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Masters Degrees (Media Ecology)

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MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/. Read more
MA in Film and Screen Studies offers a unique combination of critical and creative approaches to the past and the future of audiovisual media- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-film-screen-studies/

The 21st century is when everything about the moving image changes.

MA Film and Screen Studies will equip you with skills and knowledge to address current transformations of moving image media in a globalised world, from the media in your pocket to architectural screens.

It explores both the old and the new, philosophy and history, theory and practice, to help you understand the challenges of the 21st century's culture of moving images, changing artistic and political contexts as well as ever developing technologies.

Innovative approach

What distinguishes the MA in Film and Screen Studies is its innovative approach to learning and research. It takes you well beyond the borders of traditional film studies. It encourages you to think critically and imaginatively, across media forms, disciplinary boundaries as well as conceptual and creative work.

You'll have the option of two pathways:

-Moving Image Studies Pathway
-Media Arts Pathway

Students taking the Media Arts pathway will have the opportunity to submit some work in non-traditional forms.

Globally renowned academics

Teaching and supervision draw on the diverse research strengths of the globally renowned academics at one of the world's leading media and communications departments, which also has strong traditions in audiovisual practice.

You'll be taught by scholars of international standing who have expertise in the interface between film criticism and creation; new screen technologies; in early cinema and the media archaeology of modernity; in artist’s film; and in non-fiction film (eg documentary and avant-garde).

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Rachel Moore.

Pathways

The MA offers two pathways:

MA Film and Screen Studies: Moving Image Studies Pathway:
The moving image media today are a concentrated form of culture, ideas, socialisation, wealth and power. 21st-century globalisation, ecology, migration and activism fight over and through them. How have the media built on, distorted and abandoned their past? How are they trying to destroy, deny or build the future? This pathway explores new critical approaches that address the currency of moving image media in today's global context – their aesthetics, technology and politics. It seeks to extend the boundaries for studying moving images by considering a wider range of media and introducing students to a wider range of approaches for investigating moving images' past and present.

MA Film and Screen Studies: Media Arts Pathway:
The most intense and extreme forms of media, experimental media arts, test to breaking point our established ideas and practices. From wild abstraction and surrealist visions to activist and community arts, they ask the profoundest questions about high art and popular culture, the individual and the social, meaning and beauty. This pathway explores these emerging experimental practices of image making and criticism. Students on this pathway are encouraged not just to study but to curate and critique past, present and future media arts by building exhibitions and visual essays of their own. Short practical workshops will enable students to make the most of the skills you bring into the course.

Structure

The MA consists of:

two core modules (60 credits in total) comprising one shared and one pathway-specific core module
option modules to the value of 60 credits
a dissertation (60 credits) on a topic agreed in conjuction with your supervisor (on the Media Arts pathway up to 50% of the dissertation can be submitted in audiovisual form)

Core modules

The core modules will give you a foundation to the subject. The shared core module in Archaeology of the Moving Image introduces current debates in film and screen studies through the key notion of media history.

Pathway-specific cores develop new ways of conceptualising the cinematic today, focusing respectively on the political aspects of media forms and styles in Politics of the Audiovisual (the Moving Image Studies pathway) and on artists' use of various screen media in Experimental Media (the Media Arts pathway).

Option modules

We offer a wide range of option modules each year. Below are some examples of modules that are currently running. For a full list, please contact the Media and Communications department.

Intercollegiate options

Students on the MA in Film and Screen Studies can also take one option from the MA Film & Media programmes at other University of London colleges. Please consult the Screen Studies Group website for further details of other programmes and the Film and Screen Studies Convenor at Goldsmiths for more details on how to take part in options at other colleges. Options taken under this scheme are deemed to count for 30 credits at Goldsmiths.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

You will develop skills enabling you to analyse, contextualise, historicise and theorise current and future developments in screen-based media and to communicate your ideas in written and, on the Media Arts pathway, in audiovisual form.

Careers

Possible careers include film and video distribution, film exhibition, museums, film and television criticism, new media criticism, new media art, and other jobs associated with screen culture, as well as further academic study.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Ecology and evolutionary biology offer a perspective on biology from the level of genes to communities of species. In the master's degree program, you can become familiar with a wide variety of topics in three areas. Read more
Ecology and evolutionary biology offer a perspective on biology from the level of genes to communities of species.

In the master's degree program, you can become familiar with a wide variety of topics in three areas: ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. You can choose studies from any of these areas, as well as from other master's degree programmes. The programme is diverse and multidisciplinary: teaching is done with lectures, laboratory and computer training courses, interactive seminars, study tours and field courses. The field courses range from the northern subarctic region to tropical rainforests.

Our wide expertise extends from molecular ecology to population and community biology. The Centres of Excellence of Metapopulation Biology and Biological Interactions are located in our department.

Our programme offers you a wide range of options: evolutionary biology or genetics for those interested in ecological genetics and genomics, as well as the ability to take advantage of the high-quality molecular ecology and systematics laboratory; conservation biology for those interested in regional or global environmental problems; and ecological modelling skills for those interested in computational biology. Our training also offers Behavioural Ecology.

Ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology are not only fascinating topics for basic research, they also have a key role in addressing global environmental challenges.

Upon graduating from the Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology programme, you will:
-Have mastered the main theories and methods in ecology and evolutionary biology and be able to apply them to practical problems.
-Be able to plan and carry out a scientific research project.
-Have read the relevant scientific literature and be able to utilise your expertise in different types of work.
-Be able to work as an expert in your field.
-Be able to to write good scientific English.
-Be able to work in research projects and groups.
-Be able to continue on to doctoral studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The Master's degree program includes studies of ecology, evolutionary biology and conservation biology. The studies are organised in modules. You can affect the content of the studies by planning your personal curriculum. You can study the following themes:
-Ecology studies the abundance and distribution of species (animals, plants, microbes) and the interactions among them and with the environment. The perspective ranges from the molecular to the ecosystem level. In ecology, a central question is: Why are some species able to invade new habitats and displace native species? Which species are able to adapt to environmental change or migrate with the changing climate, and which species will become extinct?
-Evolutionary biology examines the processes which support biodiversity on its various levels (genes – individuals – populations – species – ecosystems). You will learn about the theory of evolution and how to use population genetics and genomics methods in researching evolutionary issues.
-Conservation Biology studies the depletion of biodiversity, its causes and consequences. You will learn to apply ecological theory to the problems of environmental conservation, to assess the effectiveness of methods of conservation, as well as to resolve the problems relating to conservation e.g. by modelling and computational methods. The training emphasizes the importance of interdisciplinary education in the area of conservation.

Programme Structure

You undertake modules producing a total of 120 credits (ECTS) according to your personal study plan. The degree consists of:
-60 credits of advanced studies, including a research project (Master’s thesis, 30 credits)
-60 credits of other studies chosen from the Programme or from other Programmes

Career planning or extracurricular activities can be included in your personal study plan. If you are studying to qualify as a biology teacher, you will need 60 credits of pedagogical studies in your degree. This applies only to Finnish or Swedish speaking students.

Career Prospects

Master's degree in ecology and evolutionary biology gives an access to the capability of University teaching and research tasks, for a wide range of expert and administrative tasks of the various research centres, companies, in the field of public administration (e.g., The UNITED NATIONS, the European Union, the State and the provincial administration, cities, municipalities), international and national organizations and the media. The degree also provides the scientific validity for doctoral education in different areas of biology.

The Master’s degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is a well-liked option among students studying towards biology teacher qualification (Finnish and Swedish speaking students).

Internationalization

You will have the opportunity to study at foreign universities and research institutions within the framework of an international student exchange. You can also gain valuable experience by working as a tutor of international students or participating in the international activities of the Student Union or other student organisations.

The teachers and researchers in the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology are internationally known and respected. Their research groups host numerous international researchers as visitors and workers. They also employ many foreign graduate students, which creates an international atmosphere in the programme.

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This programme equips graduates with the skills required for professional roles involving collection, management, analysis and presentation of landscape ecology and environmental conservation datasets using Geographical Information Systems. Read more
This programme equips graduates with the skills required for professional roles involving collection, management, analysis and presentation of landscape ecology and environmental conservation datasets using Geographical Information Systems.

In both the UK and overseas the concept of landscape scale land management has gained acceptance over the last decade. The implementation of environmental conservation policies and strategies based on a landscape ecology approach is increasingly dependent on spatial data that are managed and manipulated within a GIS. As a result, the Ecological Skills Gap Project has identified a clear need for ecologists with experience of GIS and for GIS specialists with an understanding of the environmental data they are being asked to manage and manipulate within a GIS.

This programme is designed to address these skills gaps and is structured around three compulsory conservation courses that integrate theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary conservation and environmental management, and three compulsory courses covering the principles and implementation of GIS. Additionally students take a compulsory Professional Practice for GI course, and one optional course. The MSc programme culminates in a third term with the dissertation, an individual piece of research focused on the application of GIS techniques to a specific landscape ecology problem.

The aims of the programme are:

- To provide landscape ecology practitioners and conservation managers with an appreciation of the merits and limitations of the spatial data that are potentially available to them.

- To provide an understanding of how these data can potentially be processed and managed within a GI System; encompassing data collection strategies, errors, uncertainties, GIS modelling, and GIS decision-support systems.

- To provide the knowledge and skills to confidently operate and manage a GI system for landscape ecology and environmental conservation data sets.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/geog/landecogis

Geography

The Department of Pharmaceutical, Chemical & Environmental Sciences offers a diverse range of degrees across geography and the environmental sciences. Teaching in the department is underpinned by world class research activities in all areas.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Principles and Practice of Environmental Conservation (15 credits)
Landscape Ecology with GIS Dissertation (60 credits)
Advanced Spatial Modelling (15 credits)
Applied GIS and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
Professional Practice for Geographical Information (15 credits)
Introduction to GIS for Natural Resource Management (15 credits)
Techniques in Applied Ecology (30 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Environmental Impact Assessment (15 credits)
Ecology and Conservation of Estuaries and Coastal Zones (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Landscape Ecology with GIS Dissertation (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Applied GIS and Remote Sensing (15 credits)
Professional Practice for Geographical Information (15 credits)
Introduction to GIS for Natural Resource Management (15 credits)

Students are required to choose 15 credits from this list of options.

Environmental Impact Assessment (15 credits)
Ecology and Conservation of Estuaries and Coastal Zones (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Principles and Practice of Environmental Conservation (15 credits)
Landscape Ecology with GIS Dissertation (60 credits)
Advanced Spatial Modelling (15 credits)
Techniques in Applied Ecology (30 credits)

- Year 3:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Landscape Ecology with GIS Dissertation (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through examinations, coursework and assessments that are practically focused using real-world examples and case studies.

Career options

Graduates develop the professional philosophy and skills base to progress to senior posts within industry, or proceed to doctoral research. Graduates from this programme can pursue employment in conservation organisations in the UK and overseas, including central and local government, environmental consultancies, non-governmental organisations, business, the media and environmental education.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643704

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This course is intended primarily for those with experience of music technology who wish to explore the field in more depth, or broaden their experience in interdisciplinary and multimedia work. Read more
This course is intended primarily for those with experience of music technology who wish to explore the field in more depth, or broaden their experience in interdisciplinary and multimedia work. It would also benefit those with a general musical background who wish to gain more experience working with technology, and those with experience in media-based technologies who wish to focus on sound.

We take a creative and experimental approach, whilst remaining non genre-specific. The course spans a wide variety of styles and approaches, and will be of interest to those involved in such areas as electro-acoustic/acousmatic music, soundscape, acoustic ecology, computer music, sound/sonic art, electronica, visual music and audiovisual work.

The emphasis of the course is largely practical, giving students the opportunity to produce a substantial body of creative work over the duration of the course. Students engage with a wide variety of technical and creative skills - these range from classic techniques derived from areas such as musique concrete and visual music to more contemporary practice, and include advanced skills such as software development using Max/MSP/Jitter and multimedia skills. The course will also include a grounding in postgraduate-level research methodology, and opportunities to collaborate with other musicians, performers and media practitioners.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

In full-time mode, the course runs over three trimesters, September to September. The first trimester gives a thorough grounding in research methodology in the Context and Methodology module, and the Skills Portfolio module offers a toolkit of optional skills-based projects designed to allow students to improve on specific technical and creative skills as required. The second trimester offers a choice; where students can opt to explore sound within a multimedia context in the Visual Music module, or to take the Electroacoustic Composition Techniques module which focuses purely on audio work. All students will take the Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Practice module, which gives an opportunity to work with peers and across subject boundaries, with the possibility of working with other creative disciplines (film- and theatre-makers, dancers and choreographers etc.) as well as musicians. The third trimester is research-based, with students undertaking an individual Major Project which allows them to explore a chosen area in depth.

MODULES

Trimester 1

• Skills Portfolio - This module is offered to allow students to garner any technical and creative skills they will need for the rest of the course. It is recognised that students at this level will already have a strong skill-set, but also that they may have areas they wish to strengthen, or indeed areas they have not previously engaged with.

• Context and Methodology - This module is intended to fulfil the requirements of a research methodology module. However, since a large part of the this programme is practice-based, and the methodology for this aspect of students’ work will be covered by other modules in the programme, it is intended to combine a study of research methodology with a study of context in terms of the student’s own practice – specifically of a set of paradigms that characterise the field’s current, creative boundaries.

Trimester 2

• Electroacoustic Composition Techniques (option) - This module will centre around a weekly seminar series. Each seminar will look at a set of techniques and their application within a compositional framework. Students will produce a portfolio of creative practical work exploring these techniques, as well as a self-evaluative written assignment which will explore the application of these techniques to their individual practice.

• Visual Music (option) - a weekly seminar series will explore the history of visual music, from pre-cinema artists such as Kandinsky and Klee, through Early Abstract Cinema pioneers such as Max Richter, Viking Eggeling and Oskar Fischinger, to the modernist, fluxus and underground artists of the 60s and 70s (the Whitney Brothers, Mark Boyle, Glenn McKay, Nam June Paik etc.). It will also cover contemporary artists such as Kurt Ralske, Jeremy Goldstein and Scott Pagano, as well as more commercial practitioners such as Chris Cunningham, Alex Rutterford and the Pleix and Shynola collectives, and new media creatives.

• Collaborative and Interdisciplinary Practice - this module encourages students to collaborate, with students on the Creative Sound and Media Technology course, with students taking our other MMus courses, or indeed with creative individuals outside of the course. It allows students who are so inclined to look beyond their core discipline and undertake interdisciplinary projects, but can also provide an opportunity to work in new ways within their core discipline through collaborative practice.

Trimester 3

• Major Project - this double module represents the culmination of the MMus, and a chance for students to work in a research-oriented environment dependent largely on personal direction and working methods. Students will use the skills acquired in their undergraduate work and the first two trimesters to produce a substantial portfolio of practical creative work. The practical portfolio will be supported by a dissertation of 5-8000 words. It is envisaged that this dissertation will be used to contextualise the practical work in terms of existing ‘repertoire’ and current practice, and to discuss any issues raised through the creative process.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Modules are normally taught via lectures, seminars and practical workshops. The Major Project is research-based and student-led, with supporting tutorials. Visiting speakers and other activities are arranged as appropriate. You are encouraged to make full use of library and IT resources within the University, and ample time will be scheduled in studios and workstation labs for independent study.

EMPLOYABILITY

Potential career destinations include:

• Composition
• Composition for media
• Other media work (web, games etc.)
• Studio engineering/production
• Programming

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment takes the form of individual assignments for each module. These generally consist of a portfolio of practical work with supporting written documentation. Context and Methodology and the Major Project also involve small-scale dissertations.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Digital Media at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Digital Media at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Digital Media at Swansea has research strengths in media and cultural theory, the history and philosophy of media technology, and contemporary developments in digital media in the UK, the European mainland, the USA and China.

The Digital Media programme is part of the Department of Languages, Translation and Communication which boasts a dynamic research and teaching environment which has already won attention and funding from outside bodies such as the Coleg Cymraeg Cenedlaethol, the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), Wellcome Trust and the EU. We are home to the Centre on Digital Arts and Humanities (CODAH), which connects researchers in Arts and Humanities, Computer Science, and other fields.

Key Features of Digital Media, MA by Research

An MA by Research in Digital Media gives you the chance to pursue a project based around your own passions and interests in Digital Media, leading to a qualification which can open the door to an academic career or boost employment prospects outside academia (typically in the private sector, the Civil Service, or education).

The Digital Media MA by Research programme will give you the freedom to explore a topic of your choosing and develop a methodology under the close supervision of two experienced academics but without attending regular classes as required in taught programmes.

As a student on the MA by Research Digital Media programme you will be supervised closely by two experienced academics in your field. Typically, you will meet them fortnightly in the first term and at regular intervals thereafter. Meetings are logged and goals agreed each time.

All research students in Digital Media are required to attend skills and training courses at College and Institutional level. They give presentations to other research students and staff at departmental seminars and the annual departmental postgraduate symposium in June and the College of Arts and Humanities conference in October. Advanced research students in Digital Media may have opportunities to teach undergraduate tutorials and seminars. You have a budget (currently £200 per year) to attend conferences outside Swansea.

MA by Research in Digital Media typically lasts from one year (full-time study) to two years (part-time study).

Research proposals on Digital Media are invited on any topic on which staff can provide supervision. It is advisable to email a member of academic staff in the appropriate area before applying. For informal enquiries regarding the MA by Research in Digital Media please contact Professor Julian Preece ().

Staff Expertise on Digital Media

Staff expertise in Digital Media lies in the following areas, among others: media history; media pedagogy; media ethics; war and media; mass media and identity in small nations; Welsh-language digital media; media and health; digital and data journalism; computational media; post-broadcast digital media ecology; gender and media; transnationalism and media; international journalism; European comparative media. In addition, there is expertise in media and digital culture among research staff in Languages and Translation as well as in other COAH departments: History, Political and Cultural Studies and English Language and Literature.

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This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialised theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Science (GCertSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Science are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus. Read more
This course in zoology and ecology complements the Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Sustainability undergraduate degrees offered on the Cairns campus.
Students have access to new and unique research facilities including the Tropical Sustainable Futures Complex (TSFC) on the Cairns campus and the Daintree Rainforest Observatory (DRO) at the site of the Canopy Crane at Cape Tribulation.
The two new field-based facilities provide direct and ready access to field locations and are designed for students to engage in practical field activities and long-term monitoring projects. Both facilities present exciting teaching opportunities that will provide students with much greater real-world experience and engagement with field biology.
These are flexible courses allowing students to specialise in the animals and ecology of rainforests, savannas, tropical freshwater systems, tropical wildlife, or tropical insects.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.0 (no component lower than 5.5), OR
*TOEFL – 550 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.0), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 79 (minimum writing score of 19), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 57

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*Dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*More tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*Teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Technology Studies Education provides a forum for exploring and studying information and communication technologies (ICT), new media, and the philosophy of technology. Read more

Program Overview

Technology Studies Education provides a forum for exploring and studying information and communication technologies (ICT), new media, and the philosophy of technology. Curriculum, pedagogy, research, and development interests of faculty and students include affective computing, cyberculture and cyborg relations, digital ecology and diversity, distributed cognition, gaming, ICT integration in K–16 formal and informal learning environments (face-to-face, hybrid, and online distance education), intellectual property, open source, and cultural studies. The program offers a common core of courses, a range of electives, and a variety of professional education opportunities.

The MA degree is particularly recommended for students who may wish to pursue a doctorate at a later date, although the MEd does not preclude application to advanced study.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Media and Technology Studies Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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Technology Studies Education provides a forum for exploring and studying information and communication technologies (ICT), new media, and the philosophy of technology. Read more

Program Overview

Technology Studies Education provides a forum for exploring and studying information and communication technologies (ICT), new media, and the philosophy of technology. Curriculum, pedagogy, research, and development interests of faculty and students include affective computing, cyberculture and cyborg relations, digital ecology and diversity, distributed cognition, gaming, ICT integration in K–16 formal and informal learning environments (face-to-face, hybrid, and online distance education), intellectual property, open source, and cultural studies. The program offers a common core of courses, a range of electives, and a variety of professional education opportunities.

The MEd degree is designed primarily for students wishing to pursue professional study in education or to prepare for positions of leadership in varied settings and is often the choice of professionals who want to reflect on issues of practice with colleagues through a breadth and depth of courses.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Media and Technology Studies Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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The Marketing, Distribution, Sales and Exhibition MA* is a unique, two-year Masters degree that gives participants all the tools to pre-sell, market, distribute, retail and exhibit films, television shows and games in the digital age. Read more
The Marketing, Distribution, Sales and Exhibition MA* is a unique, two-year Masters degree that gives participants all the tools to pre-sell, market, distribute, retail and exhibit films, television shows and games in the digital age.

Quick Facts

- 2 Year Course
- Full-time
- Course runs Jan-Dec each year
- Next intake: January 2017
- NFTS Scholarships available for UK Students

COURSE OVERVIEW

- A unique course, giving participants an unparalleled knowledge of marketing, distribution and retail
- Gain an in-depth understanding of how new and innovative media are used alongside traditional methods.
- Become an innovator and expert in this field.
- Increase employability.
- Two four week placements at major media firms.
- Take part in seminars lead by prestigious companies.
- Attend one key market in each sector – the Berlin Film Festival in MIPCOM and EGX.
- Access to NFTS's Passport to Cinema and Masterclasses lead by major creative figures from film, television and games.

Visit the website https://nfts.co.uk/our-courses/masters/marketing-distribution-sales-exhibition

The digital age has revolutionised the way that audiences and consumers interact with and consume content. Film, TV, music, books and computer games are now bought and sold over a dizzying array of platforms, from traditional cinematic exhibition to premium-priced SVOD pre-releases of movies in your living room, and from boxed computer discs from retailers to free-to-play app games on your mobile phone.

This course will take participants through the process of taking a piece of content (a game, TV show or a feature film) to its market – examining how the sales, marketing, distribution and retail (or exhibition) side of each industry works from “nose to tail”. The course will also look at the emergence of new and innovative forms of media that merge traditional media with digital markets (including Youtubers, branded content among others) and the commercial side of each. By the end of the course students will be expected to have an unrivalled overview of the three key sectors and be able to move between them with ease, making them both very employable executives and marketers who can utilise multi-disciplinary skills to innovate in their chosen sector.

At the heart of the course are two four-week work placements at major media firms, alongside professionally led seminars from some of the world’s most prestigious companies.

Over the course of the two years, students will learn:

- Key branding and marketing concepts within the creative sectors.
- Sector-specific commercial and creative trends, national and international marketplace analysis
- The full distribution value chain of each of the industries – film, television, digital entertainment and computer games
- How sales, distribution and marketing coalesce to help raise finance and complete projects
- The retail ecology and process of each sector
- The legal processes underpinning rights management and the exploitation of content
- Press, PR and opinion formers within each sector, and structured within a broader context
- Social media strategy
- SEOs and digital revenues

CURRICULUM

Below is an indicate course outline:

Term 1 (January – March)

- Introduction to the value chain of each sector (film, TV, games, digital entertainment)

Term 2 (April – July)

- Work Placement 1
- Marketing, branding and Advertising

Term 3 (September – December)

- Business of Film
- Practical marketing, sales and distribution project
- Visit MIPCOM

Term 4 (January – March)

- Legal and business affairs in marketing, distribution, sales and retail/ exhibition
- Press and PR
- Visit Berlin Film Festival

Term 5 (April – July)

- Work Placement 2
- Retail, Exhibition and Broadcast

Term 6 (September – December)

- Preparation of student final project
- Visit EGX

* Subject to Validation

WORK PLACEMENTS

Students will undertake two four-week work placements - one in the first year and one in the second year of the course at media companies, to gain experience both of the cut and thrust of a product launch (whether it is a film, game or television show) and to make contacts. These work placements will be researched by students, and agreed by tutors in advance. These placements aim to challenge and augment the participant’s skillset, and at least one must be taken within a company outside the participant’s favoured media industry.

MARKET ATTENDANCE

Students will also attend one key market in each sector – the Berlin Film Festival in February; MIPCOM in October and EGX in September. These are opportunities to see the scale of the worldwide market and to meet potential collaborates and business partners.

STUDENT FINAL PROJECTS

Students’ final projects will be a live proposal for, and implementation of, an ambitious sales, marketing and distribution strategy for a film or computer game. Participants are expected to either bring a project for consideration by tutors (for example an indie game or independent feature film), or will be placed within a company to initiate and run a fully worked-through strategy for the delivery of a product to consumers. This will be augmented with a self-reflective report on the successes and failures of the campaign.

NFTS BENEFITS

Course participants will have full access to the NFTS’ optional creative stimulus strands, including: Passport to Cinema (weekly screenings of classic and pre-release films in the state-of-the-art campus cinema or at the BFI Southbank); and NFTS Masterclasses - major creative figures from film, television and games screening their work and discussing with students in the campus cinema. Recent speakers include David Fincher (Director, Seven, Gone Girl), Andy Wilman (Executive Producer, Top Gear), Graham Linehan (The IT Crowd, Father Ted) and Hamish Hamilton (Director, Super Bowl XLVIII).

APPLY WITH

- A two page overview of a marketing campaign that you are familiar with.

HOW TO APPLY

You can apply directly to us at the NFTS by clicking on the link below:

- APPLY FOR MARKETING, DISTRIBUTION, SALES & EXHIBITION COURSE (https://nfts.co.uk/sign-me-up/apply-now/?nid=2024)

You can apply online, or download a word document of the application form to submit via email

When selecting your course, please ensure that you have read the entry requirements and details of the supporting materials that should accompany your application.

TIMING YOUR APPLICATION

We are happy to receive applications 24/7 and 365 days a year up until the deadline. That said, there is no particular advantage to submitting your application very early. The important thing is that your application shows us your latest work and tell us about your most recent filmmaking experiences.

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The course enable graduates to develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms. Read more
The course enable graduates to develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms.

How you will study

Preliminary coursework subjects are offered in the main study periods. Many subjects involve independent research projects and field trips. More advanced subjects are offered by block mode, which are 2-week intensive sessions on campus or at JCU’s research stations.
Coursework programs are flexible, with a range of electives available. Students devise a study program to meet their professional goals, in consultation with the course coordinator. Programs may contain a research component, if approved.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply specialised theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

Graduate Certificate of Science (GCertSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Certificate of Science are eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Certificate.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) –90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*more tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The course enable graduates to develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms. Read more
The course enable graduates to develop their knowledge and skills in quantitative marine ecology, conservation biology, and the biology, life history and taxonomy of tropical marine organisms.

How you will study

Preliminary coursework subjects are offered in the main study periods. Many subjects involve independent research projects and field trips. More advanced subjects are offered by block mode, which are 2-week intensive sessions on campus or at JCU’s research stations.
Coursework programs are flexible, with a range of electives available. Students devise a study program to meet their professional goals, in consultation with the course coordinator. Programs may contain a research component, if approved.

Course learning outcomes

The graduates of James Cook University are prepared and equipped to create a brighter future for life in the tropics world-wide.
JCU graduates are committed to lifelong learning, intellectual development, and to the display of exemplary personal, professional and ethical standards. They have a sense of their place in the tropics and are charged with professional, community, and environmental responsibility. JCU graduates appreciate the need to embrace and be acquainted with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples of Australia. They are committed to reconciliation, diversity and sustainability. They exhibit a willingness to lead and to contribute to the intellectual, environmental, cultural, economic and social challenges of regional, national, and international communities of the tropics.
On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma of Science, graduates will be able to:
*Integrate and apply advanced theoretical and technical knowledge in one or more science disciplines
*Retrieve, analyse, synthesise and evaluate knowledge from a range of sources
*Plan and conduct reliable, evidence-based laboratory and/or field experiments/practices by selecting and applying methods, techniques and tools, as appropriate to one or more science disciplines
*Organise, analyse and interpret complex scientific data using mathematical, statistical and technological skills
*Communicate complex scientific ideas, arguments and conclusions clearly and coherently to a variety of audiences through advanced written and oral English language skills and a variety of media
*Identify, analyse and generate solutions to unpredictable or complex problems, especially related to tropical, rural, remote or Indigenous contexts, by applying scientific knowledge and skills with initiative and high level judgement
*Explain and apply regulatory requirements, ethical principles and, where appropriate, cultural frameworks, to work effectively, responsibly and safely in diverse contexts
*Reflect on current skills, knowledge and attitudes to manage their professional learning needs and performance, autonomously and in collaboration with others.

Award title

GRADUATE DIPLOMA OF SCIENCE (GDipSc)

Course articulation

Students who complete the Graduate Diploma of Science are eligible for entry to the Master of Science, and may be granted advanced standing for all subjects completed under the Graduate Diploma.

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 1 - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 6.5 (no component lower than 6.0), OR
*TOEFL – 570 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 4.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) –90 (minimum writing score of 21), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 64

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 1 – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

James Cook University is a leading education and research centre for biology in the tropics.
*Internationally-recognised undergraduate, postgraduate and research programs in biological sciences
*dedicated research vessel, and research stations at Orpheus Island and Paluma
*more tropical courses and subjects than any other institution in the world
*teaching and research facilities including the Advanced Analytical Centre and the Aquaculture Research Facility.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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The graduate programs (M.Ed. and M.A) in Media and Technology Studies Education are part of the graduate offerings in the Department or Curriculum and Pedagogy. Read more

Program Overview

The graduate programs (M.Ed. and M.A) in Media and Technology Studies Education are part of the graduate offerings in the Department or Curriculum and Pedagogy. Media and Technology Studies provides a forum for exploring and studying information and communication technologies (ICT), new media, and the philosophy of technology. Curriculum, pedagogy, research, and development interests of faculty and students include affective computing, cyberculture and cyborg relations, digital ecology and diversity, distributed cognition, gaming, ICT integration in K-16 formal and informal learning environments (face-to-face, hybrid, and online distance education), intellectual property, open source, and cultural studies. The program offers a common core of courses, a range of electives, and a variety of professional education opportunities.

The Department offers a Sub-specialization in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in conjunction with the Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC), which is available to students in the Media and Technology Studies Education program.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Education
- Specialization: Technology Studies Education
- Subject: Education
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Major Project/Essay required
- Faculty: Faculty of Education

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The University of Windsor offers two distinct Master of Fine Arts programs. The Master of Fine Arts Program at the University of Windsor is a two-year, studio-centered program geared towards creative exploration, innovative experimentation and the development of a sustainable artistic practice. Read more
The University of Windsor offers two distinct Master of Fine Arts programs:

MFA, Visual Arts

The Master of Fine Arts Program at the University of Windsor is a two-year, studio-centered program geared towards creative exploration, innovative experimentation and the development of a sustainable artistic practice. The program provides graduate students with a critical and theoretical framework that enables the independent development of artistic research and studio production that is supported by a range of dynamic faculty, visiting artists, curators and critics. Windsor’s School of Creative Arts | Visual Arts has one of the longest running MFA programs in Canada, founded in 1979. University of Windsor MFA graduates have gone on to establish significant careers as visual artists, educators, curators and arts professionals.

Our program is distinguished for its focus on intensive graduate supervision, spacious facilities and openness to unconventional practices. We encourage a multi-disciplinary approach to art that enables students to experiment with a variety of media and methods to discover those best suited to realizing their creative projects. Recently these have ranged from video installation, audio responsive installation, performance, social practice, bio art, and urban intervention.

MFA, Film and Media Arts

The School of Creative Arts also offers an MFA in Film and Media Arts program. Like the MFA in Visual Arts, the MFA in Film and Media Arts focuses on studio production with an emphasis on multidisciplinary collaboration. Students are expected to create films and multimedia works in a variety of genres en route to developing a thesis project.

Our faculty have established national and international reputations, exhibiting, performing, and screening films regularly in Canada and abroad. Currently, School of Creative Arts faculty members are working on a range of externally funded projects that explore multimedia performance, the intersection of art and biotechnology, ecology, architecture, documentary film, and urban culture. We encourage applications from artists working in a wide variety of contemporary practices.

Philosophy and Objectives

The MFA programs at the University of Windsor’s, are intensively studio-based programs that stress individual attention and the development of professional practice in contemporary visual art. Our program provides a critical and theoretical framework that fosters dialogue and experimentation through providing a challenging environment to expand definitions of contemporary creative practice.

The objective of the MFA program is to produce artists that are self-critical and culturally aware, capable of engaging in the contemporary art world independently and self-reliantly both in terms of technical abilities and expanding professional opportunities encountered beyond the university context. The work of the graduate students encompasses a broad range of practices, aesthetic issues, personal concerns and technical means. Our program typically attracts a select group of students who pursue studio work that dissolves the boundaries of traditional areas of specialization.

Program Structure

The MFA programs provide two years of advanced education and creative development in the student’s chosen area of research. The curriculum consists of a series of seminars and concentrated studio work. These are supported by critical dialogue among students, faculty, visiting artists, lectures and conferences. Students are required to complete the following courses: four semesters of independent studio practice, four semesters of graduate seminars, one seminar on contemporary issues, and one seminar on graduate research and writing. After the completion of the above, students prepare for their final support paper and individual thesis exhibition which is examined through oral defense.

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This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/. Read more
This programme brings together social analysis, design, activism, and inventive research methods in a critical engagement with various dimensions of urban work – from planning, policy making, research, cultural intervention, to the management of social programmes and institutions- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-cities-society/

Increasingly, no matter how we live, we know this 'world' primarily through the experience of living within and between cities. These cities continuously produce new challenges for their inhabitants and administrators. In doing so, they also produce opportunities for understanding the constraints and potentials of both human and non-human life.

The MA Cities and Society is a research and training programme designed to support strategic interventions in urban governance, design, institution-building and change, as well as social-spatial development. Distinguished by it's theoretical rigour, integrity and amenability to experimental empirical research, the programme focuses particularly on:

The organisation of contemporary urban economies, including the production of built and virtual environments, physical and social infrastructure
The ways in which different forms of economic accumulation and economic practices impact upon cities, and how any city reflects a particular set of constraints and possibilities
The proliferation of technical systems, media, and practices of interpretation and organisation that change our notions about the ‘proper’ use of things and bodies
The intersections of finance, governance, ecology, and culture in producing multiple forms for assessing urban futures; particularly calculations of risk, sustainability, productivity and creativity
This programme covers the following disciplines: geography, anthropology, architecture, cultural studies, fine arts, media and communications.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Alex Rhys-Taylor.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

-Three core modules
-A specialist option module taken from the department's extensive list, or from the departments of Anthropology, Media and Communications, English and Comparative Literature, Politics, Music, Educational Studies or the Centre for Cultural Studies
-A dissertation

Dissertation (60 credits)
In the summer term you complete a major practical project consisting of any media and addressing a specific sociological problem. You will meet for individual supervision with a member of the Sociology staff. 
The dissertation is a substantive piece of research in which you develop a visual, inventive or experimental approach to a topic of your choice.

Teaching

One hour lectures address the core themes of each module, followed by one hour seminars in small groups (under 20). You'll be encouraged to attend dissertation classes that train you in the basic principles of dissertation preparation, research and writing. You are also assigned a dissertation supervisor who will be available when you are writing the dissertation (approximately one hour contact time per month).

The main aim of the program is thus to explore new approaches to thinking about and researching the city formation and urban life. This can be broken down into three inter-related aims:

To promote an appreciation of the relevance of the social, sociological knowledge and ways of knowing in the understanding of cities, urban economy, culture and politics, and the management of social change, and to encourage critical understanding of interrelated concepts, debates and themes.
To enable students critically to engage sociological and geographical theories and methodologies relevant to the studies of cities and urbanities, controversies and social change, and conduct an intellectually informed sustained investigation.
To expose students to a lively research environment and the relevant expertise of the Sociology and related departments and centres to provide a catalyst for independent thought and study.

Expert walks and seminars

The course is also accompanied by a series of expert 'London walks' spread across the year. These are led by a range of researchers from within the Centre for Urban and Community Research, as well as project managers and planners from organisations such as the Greater London Authority, and take students through the sites of that their work focuses on. The Centre for Urban Community research also holds regular seminars with a range of urban professionals, architects and academics from outside the university, giving the MA Cities and Society a spaces to join in with the Centre’s intellectual community.

Asssessment

Essays and dissertation.

MA granted on the completion of 180 CATS (all coursework and dissertation); Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education granted on the completion of 120 CATS (all coursework without dissertation); Postgraduate Certificate in Higher Education granted on the completion of 60 CATS (the completion of two core modules).

Skills

Analytical and research skills that intersect basic sociological knowledge with that of architecture, the built environment, cultural and postcolonial theory, geography, planning, digital communications, and ethnography as they apply to the study of cities across the world.

Careers

The training in this programme is applicable to work in multilateral institutions, NGOs, urban research institutes, municipal government, cultural and policy institutions, urban design firms, and universities.

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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