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Masters Degrees (Media Law)

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The LLM in Media Law at Queen Mary, University of London allows you the opportunity to gain expertise in a range of legal regimes governing key aspects of the media, from the regulation of all key forms of media content to the regulation of the infrastructures via which that content is delivered, including traditional, new and still-developing media. Read more

Overview

The LLM in Media Law at Queen Mary, University of London allows you the opportunity to gain expertise in a range of legal regimes governing key aspects of the media, from the regulation of all key forms of media content to the regulation of the infrastructures via which that content is delivered, including traditional, new and still-developing media.
In an age of seemingly infinite broadcast channels, online information at our fingertips, and the ever-increasing economic and cultural significance of the entertainment industry, media law has never been more relevant to our daily lives than it is today.

Your fellow students will come from the UK and more than 80 other countries, each able to draw on prior academic and in many cases professional experiences from different jurisdictions to enrich discussion and debate in class.

What is Media Law?

Media law is the study of the regulation of the media, whether in traditional print form, the broadcast media, or in the online arena. Increasingly, media regulations must be, and are being, adapted to take account of new technological developments as the dividing line between online media and traditional forms becomes less pronounced.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Media Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM355 Celebrity Privacy, the Media and the Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM359 Cyberspace Law: Protecting the Online Persona: Digital Rights in Cyberspace (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)

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The LLM Media Law, Policy and Practice degree has been designed to provide professional practitioners and graduates, in Law or other disciplines, with expert knowledge and a firm grounding in the concepts of media law and the regulation of media communication. Read more
The LLM Media Law, Policy and Practice degree has been designed to provide professional practitioners and graduates, in Law or other disciplines, with expert knowledge and a firm grounding in the concepts of media law and the regulation of media communication.

This Master’s draws on the University of East Anglia’s international strength in interdisciplinary and comparative approaches to media law, policy and practice.
It will particularly appeal to UK and International graduates who want a career in the media or who wish to build on their professional expertise and develop their understanding of the role of media law in private, public or corporate sectors.

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This programme provides an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of the law of the European Union, with particular emphasis upon its commercial aspects. Read more
This programme provides an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of the law of the European Union, with particular emphasis upon its commercial aspects. If you are new to European law, there is a (compulsory) foundation course providing a solid grounding in the subject. Having completed your choice of taught modules, you will then undertake an extended dissertation on a European law topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff with expertise in their chosen subject area.

Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminar or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research with individual supervision. Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme

The School is host to the Durham European Law Institute, and you are encouraged to participate in its many activities. The Library, which includes a European Documentation Centre, has extensive holdings of European materials.

Course Structure

Students must study modules in Introduction to EU law, and Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Introduction to EU Law (unless you have previously studied such a module)
-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU
-Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
-Advanced Law of Obligations
-Advanced Research in EU Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Commercial Fraud
-Comparative and Transnational Law
-Comparative Corporate Governance
-Comparative Insurance Law
-Comparative Private Law
-Corporate Compliance
-Corporate Social Responsibility
-Corporations in an EU Context
-Current Issues in Commercial Law
-Current Issues in Company Law
-Current Problems of International Law
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law
-Electronic Commerce
-Environment Law and International Trade
-EU Competition Law
-EU Trade Law
-European Discrimination Law
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective
-Fundamentals of International Law
-International and Comparative Advertising Law
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
-International Banking Law
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution
-International Co-operation in Criminal Matters
-International Human Rights Law
-International Human Rights Law, Development and Commerce
-International Investment Law
-International Law of Human Rights
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender
-International Sales Law
-Introduction to Corporate Governance
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Introduction to the Law of Oil Contracts
-Islamic Law
-Law of the WTO
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Mergers and Acquisitions
-Perspectives on Securities Law and Capital Markets
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law
-Rights of the Child
-Selected Issues in Competition Law
-Selected Issues in European Law
-Selected Issues of Intellectual Property Law
-Takeover Regulation in the EU
-Tax Law and Policy
-The Community Legal Order
-The European Union and International Trade
-Unjust Enrichment

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

Read less
This programme offers students from a wide variety of backgrounds the opportunity to develop their legal knowledge and skills in some of the most intellectually challenging and practically relevant areas of trade and commercial law. Read more
This programme offers students from a wide variety of backgrounds the opportunity to develop their legal knowledge and skills in some of the most intellectually challenging and practically relevant areas of trade and commercial law. The course has a particular emphasis upon the international aspects of these areas of legal knowledge and practice.

During the first two terms of the programme, students study taught modules drawn from a wide variety of topics on international trade and commercial law. Students then complete their studies by writing a dissertation on a topic chosen by them, and supervised by a member of staff with expertise in their selected subject area. Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminar or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research with individual supervision.

Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme. The School is host to the Institute of Commercial and Corporate Law, and students on the LLM are encouraged to participate in its activities.

Course Structure

Students must study one compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU
-Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
-Advanced Law of Obligations
-Advanced Research in EU Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Commercial Fraud
-Comparative and Transnational Law
-Comparative Corporate Governance
-Comparative Insurance Law
-Comparative Private Law
-Corporate Compliance
-Corporate Social Responsibility
-Corporations in an EU Context
-Current Issues in Commercial Law
-Current Issues in Company Law
-Current Problems of International Law
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law
-Electronic Commerce
-Environement Law and International Trade
-EU Competition Law
-EU Trade Law
-European Discrimination Law
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective
-Fundamentals of International Law
-International and Comparative Advertising Law
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
-International Banking Law
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution
-International Co-operation in Criminal Matters
-International Human Rights Law
-International Human Rights Law, Development and Commerce
-International Investment Law
-International Law of Human Rights
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender
-International Sales Law
-Introduction to Corporate Governance
-Introduction to EU Law
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Introduction to the Law of Oil Contracts
-Islamic Law
-Law of the WTO
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Mergers and Acquisitions
-Perspectives on Securities Law and Capital Markets
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law
-Rights of the Child
-Selected Issues in Competition Law
-Selected Issues in European Law
-Selected Issues of Intellectual Property Law
-Takeover Regulation in the EU
-Tax Law and Policy
-The Community Legal Order
-The European Union and International Trade
-Unjust Enrichment

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation). In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

Read less
This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Read more
This programme gives you the widest choice of modules. Modules can be selected from those available for students studying in International Trade and Commercial Law, and European Trade and Commercial Law, as well as in areas falling outside those commercial law subjects, such as in International Co-operation in Criminal Law, or International Human Rights.

Having completed your taught modules, you will undertake an extended dissertation of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words in length, under the supervision of a member of staff who is an expert in your chosen field of research. Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminars or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research.

Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme. The Law School hosts a number of research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, the Durham European Law Institute, the Centre for Criminal Law and Criminal Justice and the Human Rights Centre. Students are encouraged to participate in all their activities.

Course Structure

Students must study one compulsory module in Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules. The list below provides an example of the type of modules which may be offered.
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU
-Advanced Issues of International Intellectual Property Law
-Advanced Law of Obligations
-Advanced Research in EU Law
-Carriage of Goods by Sea
-Commercial Fraud
-Comparative and Transnational Law
-Comparative Corporate Governance
-Comparative Insurance Law
-Comparative Private Law
-Corporate Compliance
-Corporate Social Responsibility
-Corporations in an EU Context
-Current Issues in Commercial Law
-Current Issues in Company Law
-Current Problems of International Law
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law
-Electronic Commerce
-Environment Law and International Trade
-EU Competition Law
-EU Trade Law
-European Discrimination Law
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective
-Fundamentals of International Law
-International and Comparative Advertising Law
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law
-International Banking Law
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution
-International Co-operation in Criminal Matters
-International Human Rights Law
-International Human Rights Law, Development and Commerce
-International Investment Law
-International Law of Human Rights
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender
-International Sales Law
-Introduction to Corporate Governance
-Introduction to EU Law
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Introduction to the Law of Oil Contracts
-Islamic Law
-Law of the WTO
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act
-Mergers and Acquisitions
-Perspectives on Securities Law and Capital Markets
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law
-Rights of the Child
-Selected Issues in Competition Law
-Selected Issues in European Law
-Selected Issues of Intellectual Property Law
-Takeover Regulation in the EU
-Tax Law and Policy
-The Community Legal Order
-The European Union and International Trade
-Unjust Enrichment

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation). In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

Read less
This programme provides an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of corporate law. There is a (compulsory) foundation course providing a solid grounding in the subject. Read more
This programme provides an opportunity to develop an advanced knowledge of corporate law. There is a (compulsory) foundation course providing a solid grounding in the subject. Having completed your choice of taught modules, you will then undertake an extended dissertation on a corporate law topic of your choice, supervised by a member of staff with expertise in their chosen subject area.

Teaching is by a mixture of lectures and smaller, student-led, seminar or tutorial groups. The dissertation is pursued by independent research with individual supervision. Students attending the programme are drawn from a broad range of countries, and their previous academic or professional experiences enrich the programme

The School is host to the Durham Institute of Commercial and Corporate Law, and you are encouraged to participate in its many activities. The Library has extensive holdings of corporate law materials.

Course Structure

Students must study modules in Current Issues in Company Law and Applied Research Methods in Law. You must also choose a number of additional taught modules, from a large body of optional modules. Finally, a dissertation must be completed, on a topic chosen by you in consultation with your allotted supervisor.

Core Modules

-Current Issues in Company Law
-Applied Research Methods in Law
-Dissertation (of 10,000, 15,000 or 20,000 words)

Optional Modules

Candidates shall also study and be assessed in modules such as those from the following list to the value of (when added to the core modules chosen above) at least 120 credits:
-Corporations in an EU Context*
-Introduction to Corporate Governance*
-Mergers and Acquisitions*
-Corporate Social Responsibility*
-Principles of Corporate Insolvency Law*
-Securities Law and Capital Markets*
-Corporate Compliance*
-International and Comparative Corporate Insolvency Law*
-Comparative Corporate Governance*
-Corporate Taxation* (pending)
-Takeover Regulation in the EU*
-Candidates shall choose any remaining modules from the following:
-International Sales Law*
-Electronic Commerce*
-Advanced Issues in International Economic Law*
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution*
-International Investment Law*
-International Banking Law*
-International Human Rights Law, Development, and Commerce*
-Comparative and Transnational Law*
-Comparative Private Law*
-Comparative Insurance Law*
-Tax Law and Policy*
-International Perspectives on Law and Gender*
-Introduction to Intellectual Property Law*
-Advanced Issues of Intellectual Property Law*
-EU Competition Law*
-Islamic Law*
-Selected issues in Competition Law*
-Carriage of Goods by Sea*
-Unjust Enrichment*
-Introduction to the Law of Oil and Gas Contracts*
-International Human Rights Law*
-International and Comparative Advertising Law*
-Introduction to International Criminal Justice*
-Commercial Fraud*
-International Cooperation in Criminal Matters*
-Introduction to EU Law*
-Fundamentals of International Law*
-Current Problems of International Law*
-Rights of the Child*
-European Discrimination Law*
-The Community Legal Order*
-Advanced Issues in the Constitutional Law of the EU*
-Selected Issues in European Law*
-Advanced Research in EU Law*
-Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act*
-Introduction to Media Freedom under the Human Rights Act*
-Domestic Anti-Discrimination Law*
-Free Speech Problems in International and Comparative Perspective*

*Please note: not all modules necessarily run every year, and we regularly introduce new modules.

Learning and Teaching

This programme involves both taught modules and a substantial dissertation component. Taught modules are delivered by a mixture of lectures and seminars. Although most lectures do encourage student participation, they are used primarily to introduce chosen topics, identify relevant concepts, and introduce the student to the main debates and ideas relevant to the chosen topic. They give students a framework of knowledge that students can then develop, and reflect on, through their own reading and study.

Seminars are smaller-sized, student-led classes. Students are expected to carry out reading prior to classes, and are usually set questions or problems to which to apply the knowledge they have developed. Through class discussion, or the presentation of student papers, students are given the opportunity to test and refine their knowledge and understanding, in a relaxed and supportive environment.

The number of contact hours in each module will reflect that module’s credit weighting. 15-credit modules will have, in total, 15 contact hours (of either lectures or seminars); 30-credit modules will have 30 contact hours. Students must accumulate, in total, between 90 and 120 credits of taught modules for the programme (depending upon the length of their dissertation).

In addition to their taught modules, all students must produce a dissertation of between 10,000 and 20,000 words. This is intended to be the product of the student’s own independent research. Each student is allocated a dissertation supervisor, and will have a series of (usually four) one-to-one meetings with their supervisor over the course of the academic year.

Finally, all taught postgraduate students on this programme, are encouraged to attend the various events, including guest lectures and seminars, organised through the School’s research centres, including the Institute for Commercial and Corporate Law, and Durham European Law Institute.

Read less
Develop your academic knowledge and awareness of issues in media and entertainment law, and increase your understanding of the legal dimension to activities taking place in the media and entertainment fields and the extent to which they might give rise to legal issues. Read more
Develop your academic knowledge and awareness of issues in media and entertainment law, and increase your understanding of the legal dimension to activities taking place in the media and entertainment fields and the extent to which they might give rise to legal issues. This distance learning programme is taught in partnership with Informa and was created in response to the growing demand for legal education in the media sector and specifically the areas of media and entertainment contracts, sports law, intellectual property rights, and advertising law and data protection.

More about this course

This internationally recognised qualification has been developed for those who wish to acquire expertise in media and entertainment law. This is a rapidly growing area of law including intellectual property, contracts, and defamation as these relate to media, including social media, and to areas such as advertising, music and sports law.

Taught in partnership with Informa via their online learning platform, this distance learning course has been designed specifically for those working in, or wishing to enter the media and entertainment fields; or for those with, or without legal backgrounds who wish to broaden their expertise and to understand better the legal issues arising in these areas. It therefore welcomes applicants from both legal and non-legal backgrounds who have the potential to benefit from the programme and includes an introductory module to English law designed to assist those with no prior legal training.

Due to current and varied issues ranging from the way print media is regulated, to the ever increasing problems now facing companies over the misuse of social media, this course aims to bring a structure to the way the media and entertainment world is constantly trying to coexist with the law. The law can be deemed to play catch up with society and one reason for this is due to the expansion of technological developments within the industry; examples of this can be seen with issues such as cybercrime and WikiLeaks which this course will be investigating. The course is designed to merge commercial practical components and the theoretical understanding of the way these two industries work.

The purpose of the course is to enable you to:
-Develop an in-depth and practical understanding of media and entertainment law
-Understand the principles and practice of media and entertainment law and the changing commercial contexts in which these operate
-Analyse issues in media and entertainment from a legal perspective
-Apply relevant law to help resolve issues that arise in media and entertainment practice
-Utilise mediation and other alternative dispute resolution methods to help secure settlements

As well as deepening your understanding of the law our focus throughout the programme is on the practical application of the law. The programme benefits from tutors with strong relevant backgrounds in the academic world and in legal practice with a number practising as barristers or solicitors.

The assessment includes a reaserch project and a dissertation alongside other projects.

For more information on the PGDip portion of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.londonmet.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/media-and-entertainment-law---pg-dip/

Modular structure

The LLM ‘Topup’ by distance learning involves taking one research based module and completing a 15,000 word dissertation.

After the course

Successful completion of this course will highlight your legal skills in the specific context of media, entertainment and sports. The LLM will enable you to gain a professional advantage in media/entertainment industries, where legal skills are becoming more and more vital.

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On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. Read more
On this programme you will acquire specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights. The programme is interdisciplinary thus building on the strengths in this area of the Sutherland School of Law and the School of Politics and International Relations. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international human rights law from asylum law and practice, the EU and fundamental rights to the law of privacy in Ireland.

The LLM in International Human rights differs from existing degrees in Ireland by having a distinct interdisciplinary nature flowing from the co-ordination between the School of Law and the School of politics and International relations (SpIre).

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Your studies

On this programme you will acquire a specialised and in-depth knowledge and understanding of international human rights law, political theory of rights and international relations relating to human rights in a single course.
Your core modules will include International Human Rights Law and the Politics of Human Rights. You will also choose from modules such as: International Security; Politics of Development; Discrimination Law; and, Media and Regulation. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will also have international exchange opportunities during the programme. On completion of your studies, you will:
- be able to understand and think critically about the intersections between law, politics and international relations in the study of human rights;
- be able to apply this knowledge and understanding to real and hypothetical situations;
- be able to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers;
- have identified doctrinal and practical trends in legal practise and their impact; and,
- have an increased ability to identify and analyse problems from a legal perspective.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The programme qualifies you to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, legal-adviser, policymaker, advocate, researcher, or academic. Career opportunities exist in intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms, and Universities.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, there are core modules that must be taken in both Law and Politics. The core law modules are

- International Human Rights considers the theoretical underpinnings and development of contemporary international human rights law, critically examines the institutional architecture developed by the UN system and regional systems to implement human rights norms as well as national methods of implementation of human rights law.

- Law of the ECHR offers a critical examination of key aspects of the operation and substantive law of the ECHR focussing on its incorporation into domestic law and an in-depth analysis and evaluation of the Court's jurisprudence for a number of substantive rights.

- Other Law modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Comparative Constitutional Law discusses a number of constitutional issues from a comparative perspective including the influence of the ECHR and its jurisprudence on constitutional structures and systems.

- Media Regulation discusses the regulatory environment in which the media operates, and encourages a critical analysis of the implications which the current system has for media freedom, journalistic ethics and practices, democracy and governance

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

This programme will equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the field of human rights, either domestically or internationally, as practising lawyers, legal-advisers, policy-makers, advocates, researchers or academics. Career opportunities in the field of human rights can arise in a variety of different contexts. These include, but are not limited to, intergovernmental organisations (United Nations, Council of Europe, European Union, Organisation for Cooperation and Security in Europe), government departments, international and domestic non-governmental organisations, law firms and Universities.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/apply,80081,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmininternationalhumanrights/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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Are you ready to take your career in the world of commercial law to the next level?. The Master of Commercial Law is for those working in roles that require a sound grasp of commercial law issues. Read more
Are you ready to take your career in the world of commercial law to the next level?

The Master of Commercial Law is for those working in roles that require a sound grasp of commercial law issues. The course focuses on areas that include corporate and competition law, banking and finance law, and tax law and allows students to choose from an extensive range of domestic and international commercial law units. Our offering of units is designed to cater to a variety of career aspirations and interests. In this course, you will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

The Master of Commercial Law provides a formal course of training for non-lawyers working in law-related fields (e.g. accountants, company administrators, management personnel, and related business areas). It provides students with the opportunity to obtain a specialist qualification in commercial law and provides a springboard from which to launch or further your career in this complex and evolving professional area.

We are one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, and this course is offered at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers a choice from a broad range of commercial law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such as international trade law, competition law, corporate and white collar crime and corporate finance—to name a few, you will gain thorough theoretical and practical grounding in commercial law and practice. You will also develop the advanced professional skills and specialist knowledge required for work in this dynamic field.

We provide the flexibility to choose a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study options allow you to continue to work, as well as meet personal commitments.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/commercial-law-l6001?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Commercial law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Commercial law knowledge
The studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of commercial law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas commercial law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to commercial law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/commercial-law-l6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas. Read more
We are living through an era of tumultuous change in how politics is conducted and communicated. The great digital disruption of the early 21st century continues to work its way through media systems around the world, forcing change, adaptation, and renewal across a whole range of areas: political parties and campaigns, interest groups, social movements, activist organisations, news and journalism, the communication industries, governments, and international relations.

In the New Political Communication Unit at Royal Holloway, University of London, we believe the key to making sense of these chaotic developments is the idea of power—how it is generated, how it is used, and how it shapes the diverse information and communication flows that affect all our lives.

This unique new Masters degree, which replaces the MSc in New Political Communication, is for critically-minded, free-thinking individuals who want to engage with the exciting intellectual ferment that is being generated by these unprecedented times. The curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings.

While not a practice-based course, the MSc Media, Power, and Public Affairs is perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally. These include advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, and public diplomacy, to name but a few. Plus, due to its strong emphasis on scholarly rigour, the MSc in Media, Power, and Public Affairs is also the perfect foundation for a PhD in political communication.

You will study a mixture of core and elective units, including a generous choice of free options, and write a supervised dissertation over the summer. Teaching is conducted primarily in small group seminars that meet weekly for two hours, supplemented by individual tuition for the dissertation.

This course is also offered at Postgraduate Diploma level for those who do not have the academic background necessary to begin an advanced Masters degree. The structure of the Diploma is identical except that you will not write a dissertation. If you are successful on the Diploma you may transfer to the MSc, subject to academic approval.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/politicsandir/coursefinder/mscpgdipmediapowerandpublicaffairs.aspx

Why choose this course?

- be taught by internationally-leading scholars in the field of political communication

- the curriculum integrates rigorous study of the very best academic research with an emphasis on making sense of political communication as it is practiced in the real world, in both "old" and "new" media settings

- perfect for those who wish to build a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally

- a unique focus on the question of power and influence in today’s radically networked societies.

On completion of the programme, you will have:
- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of key concepts, theoretical debates, and developments in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge of the texts, theories, and methods used to enhance understanding of the issues, processes, and phenomena in the field of political communication

- advanced knowledge and critical understanding of research methods in the social sciences

- a solid foundation for a career in the growing range of professions that require deep and critical insight into the relationship between media and politics and public communication more generally, or for a PhD in any area of media and politics.

Department research and industry highlights

- The New Political Communication Unit’s research agenda focuses on the impact of new media and communication technologies on politics, policy and governance. Core staff include Professor Andrew Chadwick, Professor Ben O’Loughlin, Dr Alister Miskimmon, and Dr Cristian Vaccari. Recent books include Andrew Chadwick’s The Hybrid Media System: Politics and Power (Oxford University Press, 2013), Cristian Vaccari’s Digital Politics in Western Democracies: A Comparative Study (Johns Hopkins University Press), and Alister Miskimmon, Ben O’Loughlin, and Laura Roselle’s, Strategic Narratives: Communication Power and the New World Order (Routledge, 2013). Andrew Chadwick edits the Oxford University Press book series Oxford Studies in Digital Politics and Ben O’Loughlin is co-editor of the journal Media, War and Conflict. The Unit hosts a large number of PhD students working in the field of new political communication.

Course content and structure

You will study four core course units (chosen from a total of six options), two elective units, and write a dissertation over the summer. Course units include one of three disciplinary training pathway courses, a course in research design, analysing international politics, and specialist options in international relations.

Students studying for the Postgraduate Diploma do not undertake the dissertation.

Core course units:
Media, Power, and Public Affairs: You will examine the relationship between media, politics and power in contemporary political life. This unit focuses on a number of important foundational themes, including theories of media effects, the construction of political news, election campaigning, government communications and spin, media regulation, the emergence of digital media, the globalisation of media, agenda setting, and propaganda and the role of media in international affairs. The overarching rationale is that we live in an era in which the massive diversity of media, new technologies, and new methodologies demands new forms of analysis. The approach will be comparative and international.

Internet and New Media Politics:
 Drawing predominantly, though not exclusively, upon specialist academic journal literatures, this course focuses on a number of important contemporary debates about the role and influence of new technologies on the values, processes and outcomes of: global governance institutions; public bureaucracies; journalism and news production; representative institutions including political parties and legislatures; pressure groups and social movements. It also examines persistent and controversial policy problems generated by digital media, such as privacy and surveillance, the nature of contemporary media systems, and the balance of power between older and newer media logics in social and political life. By the end of the course students will have an understanding of the key issues thrown up by the internet and new media, as well as a critical perspective on what these terms actually mean. The approach will be comparative, drawing on examples from around the world, including the developing world, but the principal focus will be on the politics of the United States and Britain.

Social Media and Politics: This course addresses the various ways in which social media are changing the relationships between politicians, citizens, and the media. The course will start by laying out broad arguments and debates about the democratic implications of social media that are ongoing not just in academic circles but also in public commentary, political circles, and policy networks—do social media expand or narrow civic engagement? Do they lead to cross-cutting relationships or self-reinforcing echo chambers? Do they hinder or promote political participation? Are they useful in campaigns or just the latest fashion? Do they foster effective direct communication between politicians and citizens? Are they best understood as technologies of freedom or as surveillance tools? These debates will be addressed throughout the course by drawing on recent empirical research published in the most highly rated academic journals in the field. The course will thus enable students to understand how social media are used by citizens, politicians, and media professionals to access, distribute, and co-produce contents that are relevant to politics and public affairs and establish opportunities for political and civic engagement.

Media, War and Conflict:
The post-9/11 global security situation and the 2003 Iraq war have prompted a marked increase in interest in questions concerning media, war and conflict. This unit examines the relationships between media, governments, military, and audiences/publics, in light of old, new, and potential future security events.

Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations:
 You will be provided with an introduction to core theories and qualitative approaches in politics and international relations. You will examine a number of explanatory/theoretical frameworks, their basic assumptions, strengths and weaknesses, and concrete research applications. You will consider the various qualitative techniques available for conducting research, the range of decisions qualitative researchers face, and the trade-offs researchers must consider when designing qualitative research.

Dissertation (MSc only): The dissertation gives you the opportunity to study an aspect of Media, Power, and Public Affairs in depth. You will be assigned a dissertation supervisor and the length of the piece will be 12,000 words.

Elective course units:
Note: not all course units are available every year, but may include:
- Politics of Democracy
- Elections and Parties
- United States Foreign Policy
- Human Rights: From Theory to Practice
- Theories and Concepts in International Public Policy
- Contemporary Anglo-American Political Theory
- Transnational Security Studies
- Conflict and Conflict Resolution in the Middle East
- The Law of Cyber Warfare
- Comparative Political Executives
- European Union Politics and Policy
- International Public Policy in Practice
- Sovereignty, Rights and Justice
- Theories of Globalisation
- Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods in Politics and International Relations

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by coursework and an individually-supervised dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Advocacy, campaign management, political communication consultancy, journalism, government communication, policy analysis, public opinion and semantic polling, public diplomacy, PhD research.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Master commercial law in the European context through investigating business relations and transactions within the European Union. Read more
Master commercial law in the European context through investigating business relations and transactions within the European Union.

Our LLM European Union Commercial Law allows you to acquire a specialist’s knowledge and understanding of the law of the EU. You develop critical, analytical and research skills, ensuring you are capable of working in the field of EU law as a lawyer, regulator, legal adviser or researcher with government or international and business organisations (including the EU administration).

You explore topics including:
-Corporate governance within the EU
-European competition law
-EU rules on employment
-The EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights
-Legal analysis and writing

At Essex we specialise in commercial law, public law, and human rights law. We are top 20 in the UK for research excellence (REF 2014), and we are among the top 200 departments on the planet according to the QS World University rankings (2015).

Our law course will develop your intellectual and critical faculties, encourage you to think independently and teach you to present rational, coherent and accurate arguments orally and in writing. It will provide you with an excellent foundation for any career.

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

Our internationally diverse community of staff and students gives us a breadth of cross-cultural perspectives and insights into law and justice around the world.

Key staff for this course include Professor Steve Peers, who works on EU Constitutional and Administrative Law, Justice and Home Affairs, External Relations, Human Rights, Internal Market and Social Law and runs a popular blog on EU law analysis. Dr Marios Koutsias researches company law, corporate governance, European Union law (with a special emphasis on the Internal Market), privacy and Data Protection, globalisation.

This community, combined with opportunities to study abroad during your time with us, ensures you graduate with a genuine worldview and a network of international contacts.

Specialist facilities

-Volunteer at the Essex Law Clinic where you can work alongside practicing solicitors to offer legal advice to clients
-Gain commercial awareness at our Business and Legal Advice Clinic
-Work on key human rights projects at our Human Rights Clinic
-Participate in mooting competitions to develop your skills, particularly important if you hope to become a barrister
-Test your mediation and negotiation skills in our Client Interviewing Competition (sponsored by Birkett Long Solicitors)
-Join our Model United Nations society, which can improve your skills of argumentation, oral presentation and research
-Network at our student-run Law Society, Human Rights Society, and Bar Society, which provides legal advice to the Commonwealth Students’ Association (CSA)
-Our Essex Street Law project is one of the first of its kind and is the primary pro-bono project provided by our Law Society
-Take advantage of networking opportunities throughout the year with visiting law firms

Your future

Our School of Law graduates have gone on to a wide variety of careers in international and intergovernmental organisations or employment with governments across the world, in commerce and banking, in non-governmental organisations and, as might be expected, in the legal profession and the judiciary.

During the year, we hold a careers session for our students in which we reflect upon our own careers and how they have been built as well as those from former students. We are always available to discuss career options and if you are interested in a particular area of the law, we can link you up with the relevant alumni to offer advice.

We also work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation : LLM European Union Law
-Foundation Essay for Europen Union Commercial Law
-The Legal Order of the European Union
-European Union Law and Human Rights (optional)
-Legal Research and the English Legal System (optional)
-Approaches to Legal Theory (optional)
-International Trade Finance Law (optional)
-International Sale of Goods (optional)
-Carriage of Goods By Sea (optional)
-International Commercial Dispute Resolution I (optional)
-Public International Trade Law (optional)
-Legal Aspects of Electronic Commercial Transactions (optional)
-Foundation Essay for International Trade Law (optional)
-Marine Insurance I (optional)
-Maritime Law and Wet Shipping (optional)
-International Financial Law (optional)
-Cybercrime
-Data Protection (optional)
-Freedom of Expression, Privacy and the Media (optional)
-EU Private International Law (optional)
-The Economics of the European Union (optional)
-The Enlargement of the European Union (optional)
-EU Company Law (optional)
-International Commercial and Business Law: Models, Principles and Tools (optional)
-International Trade, Investment and Human Rights.
-Business and Human Rights
-Work-Based Project
-Contemporary Issues in Human Rights and Cultural Diversity (optional)

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This programme will give you specialist and in-depth knowledge of increasingly important and fastmoving areas of law. By dealing with intellectual property and information technology law together, you will obtain a deeper understanding of the interrelationship between these topics. Read more
This programme will give you specialist and in-depth knowledge of increasingly important and fastmoving areas of law. By dealing with intellectual property and information technology law together, you will obtain a deeper understanding of the interrelationship between these topics.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminipanditlaw/

Your studies

Modules available on this programme include: Patent Law; Trade Mark Law; Principles of Copyright Law; Innovation Law and Policy; Information Technology Law; Media Regulation; Online Regulation; and, a general Intellectual Property Law course. You will also have an opportunity to complete modules from other UCD Graduate Schools. You will complete a supervised dissertation and will have international exchange opportunities during the programme.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Information Technology Law, Intellectual Property Law and their inter-relationship;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Information Technology Law and Intellectual Property Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

This programme will allow you the opportunity to receive the knowledge, skills, and capacity required to work in the area of intellectual property and information technology law. You will be enabled to work domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, in house legal adviser, policy maker or researcher.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Digital Investigations and the Law deals with the legal framework governing the activities of persons involved in Information Technology security and forensics, for example, the role of digital evidence in litigation.

- Innovation Policy and the Law explores the relationship between law and innovation theory and policy considering a variety of important issues attendant upon this relationship such as the economics of IP law and the WIPO development agenda..

- Online Regulation considers the legal, regulatory and technical framework within which internet activities take place and examines how particular areas fit within that framework.. It will also examine the growth in technological responses which may bypass the legal system.

- Patent Law covers issue such as novelty and inventive step; industrial application and excluding subject matter; construction and infringement; transactions in patents, including compulsory licences; and, patent prosecution at the European Patent Office.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The aim of this programme is to equip graduates with the knowledge, skills and capacity to work in the area of information technology and intellectual property law, whether domestically or internationally, as a practising lawyer, in-house legal adviser, policy maker or researcher.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminipanditlaw/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminipanditlaw/apply,80083,en.html

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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Our Master of Laws (Juris Doctor) is an intensive, graduate entry law degree designed for non-law graduates. The Monash JD recognises the specific needs of graduate entrants and teaches the knowledge and skills available only from one of Australia's leading law schools. Read more
Our Master of Laws (Juris Doctor) is an intensive, graduate entry law degree designed for non-law graduates. The Monash JD recognises the specific needs of graduate entrants and teaches the knowledge and skills available only from one of Australia's leading law schools. We offer small class sizes and innovative teaching to promote interactivity and in depth learning. All classes are taught at the city-based Monash Law Chambers, located in the heart of Melbourne's legal precinct.

This three year full-time (four year part-time) graduate entry law degree provides high quality graduate-level education in the theory and practice of the law. The course focuses on the knowledge, legal skills and professional ethics expected of legal practitioners. The flexible nature of the Monash JD allows you tailor your workload to suit your professional and personal commitments.

Small seminar-style classes bring together passionate and dedicated individuals with diverse professional experiences in a stimulating and challenging environment.

There are three intakes per year: January, May and August.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/laws-juris-doctor-l6005?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is designed to equip you with basic legal knowledge and skills that are required for admission to legal practice, with the opportunity to develop specialised knowledge in areas of law of your choice. The basic knowledge is imparted through three broad themes: legal methodology and legal practice, public law and private law. The specialised knowledge and advanced skills are imparted in later year elective units.

Part A. Legal methodology and legal practice
This theme includes the nature of law, and particularly statute law enacted by Parliaments and common law developed by courts. It also includes the key concepts, principles and methods of research and reasoning that enable lawyers to identify and interpret law and apply it to relevant facts in order to provide legal advice. It covers the law of procedure and evidence that governs judicial proceedings, alternative methods of resolving legal disputes, and the code of ethics that regulates the professional conduct of legal practitioners.

Part B. Public law
Public law includes constitutional law, administrative law and criminal law. It concerns the powers and procedures of the legislative, executive and judicial organs of government, and how they are regulated and controlled by "the rule of law". It also concerns the legal relationship between government and individuals, including the protection of the individual rights.

Part C. Private law
Private law deals with legal relationships between legal persons, including corporations as well as individuals. It includes the study of property rights, contractual rights and obligations, wrongs (called "torts") such as trespass and the negligent infliction of injury, and the law of equity and trusts.

Part D. Extending specialised knowledge and advanced skills
In these studies you will complete at least one commercial law unit and a professional project and will also add to your expertise by choosing from a broad range of elective law units. Elective law units enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of law that suit your own interests, skills and career goals.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/laws-juris-doctor-l6005?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field. Read more
Are you passionate about human rights? Would you like to enhance your skills in this diverse field? If so the Master of Human Rights Law provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws governing this field.

You will develop advanced professional skills and knowledge, enhancing your specialist career within non-government organisations, government sectors, community groups or human rights-related organisations such as international development agencies. You will also gain an understanding of the Australian legal system and will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

As one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia we offer this course at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers choice from a broad range of human rights law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such discrimination, international refugee law, advocacy, genocide and the law, human trafficking, humanitarian law and children's rights —to name a few, you will gain specialist knowledge and understanding of recent developments in areas of human rights law and the practice of human rights law. It provides the flexibility to tailor a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study allows to you to continue to work and meet personal commitments while you study.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Human Rights law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Human rights law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas human rights law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of human rights law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to human rights law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/human-rights-law-l6002?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The dynamic world of intellectual property and communications law is a fast changing specialist field. Our Master of Intellectual Property and Communications Law can assist you to advance your expertise in this dynamic area. Read more
The dynamic world of intellectual property and communications law is a fast changing specialist field.

Our Master of Intellectual Property and Communications Law can assist you to advance your expertise in this dynamic area. You will gain in-depth knowledge of recent developments, including the laws and regulatory frameworks applicable. We are one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, and teach units accredited by the Professional Standards Board for Patent and Trade Marks Attorneys to satisfy the knowledge requirements for registration as a Patent Attorney or Trade Marks Attorney.

This one-year course is designed for non-law graduates and is offered at our Monash University Law Chambers in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne. Our course provides you with the flexibility to choose a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study options allow you to continue to work as well as meet your personal commitments.

The course offers choice from a broad range of intellectual property, communications law areas, or you can select from across the range of Master's law elective units. Our specialist units cover areas such as copyright, international trade law, competition law, law of the Internet, and cybercrime—to name a few. You will gain a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws regulating intellectual property regimes and the broader fields of communications and technology, and develop the advanced professional skills and specialist knowledge required for work in this complex and dynamic field.

You will investigate contemporary issues in law, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives. The course also enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/intellectual-property-and-communications-law-l6003?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Intellectual property and communications law knowledge and Part B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Intellectual Property and communications law knowledge
These studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of Intellectual property and communications law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of intellectual property and communications law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to intellectual property and communications law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support work in this field. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/intellectual-property-and-communications-law-l6003?domestic=true#making-the-application

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