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Masters Degrees (Media And Crime)

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This programme combines the latest in media, communications and audience theory, and research methodologies with the production and editorial skills that are required of the modern journalist. Read more
This programme combines the latest in media, communications and audience theory, and research methodologies with the production and editorial skills that are required of the modern journalist. You can apply your understanding of the role of the media in society to your own journalistic output.

Why this programme

◾You will be taught by members of the Glasgow Media Group, which has an international reputation for pioneering research methods in media and communications.
◾The Glasgow Media Group comprises industry-trained programme-makers and the programme includes a practical element related to transferable skills for employability.
◾The city of Glasgow is the centre of the media industry in Scotland and is home to the headquarters of BBC Scotland, STV and a range of major press titles including The Herald and The Daily Record. The Media Group has strong connections with local industry.
◾Researchers from the Glasgow Media Group have presented their work globally, given expert evidence to Westminster select committees and appear regularly on the BBC and other news outlets.
◾You can choose optional courses from areas such as economics, criminology, human rights, sociology, and politics whose research is at the forefront of debates about the role of the media in society.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, followed by a dissertation or research project. Courses are taught through a combination of lectures and seminars. Practical skills in news-gathering and programme-making will be developed through seminars and workshops which will focus on the delivery of journalistic articles and features across media. Assessment is based on individual written essays and assignments, as well as the practical group work and individual projects.

Core courses
◾Media, communications and journalism: Criticism and theory
◾Methods of social research
◾Practical news journalism
◾Researching audiences and the media.

Optional courses
◾China’s international politics
◾Crime, media and popular culture
◾Global economy
◾Human rights and global politics
◾International relations and development
◾International relations research
◾International security and strategic thought
◾Media and democracy
◾Political institutions communication
◾Public policy and management
◾The European Union in international politics and development
◾The internet and civil society
◾The media and regime transformation in CEE, Russia and the FSU
◾Young people, social inclusion and change.

Career prospects

The programme is aimed at those interested in pursuing careers in the public domain (journalism, public relations, factual TV and radio, government bodies, voluntary organisations, museums) where skills in media and communications are essential. However, a working and critical knowledge of media and communications is increasingly desirable in areas as diverse as health, education and finance.

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This course focuses on the role of media and communications in society across the globe. This interdisciplinary and innovative course is well suited to individuals who wish to extend, deepen, update and sharpen their knowledge and understand current developments in media and communications. Read more
This course focuses on the role of media and communications in society across the globe.

Who is it for?

This interdisciplinary and innovative course is well suited to individuals who wish to extend, deepen, update and sharpen their knowledge and understand current developments in media and communications. It will also provide you with the confidence to undertake further studies related to your academic practice and support you disseminating this work.

Objectives

Through studying this course you will develop a thorough grounding in the social, economic, political and policy context of media and communications.

Our programme aims to provide you with a wide range of in-depth knowledge of contemporary issues in media and communications. Through a range of modules you will gain an advanced understanding of recent developments and current debates in media and communications.

You will learn the methodological approaches and tools to effectively research in the field. Using these skills you will explore an aspect of theory or practice in depth through the literature and/or empirical evidence and make recommendations to improve and develop current understanding. The Department of Sociology at City offers you an extensive range of module options from across the broader field of Sociology.

This enables you to specialise in your particular areas of interest whilst studying them from a different perspective: developing your critical skills and advancing your knowledge.

Teaching and learning

The educational aims are achieved through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes supported by a personal tutorial system. You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen their knowledge of the subject. In the course of self-directed hours you are expected to read from the set module bibliography, prepare your class participation, collect and organize source material for your coursework, to plan and write your coursework.

The Department also runs a personal tutorial system which provides support for teaching and learning and any problems can be identified and dealt with early.

During the second term the Department offers a Dissertation Workshop to guide you on your dissertation outline.

Assessment

Assessment of the programme is via the submission of a 2,500-word essay for each 15-credit module and 3,000 word essay for each 30-credit module, and a dissertation.

Assessment Criteria are descriptions, based on the intended learning outcomes, of the skills, knowledge or attitudes that you need to demonstrate in order to complete an assessment successfully, providing a mechanism by which the quality of an assessment can be measured. Grade- Related Criteria are descriptions of the level of skills, knowledge or attributes that you need to demonstrate in order achieve a certain grade or mark in an assessment, providing a mechanism by which the quality of an assessment can be measured and placed within the overall set of marks. Assessment Criteria and Grade-Related Criteria will be made available to you to support you in completing assessments. These may be provided in programme handbooks, module specifications, on the virtual learning environment or attached to a specific assessment task.

Modules

As well as taking the core modules, you can specialise in particular areas of interest (such as social media; globalisation; information society; identity and representation; media policy and politics), choosing from our extensive range of modules.

The dissertation module is compulsory and should be undertaken in your own area of interest. It will involve in-depth research of an aspect of theory or practice and make recommendations to further current theories and insight.

You will take three 30-credit core modules and either two 15-credit modules or one 30-credit module from the range of electives listed below.

Core modules
-Media and Communication Theories (30 credits)
-Research Workshop (30 credits)
-Transnational Media and Communication (30 credits)

You must also complete a 60 credit dissertation in order to be awarded the Master's qualification. You are normally required to pass all taught modules before progressing to the dissertation.

Elective modules
-Developments in Communication Policy (15 credits)
-Democratisation and Networked Communication (30 credits)
-Communication, Culture and Development (30 credits)
-Celebrity (15 credits)
-Global Cultural Industries (15 credits)
-Analysing Crime (30 credits)
-Criminal Justice, Policy and Practice (30 credits)
-Victims: Policy and Politics (15 credits)
-Criminal Minds (15 credits)

NB. Elective modules choices are subject to availability.

Career prospects

Graduates have entered a wide variety of careers in broadcasting, press and telecoms networks, NGOs, the development sector and consultancies, advertising, marketing, politics, journalism, PR, media management and regulatory agencies.

Recent Job roles included:
-Advertising and Marketing Executive
-Fundraising, Campaigns and Appeal Organiser
-Journalist
-Media Planner
-Public Relations Officer

Students have access to the expert services of our Careers, Student Development and Outreach Office. They regularly receive information about internship and job opportunities and are invited to participate in media fairs and panel discussions with alumni.

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Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster. The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. Read more
Criminology has a long and distinguished tradition at Kent with its research base in the Crime, Culture and Control Cluster.

The MA was founded by the world-famous criminologist, the late Professor Jock Young. You are lectured, supervised and tutored by a team of scholars and researchers internationally renowned for their world-class teaching and publications.

Criminology is an important part of the activities of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research (SSPSSR), which is one of the four top institutions of its kind in the UK. In 2012, we were awarded the first National Award for Excellence in Teaching Criminology by the British Criminology Society in recognition of our innovative approach.

The atmosphere of the School is informal and friendly and there is a lively and diverse postgraduate community. Regular staff/graduate seminars introduce you to the work of academic staff and research students as well as academic visitors, and provide opportunities both for sociability and for intellectual stimulation. The large number of academic staff and our favourable staff/student ratios mean that academic staff are readily accessible.

A key feature of the MA Criminology is its involvement in a Common Study Programme. The Common Study Programme is a biannual student-centred conference at which students are invited to present papers, meet students and staff from other countries and exchange ideas.

The School has international links with colleagues and institutions and our current Visiting Professor of Criminology, Jeff Ferrell is an example of this extended network. Professor Ferrell is based at the Texas Christian University, USA where he is Professor of Sociology. He is a leading proponent of cultural criminology and has conducted research on urban culture, graffiti and media.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/173/criminology

Course structure

The programme involves:

- the sociological study of crime and its application to criminal justice and social policy

- the study of issues at the cutting edge of current criminological debate with a strong emphasis on the cultural context of crime

- advanced criminological theory and research methods as applied to crime and criminal justice.

It also offers opportunities for you to develop your career in the areas of criminal justice, policy development and academic research.

We are constantly developing the modules available to you in line with current issues and staff expertise. Each year we announce new choices, for example we are currently working on developing a module convened by Dr David Redmon which looks at documentary film-making from a social science perspective.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. You will be required to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

SO869 - Theories of Crime (20 credits)
SO870 - Research Methods in Criminology (20 credits)
SO875 - Drugs, Culture and Control (20 credits)
SO881 - Cultural Criminology (20 credits)
SO882 - Young People, Crime and Place (20 credits)
SO885 - Social Suffering (20 credits)
SO940 - Prisons and Penal Policy (20 credits)
LW870 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (20 credits)
LW871 - Policing (20 credits)
SO824 - Sociology of Violence (20 credits)
SO825 - Terrorism and Modern Society (20 credits)
SO830 - Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice (20 credits)
SO867 - Foundations of Sociology (20 credits)
SO868 - Critical Criminology (20 credits)
SO998 - Dissertation (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by six coursework essays and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- provide a post-graduate programme in criminology of the highest standard with teaching that is informed by internationally recognised research and scholarship

- give you a comprehensive overview and understanding of contemporary debates in criminology and criminal justice including those around diversity and inequality

- involve you in a critical analysis of crime and punishment in relation to developments in social theory, sociology and social policy

- provide an understanding of the social processes that influence the relationship between individuals, groups and institutions

- focus on the relevance of social science for the analysis and assessment of crime and criminal justice policy

- provide you with an advanced understanding of the ways in which quantitative and qualitative research methodologies may be used to study crime and criminal justice

- give you a critical awareness of the political and populist influences on criminal justice policy

- enable you to understand the emergence of social problems (including crime) and the responses of welfare and criminal justice institutions, including analysis of the theoretical, political and economic underpinnings of these responses

- build on the University’s close European ties by providing the potential for students to participate in the European Common Study programme in Criminology.

Research areas

The School has a long-established tradition of conducting criminological research.

- Crime, Culture and Control:

The group covers a diverse range of topics, employs both qualitative and quantitative methodologies and draws upon different theoretical traditions. We have particular expertise in the following areas: cultural criminology; crime, punishment and social change; drug use; gender, crime and criminal justice; penology and imprisonment (especially of female offenders); policing; quasi-compulsory treatment for drug-using offenders; race, crime and criminal justice; restorative justice and young offenders; crime and the ‘night-time economy’, terrorism and political crime; violence; youth crime and youth justice.

Present and current research has been funded by the ESRC, the Home Office and the Youth Justice Board.

Careers

Building on Kent’s success as the region’s leading institution for student employability we place considerable emphasis on you gaining specialist knowledge in your chosen subject alongside core transferable skills. We ensure that you develop the skills and competences that employers are looking for including: research and analysis; policy development and interpretation; independent thought; writing and presentation as well as time management and leadership skills. You also become fully involved in the professional research culture of the School. A postgraduate degree in the area of Criminology is a particularly valuable qualification that can lead to many exciting opportunities and professions.

Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, encompassing areas such as counter-terrorism, advocacy, probation, social policy and research. Our graduates have found positions in organisations such as the Civil Service, the Ministry of Justice, various police services and the Probation Service.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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*New for 2017, subject to final approval. The MA Crime and Gothic Fictions will introduce you to the advanced study of two popular genres that have entertained and informed culture from the nineteenth century to the present day. Read more
*New for 2017, subject to final approval

The MA Crime and Gothic Fictions will introduce you to the advanced study of two popular genres that have entertained and informed culture from the nineteenth century to the present day. You’ll explore the ways crime and Gothic enrich each other, focusing on both equally during the taught element of the MA. We’ll give you the opportunity to specialise for your final dissertation, if so desired.

The programme is deliberately international and interdisciplinary. You’ll study an imaginative choice of texts from Britain, Europe and the Americas, as well as investigating cutting-edge research and relevant theory.

The MA is particularly suited to individuals who are interested in developing their critical and research skills in preparation for further study. It can also be pursued as an end in itself, if you’re interested in investigating crime writing and Gothic at taught postgraduate level.

For information on How to Get Ahead before the course, please go to our course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-crime-and-gothic-fictions/

COURSE STRUCTURE

You’ll explore the ways crime and Gothic enrich each other, focusing on both equally during the taught element of the MA. We’ll give you the opportunity to specialise for your final dissertation, if so desired.

You’ll be taught the histories of the two genres, to ensure you have a good grounding, before moving on to consider contemporary and international examples from both genres. The programme will help strengthen your skills in comparison and criticism across genres, while allowing you to specialise in the genre of your choice.

MODULES

In the first trimester, you'll study Research: Methods, Resources and Dissemination which will account for 30 credits. You'll also study Crime and the Gothic: Pasts and Presents with will account for a further 30 credits.

In the second trimester, you'll have two more modules to study, equating to a further 30 credits each. These will be International Crime and Gothic; and Crime Stories: From Page to Screen.

Finally, in the third trimester you will work on the Dissertation module, equating to a final 60 credits.

TEACHING METHODS

This is a deliberately integrated programme of study; you’ll often work with crime fictions and Gothic texts within the same module. This will develop cross-disciplinary and cross-generic awareness, while still allowing you to specialise in the subjects that interest you most.

Teaching will take place in relatively small seminar groups, and will involve a variety of activities including tutor-led discussion; small-group activities; individual and group presentations; consideration of non-literary texts, documents and artefacts; and possibly optional field trips to relevant exhibitions, screenings or lectures.

ASSESSMENT

Modules are formally assessed primarily by essay, with the exception of the Research Methods module, which includes a bibliographical element.

Informal assessment may take the form of diagnostic essays, presentations and other exercises designed to enhance your research and presentation skills. The Dissertation module includes an assessed research proposal. There are no examinations.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Career opportunities for graduates with an MA in Crime and Gothic Fictions include:

• Working in cultural research and education.
• Academic and fictional publishing.
• Genre-related film, TV, and other media.
• Literary journalism.
• Dark tourism and the Gothic heritage industry.

For information on opportunities, facilities and resources please go to the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-crime-and-gothic-fictions/

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Understand crime and policy in a global context. The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. Read more
Understand crime and policy in a global context.

Overview

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is designed for students and professionals seeking to develop a career in criminal justice, international organisations, the media and research. You'll study an increasingly important feature of society: transnational crime and the responses taken by states and non-state actors.

You'll engage with the reality of global crime and criminal and related social policies from an interdisciplinary perspective. You will explore global policy analysis and criminal justice with an international approach. You'll also be trained in research methods.

Course content

The MA in Global Crime and Justice is based around a combination of crime, social policy and research training modules. You'll start with an introduction to major theories, institutions and debates in global policy analysis and criminal justice. You'll also get a solid grounding in the core methods of social research. You'll progress to more advanced analysis of global crime and justice, exploring diverse global crimes ranging from drug and human trafficking to corporate and state crimes. You'll also spend time in workshops designed to help you gain the communication and presentation skills you need to disseminate your research in your own research project.

Most people study for full-time for 12 months, but part-time study over 24 months is also available.

Modules
In the autumn term you'll take two compulsory modules:
-Policy Analysis - Crime and Justice
-Introduction to Social Research Methods

In the spring term you'll take another compulsory module that builds upon your earlier study:
-Global Crime and Justice

In the spring term you'll also choose one optional module from:
-Global Social Policy and Global Social Problems
-Comparative Social Policy - Governance, Management and Delivery
-Globalisation and Social Policy

In the summer term and summer months you'll take part in the Graduate Dissertation Workshop. This will give you the chance to develop your research interests and participate in a group project with other students who have similar interests. You will also use this time to work on your individual research project.

Careers

The MA in Global Crime and Justice develops the skills that employers need in a number of areas, especially criminal justice, crime policy analysis and research methods from a global perspective. You'll also find you develop transferable skills that will allow you to progress to different career areas or to continue your studies at PhD level.

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This MA offers teaching that is critical, innovative and diverse. It combines theory with practical, applied elements, and draws on a range of research and contemporary examples- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-political-communications/. Read more
This MA offers teaching that is critical, innovative and diverse. It combines theory with practical, applied elements, and draws on a range of research and contemporary examples- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-political-communications/

These come from current work in politics, political science and media studies, and also from political sociology, cultural theory and journalism. The curriculum covers political communication, from the national and international down to the local and personal, from governments and parties to NGOs and local activist groups. It engages with cultural, alternative and digital, interactive communication as well as traditional mass media.

This dynamic programme, first and foremost, offers critical engagement. It asks difficult questions about politics, economic policy, society and the media. Taking this course will not just give you an understanding of the the forms and impacts of political communications. It will also help you contextualise that knowledge in relation to the structures, institutions and actors that are at the heart of politics and media.

This course is broadly conceptual in focus, but also offers several practical, applied options as well as skills-based components. All students take a research skills course and are supervised through a dissertation with a research component. There are options, such as Campaign Skills, Social Media Campaigning, Digital News Writing and Media Law, which are entirely practice-based and taught by professionals in the field. There are also several speaker series running each year with guests from the worlds of politics, journalism, business and campaigning coming to talk.

Studying in London

Goldsmiths’ London location means that students remain in close proximity to a range of national and international political institutions, political parties, interest groups and media centres.

The MA also attracts a stimulating combination of recent graduates and experienced professionals, as well as a mix of UK and international students from across Continental Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Aeron Davis.

The programme’s core curriculum will address a range of contemporary issues, debates and theory in political communication, including work on:

-comparative media systems
-theories of communication and democratisation
-global media, international governance and transnational communication
-economic, financial and industrial policy
-digital media and online politics
-media sociology and news production
-political parties, party ideologies and party-member dynamics
-public relations, political marketing and spin
-government communication systems and media management
-media audiences, effects and agenda-setting
-public opinion and public sphere debates
-interest groups, social movements and alternative media
-advocacy, civil society and public affairs
-new technologies and the information society
-citizenship and public engagement
-the policy process and government decision-making
-politics and culture
-social theories of power, culture and communications

Theory is usually applied to a number of case study areas on, for example: conflict and war; elections; social and environmental debates; foreign affairs; the economy, finance and business; crime and disorder. Theory and discussion is always related to current events and debates.

Structure

The MA in Political Communications is built up of modules that must count up to 180 credits. The programme comprises:

Two core modules taught in the Department of Media and Communications (60 credits in total)
A research skills module
60 credits' worth of modules chosen from the Department of Politics or Department of Media and Communications. These can be a combination of 30 and 15 credit modules
Up to 30 of the 60 credits of options may be chosen from the departments of Sociology, Anthropology, English and Comparative Literature, and the Centre for Cultural Studies

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through coursework essays and written projects. Practical modules may require audiovisual elements to be submitted. It will also include a dissertation of approximately 12,000 words.

Skills

On completing the programme you'll come out with a mixture of:

-field expertise
-new analytical skills
-an understanding of research methods
-practical, applied knowledge

Careers

The programme caters to both recent graduates and those with experience who are looking for career change or advancement. Recent graduates have found (re)employment in:

-political journalism,
-olitical parties
-government institutions
-interest groups
-international bodies

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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Our Major Crime Investigation and Management Masters has been designed to provide detectives, police officers/staff and others with the knowledge and skills to conduct and manage major crime investigations from start to finish. Read more
Our Major Crime Investigation and Management Masters has been designed to provide detectives, police officers/staff and others with the knowledge and skills to conduct and manage major crime investigations from start to finish.

Whether you’re simply fascinated by issues relating to crime or aspire to lead a major crime unit, this Masters degree provides a unique platform to hone management skills specifically tailored for significant criminal investigations.

Your studies will be underpinned by the latest international recognised research in the field undertaken by the Centre for Criminology at the University. Many of our staff are research active and have expertise in homicide and major crime investigations - working in collaboration with police and senior crime detectives all over the world. For you, this means not only will you be taught by academics who are leading their field, but you’ll hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in delivering the course and will be able to share their experiences of criminal investigations.

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/1851-msc-major-crime-investigation-and-management

You’ll gain an in-depth understanding of the diverse nature and range of major crime investigations throughout the course. Building up your knowledge and investigatory skills in every facet of crime investigation, you’ll develop an advanced understanding of the characteristics and causes of difficult-to-solve homicides, an appreciation of evidence and theory around ‘failed’ and successful investigations, the gathering and managing of data, intelligence, and scientific evidence.

A key element to your studies will also focus around aspects involved in managing and conducting major investigations, from managing small and large investigative teams to working with external agencies including forensic science providers and the media.

The course has a strong theoretical foundation and will include research methods training that will develop your with critical and analytical skills. This means you’ll be better equipped to make sense of large volumes of complex data and intelligence – a typical characteristic of modern day major crime investigation.

Taught by a team of lecturers with long-standing expertise in the field, you will learn through a mix of lectures, seminars and tutorials. The teaching team comprises of active researchers in the theory and practice of criminal investigation, so you’ll benefit from being taught by staff at the forefront of their subject.

The University has an established Criminal Investigation Research Network (CIRN), led by Professor Fiona Brookman that brings together leading academics, senior investigating officers and practitioners - ensuring your learning is informed by the latest development in the field. An important feature of your studies will be hearing directly from those with distinct professional experiences of, and in some cases diverse roles within, police investigations.

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This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Read more
This course examines rapidly changing issues such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime that are major areas of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research.

This award provides an advanced programme in a new and rapidly changing area of study. During recent decades transnational crime has become a major area of concern for politicians and policy makers and an increasingly important area of research. Its context is the growth of global anxiety regarding activities such as drug trafficking, terrorism, human trafficking, illegal arms trading and financial crime which appear either to be on the increase or are assuming new and increasingly global forms.

In this award we intend to examine this phenomenon in terms of its recent emergence and further development, its historical precedents at a global level, typical forms and law enforcement responses, and the way in which transnational organised crime is typically represented by news and broadcasting media. Our intention is to provide you with a rigorous and critical education in this area which will provide you with the basis for both further study and for seeking employment in professional careers related to the award.

Course content

You will study a range of modules which cover the history, theory and analysis of transnational organised crime as well as providing a very wide range in-depth case study regarding both organised criminal groups and the global activities which they engage in.

This typically includes phenomena as diverse as international terrorism, drug trafficking, illegal arms deals, the smuggling of radioactive material, human trafficking, the global sex trade, racketeering, trading in human organs, counterfeiting of documents and identities, extortion and many different forms of state and corporate crime.

Modules studied
-Crimes against Humanity: State Crime, War Crimes and Transnational Terrorism
-Trafficking: The Illegal Trade in People, Goods and Services
-Crimes of the Powerful: Corporate, White Collar and Financial Crime
-Transnational Justice & Organised Crime
-Research Based Dissertation

Graduate destinations

The MA provides a curriculum which is suited to those seeking employment or further study in relation to careers in law enforcement, policing, customs and excise, the security industry, international governmental and non-governmental institutions, national foreign, security or defence ministries, and internationally oriented organisations of many types.

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This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime. Read more
This programme considers pressing contemporary global issues from a criminological perspective, including organised crime, trafficking, terrorism and environmental crime.

Why this programme

◾You will gain access to a wide range of potential careers and further academic pathways related to understanding international crime and developing strategies and policy for its prevention.
◾You will benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the University's Scottish Centre for Crime & Justice Research. The breadth and diversity of expertise represented within the teaching team is a key strength of the programme.
◾There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars throughout, with high-calibre speakers from the UK and abroad.
◾You will have the opportunity to link up with a criminal justice organisation for your dissertation work.

Programme structure

You will take four core and two optional courses, as well as submit a dissertation.

Core courses
◾Criminological perspectives on security and globalisation
◾Criminological theory in context
◾Research design
◾The global criminal economy.

Optional courses
◾Antiquities trafficking
◾Crime, media and popular culture
◾Gender, crime and criminal Justice
◾Punishment and in/justice
◾Rehabilitation and desistance from crime.

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with crime prevention policy and strategy, especially with international and cross-border agencies.

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From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc. Read more
From Shakespeare to Hollywood, as a culture we are fascinated by crime. Discover what makes crime captivating with City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc.

Who is it for?

This degree is for independent, critical thinkers who want to work, or are working, within criminal justice or want to undertake further research. Many of our students have undergraduate criminology degrees, and come from universities across the world. Often they want to continue their learning or specialise within a specific subject area. Students also come from other science, humanities and legal backgrounds and from within the criminal justice system. Research methods form a key component of the programme so having an interest in data collection and analysis is valuable.

"To understand crime in the 21st century you have to have specialist criminological knowledge. We don’t just focus on the criminal act; we look at the societal reaction to crime and the cultural narratives that exist around it. At City we will encourage you to develop your criminological imagination but also to use it." - Professor Eugene McLaughlin

Objectives

At City we believe crime is multi-dimensional, which is why this MSc course brings the victim into focus, not just the offender. The criminal mind is complex and our understanding of it matters – not just to the individual, but also to their family, the community and wider society at large.

We live in a criminogenic global society; one that is producing new forms of crime, and new criminal opportunities. City’s Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc course unpicks the power of the criminological imagination within this society.

This is not a Masters that focuses purely on criminal justice or crime control – instead we emphasise cutting-edge theoretical analysis and methodological training, so you can research the contemporary significance of crime and see how it can be a powerful marker of social and institutional change.

Originally part of City’s MA in Human Rights, this degree offers a distinctive perspective on the relationship between criminology and human rights violations. It is global in outlook because, by its nature, crime is transnational and is taught by eminent criminologists who author the books that appear on reading lists across the country.

Here are some of the questions the course poses:
-Why don’t more people commit criminal acts?
-What does crime tell us about the society in which we live?
-Why is crime considered abnormal but at the same time central to news, fiction and popular culture?
-What would a victim-centred justice system look like?

Academic facilities

When it comes to studying criminology, London is an amazing facility. It is one of the most sociologically diverse laboratories offering a wide range of accessible resources. From the myriad centres of policy, justice and media to the endless range of public events, at City you can become a researcher in a global city. As part of the University of London you can also become a member of Senate House Library for free with your student ID card.

Teaching and learning

We will teach you through a combination of lectures, interactive workshops and seminars, in the first and second term (September-April). This is supplemented by insight from external visiting criminologists, criminal justice charities, research agencies and, in some cases, retired criminals. This gives you the opportunity to ask questions, debate your ideas and present your own evidence around particular arguments.

During the dissertation phase of the degree you also have the chance to visit the Central Criminal Court (otherwise known as the Old Bailey) and in some cases undertake a prison visit. One student is currently in New York, researching the New York Police Department, as part of her dissertation on the stresses of being a police officer in 2016.

The majority of postgraduate sociology modules are assessed by coursework. However, if you choose to study some modules outside of the department you may have different assessment methods so please check this carefully. You will need to gain a minimum pass mark of 50% in all assessment components.

The dissertation marks the point in the course where you begin to take hold of your research and let your criminological imagination come into play. The dissertation (of 15,000 words) accounts for one third of the total marks for the Criminology and Criminal Justice MSc degree. By the end of the first term you will have to start considering your dissertation topic. You may already know you area of focus, but we offer guidance and support through dissertation workshops.

Modules

You will take three 30-credit compulsory core modules and two 15-credit elective modules. You can then choose from two of four elective modules to hone your degree towards your own area of interest. In the final part of the course you take part in a dissertation workshop and produce a dissertation over the summer period.

The first module, ‘Analysing crime’ makes up the course’s theoretical base. You then research contemporary developments in criminal justice and penal policy within the second core module. At this point in the course you get to choose from a number of elective modules covering diverse topics including the dark side of media notoriety and celebrity, and the criminal mind. All these modules draw on the School’s research strengths making them unique to City.

Core modules
-Analysing crime
-Criminal justice policy and practice
-Research Workshop
-Dissertation

Elective modules
-The criminal mind
-Victims: policy and politics
-Developments in communication policy
-Celebrity

NB: Elective module choices are subject to availability and timetabling constraints.

Career prospects

The Criminology and Criminal Justice course is taught by internationally recognised experts and prepares you for careers across the public, private and voluntary sectors.

From research to policy development and from the security services to the criminal justice system and victim support, you will have a wealth of employment options once you graduate. Previous graduates are now working in:
-The Metropolitan Police
-The National Probation service
-The UK Foreign Office
-The prison service
-Education
-Mental health
-Criminal justice charitable sector
-Doctoral research
-Prison Service

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This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. Read more
This Master's programme provides an advanced critical insight into current developments in the study of migration, organised crime and human trafficking. It's one of few programmes worldwide to offer you the chance to study the main characteristics of modern forms of slavery, their causes/roots, impacts, and ways (legal and others) of fighting/preventing them.

The degree is unique in examining, in an interdisciplinary manner, the intersection between human trafficking and migratory flows, and forced labour, and organised crime.

The programme combines vocational and theoretical components. You'll study the social conditions in which human trafficking occurs, including wealth, social and gender inequalities; migration due to political instability, war and poverty; and the role of criminal gangs and organised crime groups in the proliferation of this crime in recent years. The modus operandi of traffickers and their networks will be explored as will the challenges raised by the role in family members and communities in this increasingly complex issue.

You'll also engage critically with existing legal frameworks and policing in place to combat human trafficking. The degree also offers te chance to examine different discourses used to analyse the issue including debates about terminology, media representations, effectiveness of anti-trafficking policies and the efficacy of rescue and rehabilitation programmes.

Why St Mary's?

The MA programme is part of a wider commitment to addressing modern slavery and human trafficking through the work of the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery, established at St Mary’s in 2015. The Centre was founded to develop an evidence based response to addressing the current intensification of human trafficking and slavery cases globally. It is part of the Santa Marta Group and has links to many external partners including Kevin Hyland, the UK’s first Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner and Visiting Professor at St Mary’s University, policy makers, police, other academic institutions, safe houses, campaigners, international organizations and NGOs. Students on the MA in Human Trafficking, Migration and Organised Crime will have access to the resources of the centre, including cutting edge research and lectures by high profile experts in the field.

An inaugural conference, which took place in February 2017, was the first of an annual event, organised by the Centre for the Study of Modern Slavery. With the aim of using research to fill the knowledge and evidence gaps experienced by policymakers and practitioners, the conference provides a space to promote debate and encourage collaboration on addressing the subject of human trafficking and modern slavery, with contributions from UK and international experts. Discussions between policymakers, practitioners and researchers will identify evidence gaps and tailor research to these needs. All MA students will be encouraged to engage with and contribute to future conferences and may choose to evaluate the experience and learning as part of their assessed work.

Course Content

All modules are listed on the St Mary's website:
https://www.stmarys.ac.uk/postgraduate-courses-london/human-trafficking

Career Prospects

This course will interest students who wish to pursue careers in the voluntary sector (in organisations that work with migrants and people who have been trafficked), in the public sector dealing with crime control and criminal justice, in law and human rights, and in campaigning and media. It will also appeal to people employed in professional and third sector organisations, such as police, health professionals, social workers and frontline support workers as part of their continuing professional development.

It will provide a critical and methodological platform for students who aim to extend their studies to doctoral level. And it will appeal to students who want to investigate the historical, social and cultural factors that contribute to the intersection of criminal justice, human trafficking and migration.

The Careers Service has more information on graduate careers and part-time work available during your course.

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In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. Read more
In recent years, issues of terrorism and organised crime have gained an unprecedented profile, provoked significant social concern, and dominated both law-and-order and many wider social policy agendas. We draw on state-of-the-art research to address key critical issues surrounding organised criminality and terrorism in contemporary society.

We involve multi-level analyses of organised crime as a concept, alongside the impacts of urbanisation, migration and globalisation upon both the practice of crime and the ways in which we understand them. You address cutting-edge critical, conceptual and theoretical analyses of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

The course provides you with a strong grounding in the key theories, understandings and issues relating to organised crime and terrorism. You explore topics including:
-The analysis, politics and prevention of terrorism
-Globalisation and organised crime
-Security and the state
-The hacker ethic
-Human rights

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Employment opportunities for graduates of this course include careers in security, policing, research, intelligence and justice professions.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

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Interested in journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma in Journalism. Read more
Interested in journalism and keen to gain qualifications that will make you stand out from others? This course leads to both an MA and NCTJ Diploma in Journalism.

Course overview

‌This Masters is one of the few postgraduate degrees in the UK to be accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ). NCTJ accreditation is widely recognised as a gold standard for courses that turn out highly skilled, highly motivated and highly employable trainee journalists.

‌Previous study of journalism is not a requirement. If necessary, we may ask you to undertake a short course that covers essential skills and knowledge, before you join the main Masters course.

Journalism is an intensive course that trains, write and research like a journalist. It covers media ethics and law, reporting and public affairs, shorthand, sub-editing and production. You will develop your own specialist areas of interest such as crime, health or political journalism. In the final stage of the course you can produce your own newspaper or series of in-depth articles, with support from our professional journalists.

An important benefit of a Masters at Sunderland is the relevance of our research expertise, which includes sports and magazine journalism as well as web writing and social media. Sunderland hosts the Centre for Research in Media and Cultural Studies (CRMCS) and our Media Department has been recognised for producing some world-leading and internationally excellent research.

The Journalism Diversity Fund is aimed at people from diverse backgrounds who need help funding their journalism training. Candidates must be from a socially or ethnically diverse background, be able to demonstrate genuine commitment to becoming a successful journalist and have secured a place on an NCTJ-accredited course.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/artsdesignandmedia/postgraduate/journalism-part-time/

Course content

The content of the course is shaped by your personal interests with guidance and inspiration from Sunderland's supportive tutors.

Modules on this course include:
Journalism – Stage 1 (60 Credits)
-News Journalism: Principles and Practice 1
-Essential Media Law
-Essential Public Affairs
-Shorthand

Journalism – Stage 2 (60 Credits)
-News Journalism: Principles and Practice 2
-Reporting
-Media Ethics and Society
-Shorthand

Journalism – Stage 3 (60 Credits)
-Dissertation

Teaching and assessment

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters requires a higher level of independent working. The course aims to stretch your creativity and maximise your sense of personal fulfilment.

In Stage 1 and Stage 2, you will have approx 22/23hrs teaching per week. This is arranged so that you have Friday off each week. The course is taught by respected academics and journalism professionals through a combination of newsroom workshops, seminars and tutorials. You will work on projects both on your own and with others, developing skills in communication and teamwork.

We encourage you to publish your work. The department has strong relationships with local and national media including Johnston Press, NCJ Media and Room 501 Publishing.

Facilities & location

The facilities at the David Puttnam Media Centre help you gain skills in areas such as writing, page design, online research, managing production, IT, and time management and presentation skills.

The mediaHUB
Throughout your time in Sunderland you will have an outlet for your creative talents in the mediaHUB, a bustling multimedia newsroom on the top floor of our David Puttnam Media Centre that will give you a real taste of life as a working journalist. The mediaHUB runs websites covering sport, news, entertainments and fashion, provides the content for news bulletins on our award-winning Spark Radio and is responsible for writing and editing Spark magazine.

Journalism/PR suites
We have four journalism suites, each with 18 Apple Mac workstations with design applications and video editing. There’s an additional open access project completion suite with 20 more workstations and colour laser printing.

Broadcast Journalism Newsroom
The Broadcast Journalism Newsroom has 20 workstations plus a Sky feed with two 40” plasma screens. Each workstation has industry-standard software including Newscutter, Burli and ENPS.

Technical support
The Journalism Newsroom has another 20 Mac workstations and offers drop-in sessions run by a rota of working journalists who can advise on projects, assignments and your personal portfolio. These sessions are available every day of the week during term time. In addition, technicians are available to help you use all the software and equipment.

Radio studios
We have six radio studios including a transmission suite for 107 Spark FM, our student-run community radio station and a city centre hub.

TV studios
We have two broadcast-quality TV studios complete with green room and changing facilities. Equipment includes four Steadicam rigs plus dolly, track and mini crane. We have over 40 full HD tapeless field camera systems.

Other media facilities
We have a live Sky feed and off-air recording facility, including DVD and Blu-ray recording, plus extensive footage archive/library. There is also a 203-seat cinema with full HD projection, 7.1 surround sound facility and the capability to play 3D feature films.

University Library Services
We’ve got a wide range of books, journals and e-books on relevant topics, with many more available through the inter-library loan service. Some useful resources for your studies include:
-Lexis, which provides full-text newspaper articles as well as access to legal information
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Archival Sound Recordings with over 12,000 hours of recordings
-British Universities Film and Video Council (BUFVC), which provides resources for the production, study and use of film and related media in higher education and research

Employment & careers

Postgraduates are highly employable and, on average, earn more than individuals whose highest qualification is an undergraduate degree. On completing this course you will be equipped for roles throughout the PR and communications industries.

Recent Sunderland graduates are now working in PR consultancies as well as in the PR departments of organisations such as the Environment Agency, Tyne and Wear Sports and AA Press Office.

During the course we encourage you to gain industry experience which will enhance your skills, build up a valuable network of contacts and boost your employability.

A Masters degree will also enhance career opportunities within Higher Education and prepare you for further postgraduate studies.
As a professionally accredited centre for journalism education, we provide you with an opportunity to influence the future teaching of journalism. You can become an NCTJ student representative and attend a national council meeting once a year.

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Recognising the challenge for politicians, policy makers and practitioners in the criminal justice, and criminal law fields, this programme addresses the complex problems that crime poses for contemporary societies. Read more
Recognising the challenge for politicians, policy makers and practitioners in the criminal justice, and criminal law fields, this programme addresses the complex problems that crime poses for contemporary societies.

Why this programme

-The programme provides you with the key attributes for professions related to criminal justice.
-You will be benefit from the combined strengths of staff from the Scottish Centre for Crime & Justice Research who are based at the University.
-You will develop analytic and research skills, an interdisciplinary knowledge base, and a practical understanding of the settings in which crime and justice policies are devised and implemented.
-There will be a number of guest lectures, presentations and seminars throughout, with high-calibre speakers from the UK and abroad.
-You will have the opportunity to link up with a criminal justice organisation for your dissertation work.
-This degree is taught alongside the MSc in Transnational Crime, Justice & Security, which provides more focus on the international aspects of crime. An MRes in Criminology is also available, combining a study of the subject with greater focus on research methods training.

Programme structure

You will take core courses in criminological theory; criminal justice systems and processes; and research design and methodology. You also have the opportunity to take optional courses from a range of subject areas. In addition, the MSc programme requires you to produce a dissertation on a subject of your choice.

Core courses
-Understanding and explaining crime
-Research and enquiry in crime and criminal justice

Optional courses include:
-Punishment and penology
-Crime, media and popular culture
-Rehabilitation and desistance from crime
-The global criminal economy
-Managing and controlling crime
-Women and girls in crime and justice
-International trafficking in cultural objects

Career prospects

You will be well equipped for careers in public, private and third sector agencies concerned with crime prevention and community safety. The programme provides an excellent professional development choice for social workers and social work managers, prison governors or officers, police officers and lawyers.

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We are surrounded by advertising, marketing and media campaigns in a hugely competitive world-wide marketplace and these areas play an important commercial function within businesses and organisations. Read more
We are surrounded by advertising, marketing and media campaigns in a hugely competitive world-wide marketplace and these areas play an important commercial function within businesses and organisations.

This course brings together expertise from our top-rated Department of Sociology and Essex Business School. You investigate key theoretical and substantive debates in the critical study of advertising, marketing and media, and analyse the advertising industries in Britain, North America and newly emerging economies like India.

You explore topics including:
-Recent developments from actor network theory on market devices
-Concepts of advertising, marketing and consumption
-Contemporary marketing and management
-Media and communications
-Developing brand cultures

You will also be introduced to primary research materials, like market research data, examining debates about the historical rise of marketing-orientated businesses and the growth of the advertising agency.

Essex Business School takes you beyond the basics of a business education. Our strong emphasis on ethics and sustainable business practice in the global economy, and our expertise in international management, accounting and finance, will provide you with the knowledge and skills necessary for your future career in an increasingly complex business world.

Our Department of Sociology was rated top 10 in the UK for research quality (REF 2014), and we consistently receive strong student satisfaction scores, including 96% overall student satisfaction in 2015.

Our expert staff

We are a large and friendly department, offering a diverse range of research interests and with staff members who are committed to teaching, research and publication that covers a broad geographical spectrum.

Many have worked at the local level with local authorities, justice councils, community partnerships and charities. Others have worked at a national and international level with bodies like the United Nations, the European Commission’s Expert Group on Public Understanding of Science, Amnesty International, The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, the Home Office and national non-governmental organisations.

Within Essex Business School, our staff specialise in areas including SMEs, business-to-business relationship marketing, branding, marketing management, new product development and social entrepreneurship.

While maintaining core engagement with contemporary marketing practice, our staff enrich our courses with novel marketing ideas drawn from both the contemporary business world and cutting-edge academic research.

Specialist facilities

-Dedicated postgraduate support facilities
-Our renowned off-campus Graduate Conference takes place every February
-A unique Student Resource Centre where you can get help with your studies, access examples of previous students’ work, and attend workshops on research skills
-The Sociology common room is open all day Monday-Friday, is stocked with daily newspapers, magazines and journals, and has free drinks available
-Links with the Institute of Social and Economic Research, which conducts large-scale survey projects and has its own library, and the -UK Data Archive, which stores national research data like the British Crime Survey
-Our students’ Sociology Society, a forum for the exchange of ideas, arranging talks by visiting speakers, introducing you to various career pathways, and organising debates
-Our landmark new Essex Business School building on our Colchester Campus is the first zero carbon business school in the UK. Set around a lush winter garden, the Eden-style dome gives the building its own micro-climate.

Our new building provides you with a stunning new work environment, offering:
-A virtual trading floor with Bloomberg Terminals offering direct use of Bloomberg data, information and analytics
-A light and spacious lecture theatre, with seating for 250 students
-Study pods and innovation booths for group working
-Dedicated office space for student entrepreneurs
-Networking opportunities with visiting businesses
-A café with an adjacent sun terrace

Your future

This course provides excellent preparation for further academic study, and many of our postgraduates go on to successful academic careers, both in the UK and overseas.

Others have established careers in non-governmental organisations, local authorities, specialist think tanks, government departments, charities, media production, and market intelligence.

We work with the university’s Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

Postgraduate study is the chance to take your education to the next level. The combination of compulsory and optional modules means our courses help you develop extensive knowledge in your chosen discipline, whilst providing plenty of freedom to pursue your own interests. Our research-led teaching is continually evolving to address the latest challenges and breakthroughs in the field, therefore to ensure your course is as relevant and up-to-date as possible your core module structure may be subject to change.

MA Advertising, Marketing and the Media
-Advertising: Commerce and Creativity
-Dissertation
-Strategic Brand Communication
-Critical Marketing
-Consumption, political economy and sustainability
-Sociological Research Design
-Digital Economy (optional)

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