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Masters Degrees (Media Law)

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The LLM in Media Law at Queen Mary, University of London allows you the opportunity to gain expertise in a range of legal regimes governing key aspects of the media, from the regulation of all key forms of media content to the regulation of the infrastructures via which that content is delivered, including traditional, new and still-developing media. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Media Law at Queen Mary, University of London allows you the opportunity to gain expertise in a range of legal regimes governing key aspects of the media, from the regulation of all key forms of media content to the regulation of the infrastructures via which that content is delivered, including traditional, new and still-developing media.
In an age of seemingly infinite broadcast channels, online information at our fingertips, and the ever-increasing economic and cultural significance of the entertainment industry, media law has never been more relevant to our daily lives than it is today.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and in many cases professional experiences from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

What is Media Law?

Media law is the study of the regulation of the media, whether in traditional print form, the broadcast media, or in the online arena. Increasingly, media regulations must be, and are being, adapted to take account of new technological developments as the dividing line between online media and traditional forms becomes less pronounced.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Media Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM355 Celebrity Privacy, the Media and the Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)

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The LLM Media Law, Policy and Practice degree has been designed to provide professional practitioners and graduates, in Law or other disciplines, with expert knowledge and a firm grounding in the concepts of media law and the regulation of media communication. Read more
The LLM Media Law, Policy and Practice degree has been designed to provide professional practitioners and graduates, in Law or other disciplines, with expert knowledge and a firm grounding in the concepts of media law and the regulation of media communication.

This Master’s draws on the University of East Anglia’s international strength in interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to media law, policy and practice.
It will particularly appeal to UK and International graduates who want a career in the media or who wish to build on their professional expertise and develop their understanding of the role of media law in private, public or corporate sectors.

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LLB Law. Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. . As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will. Read more

LLB Law: Senior Status degree is ideal for non-law graduates outside the UK to gain a qualifying law degree in two years. 

As a LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) student you will:

  • Gain a sound grounding in the Law of England and Wales
  • Learn how to apply legal concepts in a practical environment
  • Gain transferable skills, including team working, communication, presentation, problem-solving, research and analytical skills

Key Features of the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) 

  • Graduates achieve an LLB accredited Law degree
  • This course covers all the compulsory foundation modules required for a qualifying law degree

Choosing law will enable you to expand your intellectual skills in the context of a discipline which touches upon every aspect of human endeavour. As the degree progresses you will notice a marked improvement in your ability to manage large amounts of materials, to express yourself in an organised and convincing manner both in writing and orally, and to evaluate the strength of arguments you encounter. Not only will this give you a sense of personal satisfaction, but you will also have acquired skills which are highly relevant to a range of career options attracting competitive salaries.

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) Programme

Modules on the LLB Law (Senior Status Degree) may include:

Year 1

  • Contract Law 1
  • European Law 1
  • Public Law 1
  • Tort 1
  • Contract 2
  • European Law 2
  • Public Law 2
  • Tort Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Medical Law
  • Human Rights Law
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Planning Law
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law

Year 2

  • Criminal Law 1
  • Land Law 1
  • Equity and Trusts 1
  • Criminal Law 2
  • Equity and Trusts 2
  • Land Law 2
  • Family Law: Adult Relationships
  • Commercial Sales
  • Legal History of Wales
  • Environmental Law 1 - Regulatory Law Approaches
  • Planning Law
  • Employment Law: Rights and Obligations
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Agreements
  • Terrorism: The Legal Response
  • Criminal Evidence
  • Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • Human Rights & Social Justice
  • Medical Law
  • International Law - Principles and Procedures
  • Jurisprudence
  • Company Law: Incorporation, Constitution and Control
  • Sports Law and Liability
  • Legislation
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Family Law: Parents & Children
  • World Trade Law
  • Criminal Procedure and Sentencing
  • Nature Conservation Law
  • Employment Law: Enforcing Rights
  • Competition Law: Regulation of Dominance
  • Human rights-based research with children
  • Criminal Evidence Law and Psychology
  • Foundations in Legal Practice
  • Media Law
  • International Dispute Settlement
  • Company Law: Governance, Rights and Liquidation
  • Legal Issues in Sport
  • Multi-level Governance
  • Cymraeg y Gyfraith
  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • Miscarriage of Justice Project
  • Clinical Legal Education
  • Street Law
  • Medical Law: Reproduction

Graduate Employability and Careers

The College of Law and Criminology takes a proactive approach to enhancing graduate employability. The College offers a range of local, national and international work placements, professional courses and the advice and support to help you develop the skills to achieve your ambitions.

Our Law graduates find careers in:

  • Advice Worker
  • Barrister
  • Barrister's Clerk
  • Chartered Accountant
  • Chartered Legal Executive
  • Civil Service
  • Company Secretary
  • Lecturer
  • Licensed Conveyancer
  • Patent Attorney
  • Police
  • Researcher
  • Solicitor
  • Stockbroker
  • Trading Standards Officer


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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law. Read more
The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law.

LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law deals with the global and regional regulation of international trade, structuring and managing international business transactions, and the economic foundations of trade and corporate law.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Students on the LLM programme who take both the QLLM136 Ethics in Business and in Finance and QLLM007 Banking Law modules will be eligible for exemption from the Chartered Banker Diploma compulsory module: Professionalism Regulation and Ethics.

Taught modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Commercial and Corporate Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change.

Please refer the toe QMUL Law website for a full list and information on the modules for this programme.

Below is an example of some of the modules for this programme .
◦◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM120 Business Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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Globalisation and immigration have transformed the religious and cultural landscape in 21st century multicultural societies, leading to many challenges and complexities posed by religion in modern democracies. Read more

Globalisation and immigration have transformed the religious and cultural landscape in 21st century multicultural societies, leading to many challenges and complexities posed by religion in modern democracies.

This new course, which is the first of its kind in the UK, addresses those challenges and complexities and will provide you with a framework to engage with issues relating to the place of religion in public life.

The course is hosted by Westminster Law School and shares modules with the rest of the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities as well as Westminster School of Media Art and Design. The course is not affiliated to any particular faith but takes a broad approach to religion including non-religious beliefs. It will allow you to gain a deeper understanding of the place of religion in society and the role of law.

You can choose whether you want to study for the MA or LLM. For the MA you will need to have obtained a minimum of 180 credits at Level 7. You will have to take the three compulsory core modules which are: Law and Religion: Theory and Practice; Law and Religion in Context and Sociology of Law and Religion. In addition, you will have to write a dissertation and take an additional three optional modules of your choice.

Students who wish to obtain the award of LLM will need to write a dissertation with a substantial law element and are expected to take at least one law option in addition to the core modules.

MA

  • Law and Religion Theory and Practice (20 credits)
  • Law and Religion in Context (20 credits)
  • Sociology of Religion (20 credits)
  • MA Dissertation (60 credits)   
  • 3 options of your choice (from the proposed list)

LLM

  • Law and Religion Theory and Practice (20 credits)
  • Law and Religion in Context (20 credits)
  • Sociology of Religion (20 credits)   
  • LLM Dissertation in Law (60 credits)   
  • 3 options, one of which must be from Law

The course will equip you with key skills such as the ability to carry out independent research and to deal with sensitive topics. You will develop an awareness of world challenges posed by religion, a thorough knowledge of equality and non-discrimination legislation, debating and mooting skills, the ability to be non-judgmental, and to work in a multicultural environment.

Students will also benefit significantly from the Law and Religion Research Cluster which launched in February 2017. The research cluster will hold regular events on topical issues and provide an opportunity for students to network with academics and professionals associated with the field of religion, law and society. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Please note that option modules are subject to student demand and staffing availability, therefore not all modules will be offered in the same academic year.

Core modules

OR:

Option modules

Option modules from Westminster School of Law:

Options from Politics and International Relations:

Option modules from Westminster School of Media, Arts and Design:

Career path

Destinations for graduates will include - for example - academia, government departments, local councils, politics, education, human resources, the legal profession, marketing and journalism.



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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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From analysing the theories of intellectual heavyweights such as Foucault and Bourdieu, to unpicking a global campaign, explore the hinterland between the big three promotional professions and the media and society on this innovative MA. Read more

From analysing the theories of intellectual heavyweights such as Foucault and Bourdieu, to unpicking a global campaign, explore the hinterland between the big three promotional professions and the media and society on this innovative MA.

Right now the roles within public relations, advertising and marketing are converging. So this MA isn’t about studying ads – it’s about becoming a professional who can understand the dynamics of power that exist between these professions, and critically intervene in today’s media landscape. 

At its core this masters looks at how we can better serve society by improving communications across these disciplines, and how we can develop as professionals who can adapt within a challenging media world. You’ll learn how to reflect on the intellectual theories of the past and apply them to the present, so you plan the first decade of your career.

The questions we explore

We want you to understand the power struggles that exist between these three professions so we look at public relations, advertising and marketing as inter-related disciplines, drawing on theoretical and professional debates around issues such as globalisation and homogenised consumption. We also discuss current industry expectations looking at the crossovers that exist between creativity, management and strategy.

We’ll tackle some of the big things that are changing when it comes to the way the world works - aspects such as globalisation, the control of knowledge, digital technologies, and the way content is created. You’ll also get an introduction to media and cultural theory, which lies at the intersection between the promotional professions, media and society.

The processes we use

This is a theory-based programme, but it also offers vocational elements, so you can take practice-based options in subjects ranging from online journalism and social media campaigning, to design methods and media law and ethics. You'll also get the latest insights from industry professionals across a range of sectors through our visiting speaker series in the Spring.

The approach we take

We take fields such as sociology, anthropology media and cultural studies to understand how public relations, advertising and marketing get together, where they overlap and where the tensions lie. This means we might take an anthropological perspective on how the promotional professions work together to develop a product – not just in terms of its messaging – but in terms of how it was conceived and came to market in the first place.

It’s important to mention that this isn’t a business studies-style MA; it’s a rigorous, academic programme investigating promotional workers and their use of media in today’s campaigns and debates. 

Modules & structure

Throughout the core components of the degree, you'll examine the very wide range of ways in which public relations, advertising and marketing is represented in society, together with the skills and techniques enacted by practitioners in their day-to-day roles. You will be encouraged to develop your critical and analytical skills, but also to think creatively and become more confident in your aesthetic judgment.

Goldsmiths prides itself on its innovative and critical approach, and you will be encouraged to immerse yourself in its wider intellectual environment in order to deepen your understanding of the cultural infrastructure surrounding branding and promotional media.

Core modules

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Department of Media and Communications.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills & careers

From account executives to digital copywriters and from product managers to media planners and sponsorship coordinators, our graduates enhance their careers by working across disciplines, across countries, and across everything from social media and content generation, from sponsorship and events marketing, to corporate communications or government communications.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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Master the theory and practice of international law, both private and public. Develop advanced analytic and research skills for professional practice and other high-level international careers. Read more

Master the theory and practice of international law, both private and public. Develop advanced analytic and research skills for professional practice and other high-level international careers.

  • Master advanced international law in the English language, alongside legal practitioners from diverse jurisdictions and backgrounds
  • Benefit from small classes: receive close support and form lifelong friendships
  • Study at the centre of Cambridge’s legal quarter, halfway between the crown count and county court
  • Join a Law School with satisfied students: our law undergraduates were the UK’s most satisfied in 2015 and 2016*
  • Volunteer for our Law Clinic: put legal theory into practice by helping members of the public
  • Get first-hand advice and guidance from a professional on our mentoring scheme
  • Receive access to the University of Cambridge’s Squire Law Library

*The Complete University Guide 2015 and The Times and Sunday Times University League Table 2016

Develop your legal skills to an advanced level

On our LLM International Law, you will develop the necessary skills to critically appraise how international laws are created and enforced. Your legal reasoning, critical analysis, research skills and independent judgement will all be exercised as you learn to apply legal discourse to the regulation of transnational commercial, political and social interactions.

Learn the fundamental themes, and specialise

Our core modules will introduce you to the fundamental themes in the higher study of international law, the key principles of private and public international law, and an overview of international human rights and criminal law. On our optional modules, you can specialise in areas such as legal frameworks for media industries, synergies between European and international law, or more traditional topics such as comparative company law and international arbitration.

At the end of the course, you will use all the skills and knowledge you have learned to research and complete a Major Project in the area of international law that most interests you, under expert supervision.

Benefit from small classes

All of our modules involve small group seminar work complemented by independent study, allowing you to tackle each issue one at a time and giving you a clear distinction between them. Our small classes will allow you to receive dedicated support from lecturers and form close friendships with your fellow students.

Get support from diverse experts

Throughout the course, you will receive support and advice from dedicated staff who are expert in their fields. These include Course Leader Tom Serby and Dr Sarita Patil-Woolhouse (both of whom practised as commercial lawyers in the City of London after graduating from the University of Cambridge); Dr Ana Keglević Steffek(an author of leading texts on commercial law) and Professor Rohan Kariyawasam (Harvard Fulbright scholar, and member of E15 consultancy group on the China belt road project).

Course Leader: Tom Serby

Careers

Transferable skills

Our LLM will help you develop professional skills including logical reasoning, critical analysis, research and independent judgement, along with an understanding of the complex interplay between infrastructure, content, competition, social policy, punishment and trade in the international arena, and a greater capacity for legal communication.

These skills will prepare you for international practice and academic research at the highest level, but are also transferable to a range of other intellectually demanding roles, such as working for international NGOs and other agencies, or public service.

Employability events and opportunities

Volunteer for our Law Clinic and practise your legal skills in a real-life setting. Work alongside local solicitors, providing pro bono advice to people who have limited access to legal resources.

Join our mentoring scheme: partner with a professional from a regional law firm to get first-hand advice and guidance.

Our employability service also organise many focused events, such as careers fairs specifically for law students.

Access to legal resources

Cambridge has three courts, all close to ARU’s campus, where you can attend cases relevant to your studies: the Cambridgeshire Magistrates CourtCambridge Crown Court and Cambridge County and Family Court. The benefits of attending court cases for law students have been outlined in a recent Guardian article.

You can receive access to the University of Cambridge’s world-renowned Squire Law Library, where you will find resources including rare antiquarian legal history materials, a historical Labour Law collection and numerous old editions of prominent legal texts.

Access our own extensive library facilities on-campus, including an online digital library. All our LLM students receive a two-hour session with a dedicated Law School Librarian during Semester One and Semester Two. This will introduce you to research skills, and is carried through into the Research module.

Extracurricular law activities

Join our Law Society and take part in national competitions including mooting and Client Interviewing (won by ARU a record six times), or contribute to our Anglia Law Review. Mooting and Client Interviewing will further develop many of your transferable skills, including teamworking, public speaking, research and analysis, listening and responding, creative thinking and empathy.



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Entertainment is a large part of life globally in many forms such as music, film, media, sports and the arts. It is a combination of society, popular culture and commerce, and the interaction of these with law produces an exciting contemporary commercial subject with eclectic outcomes. Read more

Entertainment is a large part of life globally in many forms such as music, film, media, sports and the arts. It is a combination of society, popular culture and commerce, and the interaction of these with law produces an exciting contemporary commercial subject with eclectic outcomes. It is an area deeply affected by technological progress as well as business adaptation. This course combines academic analysis and commercial practice elements of entertainment law in an international perspective. The diverse nature of entertainment law will enable you to follow a number of relevant specialisms, all of which are underpinned by issues of contract and intellectual property. 

This course will suit graduates from a law background, or those from a non-law background who have significant relevant experience. There have been many successful international graduates on the course from all over the world. It will give you the opportunity to explore new ideas, thoughts and academic experiences within a supportive environment.

The course aims to develop your understanding of how key fields within the entertainment industries operate, to assess the impact of the law upon them, and give you the practical skills necessary to succeed in a career in entertainment and media law.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Option modules

Career path

As an entertainment law graduate you will be able to develop a career in a whole range of professions within the entertainment industry. Perhaps the most popular of these are roles in sports, music, and media and communications law. The subject gives a modern edge to traditional law subjects and is well respected by employers.



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What is the Master of Intellectual Property and ICT Law about?. The advanced master’s programme in IP & IT Law builds on the expertise of the KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law (CiTiP). Read more

What is the Master of Intellectual Property and ICT Law about?

The advanced master’s programme in IP & IT Law builds on the expertise of the KU Leuven Centre for IT & IP Law (CiTiP).

This programme intends to address the increasing demand for qualified legal experts in the IP, ICT and media sector. These are rapidly evolving and highly complex sectors influenced by a myriad of technological, economic and sociological developments. Existing legal frameworks are continuously challenged within these sectors and traditional legal concepts and principles are regularly being reinterpreted.

To achieve this objective, students are offered a comprehensive study of international and European IP law, IT law and media and communications law, with special attention to interdisciplinary perspectives and practical skills that are in demand in these sectors. 

The teaching staff consists of internationally respected academics, experts from institutions such as the European Commission and national regulatory authorities, and leading practitioners, ensuring optimal knowledge and experience transfer. The programme provides an excellent academic education and added value both to graduate students wishing to enhance their curriculum and to practitioners in search of top-quality, cutting-edge expertise.

Those who concentrate on the specialisation Intellectual Property Law/Droits Intellectuals follow a majority of the courses in Dutch and French. Those who concentrate on ICT Law follow all courses in English. Students remain, however, free to choose courses in the language of their choice. The programme also includes a Master's dissertation, optionally in Dutch, French or English.

This is an Advanced Master's programme which you can follow on a full-time or a part-time basis.

Objectives

  • The student masters the structure and methodology of the international and European and / or Belgian intellectual property rights, media and / or ICT law that he / she has followed.
  • The student can deal with complex problems in the domain of the intellectual property rights, media and / or ICT law that he / she has followed.
  • The student can independently test research findings and situate them in a personally substantiated structure that makes an original contribution to knowledge.
  • The student can adopt a critical position in relation to the domain of the intellectual property law rights, media law and / or IT law that he / she has followed.
  • The student can communicate his point of view to colleagues in Dutch, French and / or English.

Career perspectives

Graduates are well positioned for jobs in (international) law firms and companies in the IP, ICT and media sector. Graduates have also gone on to positions in (international) public administration as well as in international public interest organisations. Students may also choose to further develop their academic skills by pursuing a PhD related to fundamental issues of IP, ICT or media law.



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The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

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Develop your academic knowledge and awareness of issues in media and entertainment law, and increase your understanding of the legal dimension to activities taking place in the media and entertainment fields and the extent to which they might give rise to legal issues. Read more
Develop your academic knowledge and awareness of issues in media and entertainment law, and increase your understanding of the legal dimension to activities taking place in the media and entertainment fields and the extent to which they might give rise to legal issues. This distance learning programme is taught in partnership with Informa and was created in response to the growing demand for legal education in the media sector and specifically the areas of media and entertainment contracts, sports law, intellectual property rights, and advertising law and data protection.

More about this course

This internationally recognised qualification has been developed for those who wish to acquire expertise in media and entertainment law. This is a rapidly growing area of law including intellectual property, contracts, and defamation as these relate to media, including social media, and to areas such as advertising, music and sports law.

Taught in partnership with Informa via their online learning platform, this distance learning course has been designed specifically for those working in, or wishing to enter the media and entertainment fields; or for those with, or without legal backgrounds who wish to broaden their expertise and to understand better the legal issues arising in these areas. It therefore welcomes applicants from both legal and non-legal backgrounds who have the potential to benefit from the programme and includes an introductory module to English law designed to assist those with no prior legal training.

Due to current and varied issues ranging from the way print media is regulated, to the ever increasing problems now facing companies over the misuse of social media, this course aims to bring a structure to the way the media and entertainment world is constantly trying to coexist with the law. The law can be deemed to play catch up with society and one reason for this is due to the expansion of technological developments within the industry; examples of this can be seen with issues such as cybercrime and WikiLeaks which this course will be investigating. The course is designed to merge commercial practical components and the theoretical understanding of the way these two industries work.

The purpose of the course is to enable you to:
-Develop an in-depth and practical understanding of media and entertainment law
-Understand the principles and practice of media and entertainment law and the changing commercial contexts in which these operate
-Analyse issues in media and entertainment from a legal perspective
-Apply relevant law to help resolve issues that arise in media and entertainment practice
-Utilise mediation and other alternative dispute resolution methods to help secure settlements

As well as deepening your understanding of the law our focus throughout the programme is on the practical application of the law. The programme benefits from tutors with strong relevant backgrounds in the academic world and in legal practice with a number practising as barristers or solicitors.

The assessment includes a reaserch project and a dissertation alongside other projects.

For more information on the PGDip portion of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/media-and-entertainment-law---pg-dip/

Modular structure

The LLM ‘Topup’ by distance learning involves taking one research based module and completing a 15,000 word dissertation.

After the course

Successful completion of this course will highlight your legal skills in the specific context of media, entertainment and sports. The LLM will enable you to gain a professional advantage in media/entertainment industries, where legal skills are becoming more and more vital.

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The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights. Read more

About the course

The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights.

This enables graduates to fill the increasing demand for expertise in these areas and to produce their own 'bespoke' degree to suit their career needs.

Furthermore, because many of the modules have an international dimension, the LLM law course has proven to be of great interest to overseas candidates.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

Students receive a thorough grounding in the legal concepts and principles operating in the areas of law chosen.

They are given the opportunity to gain an understanding of areas of social and criminal justice policy where relevant and are introduced
to areas of controversy in their selected areas of law and socio-legal studies.

The Brunel Law School’s Masters of Law programme is designed to flexible enabling students to either broaden their proficiency in a range of areas or gain in-depth specialist knowledge of a particular subject of interest.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

EU Competition Law
International Criminal Law
International Criminal Justice
Corporate Law I
Corporate Law II
International Human Rights and Islamic Law
Theory of International Financial Regulation
World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law
Privacy and Data Protection
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration
Philosophical Foundations of IP
Media Law and Regulation
Internet Law I -Substantive Legal Issues
Public International Law
European System of Human Rights Protection
Foundations of International Human Rights Law
International Humanitarian Law
Multiculturalism and Human Rights
Patent Law and Practice
Trade Marks and Allied Rights
International Trade Law
International Environmental Law
Comparative Criminal Justice
Comparative Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law
Theory and Practice of International Human Rights
Practice of International Financial Regulation
Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
Human Rights of Women
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Americas, Africa, Asia
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights
Managing Intellectual Property
International Intellectual Property Law
EU Intellectual Property Law

Teaching

The classes are taught to groups of approximately 30 students. Tutors use a variety of teaching methods to deliver their modules. Lectures provide a structure for the module and give an overview of the subject matter. They will introduce students to new topics relevant to their modules.

Some classes will take the form of a lecture, others will be taught seminar style. Some may use a mixture of teaching methods (eg lecture, research, case law and problem methods), in order to promote a personalised learning that considers the individual student’s interests, needs and abilities. We believe that it is part of student experience to be exposed to different teaching styles.

There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over one of the teaching terms.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by:

- participating in research centre activities and research trips
- contributing to newsletters
- making oral presentations
- attending law film screenings
- participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible Start Times and Learning Options
Programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offer smaller 15 credit modules, which provides students a range of options to both tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
Brunel Law School benefits from very active research centres, which have hosted a large number of research seminars and workshops in the last few years. Many of these events focus on a wide range of issues and they tackle the latest debates in the industry with a number of highly respected guests. Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking, and it is important to us that all our staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE).  In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-Curricular Activities
Brunel Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
Brunel Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

The Graduate School
Brunel Graduate School offers postgraduates additional features for study and the opportunity to meet fellow postgraduate students from across the University, so you will have the opportunity to meet others studying for their master of laws degrees and socialise with fellow postgraduate students.

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On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. Read more
On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. The programme is interdisciplinary thus building on the strengths in this area of the Sutherland School of Law and the School of Politics and International Relations. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international human rights law from asylum law and practice, the EU and fundamental rights to the law of privacy in Ireland.

The LLM in International Human rights differs from existing degrees in Ireland by having a distinct interdisciplinary nature flowing from the co-ordination between the School of Law and the School of politics and International relations (SpIre).

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Your studies

On this programme you will acquire a specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights in a single course.
Your core modules will include International Human Rights Law and the Politics of Human Rights. You will also choose from modules such as: International Security; Politics of Development; Discrimination Law; and, Media and Regulation. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will also have international exchange opportunities during the programme. On completion of your studies, you will:
- be able to understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and international relations in the study of human rights;
- be able to apply this knowledge and understanding to real and hypothetical situations;
- be able to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers;
- have identified doctrinal and practical trends in legal practise and their impact; and,
- have an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The programme qualifies you to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, legal-adviser, policymaker, advocate, researcher, or academic. Career opportunities exist in intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms, and Universities.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- International Human Rights considers the theoretical underpinnings and development of contemporary international human rights law, critically examines the institutional architecture developed by the UN system and regional systems to implement human rights norms as well as national methods of implementation of human rights law.

- Law of the ECHR offers a critical examination of key aspects of the operation and substantive law of the ECHR focussing on its incorporation into domestic law and an in-depth analysis and evaluation of the Court's jurisprudence for a number of substantive rights.

- Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Comparative Constitutional Law discusses a number of constitutional issues from a comparative perspective including the influence of the ECHR and its jurisprudence on constitutional structures and systems.

- Media Regulation discusses the regulatory environment in which the media operates, and encourages a critical analysis of the implications which the current system has for media freedom, journalistic ethics and practices, democracy and governance

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as practising lawyers, legal-advisers, policy-makers, advocates, researchers or academics. Career opportunities in the field of human rights can arise in a variety of different contexts. These include, but are not limited to, intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms and Universities.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/apply,80081,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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