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Masters Degrees (Media Literacy)

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The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media in society, with a particular focus on education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. Read more

The Digital Media, Culture and Education MA explores the theory and practice of media in society, with a particular focus on education and emergent new literacies in the digital age. The programme combines theory with practical opportunities for media production. Students will critically examine new developments within digital media and work with partners including the British Film Institute (BFI).

About this degree

This programme provides the opportunity to explore different media forms, media education, media literacy and related fields. It combines theory with practical opportunities in moving image production, Internet cultures and game design. Students will critically examine developments in the fields of new media, including the impact of new technologies on education, and debates about the place and purpose of media in society.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (60 credits), two optional modules (60 credits), a dissertation (60 credits) or a report (30 credits) and an additional optional module (30 credits).

Core modules

  • Digital Media, Cultural Theory and Education
  • Internet Cultures: Theory & Practice

Recommended optional modules include:

  • Moving Image Production
  • Digital Games, Play and Creativity
  • Bodies and Digital Media

Dissertation/report

All students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of 20,000 words or a report of 10,000 words. Either the dissertation or the report can be part-production based, in which case the production element replaces 50% of the wordcount.

Teaching and learning

Teaching is delivered by face-to-face lectures and seminars, practical workshops combined with online-learning. Students are assessed by coursework assignments of up to 5,000 words, plus practical work for some modules, and a 20,000-word dissertation or 10,000-word report.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Media, Culture and Education MA

Careers

Graduates of this programme are currently working across a broad range of areas. Some are working as teachers in primary, secondary schools and further and higher education, while others have jobs as within areas related to digital media. Graduates can also be found working as museum and gallery education officers and in other informal learning spaces.

Employability

The course provides students with skills relevant to media work in a wide variety of employment contexts, including education, museums and galleries, social media, cultural organisations. It provides experience of digital media production relevant to these contexts, but not professional production traiinng for the media industries.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This programme will equip students with skills, knowledge and experience related to the rapidly-changing worlds of digital media, culture and education. It will therefore support career development in a variety of media contexts, including educational settings, broadly-defined.

Students are able to work with the BFI, our partner for part of the course, as well as leading researchers from the DARE Collaborative, a research partnership focussed on the digital arts in education led by UCL Institute of Education (IOE) and the BFI.

The course is based at the UCL Knowledge Lab, which conducts research, design and development across a broad range of media, systems and environments and brings together researchers from the areas of education, sociology, culture and media, semiotics, computational intelligence, information management, personalisation, semantic web and ubiquitous technologies.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Culture, Communication & Media

78% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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The Digital Media, Culture and Society MA is an innovative programme that stays responsive to key developments in contemporary digital media, culture and society. Read more

The Digital Media, Culture and Society MA is an innovative programme that stays responsive to key developments in contemporary digital media, culture and society.

It engages with some of the most exciting and pressing cultural and social issues of our time, such as activism, big data, the cultural and creative economy, everyday life, future cities, social wellbeing and identity.

It covers key theoretical debates in media and cultural studies and draws from local, national and global contexts to help you develop the critical and methodological skills that are necessary for researching the role of digital technologies in culture and society. 

You will be taught by leading academics in visual communication, social media, smart technologies and media production for social change. Our knowledge-exchange activities engage us with diverse businesses, communities and policy actors including media, publishers, digital companies, community groups and NGOs, which will allow you to make professional contacts during your studies.

The course offers flexible modes of study through online distance or campus learning – full-time or part-time – with entry points in September and February. There are also opportunities to complete shorter programmes at both certificate and diploma level.

What is the difference between this course and the Digital Media Arts MA?

The Digital Media, Culture and Society MA has a broader syllabus and is particularly suitable for mid-career professionals who would benefit from flexible modes of study. The Digital Media Arts MA has more of a focus on media technology, with many graduates now working in digital development and design.

Course structure 

The Digital Media, Culture and Society MA is structured as follows:

Core modules

  • Practising Media Research (MA and PGDip)
  • Professional Media Practice: Industries and Cultures (MA and PGDip)
  • Dissertation/Project (MA)

Options

  • Big Data, Culture and Society
  • Collaborative Documentary Media Production*
  • Digital Cities
  • Locative Media
  • Social and Digital Media Activism 
  • Sonic Media
  • Media Access in a Networked Society
  • Participatory Media Production for Social Change*
  • Digital Media and Web Technologies (Shared option from the Digital Media Arts MA)*
  • Cultural Theory (Shared option from the Cultural and Critical Theory MA)*

(*On-campus-only mode)

It is possible to complete shorter programmes in Digital Media, Culture and Society at postgraduate certificate and postgraduate diploma level.

Making sure that what you learn with us is relevant, up to date and what employers are looking for is our priority, so courses are reviewed and enhanced on an ongoing basis. When you have applied to us, you’ll be told about any new developments through our applicant portal.

During your studies, you'll be granted flexibility in content, form and delivery. This flexibility is increased through the availability of online distance education modules. Not only is it possible to switch modes from on-campus to Distance Learning, you may also choose to complete the entire degree through Distance Learning.

Distance learning

Students can complete the Digital Media, Culture and Society MA in online distance mode, either through part-time of full-time study. Distance learners follow the same weekly syllabus as on-campus students and engage online on a continuous basis with the teaching staff and their peers.

Each module has a guide that contains detailed information about the module content, readings and assessments, as well as clear instructions on how to engage with it. The University of Brighton’s student intranet system, studentcentral, is used to teach and deliver the modules.

If you are a distance learner, each module sees you: reading the module guide and collected readings to grasp the shape, content and pathway through the teaching material; participating in asynchronous online discussion boards to engage with the weekly topics; and conducting independent research and background reading to support all parts of your module study in preparation for the assessment.

Module tutors facilitate discussion and offer guidance throughout.

Provisions

  • Seminar discussions are facilitated in a number of ways to enable distance learners to participate. These include live video conferencing, online chat rooms and discussion forums.
  • Masterclasses, lectures and on-campus seminars are video or audio recorded and uploaded for students to access online on studentcentral within 48 hours of the class. A range of seminars will also be streamed live online.
  • All weekly readings are electronically accessible online via the studentcentral reading list.
  • All assignments are submitted electronically via studentcentral (with the exception of physical artefacts, which are submitted via postal system).
  • One-to-one tutorials are conducted either online either using video conferencing or via a telephone conversation.

Careers and employability

Creative media is both a description of what we do and an instruction for future practice. We take the best elements of media education, creative industries, communication/media studies and literacy theory and offer students a suite of modules that can be customised to fit career goals, family and working patterns, and personal interests. 

Graduates of the MA will be able to:

  • demonstrate a range of analytical, critical, collaborative practice and professional skills relevant to the digital media sector.
  • understand how cultural, social and economic differences operate in mediated environments, and how they are changing with new media technologies.
  • use a range of research methods and work within diverse disciplinary and professional paradigms. 

Previous students include PhD candidates at Salford and Brighton, a lecturer at the University of Sussex, a journalist and presenter at the Chongqing Broadcasting Group, an employee in the public diplomacy division at NATO, the founder of Australia's Swarn Conference, a project manager at Agile Impact Group, and a creative producer at the International Symposium of Electronic Art.



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Smartphones and social media, digital networks and big data, gamification and mobile platforms – new media continue to change the way we live, work and communicate. Read more

Smartphones and social media, digital networks and big data, gamification and mobile platforms – new media continue to change the way we live, work and communicate. This programme interrogates the impact of digital technologies on individuals and society, and provides you with the skills and knowledge to be able to think critically and creatively about new media.

Working both individually and in teams, you will learn about diverse digital media techniques and processes, including coding and hacking, web design, mapping and visualisation, scraping and mining, interactive narratives, animation, digital ethnography, action research, prototyping and iterative design, representation, and more. Through an applied, hands-on approach, you will gain an understanding of the social, cultural and economic roles of new media, and explore what it is like to work in the new media industries.

With a range of optional modules to choose from, you will also be able to expand your knowledge into areas such as multimedia journalism, cinema and photography, political and promotional communication, feminism and the media, and many more. Taught by expert practitioners and researchers, you will gain the knowledge and skills to thrive in this dynamic, fast-paced sector.Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Depending on your previous experience, you may need to take the module New Media Production Skills to develop your knowledge of visual design software, HTML, CSS, PHP, WordPress, Javascript and animation. The module isn’t assessed so it will appear in your transcript, but won’t count towards your classification.

In each semester you’ll study core modules that build your knowledge of new media contexts and practice. You’ll consider the relationship between new media and contemporary culture and the interactive forms and practices that are emerging. Then you’ll gain practical production, project management and critical skills and respond to new media briefs in collaborative projects.

You’ll then have the chance to broaden your approach with your choice of optional modules, from photography and cinematics to political communication, television narratives and public relations in society.

To demonstrate the skills you’ve gained, you’ll also undertake a major independent project. You can choose to submit a dissertation and take classes on research methods throughout the year, or you can work on a sustained, practical new media project with a written element.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Digital Practices 30 credits
  • New Media Independent Project 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • New Media Production Skills 10 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Individual Directed Study (New Media) 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • New Media Independent Project 60 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read New Media MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read New Media MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll be taught in a mixture of practical workshops, lectures and small group seminars which allow you to discuss your reading and present some of your research to other students. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, allowing you to practice your skills and deepen your knowledge.

Assessment

We also use a range of assessment methods, depending on the modules you choose. They’re likely to include practical projects, essays, reports, group and individual presentations and case studies among others.

Career opportunities

This programme is still relatively new, and digital media are rapidly growing, evolving and expanding.

People with high-level production and project management skills in new media will be in high demand for decades to come, and this programme will equip you with the knowledge and skills to thrive in a wide – and rapidly expanding – range of careers in new media practice.

These could include digital marketing, animation, web design and development, social media, analytics, PR and consultancy among others. You’ll also be well prepared for future research in this young and fast-changing field.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The media play an important role in entertaining and informing the public – but they also make up a huge industry that employs thousands of people worldwide. Read more

The media play an important role in entertaining and informing the public – but they also make up a huge industry that employs thousands of people worldwide. This programme will give you an insight into both aspects of the media industries, as you analyse their cultural and economic dimensions.

You’ll explore the full range of media production, from individual bloggers to huge corporations. Taking an international approach, you’ll study the development of contemporary media to understand current trends. It’s a truly interdisciplinary programme, drawing on communication and cultural studies, economics, anthropology, business and management studies, sociology, politics, law, literature, art history and music.

Guided by leading researchers in the field, many of whom are involved in our Media Industries Research Centre, you’ll gain an insight into how television, film, music, online media, newspapers, magazines and advertising are produced, and what it’s like to work in each industry.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

You’ll develop your knowledge of the full range of media industries through core modules that run in each semester.

You’ll be introduced to issues and debates in media studies as well as the impacts of developments such as digitalisation and marketisation. Then you’ll explore the organisational dynamics of industries such as television, film, music, digital media, newspapers, magazines and advertising to consider what it’s like to work in them.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

Alongside the compulsory modules, you’ll be able to tailor the programme to suit your own interests by selecting from a range of optional modules on topics such as television narrative, identity and media, political communication, cultural policy, international film industries and public relations, among others.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • The Media Industries 30 credits
  • Media Production Analysis 30 credits 

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Cultural Policy: Models and Debates 30 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Media Industries MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Media Industries MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

We use different methods to assess your progress, depending on the modules you choose. These are likely to include essays, video or photography work, presentations or project work and reports.

Career opportunities

This programme will prepare you for a variety of careers in the management and production of media content, both in the UK and worldwide. You’ll also be equipped to work in communications in broader contexts such as communications and media policy, PR or other cultural and creative industries.

You’ll also be well placed to pursue your research at PhD level, and even pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.




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This well-established postgraduate course is taught as an intensive year-long programme and offers students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of new media and communications practices. Read more

About the course

This well-established postgraduate course is taught as an intensive year-long programme and offers students an interdisciplinary approach to the study of new media and communications practices.

It aims to explore:

How does the media shape culture and society?
What role does the media play in people's lives?
Is the media creating a global culture?
Are audiences now producers?
Do social networking sites influence personal communication?
Are young people disconnected from traditional politics?

The Media and Communications course focuses on the rapid changes in global media and communications and their social and cultural consequences within an international context.

Students have the opportunity to meet professionals working in the broadcast, advertising and marketing industries and we also organise field trips (e.g. to the BBC TV Centre).

The Master’s course combines theoretical and empirical study of the media including issues of media audiences together with the study of developments in information and communication technologies.

The department scored highly in the 2008 RAE exercise with a rating that made it the top department of its size in the UK. We have a long tradition of research in Sociology and Communications and all of our staff are research active.

Aims

The course will meet the needs of advanced students with backgrounds in media, sociology and other relevant disciplines.

The course is also perfectly suited for professionals in the communications/broadcast industry seeking to gain a more sociologically informed understanding of those industries.

Course Content

The MSc consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation in Media and Communications
Issues and Controversies in Media and Communications
Qualitative Methods in Social and Cultural Research
Making Web Cultures
The Creative Industries
Media Audiences
Principles of Media Research
Media, Body and Society

Teaching

Taught modules of the MSc Media and Communications are delivered via traditional lecture/seminar format along with other workshops and set activities. Students may be required to keep diaries of media consumption, contribute to online blogs and engage in critical analysis of visual media.

Assessment

Assessment is by a mixture of essays, report writing, blog entries and online group work. Students also complete a 15,000 word dissertation.

Special Features

This postgraduate course is taught by leading academics in Sociology and Communications. Throughout our research we aim to tackle core theoretical questions and also engage with the international community and relevant groups of practitioners in industry, government and the wider public.

Where possible we invite professionals who are working in the media and broadcast industry (advertising and marketing; television documentary and different PR organisations) to come and talk to our MSc students and offer careers advice. We have also organised a field trip to BBC Television Centre in West London. Students are invited to our academic research seminar programme and to attend our social events.

We offer additional bespoke workshops and lectures to enhance students' employability skills, including ‘pitching yourself to employers’.

All students can benefit from our programme of workshops and informal ‘drop in’ sessions on information literacy to enhance academic writing skills.

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The MDM is Canada's first professional graduate program in digital media focusing on the creation of digital media solutions for real world problems. Read more

Master of Digital Media Program in Vancouver

The MDM is Canada's first professional graduate program in digital media focusing on the creation of digital media solutions for real world problems. Students come from a variety of backgrounds including filmmaking, engineering, game design, business analysis, architecture, software engineers, artists, primatology, biology, and advertising to name a few.

Housed at the Centre for Digital Media in Vancouver BC, this intensive 12-month program engages students through coursework and projects to develop essential communication, collaboration & leadership skills. The unique curriculum meets the needs of the new and expanding digital media markets across all business verticals including but not limited to healthcare, education, business and the entertainment industry.

Guided by top-level faculty and industry mentors, students work closely with clients and peers on team-based, industry supported digital media projects.This experience allows graduates the know-how and confidence to work at the highest level across all sectors as creators, producers, innovators or entrepreneurs.

Graduates gain the skills and knowledge that help them to:

Collaborate and communicate effectively in multidisciplinary teams.
Create comprehensive business strategies and manage development projects.
Design and deliver innovative, high-grade products to clients on time and on budget.

The program also helps develop six core competencies valued in the digital media industry:

Self-Awareness
Articulation
Design process
Time management
Information literacy
Teamwork

Scholarship Opportunities

The Master of Digital Media program has a strong scholarship support. In the September 2014 intake, +58% of students received scholarships or other funding assistance.

Where Alumni Work

Students graduate from the MDM program with the skills to work in the top jobs in the digital media industry as creators, producers, designers, managers, art directors and entrepreneurs.

What is Digital Media

Digital Media blends many media forms and requires working in multi-skilled teams. The MDM program teaches people from different backgrounds and with different skill sets to understand each other, work together and execute a digital media project with a cohesive vision.

Master of Digital Media students come from all over the world and from all professional and educational backgrounds, such as engineering, fine arts, design, architecture, film, history and business.

Alumni

"My two years at the MDM have shaped me in more ways than ever imagined. It gave me a reason to step outside my creative comfort zone and surround myself with new ideas, technologies and most importantly with a group of wonderful and immensely talented people."
Karin Schmidlin, Manager Virtual Incubation Program, CONRAD Business Centre, University of Waterloo

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Public relations is a growing presence in daily life. It’s behind much of the news and websites we read, the social media we follow and brands we choose to buy. Read more

Public relations is a growing presence in daily life. It’s behind much of the news and websites we read, the social media we follow and brands we choose to buy. It shapes how we see the world around us. This programme examines the social, political, cultural and economic functions and consequences of PR.

Core modules explore theoretical perspectives applied to PR within communication and cultural studies, and introduce you to its role as a cultural intermediary. You’ll learn to deconstruct the strategies and tactics of PR campaigns and understand how they affect both the organisations that use them and their social and cultural contexts.

You can also tailor this programme to suit you: you’ll choose from optional modules to gain specialist knowledge of topics such as new media, political communication, photography or communication and development. This isn’t a practical training course – instead it offers an insight into the way PR changes how we live, work and relate to each other.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

This course provides an in-depth understanding of promotional media and the role of promotion in social, cultural and economic life.

The promotional industries and professions – advertising, branding, marketing and public relations – play a fundamental role in media and society.

This course develops your ability to engage critically with promotional media by analysing various promotional forms and practices, and evaluating impacts and implications for individuals, organisations and societies. You will be introduced to key theoretical perspectives and scholarly debates regarding promotional culture, consumerism and the media, and will explore local, national and global contexts.

You will also have the opportunity to choose optional modules from across the School. 

You will study research methods and undertake an independent research project, working under the guidance of an individual supervisor.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Public Relations Theory 30 credits
  • Public Relations, Culture and Society 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Integrated Communication 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Public Relations and Society MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Public Relations and Society MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessment methods may vary depending on the modules you choose. They’re likely to include essays, case analyses, group projects and reports. Optional modules may even use literature reviews, campaign reports or even video and photography projects.

Career opportunities

This is not a practical training course, but it gives you a real insight into the construction, influence and impact of PR in a range of contexts.

You’ll also acquire or refine high-level skills in areas such as research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication, as well as having good cultural, political and critical awareness.

You’ll be well prepared for a career in PR or public affairs in a wide range of sectors, working in-house for large or small organisations or in an agency context. There are also opportunities for PR professionals in specialist sectors such as finance or the non-profit sector.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Are you interested in the creative industries? Want to learn more about management and promotional culture?. Read more
Are you interested in the creative industries? Want to learn more about management and promotional culture?

Mass Communication Management at Northumbria offers you an exciting opportunity to study the issues and trends across mass communication platforms such as TV, radio, newspaper, movies, advertising and social media.

You will learn to recognise how these modes of communication are connected and how they relate to ideas and problems in society at both the national and the global level.

You will develop an awareness of the media, communication and cultural industries in the 21st century through research-informed and practical activities as you learn how communication strategies are produced, distributed and consumed.

Applying academic theory to a range of real-world issues, this course also includes training in cultural management, enterprise and leadership, providing you with the skills and confidence to succeed in a range of media and communication industries.

This course is also taught on our London campus. This course can also be started in January - please view this web-page for details: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/mass-communication-management-dtfmax6/

Learn From The Best

Dr Sarah Ralph is a lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies, and her expertise lies in the realm of empirical methods and approaches to the study of production cultures, media audiences and reception.

Dr Ibrahim Seaga Shaw has a background as a reporter, editor, sub editor and correspondent in Sierra Leone, France and the UK, and brings real-life issues to the classroom.

Dr Gabriel Moreno practiced journalism for 13 years, including as a general and financial news correspondent with Reuters news agency in Mexico City. He was awarded a PhD in Journalism and Mass Communication from Westminster University and is currently involved in research projects involving new media and migration, and social media and environmental communication. He became a fellow of the UK’s Higher Education Academy in December 2015.

Teaching And Assessment

You’ll learn through a mix of theory and practice, including taught sessions, field trips, lectures, seminars and group assignments.

You’ll discover the theories and issues informing real-work examples within a range of media and cultural industries and then put these to use in workshop activities which reinforce the links between theory and practice. You will be encouraged to develop your communication skills by taking an active part in seminars.

The dissertation module provides an opportunity for you to put learning into practice by designing, executing and writing up an original piece of research on a topic negotiated between you and your dissertation supervisor.

You will have the opportunity to go on at least one industry visit and hear from professionals working in a local media organisation. Previous visits have included to sites which represent successful local cultural regeneration such as BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts and Sage, Gateshead.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
MP7002 - Advertising and Promotional Cultures (Core, 30 Credits)
MP7003 - Working in Mass Communication Industries (Core, 30 Credits)
MP7004 - Media Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
MP7005 - Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7006 - Cultural Management, Enterprise & Leadership (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Your learning experience is enhanced by new technologies used to deliver and assess your course modules, including online reading lists and electronic submission of assignments. You are also encouraged to use social media to communicate with your peers and students regularly develop module Facebook groups for this purpose.

You will have access to an e-learning portal that provides lecture materials, assessment criteria, handbooks and additional learning materials such as videos, podcasts and news items.

You will have access to state-of-the art facilities such as the university library which has been recognised as being in the top three in the UK (tied with Cambridge University).

As part of the research methods module, you will explore using online forms for survey research, including social media and generic software tools such as Survey Monkey.

If you are an international student, you can develop your literacy and communications skills through English for Specific Academic Purposes.

Research-Rich Learning

Northumbria University is ranked in the UK top 20 for the quality of research outputs in communication, cultural and media studies (REF 2014).

70% of Northumbria’s research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies is rated as being either world leading or internationally excellent.

The Mass Communication Management course has been designed with the help of industry practitioners so you will be graduating with the latest knowledge and skills required by the creative and media industries.

You will be learning from tutors who are specialists in their disciplines and who are research active at the cutting-edge of their field. Their expertise and industry experience helps to bring theory to life in the classroom.

You will develop your own practical research skills and will be able to demonstrate your own interest in at least one aspect of the wider cultural industry through planning, executing and writing-up an empirically-focused research project.

Give Your Career An Edge

Your course is designed to give you the skills and competencies, theory and practical experience that employers in the media industries are looking for.

You will be encouraged to think like an entrepreneur and to understand the behaviours you need to exhibit in order to succeed in your future career aspirations. Graduates are global citizens who are not afraid to ask the big, challenging questions.

The diverse examples and case studies which are used across the modules provide a good grounding in a range of different media industries, enabling you to be a credible applicant for opportunities in a range of cultural industries.

Taking part in seminar discussions and group activities will encourage you to develop teamwork and a range of other transferable skills including effective communication, relationship-building and personal time management.

Your Future

This course will foster your intellectual curiosity and help you become a reflective and independent thinker, especially on issues, trends, policies, and challenges in mass communication industries in national and global contexts.

You will have the opportunity to develop skills in effectively interrogating ideas to clarify and boost your understanding. This combination of critical knowledge and skills will provide you with an excellent foundation for pursuing your future career.

On graduation, you could progress into a career in advertising, marketing, media or journalism.

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Do you want to become an outstanding teacher? Our specialist PGCE in Secondary Education with Media Studies is a direct route to a career of which you can be proud. Read more
Do you want to become an outstanding teacher? Our specialist PGCE in Secondary Education with Media Studies is a direct route to a career of which you can be proud. Media Studies stimulates an interest in and a sense of wonder about our world, this course develops a range of teaching styles appropriate to the delivery of Media Studies within the National Curriculum and GCSE/A Level specifications. Media Studies is a truly contemporary subject which is relevant to all our pupils’ lives. Media impacts on our lives through different areas of influence political, cultural and economic, this course aims to produce dynamic, confident, and innovative teachers who are committed to developing life skills of analysing communicating findings and being imaginative and creative accessible for all.

The aim of the course is to prepare trainee teachers for a first appointment as a teacher of Media studies in a secondary school and assess current developments in the subject and their possible effect on teaching in schools. To develop as a teacher, you will be learning about how pupils can engage positively with the media and how they can be helped to a better understanding of themselves and the world through the media. Furthermore, our PGCE Media Studies trainees take up ‘enhancements’ linked to other curriculum subjects e.g english, primary phase or Special Education Needs and Diversity.

We acknowledge that the trainees themselves are the most valuable resource on the course and we will be giving you the opportunity you to share your specialisms with the other trainees, and you will develop essential components of creativity and imagination such as determination, hard work, observing, thinking, experimenting, investigating, making, evaluation.

At the University of St Mark & St John, we pride ourselves on the quality of our teaching programmes. PGCE External examiners commented “The work across the Partnership results in excellent relationship building with staff and pupils as well as creative and forward thinking pedagogical ideas.”If the idea of joining these trainees inspires and motivates you, it’s time to start the application process.

Modules

-Becoming a teacher: Pedagogy & Philosophies of Learning
-Inclusion in the Secondary Classroom: Appreciating Diversity
-Understanding the Learner: A Personalised Approach to Learning & Assessment
-Teaching Placement

Career Opportunities

The reputation of our trainees, both within and outside of immediate partnership schools in the South West, has resulted in high employability rates, with over 95% of secondary Trainees gaining employment. Ofsted (2104) praised the University’s ‘effective use of local diversity and wider links which ensures trainees have breadth and variety in their training, so making them highly employable’.

More information

Please note that Level 2 Key Skills in Application of Numbers and Communication or Certificates in Adult Literacy or Numeracy, are not sufficient to meet the entry requirements to a PGCE programme.

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Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication. Read more

Modern democracies are increasingly shaped by the relationships between politicians, mass media and citizens. This interdisciplinary programme applies ideas from a range of approaches to give you an insight into the context and production of political journalism and communication.

Core modules will introduce you to political communication in established and emerging democracies worldwide, exploring the ethics and power dynamics at play. You’ll ask questions around media freedom, the responsibilities of journalists, ‘spin doctors’, the impact of emerging technologies and whether elections really are decided on TV.

You’ll also tailor the programme to suit your personal and career interests, choosing from optional modules on topics such as digital media, PR and the role of the media in democratisation. Supported by our Media Industries Research Centre, leading researchers and experienced practitioners, you’ll be well equipped for a career in this challenging field.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

Throughout the year you’ll study two core modules that cover the foundations of the programme, exploring the role of communications in contemporary politics.

You’ll look at different models of contemporary democracy and compare the relations between political actors, the media and citizens. From there you’ll move onto recent innovations sparked by cultural, technological and political change. With this in mind, you’ll then design a political campaign that incorporates some of these developments.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as television narrative, media and globalisation, urban narratives, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Feminism, Identity and Media 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Political Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments also take different forms so you can develop diverse skills. These are likely to include essays and exams as well as group presentations, projects and reports, as well as campaign analyses and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme isn’t a practical training course, but it does give you an in-depth understanding of the role and importance of political communication – a sector which is constantly growing.

Our graduates have entered a wide range of related careers in political journalism, government communications, communications analysis and advisory roles for political parties. Others have gone on to work for international organisations and pressure groups.

You’ll also be prepared to continue with further research at PhD level and pursue an academic career.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The media, communications and information landscapes have changed beyond recognition and continue to evolve. This programme will give you an understanding of how messages flow across borders in a globalised world – and how they relate to political, economic and cultural affairs. Read more

The media, communications and information landscapes have changed beyond recognition and continue to evolve. This programme will give you an understanding of how messages flow across borders in a globalised world – and how they relate to political, economic and cultural affairs.

You’ll explore the concept of ‘global media’ and whether mass media inspire or simply report events. You’ll look at the role of social media in communications and how audiences around the world understand and consume global media products.

Core modules will give you the context and theoretical knowledge to consider these questions, and you’ll choose from optional modules to focus on the areas that suit your interests or career aspirations.

You could study war reporting, identity in the media, public relations and more, to gain the skills to thrive in a fast-paced and challenging sector.

Our School has a range of fantastic facilities to support your studies. The 58-seat Phil Taylor Cinema is equipped with Dolby Digital sound and high-definition projection facilities, as well as projectors for 16mm and 35mm film.

You can also work on your own projects in our 44 editing suites, equipped with Avid Media Composer editing software and Adobe Creative Cloud. The fully equipped TV studio also has a large green screen area, lighting and photo-flash facilities. We also have a track and dolly, sliders, Glidecam and various cranes, and you’ll have access to a new photographic dark room.

We also run a loans service where you can borrow a range of HD digital camcorders and various Canon stills cameras to help with your project work.

Course content

You’ll study core modules throughout the course that give you the contextual knowledge and research skills to support your studies.

These will explore the relationships between communications and international systems: how communications networks can function as a source of power, how they are regulated and how new technologies are changing the landscape. You’ll also think about the economic and cultural impacts of globalised communication.

On top of this, you’ll build specialist knowledge through your choice of optional modules. These vary every year, but can include topics such as the media and globalisation, urban narratives, public relations, and media and democratisation. The optional modules allow you to focus on topics that suit your own interests or perhaps reflect your career plans.

Throughout the year, you’ll also be preparing for your dissertation through the Dissertation and Research Methods module. Your dissertation is a major independent research project on a topic of your choice, which you submit at the end of the year.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll complete the MA over two years, instead of one, taking fewer modules each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Communication and International Affairs 30 credits
  • Media, Culture and Globalisation 30 credits
  • Dissertation and Research Methods 60 credits

Optional modules

  • Technology, Media and Critical Literacy 30 credits
  • International Film Industries 30 credits
  • The Media and Democratisation: Global Perspectives 30 credits
  • Innovations in Political Communication 30 credits
  • Politics and the Media 30 credits
  • Communication and Public Opinion 30 credits
  • Multimedia Journalism 30 credits
  • Communication and Development 30 credits
  • The Cultural History of Promotional Communication 30 credits
  • Radio Technologies, Industries and Cultures 30 credits
  • Identity, Culture and Technology 30 credits
  • Urban Narratives 30 credits
  • Cultures of Contemporary Photography 30 credits
  • Cinematics and Photography 30 credits
  • Rhetoric and Public Speaking 15 credits
  • Managing Business Across Cultures 15 credits
  • International Organisations: Context, Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Writing for Professional Purposes 15 credits
  • Critical Debates in Culture and Place 30 credits
  • 'Race', Identity and Culture in the Black Atlantic 30 credits
  • Researching Inequality in the Media 30 credits
  • Reality TV: Truth or Fiction?30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read International Communication MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read International Communication MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

MA modules will use a range of teaching and learning methods including lectures, group learning and project work, seminars, tutorials and workshops. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, as an opportunity to deepen your knowledge of the subjects introduced in lectures and seminars, and to develop your skills in analysis and research. You should anticipate spending at least 20 hours per week on independent study associated with your modules.

Assessment

Assessments can also take a variety of forms depending on the modules you choose. These will include exams and essays as well as group and individual presentations and project work, reports and case studies.

Career opportunities

This programme will give you an in-depth understanding of different aspects of international communication. It will also equip you with sophisticated skills in research, analysis, interpretation and communication. You’ll also have good political, cultural and social awareness, which are valuable in a wide range of sectors and industries.

Graduates have gone onto succeed in roles for a range of international organisations and agencies that have international objectives. Others have launched careers in journalism, with a focus on international affairs – and some also use the programme to prepare for further research at PhD level.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This unique, two-year degree provides an interdisciplinary study of the interaction between children, texts and media, along with the opportunity to study and live in at least two European countries. Read more

This unique, two-year degree provides an interdisciplinary study of the interaction between children, texts and media, along with the opportunity to study and live in at least two European countries. You will be able to engage with an array of cultural events related to children’s literature and media, and participate in a placement with a practitioner organisation.

WHY THIS PROGRAMME

  • This is a unique programme that draws on the recognised strengths of the consortium partners to offer a joint degree that engages in children’s literature, media and culture.
  • Glasgow is the leading partner in the consortium of universities that have developed this programme. The other universities are Aarhus University, Tilburg University and the Autonomous University of Barcelona.
  • Rather than focus either on the literary, media or educational aspects on their own, the programme looks at the interaction between them in a flexible framework that allows for the incorporation of constantly changing format (e.g. digital technologies that affect reading and viewing) and input into creative initiatives around literature and learning. 
  • The programme includes the study of a wide variety of genres and considers new developments in the production of texts and media for children, including multimodal forms and digital technologies.
  • You will receive a theoretical grounding in children’s literature and media as well as the opportunity to complete bespoke placements.
  • You will be supported by a friendly, internationally acclaimed team of scholars who work in both the arts and humanities and the social sciences.
  • You will have access to world class libraries, teaching and research facilities, as well as museums and other cultural organisations.

CAREER PROSPECTS

Graduates will develop key skills sought by many employers, including the ability to find, select and analyse texts and empirical data; confident and persuasive oral and written communication skills; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. The programme provides excellent preparation for careers in media, education and literacy, publishing, archive and information studies, heritage and creative industries, as well as a springboard for PhD study and an academic career.



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For individuals with more than 2 years English language teaching experience, this course offers a comprehensive critique of the key concepts and theories that lie behind language teaching. Read more
For individuals with more than 2 years English language teaching experience, this course offers a comprehensive critique of the key concepts and theories that lie behind language teaching. You will take a critical professional perspective towards TESOL and Applied Linguistics in a global, cultural, political and educational context.

Language is embedded in the social, cultural, personal, and interpersonal processes of human life, with complex forms and patterns that constantly develop to help us communicate more effectively. Thus, you will be encouraged to think of language as more than a set of rules. Instead, you will recognise language use as a complex process with personal, social and educational consequences, and you will acquire the knowledge and skills required to reflect critically upon your own language teaching practice.

This course can be taken part time and has start dates in January, for more information, please view the relevant web-page below:
January 16 months full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/applied-linguistics-for-tesol-dtfalf6/

September 2 years part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/applied-linguistics-for-tesol-dtpalt6/

January 28 months part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/applied-linguistics-for-tesol-dtpalf6/

Learn From The Best

Our staff have extensive practical experience of both teaching and teacher training and they have strong connections with the professional (English) language teaching community in the UK and overseas.

You will benefit from the vast research experience of the teaching team. While much of our current research relates to the teaching and learning of language, we also explore a broader range of applied linguistic topics including: discourse analysis and representations of culture; the spread of English and Englishes around the world; educational linguistics and the internationalisation of UK Higher Education; and second language acquisition.

Cutting-edge research undertaken by the Applied Linguistics and TESOL team has been published in leading journals in the field and our lecturers are regularly invited to present their research around the world.

Teaching And Assessment

Our MA combines exciting subject-specific content with an emphasis on development of independent analytical and research skills, supported by knowledgeable, research-active staff.

Our learning and teaching strategy is designed to deliver a stimulating and student-centred environment through a combination of lectures, seminars, group workshops and individual tutorials. The range of subject-specific modules has been developed to help you acquire the core skills appropriate to the study of TESOL and Applied Linguistics and the course culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000 words.

Our team offers a progressively challenging and rewarding experience, integrating the teaching of fundamental issues in Applied Linguistics and TESOL with the up-to-date findings of research conducted by the teaching team.

Learning Environment

You will engage with a range of technology enhanced learning (TEL) activities that support the learning and teaching principles, including a virtual learning environment that delivers specific course and module information, a range of course-related activities and online interactive reading lists. You will also have access to scholarly databases and can submit coursework electronically.

Our staff constantly seek to develop new ways of engaging with technology, including the use of mobile technology, tablet devices, and social media in both directed and independent learning to improve individual and group interaction. Engagement with TEL throughout the course will prepare you for the increasing importance of technology in the teaching of TESOL and Applied Linguistics.

Research-Rich Learning

Research, informed by our wide-ranging staff interests, is embedded throughout the course. We specifically recruit students of a high calibre with a view to further develop intellectual and professional interests through a lifelong engagement with the subject matter. You will engage with advanced theory, professional development at a high level, and critical reflection on methodological assumptions within the field.

The modules combine exciting content with an emphasis on the development of independent analytical and research skills, supported by knowledgeable team members with links to the English Language Teaching Journal (Oxford University Press), British Association of for Applied Linguistics (BAAL), International Cognitive Linguistics Association (ICLA), International Association of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language (IATEFL) and the British Council.

We encourage postgraduates to manage their own research projects as a preparation for possible independent research at doctoral level.

Give Your Career An Edge

Employability is woven into the course at all stages to develop your lifelong learning, critical skills and attitudes, presentation skills, and reflective and evaluative abilities.

You will improve skills in motivation, show initiative and personal responsibility, be capable of making decisions in complex situations, and possess a thirst for independent learning. You will have demonstrated a critical awareness of the current research and scholarship within your discipline, helping you to interpret knowledge in a variety of professional fields. In addition, the course will strengthen your communication skills, media literacy, self-management and planning, ethical and professional understanding, as well as developing your research and inquiry skills.

Your Future

The MA has been designed to enhance promotion prospects, fulfilling industry demands for highly qualified graduates with the skills to work across a variety of professions – most notably English Language teachers and teacher trainers, managers, course planners, government advisers, inspectors, material developers and consultants. The course is also ideal for those looking to move into professional research, publishing and editing, and educational management. There is constant demand both in the UK and overseas for Applied Linguistics and TESOL graduates in other language-related professions, such as the media, the helping professions, communication, publishing and editing.

Employment prospects for those holding the MA Applied Linguistics for TESOL qualification are excellent and graduates have gone on to good careers as English teachers overseas or in their home countries.

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This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding. . Read more

This exciting degree offers you the opportunity to study one of the major areas in contemporary media and communications – branding. 

The unique programme introduces you to the variety of ways in which brands are developed and used, and helps you to understand how the growth of branding – in business, but also in politics, government, sport and culture – has changed the societies we live in.

What happens when the state starts to use branding techniques to communicate with its citizens?

And how does the rise of digital and social media change the relationship between brands and their publics?

What, for example, are the consequences of understanding political parties, artists or sports teams as ‘brands’?

An introduction to contemporary branding debates

The MA in Brands, Communication and Culture aims to provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the history and development of brands and branding, and their relationship to contemporary forms of communication and culture. Specifically, you should acquire an in-depth knowledge of the social, political and economic backdrop against which branding has become so important, and an understanding of the key themes and debates surrounding its development and use, including the relationship between brands and intellectual property, and the extent to which branding promotes or inhibits openness and transparency within organisations.

You will also improve your ability to think critically and creatively about contemporary communications and cultural practices. When you have completed the programme you will have at your disposal a range of tools that will enable you to analyse contemporary communications, to make judgments about their significance and value and be able to thoughtfully contribute to contemporary communications.

A unique approach to the study of brands

This MA is not a conventional branding or marketing course. Instead it offers a unique approach to the study of brands. This is reflected in the topics taught on our core modules, which include:

  • The role of brands in and beyond markets
  • The rise of consumer culture
  • Critical perspectives on brand management and governance
  • Intellectual property
  • Immaterial labour and the rise of ‘branded workers’
  • Gender, colonial history and branding
  • Attachment, identity and emotions in branding
  • Ethics and transparency
  • The emergence of brand experiences and ‘staging’ of brands
  • Fair trade and accountability
  • Branded spaces and communities
  • Social media and open source cultures
  • Geodemographics and new forms of social classification

The MA Brands, Communication and Culture is taught across two departments: Media & Communications and Sociology. This gives you access to experts in many fields. In addition to the two core courses you will have the opportunity to customize your degree by choosing from a range of modules from different departments to allow you to explore your own interests and make wider connections.

We welcome students who bring to the course a range of experiences and interests in communication, management, politics, design and the cultural industries.

Recent dissertation topics include:

  • Branding post-capitalism? An investigation of crowdfunding platforms
  • Trespassed City: Mapping London’s privately owned public spaces
  • The rise of co-working spaces
  • Craft Entrepreneurs: an inquiry into the rise of artisanal production in post-industrial cities
  • Hashtags in photo sharing social media apps
  • Consumer culture in contemporary Shanghai
  • Branding of NGOs
  • Sustainable brand strategies - good for the environment or just a selling strategy?
  • Fashion bloggers and cultural capital
  • Medical tourism and branded healthcare
  • Intellectual property in the fashion industry
  • Branding London's districts

Modules & structure

The programme is made up of two core modules (60 credits in total), between two and four options modules (60 credits in total), and a dissertation (60 credits).

The first core module, Branding I, introduces you to contemporary definitions and theories of branding, its history and development, changes in the role of marketing, promotion and design, and their place in the global economy.

The second core module, Branding II, puts greater emphasis on contemporary themes and issues in branding, and their relationship to wider debates in society, economy and culture.

Throughout the core components of the degree, you will examine the wide range of ways in which branding is currently used, in organisations ranging from large corporations to public sector bodies, charities and other third sector organisations.

For the optional modules, you'll have an opportunity to explore some of the wider contexts for brands and branding by taking up to 60 credits of modules provided elsewhere in Media and Communications or neighbouring departments such as SociologyCultural Studies and Anthropology.

Part-time students typically take the two core modules in their first year, and the options modules plus the dissertation in their second year.

Vocational elements

The department offers some practice-based options in areas such as:

  • Media Futures
  • Online Journalism
  • Campaign Skills
  • Media Law and Ethics
  • Design Methods
  • Processes for Innovation

Assessment

Assessment consists of coursework, extended essays, reports, presentations, practice based projects or essays/logs, group projects, reflective essays, and seen and unseen written examinations.

Download the programme specification. If you would like an earlier version of the programme specification, please contact the Quality Office.

Please note that due to staff research commitments not all of these modules may be available every year.

Skills

The programme helps students to develop a high-level understanding of contemporary branding and communications techniques and their social, economic and political contexts. You will be encouraged to develop your critical reasoning skills and your understanding of contemporary cultural and media theory, but also to develop greater visual literacy and a capacity for creative thinking. Assessments are designed to ensure that you are able to apply these skills in practical ways.

Careers

The programme equips you with the skills necessary to pursue a wide range of careers related to branding and communication in the media and other industries. Students are encouraged to seek work experience and work placements during the programme as time allows. The MA also allows you to pursue further academic research in one or more of the areas covered on the programme.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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IN BRIEF. Enjoy excellent job prospects in the growing field of science communication. This course is delivered in partnership with industry giving you the opportunity to tap into world-class professional networks. Read more

IN BRIEF:

  • Enjoy excellent job prospects in the growing field of science communication
  • This course is delivered in partnership with industry giving you the opportunity to tap into world-class professional networks
  • Access to state of the art MediaCityUK facilities during the course residential
  • A part-time only course
  • Based at MediaCityUK
  • International students can apply

COURSE SUMMARY

Over the last 25 years, science communication has expanded from a field of public intellectuals, celebrity scientists, broadcast media professionals and event producers to a global industry of ground-breaking artists, games developers, disruptive creators, radical curators, social entrepreneurs and citizen scientists. Developed in partnership with industry, this part-time, distance learning course will provide you with the knowledge and skills required to take advantage of excellent job prospects in this growing field.

Studying this MSc will provide you with the opportunity to accelerate your career and become part of a worldwide community which is pushing the boundaries of science communication through new and emerging technologies. You will gain practical and transferable skills informed by theory, a creative portfolio and access to world-class professional networks to progress your career in science communication. You will become mindful of the ethical challenges that new communication systems might pose to achieving sustainable development goals for health and wellbeing, gender equality and communities.

Through a selection of specifically designed modules, you will learn about the importance of involving the public in the co-creation of citizen science projects, explore the increasing trend of locating science within festivals, examine how art and science come together to innovate, and explore digital storytelling strategies for communicating science. Additionally, you will investigate how science writing and journalism has changed in a digital era, and focus on contemporary matters of global concern in science communication. All modules aim for you to develop and enhance your public portfolio through a range of creative projects.

Science communication is an expanding field and, as such, there are many exciting career prospects working in science journalism, public engagement, events production, science publishing and within the media, to name a few. Our academics have strong networks in the field and, as the course is delivered in collaboration with industry experts and professional science communicators, you can be sure that the skills and knowledge you gain are those you need to forge a successful career in the field and stay ahead of the curve. This course aims to bridge the #scicomm digital skills gap in an era where digital fluency, critical thinking, and creative innovation make professionals stand out from the crowd.

COURSE DETAILS

This science communication masters focuses on the areas of communication, media management, public engagement, emerging technologies, global challenges, digital literacy and creative practice.

Features  

  • Course content reflects and connects your needs with industry trends  
  • Digital skills and emerging technologies focus  
  • Become part of a global learning community  
  • Connectivity and access to world-class facilities  
  • Co-delivery with industry practitioners  

Benefits

  • Learn alongside cutting edge researcher-practitioners  
  • Secure a global competitive edge and excellent employment prospects  
  • Gain real world, practical and problem solving experience  
  • Create a portfolio to showcase and help secure future work  
  • Access to a national and international peer and industry network

SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

We offer awards to help you study through our:

  • Vice-Chancellor's Excellence Scholarship
  • University of Salford student loyalty discount
  • Country bursary scheme for International students only

There are also other sources of funding available to you.

For more information please see our funding section.

EMPLOYABILITY

This science communication MSc is designed to equip the modern science communicator with the practical skills and theoretical grounding to carry out science communication, public engagement and policy roles in a wide range of institutions, from Universities to science festivals, museums and galleries to research funders, science and health charities, NGOs and science businesses spanning education, entertainment, PR/ advocacy and sustainable development.

Science communication professionals contribute to a wide range of industries including:

  • Media and creative industries;  
  • Science centres and museums;
  • Science education and outreach;
  • Research councils and policymaking.

Graduates could undertake roles (within these sectors and others) such as:

  • Broadcast, Media and Entertainment;
  • Science Journalism;
  • Science Advocacy;
  • Professional Consultancy;
  • Public Relations;
  • Science publishing;
  • Public Engagement; 
  • Public Involvement and Impact; 
  • Knowledge Exchange;
  • Museum education, exhibition and curation;
  • Events production, management.


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