

Students can opt for an internship which can take place in a Belgian company or in a medical technology centre abroad. 

Through the general interest courses, the student has the opportunity to broaden his/her views beyond biomedical engineering. These include courses on management, on communication (e.g. engineering vocabulary in foreign languages), and on the socio-economic and ethical aspects of medical technology.

A design project and a Master’s thesis familiarize the student with the daily practice of a biomedical engineer.

International

The Faculty of Engineering Science at KU Leuven is involved in several Erasmus exchange programmes. For the Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering, this means that the student can complete one or two semesters abroad, at a number of selected universities.

An industrial fellowship is possible for three or six credits either between the Bachelor’s and the Master’s programme, or between the two phases of the Master’s programme. Students are also encouraged to consider the fellowship and short courses offered by BEST (Board of European Students of Technology) or through the ATHENS programme.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty.

Strengths

The programme responds to a societal need, which translates into an industrial opportunity.

Evaluation of the programme demonstrates that the objectives and goals are being achieved. The mix of mandatory and elective courses allows the student to become a generalist in Biomedical Engineering, but also to become a specialist in one topic; industry representatives report that graduates master a high level of skills, are flexible and integrate well in the companies.

Company visits expose all BME students to industry. Further industrial experience is available to all students.

Our international staff (mostly PhD students) actively supports the courses taught in English, contributing to the international exposure of the programme.

The Master’s programme is situated in a context of strong research groups in the field of biomedical engineering. All professors incorporate research topics in their courses.

Most alumni have found a job within three months after graduation.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Career perspectives

Biomedical engineering is a rapidly growing sector, evidenced by an increase in the number of jobs and businesses. The Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering was created to respond to increased needs for healthcare in our society. These needs stem from an ageing population and the systemic challenge to provide more and better care with less manpower and in a cost-effective way. Industry, government, hospitals and social insurance companies require engineers with specialised training in the multidisciplinary domain of biomedical engineering.

As a biomedical engineer, you'll play a role in the design and production of state-of-the-art biomedical devices and/or medical information technology processes and procedures. You will be able to understand medical needs and translate them into engineering requirements. In addition, you will be able to design medical devices and procedures that can effectively solve problems through their integration in clinical practice. For that purpose, you'll complete the programme with knowledge of anatomy, physiology and human biotechnology and mastery of biomedical technology in areas such as biomechanics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, bio-instrumentation and medical information systems. The programme will help strengthen your creativity, prepare you for life-long learning, and train you how to formalise your knowledge for efficient re-use.

Careers await you in the medical device industry R&D engineering, or as a production or certification specialist. Perhaps you'll end up with a hospital career (technical department), or one in government. The broad technological background that is essential in biomedical engineering also makes you attractive to conventional industrial sectors. Or you can continue your education by pursuing a PhD in biomedical engineering; each year, several places are available thanks to the rapid innovation taking place in biomedical engineering and the increasing portfolio of approved research projects in universities worldwide.



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The School of Clinical Medicine offers a programme in Medical Imaging with an option in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety or Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography. Read more
The School of Clinical Medicine offers a programme in Medical Imaging with an option in Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety or Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

The Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Safety strands are offered in parallel on a bi-annual basis, the Magnetic Resonance Imaging and CT strand are offered on alternate years. In September 2013, the MRI and CT strands will commence.

The main aim of the programme is to train and qualify Radiographers in the practice of Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Computed Tomography.

The course is intended for qualified Radiographers with a clinical placement in a Nuclear Medicine Department, a Radiology Department, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department or a Computed Tomography Department. It is a course requirement that the student must spend a minimum of 15 hours per week on clinical placement in a Nuclear Medicine Department, a Radiology Department, a Magnetic Resonance Imaging Department or a Computed Tomography Department as appropriate to fulfill the requirements of the course.

The M.Sc. in Medical Imaging will be run over 12 months on a part-time basis.

In the M.Sc. in Medical Imaging, there are 4 separate strands: Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography. Students will choose one of the 4 options.

The taught component of the course is covered in the first 8 months. The student may opt to exit the programme upon completion of the taught component with a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Imaging.

From May to September, students undertake an independent research project. Successful completion of the research component of the programme leads to the award of M.Sc. in Medical Imaging.

The list of common core modules currently available to students of the Nuclear Medicine, Radiation Safety, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and CT strands are:

Medico-Legal Aspects, Ethics and Health Services Management (5 ECTS)
Clinical Practice (10 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Nuclear Medicine strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation, and Computer Technology Radiation Protection and Quality Control in Nuclear Medicine (15 ECTS)
Clinical Applications of Nuclear Medicine and Hybrid Imaging (15 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to Nuclear Medicine (5 ECTS)
Radiopharmacy (5 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Radiation Safety strand are:

Radiation Protection Legislation (10 ECTS)
Practical Aspects of Radiation Protection (5 ECTS)
Physics and Instrumentation and Computer Technology (10 ECTS)
Quality Management and Quality Control (15 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Magnetic Resonance Imaging strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation of MR and computer technology (15 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to MR (10 ECTS)
Safety in MR and Quality Control (5 ECTS)
MR Imaging Techniques and Protocols (15 ECTS)

The additional modules in the Computed Tomography strand are:

Physics and Instrumentation of CT and computer technology (10 ECTS)
Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology applied to CT (10 ECTS)
CT Imaging Techniques and Protocols (15 ECTS)
Radiation protection and quality assurance in CT (5 ECTS)

All common modules and strand-specific modules must be undertaken. The taught component thus consists of 60 ECTS.
Dissertation (30 ECTS)

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The MSc in Electronics with Embedded Systems aims to produce postgraduates with an advanced level of understanding in the design of real-time embedded systems for time-critical, power sensitive applications. Read more
The MSc in Electronics with Embedded Systems aims to produce postgraduates with an advanced level of understanding in the design of real-time embedded systems for time-critical, power sensitive applications. Practical skillset development is emphasized throughout the course. Students will be taught the theory, protocol and the efficient use of both analogue and digital interfaces and sensor devices together with the principles of and use of Real-Time-Operating-Systems (RTOS). A key focus of the course will be in the implementation of power aware sustainable solutions, the course will provide an in-depth discussion of the underlying power management hardware sub-systems within modern MCUs and will show and use software techniques that will exploit these to reduce power consumption.

Broader consideration of embedded system design will be examined. In particular, the design process, risk assessment, product life-cycle, software life-cycle, safety and regulation will be investigated and used. It is intended that the course will re-focus existing knowledge held by the student in software engineering and hardware engineering and deliver a set of enhanced practical skills that will enable the student to fully participate in this multi-disciplined, fast expanding and dominating engineering sector of embedded systems.

Course Structure

Each MSc course consists of three learning modules (40 credits each) plus an individual project (60 credits). Each learning module consists of a short course of lectures and initial hands-on experience. This is followed by a period of independent study supported by a series of tutorials. During this time you complete an Independent Learning Package (ILP). The ILP is matched to the learning outcomes of the module. It can be either a large project or a series of small tasks depending on the needs of each module. Credits for each module are awarded following the submission of a completed ILP and its successful defence in a viva voce examination. This form of assessment develops your communication and personal skills and is highly relevant to the workplace. Overall, each learning module comprises approximately 400 hours of study.

The project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development project. For part-time students, this can be linked to their employment. It is undertaken in two phases. In the first part, the project subject area is researched and a workplan developed. The second part involves the main research and development activity. In all, the project requires approximately 600 hours of work.

Further flexibility is provided within the structure of the courses in that you can study related topic areas by taking modules from other courses as options (pre-requisite knowledge and skills permitting).

Prior to starting your course, you are sent a Course Information and Preparation Pack which provides information to give you a flying start.

MSc Electronics Suite of Courses

The MSc in Electronics has four distinct pathways:
-Robotic and Control Systems
-Embedded Systems
-System-on-Chip Technologies
-Medical Instrumentation

The subject areas covered within the four pathways of the electronic suite of MSc courses offer students an excellent launch pad which will enable the successful graduate to enter into these ever expanding, fast growing and dominant areas. With ever increasing demands from consumers such as portability, increased battery life and greater functionality combined with reductions in cost and shrinking scales of technologies, modern electronic systems are finding ever more application areas.

A vastly expanding application base for electronic systems has led to an explosion in the use of embedded system technologies. Part of this expansion has been led by the introduction of new medical devices and robotic devices entering the main stream consumer market. Industry has also fed the increase in demand particularly within the medical electronics area with the need of more sophisticated user interfaces, demands to reduce equipment costs, demands for greater accessibility of equipment and a demand for ever greater portability of equipment.

There are plenty of opportunities for employment in the electronic systems subject area, in particular, there is a demand for engineers that can solve problems requiring a multi-disciplined approach covering skills from software engineering, control engineering, digital electronic systems engineering, analogue electronic engineering, medical physics, and mechanics amongst others. The MSc in Electronics and its specialist pathways will provide the foundations required to re-focus existing knowledge and enter this exciting world of multi-disciplined jobs.

The technical tasks undertaken in ILPs, along with the required major project, thoroughly exercise the concepts covered in the course modules and give scope for originality and industry-relevant study. Team-working activities encouraged within modules, along with the all-oral individual examination regimen employed in this Electronics MSc Suite, have proven solidly beneficial in refining the communication and employability-enhancing skills that are strongly valued by industry.

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The MSc in Electronics with Robotic and Control Systems aims to produce postgraduates with a strong practical skill base that will enable them to model, analyse, design and prototype smart robotic sub-systems. Read more
The MSc in Electronics with Robotic and Control Systems aims to produce postgraduates with a strong practical skill base that will enable them to model, analyse, design and prototype smart robotic sub-systems. Specialist knowledge and practical skillsets will be taught, extensively developed and practiced in the areas of control systems and the analysis, categorisation and design of robotic systems that facilitate movement with multiple degrees of freedom. The knowledge and skillsets taught are key enabling skillsets used to implement devices for applications such as security drones, warehouse robots, medical robots and more humanoid like robots. It is intended that the course will re-focus and enhance existing knowledge in the areas of software engineering, electronic engineering and real-time embedded systems to enable the student to participate in the fast expanding and exciting sector of industrial and consumer robotic systems.

Course structure

Each MSc course consists of three learning modules (40 credits each) plus an individual project (60 credits). Each learning module consists of a short course of lectures and initial hands-on experience. This is followed by a period of independent study supported by a series of tutorials. During this time you complete an Independent Learning Package (ILP). The ILP is matched to the learning outcomes of the module. It can be either a large project or a series of small tasks depending on the needs of each module. Credits for each module are awarded following the submission of a completed ILP and its successful defence in a viva voce examination. This form of assessment develops your communication and personal skills and is highly relevant to the workplace. Overall, each learning module comprises approximately 400 hours of study.

The project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development project. For part-time students, this can be linked to their employment. It is undertaken in two phases. In the first part, the project subject area is researched and a workplan developed. The second part involves the main research and development activity. In all, the project requires approximately 600 hours of work.

Further flexibility is provided within the structure of the courses in that you can study related topic areas by taking modules from other courses as options (pre-requisite knowledge and skills permitting).

Prior to starting your course, you are sent a Course Information and Preparation Pack which provides information to give you a flying start.

MSc Electronics Suite of Courses

The MSc in Electronics has four distinct pathways:
-Robotic and Control Systems
-Embedded Systems
-System-on-Chip Technologies
-Medical Instrumentation

The subject areas covered within the four pathways of the electronic suite of MSc courses offer students an excellent launch pad which will enable the successful graduate to enter into these ever expanding, fast growing and dominant areas. With ever increasing demands from consumers such as portability, increased battery life and greater functionality combined with reductions in cost and shrinking scales of technologies, modern electronic systems are finding ever more application areas.

A vastly expanding application base for electronic systems has led to an explosion in the use of embedded system technologies. Part of this expansion has been led by the introduction of new medical devices and robotic devices entering the main stream consumer market. Industry has also fed the increase in demand particularly within the medical electronics area with the need of more sophisticated user interfaces, demands to reduce equipment costs, demands for greater accessibility of equipment and a demand for ever greater portability of equipment.

The technical tasks undertaken in ILPs, along with the required major project, thoroughly exercise the concepts covered in the course modules and give scope for originality and industry-relevant study. Team-working activities encouraged within modules, along with the all-oral individual examination regimen employed in this Electronics MSc Suite, have proven solidly beneficial in refining the communication and employability-enhancing skills that are strongly valued by industry.

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The MSc Electronics with System-On-Chip Technologies aims to produce postgraduates with an advanced understanding of the various routes to implementing systems-on-chip (SoC) and with hands-on experience of the design of such systems using several approaches to their implementation. Read more
The MSc Electronics with System-On-Chip Technologies aims to produce postgraduates with an advanced understanding of the various routes to implementing systems-on-chip (SoC) and with hands-on experience of the design of such systems using several approaches to their implementation. The core aim of the course is to produce students who are “silicon qualified” by providing them with a complete SoC design experience by setting a framework of activities that allow the student to use industry-standard Computer-Aided-Engineering (CAE) software tools for the fast and accurate design, simulation and verification of integrated circuits.

Course structure

Each MSc course consists of three learning modules (40 credits each) plus an individual project (60 credits). Each learning module consists of a short course of lectures and initial hands-on experience. This is followed by a period of independent study supported by a series of tutorials. During this time you complete an Independent Learning Package (ILP). The ILP is matched to the learning outcomes of the module. It can be either a large project or a series of small tasks depending on the needs of each module. Credits for each module are awarded following the submission of a completed ILP and its successful defence in a viva voce examination. This form of assessment develops your communication and personal skills and is highly relevant to the workplace. Overall, each learning module comprises approximately 400 hours of study.

The project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development project. For part-time students, this can be linked to their employment. It is undertaken in two phases. In the first part, the project subject area is researched and a workplan developed. The second part involves the main research and development activity. In all, the project requires approximately 600 hours of work.
Further flexibility is provided within the structure of the courses in that you can study related topic areas by taking modules from other courses as options (pre-requisite knowledge and skills permitting).

Prior to starting your course, you are sent a Course Information and Preparation Pack which provides information to give you a flying start.

MSc Electronics Suite of Courses

The MSc in Electronics has four distinct pathways:
-Robotic and Control Systems
-Embedded Systems
-System-on-Chip Technologies
-Medical Instrumentation

The subject areas covered within the four pathways of the electronic suite of MSc courses offer students an excellent launch pad which will enable the successful graduate to enter into these ever expanding, fast growing and dominant areas. With ever increasing demands from consumers such as portability, increased battery life and greater functionality combined with reductions in cost and shrinking scales of technologies, modern electronic systems are finding ever more application areas.

A vastly expanding application base for electronic systems has led to an explosion in the use of embedded system technologies. Part of this expansion has been led by the introduction of new medical devices and robotic devices entering the main stream consumer market. Industry has also fed the increase in demand particularly within the medical electronics area with the need of more sophisticated user interfaces, demands to reduce equipment costs, demands for greater accessibility of equipment and a demand for ever greater portability of equipment.

The technical tasks undertaken in ILPs, along with the required major project, thoroughly exercise the concepts covered in the course modules and give scope for originality and industry-relevant study. Team-working activities encouraged within modules, along with the all-oral individual examination regimen employed in this Electronics MSc Suite, have proven solidly beneficial in refining the communication and employability-enhancing skills that are strongly valued by industry.

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