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Rapid growth in the global medical devices industry demands an innovative fusion of biomedical, materials sciences, manufacturing, and engineering knowledge - and the University of Auckland is responding to the challenge. Read more

Invest in your future

Rapid growth in the global medical devices industry demands an innovative fusion of biomedical, materials sciences, manufacturing, and engineering knowledge - and the University of Auckland is responding to the challenge.

This programme is aimed primarily at engineers and health professionals to provide them with the necessary broad range of knowledge in the various technologies underpinning medical devices.

Programme Structure

Taught or Research (120 points)
The programme is normally two semesters and will accommodate part-time enrolments. To best meet the needs of participants with different backgrounds, including those coming from industry, the programme is provided as both a research masters and a taught masters.

All students complete two core courses that give an overview of technology and practices related to medical devices.

Students have a choice of completing a 90-point research portfolio or a smaller 60-point research project. In both cases the research is a significant component of the study programme and will involve working with a research group or being seconded to industry for a supervised research project that provides specialisation in a particular aspect of medical device technology. For participants without a medical background, a clinical secondment will be used to strengthen the experiential component of their learning.

Participants enrolled in the 90-point research portfolio will prepare a written thesis, while participants enrolled in the 60-point project will prepare a written project report. Both are examined following the standard the University of Auckland processes.

The taught masters option provides a wide variety of courses that participants can draw upon to best address their own areas of interest. Courses are lecture-based and delivered as modules, each taught by the University’s research specialists ensuring participants meet the multidisciplinary requirements of medical devices technology.

Electives

Elective enrolments may depend on your prior study and professional experience, but ultimately, choosing the appropriate courses and topics can allow you to concentrate on and develop strengths in your energy field of choice.

Our broad list of electives include courses in:
• Marketing for Scientific and Technical Personnel
• Frontiers in Biotechnology
• Law and Intellectual Property
• Research Commercialisation
• Commercialisation Project
• Science Enterprise Research Methods
• Product Development and Regulatory Environments
• Advanced Biomedical Imaging
• Advanced Imaging Technologies
• Microelectromechanical Systems
• Biomechatronic Systems

Next generation research at the Faculty of Engineering

The Faculty of Engineering is dedicated to providing you with all the facilities, flexibility and support needed for you to develop the skills needed for the workforce. We boast research themes and programmes that provoke interdisciplinary projects, bringing together expertise from our five departments, other faculties, and industry partners and research organisations. Collaborative study is strongly encouraged – postgraduates in particular have the benefit of experiencing cohorts with diverse academic and industry backgrounds.

You will gain access to world-renowned experts who actively demonstrate the positive impacts research have on society. High-performance equipment and labs beyond industry standards are at your fingertips. Our facilities extend beyond study hours – we take pride in our involvement in student events and associations across the University, and are dedicated to providing you with academic, personal and career advice. We encourage you to take advantage of our resources, and use them to expand the possibilities of your research and career path.

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This MSc course provides engineers and physical scientists with knowledge and understanding of the medical devices used in diagnosis and treatment of patients. Read more

Why this course?

This MSc course provides engineers and physical scientists with knowledge and understanding of the medical devices used in diagnosis and treatment of patients.

The course is delivered by staff of the EPSRC-funded Centre for Doctoral Training in Medical Devices and Health Technologies (CDT), with colleagues from Engineering, the Life Sciences and Physical Sciences. There’s also input from clinical advisers from the NHS and elsewhere.

The training programme equips you with the basic knowledge and terminology in current life science subjects to allow you to explore topics in your own research project with direction from your supervisor.

You'll gain practical experience in the life science techniques and an appreciation of interdisciplinary project work.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/medicaldevicesmsc/

You’ll study

This credit-based modular degree comprises assessed instructional classes and project work.
You’ll also undertake a research project. You’ll choose from a list of relevant industrial or clinical projects, and submit a thesis.

Recent Projects

There's a range of projects topics you can choose from. Some of our more recent titles are:
- Vaccine delivery via high-throughput nanoparticle-enhanced cell imaging in microfluidic devices
- Development of an optically guided navigated orthopaedic surgical tool (OGNOST)
- Developing a means of diagnosing and assessing prosodic deficits in people with Parkinson's disease
- A plastic laser diagnostic platform for assessing the risk of cardiovascular disease

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

The first and second semesters consist of taught classes, laboratory demonstrations, practical exercises and clinical visits.

Careers

This course will enable graduates to pursue a career in the medical device or research industry.

No.1 in the UK for Medical Technology

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is ranked No. 1 in the Complete University Guide League Tables 2016 for Medical Technology.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/search/scholarships/index.jsp

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Clinical Science (Medical Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Medical physicists fill a special niche in the health industry. The role includes opportunities for laboratory work, basic and applied research, management and teaching, which offers a uniquely diverse career path. In addition there is satisfaction in contributing directly to patient treatment and care.

This three-year programme in Clinical Science (Medical Physics), hosted by the College of Medicine, builds on an existing collaboration with the NHS in providing the primary route for attaining the professional title of Clinical Scientist in the field of Medical Physics.

Key Features of MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics)

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) programme is accredited by the NHS and provides the academic component of the Scientist Training Programme for medical physics trainees, within the Modernising Scientific Careers framework defined by the UK Department of Health, and offers students the chance to specialise in either radiotherapy physics or radiation safety. This Master’s degree in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is only suitable for trainees sponsored by an NHS or an equivalent health care provider.

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) is modular in structure, supporting integration of the trainee within the workplace. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits of taught-course elements and a project that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation.

The Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc is accredited by the Department of Health.

Modules

Modules on the Clinical Science (Medical Physics) MSc typically include:

• Introduction to Clinical Science
• Medical Imaging
• Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging
• Radiation Protection
• Radiotherapy Physics
• Research Methods
• Advanced Radiotherapy
• Specialist Radiotherapy
• Advanced Radiation Safety
• Specialist Radiation Safety

Careers

The MSc in Clinical Science (Medical Physics) provides the main route for the professional qualification of Clinical Scientist in Medical Physics.

Additionally, the need for specific expertise in the use of medical radiation is enshrined in law. The Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations (IRMER) 2000 defines the role of Medical Physics Expert, required within any clinical context where radiation is being administered, either a diagnostic or therapeutic.

Links with industry

The close working relationship between Swansea University and the NHS in Wales, through the All-Wales Training Consortium for Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, provides the ideal circumstances for collaborative teaching and research. The Consortium is recognised by the Welsh Government. A significant proportion of the teaching is delivered by NHS Clinical Scientists and other medical staff.

Facilities

The close proximity of Swansea University to Singleton Hospital, belonging to one of the largest health providers in Wales, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University (ABMU) health board, as well as the Velindre NHS Trust, a strongly academic cancer treatment centre, provide access to modern equipment, and the highest quality teaching and research.

The Institute of Life Science (ILS) Clinical Imaging Suite has recently been completed and overlaps the University and Singleton Hospital campuses. It features adjoined 3T MRI and high-resolution CT imaging. ILS has clinical research of social importance as a focus, through links with NHS and industrial partners.

Research

Swansea University offers a vibrant environment in medically-oriented research. The Colleges of Medicine has strong research links with the NHS, spearheaded by several recent multimillion pound developments, including the Institute of Life Science (ILS) and the Centre for NanoHealth (CNH).

The University provides high-quality support for MSc student research projects. Students in turn make valuable progress in their project area, which has led to publications in the international literature or has instigated further research, including the continuation of research at the doctoral level.
The College of Medicine provides an important focus in clinical research and we have the experience of interacting with medical academics and industry in placing students in a wide variety of research projects.

Medical academics have instigated projects examining and developing bioeffect planning tools for intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy and devices for improving safety in radiotherapy. Industry partners have utilised students in the evaluation of the safety of ventricular-assist devices, intense-pulsed-light epilators and in the development of novel MRI spectroscopic methods. The student join teams that are solving research problems at the cutting-edge of medical science.

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This MSc programme combines knowledge of the engineering and medical sciences with advances in technology and practice to generate applications and solutions to clinically relevant problems. Read more

Why this course?

This MSc programme combines knowledge of the engineering and medical sciences with advances in technology and practice to generate applications and solutions to clinically relevant problems.

It affords a Masters level degree in this clinical area, while considering globally the effects of disability within a population and society’s approaches globally.

This is one of the few programmes globally that offers a specific degree in prosthetics and orthotics. The National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics (NCPO) has an international reputation for quality education within this field. The staff of the NCPO is involved in research and clinical practice both nationally and internationally.

The main aim of the course is to produce postgraduates capable of developing careers in allied health professionals and biomedical engineering (research, industrial and NHS).

We require candidates first degree to be in Prosthetics & Orthotics. Our learning environment brings together ideas and concepts from science, medicine and engineering to enable the development of relevant clinical and industrial research.

What you'll study

Taught classes, laboratory demonstrations, practical exercises and clinical visits take place during semesters 1 and 2. Diploma students then complete a project dissertation and MSc students complete a research or development project reported by a thesis.

Work placement

Visits to local clinical centres and lectures from industrialists and visiting experts from the UK and overseas are an integral part of our courses.

You'll also have the opportunity to meet our many industrial and clinical collaborators to help advise and further your career.

Major projects

You'll undertake a clinically relevant project in the rehabilitation area of prosthetics and/or orthotics.

Facilities

The Department of Biomedical Engineering consists of the Bioengineering Unit and the National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics – two complementary and key areas of health technology teaching and research within the University.

The National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics was established in 1972, growing out of the Bioengineering Unit at the University of Strathclyde, which was established more than 50 years ago, both being internationally-recognised centres of excellence for education and research at the interface of engineering and the medical science, with particular emphasis on clinically-related teaching and research. The new department of Biomedical Engineering in 2012 was formed through the merger of these two esteemed units.

Research areas include:

Rehabilitation Engineering
Medical Devices
Diagnostic Technologies: the Foot in Diabetes

The department also hosts the Centre for Doctoral Training in Medical Devices and Health Technologies, the Strathclyde Institute of Medical Devices and the Centre for Excellence in Rehabilitation Research.

In addition the department is a major partner in the Glasgow Research Partnership in Engineering; Health Technologies Knowledge Transfer Network; and Glasgow Health Technology Cooperative.

Guest lectures

This programme will include internationally recognised lecturers from the World Health Organisation and large NGOs globally which may include Handicap International and the international Committee for the Red Cross.

Fees and funding

Scotland/EU/Rest of UK: Any UK practicing Orthotist wishing to undertake this Masters programme will be eligible to apply for funding from the Orthotic Education and Training Trust OETT, and would be considered for funding up to a maximum or 67%.

International: £19,100

International Excellence Awards: Biomedical Engineering is pleased to offer these prestigious competitive scholarships to four full-time international applicants to the MSc Biomedical Engineering. Recipients will be awarded up to £4,000 towards their fees. The recipients will be notified before the beginning of term.

The China-Scotland Friendship Award: This award of £4,000 towards tuition fees is offered to a Chinese applicant of outstanding ability. The recipient will be notified before the beginning of term.

Biomedical Engineering Celebration Awards for India: These awards of £6,000 towards tuition fees are open to well-qualified applicants from India joining the one-year full-time MSc Biomedical Engineering. The final submission date for applications is 29 May 2015. Applicants will be advised of the outcome in June 2015.

Biomedical Engineering Malaysia Award: This competitive award of £4,000 towards tuition fees is offered each year to one very well-qualified Malaysian applicant to the MSc Biomedical Engineering. The recipient will be notified before the beginning of term.

Home applicants: Home applicants may apply for a Postgraduate Student Awards Agency for Scotland (PSAS) loan which covers the cost of tuition fees on specific eligible courses.

Scottish students: Students living in Scotland can find out more about funding from the Student Awards Agency Scotland.

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This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation. Read more
This programme is the first taught Masters programme in medical visualisation in the UK. Offered jointly by the University of Glasgow and the Glasgow School of Art, it combines actual cadaveric dissection with 3D digital reconstruction, interaction and visualisation.

Why this programme

◾You will examine human anatomy and reconstruct it in a real-time 3D environment for use in education, simulation, and training.
◾You will have access to the largest stereo 3D lab in Europe, and its state-of-the-art facilities such as laser scanner (for 3D data acquisition), stereo 3D projection, full body motion capture system, haptic devices and ambisonic sound.
◾You will also have access to the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow, one of the largest in Europe.
◾The programme has excellent industry connections through research and commercial projects and there are possible internship opportunities. You will benefit from guest lectures by practitioners, researchers and experts from industry.
◾This programme is accredited by the Institute of Medical Illustrators.

Programme structure

You will split your time between the Glasgow School of Art (Digital Design Studio) and the University of Glasgow (Laboratory of Human Anatomy). The programme is structured into three stages.

Stage one: digital technologies applied to medical visualisation (delivered by the Digital Design Studio at the Glasgow School of Art)

Core courses
◾3D modelling and animation
◾Applications in medical visualisation
◾Volumetric and 3D surface visualisation
◾Core research skills for postgraduates.

Stage two: human anatomy (delivered by the Laboratory of Human Anatomy at the University of Glasgow).

Core courses
◾Introduction to anatomy
◾Structure and function of the human body
◾Cadaveric dissection techniques.

In stage three you will complete a self-directed final project, supported throughout with individual supervision.

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist within the commercial healthcare device manufacturer, the public and private healthcare sectors, as well as in academic medical visualisation research. Students with medical, biomedical, anatomy, or health professional backgrounds will be able to gain 3D visualisation skills that will enhance their portfolio of abilities; students with computer science or 3D graphics background will be involved in the design and development of healthcare related products through digital technology, eg diagnostic and clinical applications, creating content involving medical visualisation, simulation, cardiac pacemakers, and biomechanically related products for implantation, such as knee, hip and shoulder joint replacements.

Here are some examples of roles and companies for our graduates:
◾Interns, Clinical Assistants and Clinical Researchers at Toshiba Medical Visualisation Systems
◾Research Prosector (GU)
◾3D printing industry
◾Demonstrators in Anatomy
◾PhD studies - medical history, medical visualisation
◾Medical School
◾Dental School
◾Digital Designer at Costello Medical
◾Lead Designer at Open Bionics
◾Founder of Axial Medical Printing Ltd
◾Digital Technician at University of Leeds
◾Digital Project Intern at RCPSG
◾Researcher and Factual Specialist at BBC
◾Graduate Teaching Assistants
◾Freelance Medical Illustration
◾Numerous successful placements on PhD programmes (medical visualisation, anatomy, anatomy education, medical humanities)
◾MBChB, BDS courses

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The MSc in Biomedical Engineering at Keele is a multidisciplinary course that will prepare you for an exciting career across a wide range of areas of engineering in medicine, be that in academic or industrial research, the medical devices sector or in the clinical arena. Read more

Overview

The MSc in Biomedical Engineering at Keele is a multidisciplinary course that will prepare you for an exciting career across a wide range of areas of engineering in medicine, be that in academic or industrial research, the medical devices sector or in the clinical arena. The course is professionally accredited and suitable for people with both engineering and life science backgrounds, including medicine and subjects allied to medicine.

Course Director: Dr Ed Chadwick ()

Studying Biomedical Engineering at Keele

The course will cover the fundamentals of engineering in medicine, introduce you to the latest developments in medical technology, and expose you to the challenges of working with patients through clinical visits. Learning and teaching methods include lectures and demonstrations from medical and engineering specialists, practical classes using state-of-the-art facilities and seminars with leading national and international researchers.

Graduate destinations for our students could include: delivering non-clinical services and technology management in a hospital; designing, developing and manufacturing medical devices in the private sector; working for a governmental regulatory agency for healthcare services and products; undertaking further postgraduate study and research (PhD); pursuing a university-based, academic research career; or providing technical consultancy for marketing departments.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomed/

Course Accreditation by Professional Body

The course is accredited by the Institute for Physics and Engineering in Medicine, whose aims are to ensure that graduates of accredited programmes are equipped with the knowledge and skills for the biomedical engineering workplace, be that in industry, healthcare or academic environments. Accreditation gives you confidence that the course meets strict suitability and quality criteria for providing Masters-level education in this field.‌‌‌

About the department

Now delivered through the Keele Medical School and the Research Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, the course dates as far back as 1999, when it was established in partnership with Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics at the University Hospital. Most teaching now takes place in the Guy Hilton Research Centre, a dedicated research facility located on the hospital campus. The medical school is one of the top-ranked in the UK, and the research institute has an international reputation for world-leading research.

The centre was opened in 2006 and offers state-of-the-art equipment for translational research including newly-developed diagnostic instruments, advanced imaging modalities and additive manufacturing facilities. Its location adjacent to the university hospital ensures that students experience real-world patient care and the role that technology plays in that. Students also have access to advanced equipment for physiological measurement, motion analysis and functional assessment in other hospital and campus-based laboratories. The School embraces specialists working in UHNM and RJAH Orthopaedic Hospital Oswestry, covering key medical and surgical subspecialties.

The course runs alongside its sister course, the MSc in Cell and Tissue Engineering, and an EPSRC and MRC-funded Centre for Doctoral Training, ensuring a stimulating academic environment for students and many opportunities for engaging with further study and research.

Course Aims

The aim of the course is to provide multidisciplinary Masters level postgraduate training in Biomedical Engineering to prepare students for future employment in healthcare, industrial and academic environments. This involves building on existing undergraduate knowledge in basic science or engineering and applying it to core principles and current issues in medicine and healthcare.

Specifically, the objectives of the course are to:
- provide postgraduate-level education leading to professional careers in biomedical engineering in industry, academia and a wide range of healthcare establishments such as medical organisations, medical research institutions and hospitals;

- provide an opportunity for in-depth research into specialist and novel areas of biomedical and clinical engineering;

- expose students to practical work in a hospital environment with hands-on knowledge of patient care involving technological developments at the forefront of the field;

- introduce students to exciting new fields such as regenerative medicine and novel technologies for physiological monitoring and diagnostics.

Teaching and Learning Methods

The course is taught through subject-centred lectures and seminars, supported by tutorials and practical exercises. Collaborative learning and student-centred learning are also adopted giving widespread opportunity for group work and individual assignments. Students are required to conduct extensive independent study, and this is supported by full access to two libraries, online journal access and a suite of dedicated computers for exclusive use by MSc students on the course. In addition, students are supported by the guidance of a personal tutor within the department, as well as having access to university-wide support services. This includes English language support where appropriate.

Assessment

Modules will be assessed by a mixture of assessment methods, including lab reports, essays, and presentations, and final examination. This ensures the development of a range of transferrable employability skills such as time management and planning, written and verbal communication and numeracy as well as technical and subject-specific knowledge. The project dissertation forms a major component of the student’s assessed work.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this postgraduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Signal processing is recognised as a core technology in rapidly growing areas such as sensor networks, medical devices and renewable energy, audio, image and video systems. Read more

Why this course?

Signal processing is recognised as a core technology in rapidly growing areas such as sensor networks, medical devices and renewable energy, audio, image and video systems. It’s the underpinning technology of all communication including the internet, wireless and satellite.

We’ve been carrying out research and development in signal processing for more than 30 years. Many of today’s industry leaders are alumni of the University and this industry awareness and experience underpins this specialised degree.

This MSc aims to address the growing skills shortage in industry of engineers who have an understanding of the complete signal processing design cycle. It’s also essential preparation if you’re considering advanced research in applied signal processing.

See the website https://www.strath.ac.uk/courses/postgraduatetaught/signalprocessing/

What you’ll study

There are two semesters of compulsory and optional classes, followed by a three-month practical research project in a specialist area. There’s the opportunity to carry this out through the department's competitive MSc industrial internships.

The internships are offered in collaboration with selected department industry partners eg ScottishPower, SmarterGridSolutions, SSE. You'll address real-world engineering challenges facing the partner, with site visits, access and provision of relevant technical data and/or facilities provided, along with an industry mentor and academic supervisor.

Facilities

You'll have exclusive access to our extensive computing network and purpose built teaching spaces such as our Hyperspectral Imaging Centre and the DG Smith Radio Frequency laboratory, equipped with the latest technologies.

Accreditation

The course is fully accredited by the professional body, the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). This means that you'll meet the educational requirements to become a Chartered Engineer – a must for your future engineering career.

Pre-Masters preparation course

The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options.

To find out more about the courses and opportunities on offer visit isc.strath.ac.uk or call today on +44 (0) 1273 339333 and discuss your education future. You can also complete the online application form. To ask a question please fill in the enquiry form and talk to one of our multi-lingual Student Enrolment Advisers today.

Learning & teaching

We use a blend of teaching and learning methods including interactive lectures, problem-solving tutorials and practical project-based laboratories. Our technical and experimental officers are available to support and guide you on individual subject material.

Each module comprises approximately five hours of direct teaching per week. To enhance your understanding of the technical and theoretical topics covered in these, you're expected to undertake a further five to six hours of self-study, using our web-based virtual learning environment (MyPlace), research journals and library facilities.

The teaching and learning methods used ensure you'll develop not only technical engineering expertise but also communications, project management and leadership skills.

- Industry engagement
Interaction with industry is provided through our internships, teaching seminars and networking events. The department delivers monthly seminars to support students’ learning and career development. Xilinx, Texas Instruments, MathWorks, and Agilent are just a few examples of the industry partners you can engage with during your course.

Assessment

A variety of assessment techniques are used throughout the course. You'll complete at least six modules. Each module has a combination of written assignments, individual and group reports, oral presentations, practical lab work and, where appropriate, an end-of-term exam.

Assessment of the summer research project/internship consists of four elements, with individual criteria:
1. Interim report (10%, 1,500 to 3,000 words) – the purpose of this report is to provide a mechanism for supervisors to provide valuable feedback on the project’s objectives and direction.

2. Poster Presentation (15%) – a vital skill of an engineer is the ability to describe their work to others and respond to requests for information. The poster presentation is designed to give you an opportunity to practise that.

3. Final report (55%) – this assesses the communication of project objectives and context, accuracy and relevant of background material, description of practical work and results, depth and soundness of discussion and conclusions, level of engineering achievement and the quality of the report’s presentation.

4. Conduct (20%) - independent study, project and time management are key features of university learning. The level of your initiative & independent thinking and technical understanding are assessed through project meetings with your supervisor and your written logbooks.

Careers

With Signal Processing being a core technology in high-growth areas such as sensor networks, medical devices, renewable energy and communications, this course enables you to capitalise on job opportunities across all of these sectors, as well as in electronics design, IT, banking, and oil and gas.

Almost all of our graduates secure jobs by the time they have completed their course. They've taken up well-paid professional and technical occupations with multinationals such as Google, Microsoft, Texas Instruments, Motorola Mobility, Intel, as well as Wolfson Microelectronics, Agilent, Freescale and Thales in the vibrant national UK arena.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.strath.ac.uk/engineering/electronicelectricalengineering/ourscholarships/.

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Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course. This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. Read more
Make future breakthroughs within healthcare with the MSc Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course.

Who is it for?

This course is for inquisitive students who want to design, develop, apply or even manage the use of cutting-edge methods and devices that will revolutionise healthcare. It is open to science and engineering graduates and those working within hospitals or related industry who want to work in healthcare organisations, in the medical devices industry, or in biomedical engineering research.

The course will suit recent graduates and/or clinical engineers with a technical background or those working in healthcare who want to move into a management position.

Objectives

With several medical conditions requiring extensive and continuous monitoring and early and accurate diagnosis becoming increasingly desirable, technology for biomedical applications is rapidly becoming one of the key ingredients of today and tomorrow’s medical care.

From miniaturised home diagnostic instruments to therapeutic devices and to large scale hospital imaging and monitoring systems, healthcare is becoming increasingly dependent on technology. This course meets the growing need for biomedical and clinical engineers across the world by focusing on the design of medical devices from conception to application.

One of the few accredited courses of its kind in London, the programme concentrates on the use of biomedical-driven engineering design and technology in healthcare settings so you can approach this multidisciplinary topic from the biological and medical perspective; the technological design and development perspective; and from the perspective of managing the organisation and maintenance of large scale equipment and IT systems in a hospital.

This MSc in Biomedical Engineering with Healthcare Technology Management course has been created in consultation and close collaboration with clinicians, biomedical engineering researchers and medical technology industrial partners. The programme fosters close links with the NHS and internationally-renowned hospitals including St. Bartholomew's (Barts) and the Royal London Hospital and Great Ormond street so that you can gain a comprehensive insight into the applied use and the management of medical technology and apply your knowledge in real-world clinical settings.

Placements

In the last few years there have been some limited opportunities for our top students to carry out their projects through placements within hospital-based healthcare technology groups or specialist London-based biomedical technology companies. Placement-based projects are also offered to selected students in City’s leading Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE). As we continue our cutting-edge research and industrial and clinical collaborations, you will also have this opportunity.

Academic facilities

As a student on this course you will have the opportunity to work with cutting-edge test and measurement instrumentation – oscilloscopes, function generators, analysers – as well as specialist signal generators and analysers. The equipment is predominantly provided by the world-leading test and measurement equipment manufacturer Keysight, who have partnered with City to provide branding to our electronics laboratories. You also have access to brand new teaching labs and a dedicated postgraduate teaching lab. And as part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

You will be taught through face-to-face lectures in small groups, where there is a lot of interaction and feedback. Laboratory sessions run alongside the lectures, giving you the opportunity to develop your problem-solving and design skills. You also learn software skills in certain modules, which are taught inside computer labs. We also arrange hospital visits so you gain hands-on experience of different clinical environments.

We arrange tutorials for setting coursework, highlight important subject areas, conduct practical demonstrations, and offer support with revision. You are assessed by written examinations at the end of each term, and coursework assignments, which are set at various times throughout the term.

You also work towards an individual project, which is assessed in the form of a written thesis and an oral examination at the end of the summer. The project can be based on any area of biomedical engineering, telemedicine or technology management and will be supervised by an academic or clinical scientist with expertise in the subject area. Many projects are based in hospital clinical engineering departments, or if you are a part-time student, you can base the project on your own workplace. You will have regular contact with the supervisor to make sure the project progresses satisfactorily. Some of the programme’s current students are working on a project focusing on devices that use brain signals to move external objects such as a remote control car and a prosthetic arm.

Some of the previous projects students have worked on include:
-A cursor controller based on electrooculography (EOG)
-Modelling a closed-loop automated anaesthesia system
-Design of a movement artefact-resistant wearable heart rate/activity monitor
-Review of progress towards a fully autonomous artificial mechanical heart
-Design of smartphone-based healthcare diagnostic devices and sensors.

If you successfully complete eight modules and the dissertation you will be awarded 180 credits and a Masters level qualification. Alternatively, if you do not complete the dissertation but have successfully completed eight modules, you will be awarded 120 credits and a postgraduate diploma. Completing four modules (60 credits) will lead to a postgraduate certificate.

Modules

Along with the 60 credit dissertation eight core modules cover diverse subject areas including biomedical electronics and instrumentation, technology infrastructure management, as well as the latest advances in medical imaging and patient monitoring.

The course includes a special module which gives you an introduction to anatomy, physiology and pathology designed for non-clinical science graduates.

The most innovative areas of biomedical and clinical engineering are covered and the content draws from our research expertise in biomedical sensors, bio-optics, medical imaging, signal processing and modelling. You will learn from academic lecturers as well as clinical scientists drawn from our collaborating institutions and departments, which include:
-Charing Cross Hospital, London
-The Royal London Hospital
-St Bartholomew's Hospital, London
-Basildon Hospital
-Department of Radiography, School of Community and Health Sciences, City, University of London

Modules
-Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology (15 credits)
-Physiological Measurement (15 credits)
-Biomedical Instrumentation (15 credits)
-Medical Electronics (15 credits)
-Cardiovascular Diagnostics and Therapy (15 credits)
-Medical Imaging Modalities (15 credits)
-Clinical Engineering Practice (15 credits)
-Healthcare Technology Management (15 credits)

Career prospects

This exciting MSc programme offers a well-rounded background and specialised knowledge for those seeking a professional career as biomedical engineers in medical technology companies or research groups but is also uniquely placed for offering skills to clinical engineers in the NHS and international healthcare organisations.

Alumnus Alex Serdaris is now working as field clinical engineer for E&E Medical and alumna Despoina Sklia is working as a technical support specialist at Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. Other Alumni are carrying out research in City’s Research Centre for Biomedical Engineering (RCBE).

Applicants may wish to apply for vacancies in the NHS, private sector or international healthcare organisations. Students are encouraged to become members of the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) where they will be put in touch with the Clinical Engineering community and any opportunities that arise around the UK during their studies. Application to the Clinical Scientist training programme is encouraged and fully supported.

The Careers, Student Development & Outreach team provides a professional, high quality careers and information service for students and recent graduates of City, University of London, in collaboration with employers and other institutional academic and service departments. The course also prepares graduates who plan to work in biomedical engineering research and work within an academic setting.

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The MSc in Medical and Healthcare Devices is a unique and flexible course for graduates, scientists and technologists. Read more
The MSc in Medical and Healthcare Devices is a unique and flexible course for graduates, scientists and technologists. Study on the course will build an excellent range of knowledge and expertise if you are looking to begin a career in the sector or it will enhance and support your personal development if you are already working in this field.

As a student on the course you will develop an understanding of the properties of advanced materials and how they affect the design of medical and healthcare devices. You will study intelligent bioengineering systems and consider how smart materials, micro-electronics and mechanical and information technology knowledge are used in the development of these devices.

These studies will be supported by considering the principles that underpin the development and application of advanced materials and also regulations, procedures and principles that are applied to this sector. In addition, you will study the use of healthcare and medical devices in the specific context of human anatomy, physiology, illness, disease and rehabilitation.

The MSc Medical and Healthcare Devices course is interdisciplinary and will be delivered at the University of Bolton’s Institute for Materials Research and Innovation (IMRI) in collaboration with the Schools of Business & Creative Technologies (BCT) and Health & Social Sciences (HSS).

IMRI is a multidisciplinary centre in which research and innovation is carried out in collaboration with industry and other academic institutions. It is the leader in the UK – and is known internationally – for its research and applications development in the field of applied materials science and engineering.

Developments carried out within IMRI include new, designer and novel smart and multifunctional materials in fibres, films, foams and particles, at nano and micro levels, as well as associated processing technologies that have the potential for development to compete in the global marketplace.

Throughout your studies you will have opportunities to interact and collaborate with medical and healthcare device companies, UK medical and dental schools and the NHS.

Special features

Teaching for each module is delivered as a short course that will last no more than two weeks. The rest of your study is very flexible and may be carried out away from the University.

Class sizes are small which means you will be able to work closely with your fellow students and your tutor.

Your subject of study and your personal project means you have the opportunity to work in an area that is of personal interest or that is closely related to your role in your place of work.

You will study 6 modules:

Introduction to Medical Devices and Product Regulations;
Human Physiology and Biotechnology;
Biomedical Devices and Product Development;
Intelligent Bioengineering Systems;
Research Methods (including an introduction to innovation and intellectual property management);
Research Project.


For more information please visit http://www.bolton.ac.uk/postgrad

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This programme is delivered by faculty based in LSE Health, one of the Department of Social Policy’s associated research centres and one of the world’s most highly rated research and teaching centres. Read more

About the MSc programme

This programme is delivered by faculty based in LSE Health, one of the Department of Social Policy’s associated research centres and one of the world’s most highly rated research and teaching centres. Offered in collaboration with the European Society of Cardiology, it aims to provide practicing healthcare professionals with a set of tailored courses in health economics, outcomes research and health care management in cardiovascular sciences.

It will prepare you to explore new research, advisory, consulting, and leadership roles through unique modules tailored for practicing healthcare professionals. In addition to gaining a theoretical and conceptual understanding of health economics and outcomes research, you will acquire new skills to accelerate or refocus your career. Upon graduation, it will allow you to expand your employment opportunities in related sectors including the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries, consultancies, government, and non-governmental organisations.

Graduate destinations

This MSc will prepare students to explore new advisory, management, and leadership roles within the health care field. Beyond their current work settings, students will be able to expand their employment opportunities in related sectors including the pharmaceutical and medical devices industries, consultancies, government, and non-governmental organisations. Upon graduation, you can expect to take on more responsibility or shift your career focus in the cardiovascular science field. .

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Humber’s Regulatory Affairs graduate certificate program focuses on developing the concepts, skills and techniques required to work in regulatory affairs in the pharmaceutical, medical device or biotechnology industries. Read more
Humber’s Regulatory Affairs graduate certificate program focuses on developing the concepts, skills and techniques required to work in regulatory affairs in the pharmaceutical, medical device or biotechnology industries. You will gain knowledge of the regulatory system, legislation, procedures and practices which relate to the development, manufacture, quality assurance and marketing of health-related products.

The importance of internationally harmonized regulations and future trends in the industry will be examined by analyzing relevant international and Canadian legislation and regulations. You will study a wide range of regulations and standards including good manufacturing practices, good laboratory practices, good clinical practices, good documentation practices, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), the Canadian Food and Drugs Act, the Environmental Protection Act, principles of regulatory compliance and inspections, drug establishment licensing, and related standards and guidelines. Teamwork and communication skills are emphasized and you will acquire information technology skills that assist communication and data management specific to regulatory affairs.

You will become familiar with the steps necessary for product submission; how to assemble documents and statistical evidence; the complexity of product registration, negotiation and follow-up, and how these are linked to the federal government and provincial formularies.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:
• Describe the government processes within the Canadian health care system and provincial formularies.
• Explain the roles and responsibilities of a regulatory professional in industry.
• Explain the concepts in pharmacoeconomics as they relate to the socioeconomic aspects of health care and health care products.
• Explain Canadian and international health care legislation and regulations including (as examples) Good Manufacturing Practices, Good Laboratory Practices, Good Clinical Practices, Good Documentation Practices, International Standards Organization (ISO), Food and Drug Act Regulations, the Environmental Protection Act, Regulatory compliance/inspection, Drug Establishment Licensing and related standards and guidelines.
• Describe international harmonization of regulations and the impact on manufacturing and the submission process.
• Explain the Product Development Process.
• Outline the Quality Control Process.
• Demonstrate information technology skills in the use of software applicable to regulatory affairs submissions, in document and database management systems, in data correction techniques and in the use of the Internet for research.
• Define drug (prescription and non-prescription)/medical device/biologic submission process requirements.
• Prepare a drug/medical device/biologic submission to the Therapeutic Products Program (TPP) including supplemental documentation.
• Demonstrate the problem solving process as it relates to pharmacovigilance and post-marketing surveillance.
• Demonstrate effective interviewing and negotiating skills in managing a clinical study.

Modules

Semester 1
• REGA 5020: Health Care Legislation, Regulation and Guidelines
• REGA 5021: Product Development-Premarket
• REGA 5022: Product Development-CMC
• REGA 5023: Medical Products Safety
• REGA 5024: Communication
• REGA 5025: Pathophysiology and Pharmacology

Semester 2
• REGA 5030: Management of Regulatory Submissions
• REGA 5031: Management of Global Regulatory Submission
• REGA 5033: Regulation of Food Products and Agrichemicals
• REGA 5034: Medical Devices
• REGA 5035: Provincial Formularies and Reimbursement Policy
• REGA 5036: Emerging Biotechnology

Semester 3
• REGA 5040: Internship
• REGA 5041: Integative Seminar

Work Placement

Following two academic course-based semesters, students complete a three-month placement that provides opportunities to apply and integrate theoretical knowledge and skills into real-world work settings. Most placements are in the following sectors: pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical device organizations, government agencies or food industries.

Your Career

Our graduates work in a spectrum of fields such as pharmaceutics, biotechnology, medical devices, natural health product industries or in government.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

Examples of other topics include magnetic resonance imaging and the use of lasers in medicine.

You will learn the theoretical foundations underpinning modern imaging and treatment modalities, and will gain a set of experimental skills essential in a modern medical physicist’s job.

These skills are gained through experimental sessions in the physics department and practical experiences at collaborating hospitals using state-of-the-art clinical facilities.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement C
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Skills (Euromasters)
-Outreach and Public Engagement
-Euromaster Dissertation Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

In the second year of the programme the outcomes are linked closely to a unique 8-month research project (two months preparation and research skills development, 5 months research, and 1 month reporting), students will apply their acquired research skills to an individual research project in a Research Group.

During the first two months of year two of the programme students will further extend their self-confidence in their practical, analytical and programming abilities; their ability to communicate; realise that they can take on responsibility for a task in the Research Group and see it through.

An important element is the assignment of responsibility for a substantial research project which is aimed to be of a standard suitable for publication in an appropriate professional journal.

It is expected that the student will approach the project in the manner of a new Research Student, e.g. be prepared to work beyond the normal working day on the project, input ideas, demonstrate initiative and seek out relevant information.

Thereby the students will acquire proficiency in research skills, including (but not limited to) careful planning, time scheduling, communication with colleagues and at workshops, keeping a detailed notebook, designing and testing equipment, taking and testing data and analysis.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

During the Research Project as a whole it is expected that the students will further develop communication skills through participation in group meetings, preparation of in-house reports, giving oral presentations and show initiative in acquiring any necessary new skills.

The oral presentation at the end of the Research Project is a chance to show their oral presentation skills and ability to think independently.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development.

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey. Read more
Our Medical Physics MSc programme is well-established and internationally renowned. We are accredited by IPEM (Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine) and we have trained some 1,000 medical physicists, so you can look forward to high-quality teaching during your time at Surrey.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

The syllabus for the MSc in Medical Physics is designed to provide the knowledge, skills and experience required for a modern graduate medical physicist, placing more emphasis than many other courses on topics beyond ionising radiation (X-rays and radiotherapy).

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over two academic years. It consists of ten taught modules and a dissertation project. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Therapy Physics
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Extended Group Project
-Research Project

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in Physics that is fully compatible with the spirit and the letter of the Bologna Accord.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following areas:
-Concepts and theories: Students will be able to demonstrate a systematic understanding of the concepts, theories and ideas of a specialized field in physics in Radiation Physics through the taught elements of one of the component MSc programmes MSc in Medical Physics.
-Instrumentation and materials: Students will understand the operation, function and performance of the key radiation detection devices and technologies or principles of the physics relevant to applied radiation physics, in particular medical applications.
-Methods and best practices: Students will become fully acquainted with the scientific methods and best practices of physics and exposed to a specialized field described in the handbook documents of the validated MSc in Medical Physics.

During their 60-credit Research Project students will gain further practical, analytical or programming abilities through working on a more extended investigation. This may be an experiment- or modelling-based project, for which the student will be encouraged to propose and set in place original approaches.

The dissertation required at the end of the Research Project has the objective of encouraging students to write clearly and express their understanding of the work, thereby developing the required skills of scientific writing.

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context.
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course.
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication.
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection.
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others.

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of Medical Physics in an academic and professional context, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to research projects in Medical Physics
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application to Medical Physics in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions (students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions or with published data; they should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context)
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medical and Health Care Studies at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Medical and Health Care Studies at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The research and innovation arm of Swansea University’s Medical School is the Institute of Life Science (ILS). The vision for ILS is to advance medical science through interdisciplinary research and innovation to improve the health wealth and well-being of the people of Wales and beyond.

The Institute of Life Science

- is a unique example of successful collaboration between the NHS, academia and industry in the life science and health sector.
- enjoys close links with the Colleges of Engineering and Science especially through the Centre for NanoHealth.
- is Wales’ premier purpose-built medical research facility.
- is a collaboration between Swansea University and the Welsh Government, together with Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, and industry and business partners.

Our research within Medical and Healthcare Studies focuses around four themes:

Biomarkers and Genes
Devices, Microbes and Immunity
Patient and Population Health
Informatics

Thanks to the interdisciplinary ethos of the Institute of Life Science, researchers dedicated to four theme areas work together seamlessly on complex medical problems that have both biological and social impacts. Candidates for the Medical and Health Care Studies programme are asked to nominate their preferred research area.

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The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases. Read more

Master's specialisation in Medical Epigenomics

The only Master’s specialisation in the Netherlands covering the function of our epigenome, a key factor in regulating gene expression and in a wide range of diseases.
Our skin cells, liver cells and blood cells all contain the same genetic information. Yet these are different types of cells, each performing their own specific tasks. How is this possible? The explanation lies in the epigenome: a heritable, cell-type specific set of chromosomal modifications, which regulates gene expression. Radboud University is specialised in studying the epigenome and is the only university in the Netherlands to offer a Master’s programme in this field of research.

Health and disease

The epigenome consists of small and reversible chemical modifications of the DNA or histone proteins, such as methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. It changes the spatial structure of DNA, resulting in gene activation or repression. These processes are crucial for our health and also play a role in many diseases, like autoimmune diseases, cancer and neurological disorders. As opposed to modifications of the genome sequence itself, epigenetic modifications are reversible. You can therefore imagine the great potential of drugs that target epigenetic enzymes, so-called epi-drugs.

Big data

In this specialisation, you’ll look at a cell as one big and complex system. You’ll study epigenetic mechanisms during development and disease from different angles. This includes studying DNA and RNA by next-generation sequencing (epigenomics) and analysing proteins by mass spectrometry (proteomics). In addition, you‘ll be trained to design computational strategies that allow the integration of these multifaceted, high-throughput data sets into one system.

Why study Medical Epigenomics at Radboud University?

- Radboud University combines various state-of-the-art technologies – such as quantitative mass spectrometry and next-generation DNA sequencing – with downstream bioinformatics analyses in one department. This is unique in Europe.
- This programme allows you to work with researchers from the Radboud Institute for Molecular Life sciences (RIMLS), one of the leading multidisciplinary research institutes within this field of study worldwide.
- We have close contacts with high-profile medically oriented groups on the Radboud campus and with international institutes (EMBL, Max-Planck, Marie Curie, Cambridge, US-based labs, etc). As a Master’s student, you can choose to perform an internship in one of these related departments.
- Radboud University coordinates BLUEPRINT, a 30 million Euro European project focusing on the epigenomics of leukaemia. Master’s students have the opportunity to participate in this project.

Career prospects

As a Master’s student of Medical Epigenomics you’re trained in using state-of-the art technology in combination with biological software tools to study complete networks in cells in an unbiased manner. For example, you’ll know how to study the effects of drugs in the human body.
When you enter the job market, you’ll have:
- A thorough background of epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease, which is highly relevant in strongly rising field of epi-drug development
- Extensive and partly hands-on experience in state-of-the-art ‘omics’ technologies: next-generation sequencing, quantitative mass spectrometry and single cell technologies;
- Extensive expertise in designing, executing and interpreting scientific experiments in data-driven research;
- The computational skills needed to analyse large ‘omics’ datasets.

With this background, you can become a researcher at a:
- University or research institute;
- Pharmaceutical company, such as Synthon or Johnson & Johnson;
- Food company, like Danone or Unilever;
- Start-up company making use of -omics technology.

Apart from research into genomics and epigenomics, you could also work on topics such as miniaturising workflows, improving experimental devices, the interface between biology and informatics, medicine from a systems approach.

Or you can become a:
- Biological or medical consultant;
- Biology teacher;
- Policy coordinator, regarding genetic or medical issues;
- Patent attorney;
- Clinical research associate;

PhD positions at Radboud University

Each year, the Molecular Biology department (Prof. Henk Stunnenberg, Prof. Michiel Vermeulen) and the Molecular Developmental Biology department (Prof. Gert-Jan Veenstra) at the RIMLS offer between five and ten PhD positions. Of course, many graduates also apply for a PhD position at related departments in the Netherlands, or abroad.

Our approach to this field

- Systems biology
In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation you won’t zoom in on only one particular gene, protein or signalling pathway. Instead, you’ll regard the cell as one complete system. This comprehensive view allows you to, for example, model the impact of one particular epigenetic mutation on various parts and functions of the cell, or study the effects of a drug in an unbiased manner. One of the challenges of this systems biology approach is the processing and integration of large amounts of data. That’s why you’ll also be trained in computational biology. Once graduated, this will be a great advantage: you’ll be able to bridge the gap between biology, technology and informatics , and thus have a profile that is desperately needed in modern, data-driven biology.

- Multiple OMICS approaches
Studying cells in a systems biology approach means connecting processes at the level of the genome (genomics), epigenome (epigenomics), transcriptome (transcriptomics), proteome (proteomics), etc. In the Medical Epigenomics specialisation, you’ll get acquainted with all these different fields of study.

- Patient and animal samples
Numerous genetic diseases are not caused by genetic mutations, but by epigenetic mutations that influence the structure and function of chromatin. Think of:
- Autoimmune diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis and lupus
- Cancer, in the forms of leukaemia, colon cancer, prostate cancer and cervical cancer
- Neurological disorders, like Rett Syndrome, Alzheimer, Parkinson, Multiple Sclerosis, schizophrenia and autism

We investigate these diseases on a cellular level, focusing on the epigenetic mutations and the impact on various pathways in the cell. You’ll get the chance to participate in that research, and work with embryonic stem cell, patient, Xenopus or zebra fish samples.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/medicalbiology/epigenomics

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