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Join us at the Faculty of Engineering and embark on a rewarding course of study that can contribute to your academic reputation and further your professional life. Read more

Invest in your future

Join us at the Faculty of Engineering and embark on a rewarding course of study that can contribute to your academic reputation and further your professional life.

The Master of Engineering (ME) is a research-based qualification that provides specialised knowledge in your field of choice, advances your abilities to perform rigorous intellectual analysis, and confidently build independent problem-solving skills.

Our postgraduate students have access to world-class facilities and experts who apply their research discoveries, expertise and experiences to their teaching and supervision. You will undertake a stimulating mix of theoretical and experimental research to solve real-world problems, become a valued member of your supervisor’s research team, and influence future research directions. No one works in isolation here, and we aim to equip you with the tools you will need to cultivate your critical thinking abilities.

The ME gives you the chance to engage in advanced, independent and original research, which can make it an enriching introduction to further study in our doctoral programme. Be assured that the ME will set you apart if you intend to progress into higher-level positions in industry and the employment market, or mark the beginnings of a future in research and academia.

Programme structure

Research (120 or 180 points)
Full-time or part-time

The ME is a research degree – you must successfully complete a 120-point thesis to gain this qualification. The 120-point option only applies if you have completed a four-year honours degree in Engineering. If you have a three-year bachelors degree in Engineering or a related field (such as Science), you’ll be expected to complete a 180-point programme. This requires you to choose four taught courses relevant to your research area of choice, as well as submit the 120-point thesis.

Subject options

The Faculty of Engineering is home to five departments dedicated to pioneering innovative, world-class research. You will have the opportunity to choose from a range of subject areas to consider as your focus. The project areas that you may specialise in for your ME degree are:

Bioengineering
Chemical and Materials Engineering
Civil Engineering
Computer Systems Engineering
Engineering Science
Environmental Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Mechatronics Engineering
Software Engineering

Next generation research at the Faculty of Engineering

The Faculty of Engineering is dedicated to providing you with all the facilities, flexibility and support needed for you to develop the skills needed for the workforce. We boast research themes and programmes that provoke interdisciplinary projects, bringing together expertise from our five departments, other faculties, and industry partners and research organisations. Collaborative study is strongly encouraged – postgraduates in particular have the benefit of experiencing cohorts with diverse academic and industry backgrounds.

You will gain access to world-renowned experts who actively demonstrate the positive impacts research have on society. High-performance equipment and labs beyond industry standards are at your fingertips. Our facilities extend beyond study hours – we take pride in our involvement in student events and associations across the University, and are dedicated to providing you with academic, personal and career advice. We encourage you to take advantage of our resources, and use them to expand the possibilities of your research and career path.

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As a Master of Engineering (ME) graduate you will have the opportunity to either seek employment as a professional engineer, or start a research career. Read more

As a Master of Engineering (ME) graduate you will have the opportunity to either seek employment as a professional engineer, or start a research career.

The ME normally takes 12 months to complete full-time.  It builds on prior study at undergraduate level, such as the four-year BE(Hons) or BSc(Tech).  The degree requires 120 points, which can either be made up of 30 points in taught papers and a 90-point dissertation (research project), or one 120-point thesis.

If you enrol in an ME via the Faculty of Science & Engineering you can major in Engineering, and your thesis topic may come from our wide range of study areas such as biological engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, mechanical engineering, materials engineering, environmental engineering and electronic engineering.

The Faculty of Science & Engineering fosters collaborative relationships between science, engineering, industry and management.  The Faculty has developed a very strong research base to support its aims of providing you with in-depth knowledge, analytical skills, innovative ideas, and techniques to translate science into technology in the real world.

You will have the opportunity to undertake research with staff who are leaders in their field and will have the use of world-class laboratory facilities. Past ME students have worked on projects such as a ‘snake robot’ for disaster rescue and a brain-controlled electro-mechanical prosthetic hand.

Facilities

The University of Waikato School of Engineering’s specialised laboratories includes the Large Scale Lab complex that features a suite of workshops and laboratories dedicated to engineering teaching and research.  These include 3D printing, a mechanical workshop and computer labs with engineering design software.

The computing facilities at the University of Waikato are among the best in New Zealand, ranging from phones and tablets for mobile application development to cluster computers for massively parallel processing. Software engineering students will have 24 hour access to computer labs equipped with all the latest computer software.

Build a successful career

Depending on the thesis topic studied, graduates of this degree may find employment in the research and development department in a range of engineering industries, including energy companies, environmental agencies, government departments, biomedical/pharmaceutical industries, private research companies, universities, food and dairy industries, electronics, agriculture, forestry and more. The ME can also be a stepping stone to doctoral studies.

Career opportunities

  • Aeronautical Engineer
  • Automotive Engineer
  • Biotechnologist
  • Computer-aided Engineer
  • Engineering Geologist
  • Food and Drink Technologist
  • Laboratory Technician
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Medical Sciences Technician
  • Patent Attorney
  • Pharmaceutical Engineer
  • Quality Assurance Officer
  • Research Assistant
  • Theoretical Physics Research


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The MA programme has been designed to achieve a close connection between the learning environment and the workplace. Emphasis is placed on face to face delivery of the programme with student participation and experience being central to the facilitation of learning and teaching. Read more
The MA programme has been designed to achieve a close connection between the learning environment and the workplace. Emphasis is placed on face to face delivery of the programme with student participation and experience being central to the facilitation of learning and teaching. The use of professional specialists to provide input where required is also a key feature of the learning approach.

The programme examines the practice of leadership and management informed by an analysis of wider management theory, in a changing organisational context.

You will attend our Bognor Regis campus for 1 day per month for 10 months in the first 2 years. The final year is more flexible and focuses on producing a dissertation topic supported by your tutors. We predominantly use small group learning and Action Learning Sets to deliver the content of the programme. Assessment is via assignment/presentations and report completion.

You will create a detailed, transformational Personal Development Plan in your first year alongside a study into ‘Managing a Department’. In the second year you will study Strategic Leadership and High Performance Team Management. In the final year you will attend research methods workshops, decide on a specific area to investigate and report on what is relevant to you, your career or your employer.

Contemplating taking on a masters-level programme whilst maintaining a demanding full-time position and a young family is a scary thought. This worry, however, was quickly removed when starting on the University of Chichester’s part-time MA in Leadership and Management. It would appear to me that this programme is specifically designed for people in my situation. The self-directed teaching style, complemented with monthly taught sessions, creates the excellent balance to fit post-graduate study into an already busy schedule.

The flexibility of course content and focus on work-based learning has allowed me to bring my studies into the workplace and has already helped to deepen my understanding of my role as a manager. Learning and sharing with others professionals seeking to also broaden their perception of management practice is a real asset and allows for further insight through supportive challenges and encouragement.

I would certainly recommend this course to others wishing to develop themselves as a leader, to bridge the gap between management theory and practice and to deepen their understanding of the role they play in their respective teams."

Vito Mastrolonardo, Head of Support & Customer Experience:

"There are a number of organisational developments where I work and with development comes change and opportunity. I want to put myself in the best place possible for the career developments that may arise.

Furthering my education in a practical and hands on way looked like the best option. And that is exactly what the MA Leadership and Management does.

I had a degree in Business Studies and the next logical progression route was a professional qualification or a masters level degree. However a Masters or MBA appear on the face of it very expensive and require a major time commitment. That is, until I found the University of Chichester MA in Leadership and Management. It is still a long term commitment, it still has a commitment to work hard and be very self-directed but, it is over three years. One day a month. And I can jump off at the end of each of those three years with a post graduate qualification.

What’s more, it was a ‘hands on’ course. All the assignments must be relevant and applicable to your job. This is even better. I need to manage a department, I have a team to lead, what better than to directly and immediately apply that knowledge.

I’m now 5 months in to the programme. 5 sessions that have included developing my knowledge in creating vision, objectives, strategy and change management. In additional to the directed learning, action learning sets that have been invaluable in helping me to understand myself and question what we have learnt in a facilitated, confidential group environment.

I am already applying my new found knowledge. I need to create a new strategy for my department and this has become the focus of one of my assignments. My personal journey has seen me read a number of contrasting articles on strategy and leadership, encouraging me to critically evaluate my thinking and the thinking of others. This has been especially useful when reading journals and books on leadership and applying this critical thinking to the workplace.

This is the course for me. This was the way for me to cement my knowledge in leadership and management and how to develop it further. It gives me the opportunity to advance my learning and knowledge in a practical and applied way to my work. It allows me the valuable opportunity to work on assignments during my working day as they directly relate to the work that I am currently doing. I am now on a respected, powerful journey to becoming a Master Leadership and Management enabling me to develop my career and satisfying my thirst for personal development."

Gareth Sear, Business Start Up Manager

Indicative modules
Personal Development for Leading Transformation
Managing a Department
Strategic Team Development
Developing and Implementing Corporate Strategy
Research Methods and Dissertation

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/mechanical/program/graduate-meng/overview. The master of engineering in mechanical engineering is a 30 credit hour degree program. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/mechanical/program/graduate-meng/overview

The master of engineering in mechanical engineering is a 30 credit hour degree program. It is intended to be a terminal degree program designed for those who do not expect to pursue a doctoral degree but who wish to become a leader within the mechanical engineering field. This degree is particularly well-suited for students who wish to study part time, for those interested in updating their technical skills, or for those who are not focused on a research-oriented master of science thesis. A conventional thesis is not required for the program. In its place, students complete a capstone experience, which may be a design project leadership course or a well-organized and carefully chosen industrial internship. A research methods course may also fulfill the capstone experience; however, this option is primarily intended for students who are considering transitioning to the MS program in mechanical engineering. (Courses taken within the ME program are transferrable to the MS program.)

Plan of study

In addition to the two required courses, students choose three courses from 9 different focus areas and four elective courses. All full-time equivalent students are required to attend the weekly graduate seminar each semester they are on campus. Up to three courses may be taken outside the mechanical engineering department. Students may complete the program's requirements within one calendar year with summer study. Students may also augment their education through cooperative education employment opportunities. Although co-op is not a requirement of the program, it does give students an opportunity to gain employment experience within the field.

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University of Derby has launched a free open online course titled “Digital.Me. Managing your digital self”. This FREE online summer course will help you to considering your digital reputation and its impact on your private and professional life. Read more
University of Derby has launched a free open online course titled “Digital.Me: Managing your digital self”.

This FREE online summer course will help you to considering your digital reputation and its impact on your private and professional life. Often we are quite adept at using technology and regard ourselves as fairly tech savvy but that doesn’t necessarily mean we are digitally literate and know how to use technology for our benefit rather than being driven by technology.

Whilst developing your digital literacy skills as you progress though the 6 short units, you will earn Mozilla open badges for each topic completed, and then upon completion of the course you will gain an E-Certificate that you could add to your CV.

The course is 100% online and will run from the 12 June. You can complete the course in just one day, or over 6 weeks – the course fits around your schedule.


Don’t delay limited places available.

Course starts 12 June 2017, register your interest now!

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The Master of Science in Nursing (ME-MSN) Non-Nurse program is designed for students who hold a bachelor's degree in areas of study outside of nursing and are seeking new careers as registered nurses (RNs). Read more
The Master of Science in Nursing (ME-MSN) Non-Nurse program is designed for students who hold a bachelor's degree in areas of study outside of nursing and are seeking new careers as registered nurses (RNs).

The program, rated among the top in the country, prepares students for licensure as RNs while integrating graduate-level study that prepares them for positions as clinical nurse leaders (CNLs).

Students complete 68 credits over the course of two years of continuous study on the USF main campus. It’s full time, with classroom instruction three days weekly and clinical practice two days weekly.

The CNL Role

The new Clinical Nurse Leader role prepares nurses as clinical leaders in often complex environments to assist patients in creating an experience of a coordinated approach to care. The CNL role is a pivotal role that allows health care professional teams to be creative in envisioning how other roles will best promote reliable and competent patient care.

ACCREDITATION

The baccalaureate degree in nursing, master’s degree in nursing and the Doctor of Nursing Practice at the University of San Francisco School of Nursing and Health Professions are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

It is also approved by the California State Board of Registered Nursing. Students who graduate from the program are also eligible to receive the California Public Health Nursing Certificate.

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The ME in Manufacturing Management & Innovation is a 90 ECTS Masters programme. Candidates will undertake 12 modules of 5 ECTS each and complete a project worth 30 ECTS. Read more
The ME in Manufacturing Management & Innovation is a 90 ECTS Masters programme. Candidates will undertake 12 modules of 5 ECTS each and complete a project worth 30 ECTS. Graduates will obtain a DIT Level 9 award of Master of Engineering in (Manufacturing Management and Innovation). The programme involves collaboration between the School of Manufacturing & Design DIT Bolton St and the College of Business DIT Aungier St. The programme uniquely combines learning in the developing areas (sustainability, lean, systems integration etc.) within the core engineering discipline with the broader skillsets (innovation, entrepreneurship, finance, strategic management etc.). The result is a qualification which befits aspiring and existing team leaders and managers equipping these professionals to address the challenges posed by the demands of modern manufacturing environments.

Career Opportunities

Career opportunities are excellent with advanced manufacturing and management skills in high demand. Graduates have the opportunity to engage in advanced technical roles and quickly progress to management positions in a wide variety of manufacturing industries such as the medical devices, food, pharma, electronics and general engineering.

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Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons. Read more
Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons.

Why study Social Research Methods at Dundee?

Social research methods are important not just to social scientists wishing to study a particular problem or to test a theory in a way that is be considered rigorous. They are also fundamental tools of value to government, service providers and to business. There are of course a diverse range of research methods available to social scientists.

The aims of the MSc/Diploma programme in Social Research Methods are:
To advance your knowledge and understanding of the nature of research in social science.
To enhance your skills in areas that will equip you as a social scientist for employment in a government, business or a public policy environment as well as in an academic context.

"I undertook the Social Research Methods MSc in 2009/2010. This was a really interesting course which not only helped me develop a range of research skills which have been extremely relevant and useful in my PhD, but also helped me to critically engage with broader issues of social justice. This sparked an interest in my current research field, and ultimately, has been invaluable in giving me a solid foundation for continuing onto an academic career. Beyond the academic knowledge however, this MSc also provides a useful set of practical and applicable skills which many employers value, such as in GIS and statistics"
Andrew Wooff, studied full-time 2009-10

Researcher, Centre for Criminological Research, University of Sheffield

Specialism in population and welfare

The MSc in Social Research Methods offers a specialism in population and welfare issues under the title MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare). This option is an accredited course for the ESRC Population Investigation Council funding. This specialism is particularly relevant for students interested in demographic and welfare issues.

What's so good about Social Research Methods at Dundee?

The staff teaching the MSc in Social Research Methods course have wide experience of both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and have deployed these skills not only to pursue frontline research in social science, but also as expert advisers to governments and as consultants to international organisations.

This course emphasises that it is important not only to understand how to use a particular research tool, but also to consider the wider meanings of how knowledge can be constructed in different ways and for diverse range of purposes. One particular feature of the course is the comprehensive and in-depth coverage of a variety of research methods including ethnographic and participatory tools; the analysis of large datasets plus GIS skills. The course seeks to encourage students to think critically not only about the methods they use, but also to reflect on the limitations of what is knowable from the evidence presented by others.

"As a part time student on the MSc Social Research Methods course, my experience was exceptionally inspiring. Coming from an arts background it was a real challenge, but one that allowed me to broaden my horizons and bring back to my day job teaching design in an art college an understanding of human geography and how it informs us of local and global social issues. My experience was invaluable in so many ways and staff were always very supportive"

Jackie Malcolm, studied part-time 2010-12
Lecturer in Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

Modules start at the beginning of the academic session in September and are taught by lectures and tutorials.
What you will study

There are core modules in:

Research Training
Social Theory
Quantitative Methods in Social Research
Qualitative Methods in Social Research
Plus students choose one from:

Research in Practice (work placement)
Applied GIS and Geospatial Data Analysis
Population Vulnerability and Resilience

Students enrolled on the Masters programme also complete a dissertation.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework (essays, practical classes, projects), examination and dissertation (for Masters students).

Careers

The course seeks to offer students a wide range of skills suitable for entry into careers as information officers and analysts, research assistants and geographical system experts working in a business or government environment.

Research by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) shows that the demand for Social Science Masters students with quantitative research skills far outstrips supply. This degree programme course has strong emphasis in this area, but the optional modules allow you to tailor the course to your personal career ambitions.

Previous students from our other MSc programmes have gone on to work for local authority planning departments, the General Registrars Office Scotland (census office), GIS analysts for Tayside Police, ONS social analysis unit, and also as research assistants within the University sector.

"The course allowed me to develop on an academic and personal level through its range of critical thinking and skill based modules. I appreciated the broad themes set out by lecturers as it provided an opportunity to integrate my own research interests into class assignments and discussions, enhancing the individual relevancy it had for my classmates and I. Since completing the course in September 2012, I have started working towards a PhD in the Geography department at Dundee, incorporating many of the attributes that I learned at MSc level. The training, support and enthusiasm offered on the course gave me the confidence to undertake fieldwork overseas and inspired me to pursue a future career in academia"

Jade Catterson, studied full-time 2011-12
ESRC-funded PhD student, University of Dundee

Read less
Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons. Read more
Social research methods are a means of providing evidence to examine ideas about society - they are a way of 'knowing'. This course seeks to introduce you to a portfolio of research skills that will help you not only to become a competent researcher but also to expand your employment horizons.

Why study Social Research Methods at Dundee?

Social research methods are important not just to social scientists wishing to study a particular problem or to test a theory in a way that is be considered rigorous. They are also fundamental tools of value to government, service providers and to business. There are of course a diverse range of research methods available to social scientists.

The aims of the MSc/Diploma programme in Social Research Methods are:
To advance your knowledge and understanding of the nature of research in social science.
To enhance your skills in areas that will equip you as a social scientist for employment in a government, business or a public policy environment as well as in an academic context.

"I undertook the Social Research Methods MSc in 2009/2010. This was a really interesting course which not only helped me develop a range of research skills which have been extremely relevant and useful in my PhD, but also helped me to critically engage with broader issues of social justice. This sparked an interest in my current research field, and ultimately, has been invaluable in giving me a solid foundation for continuing onto an academic career. Beyond the academic knowledge however, this MSc also provides a useful set of practical and applicable skills which many employers value, such as in GIS and statistics"
Andrew Wooff, studied full-time 2009-10

Researcher, Centre for Criminological Research, University of Sheffield

Specialism in population and welfare

The MSc in Social Research Methods offers a specialism in population and welfare issues under the title MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare). This option is an accredited course for the ESRC Population Investigation Council funding. This specialism is particularly relevant for students interested in demographic and welfare issues.

What's so good about Social Research Methods at Dundee?

The staff teaching the MSc in Social Research Methods course have wide experience of both quantitative and qualitative research methods, and have deployed these skills not only to pursue frontline research in social science, but also as expert advisers to governments and as consultants to international organisations.

This course emphasises that it is important not only to understand how to use a particular research tool, but also to consider the wider meanings of how knowledge can be constructed in different ways and for diverse range of purposes. One particular feature of the course is the comprehensive and in-depth coverage of a variety of research methods including ethnographic and participatory tools; the analysis of large datasets plus GIS skills. The course seeks to encourage students to think critically not only about the methods they use, but also to reflect on the limitations of what is knowable from the evidence presented by others.

"As a part time student on the MSc Social Research Methods course, my experience was exceptionally inspiring. Coming from an arts background it was a real challenge, but one that allowed me to broaden my horizons and bring back to my day job teaching design in an art college an understanding of human geography and how it informs us of local and global social issues. My experience was invaluable in so many ways and staff were always very supportive"

Jackie Malcolm, studied part-time 2010-12
Lecturer in Design, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee

The start date is September each year, and lasts for 12 months.

How you will be taught

There are core modules in:

Research Training
Social Theory
Quantitative Methods in Social Research
Qualitative Methods in Social Research
Plus students choose one from:

Research in Practice (work placement)
Applied GIS and Geospatial Data Analysis
Population Vulnerability and Resilience

For students following the MSc Social Research Methods (Population and Welfare) route, ‘Social Impacts on Population’ is a core module, and ‘Qualitative Methods in Social Research’ is an option module.

Students enrolled on the MSc programme also complete a dissertation.

How you will be assessed

The course is assessed by coursework (essays, practical classes, projects), examination and dissertation (for Masters students).

Careers

The course seeks to offer students a wide range of skills suitable for entry into careers as information officers and analysts, research assistants and geographical system experts working in a business or government environment.

Research by the Economic & Social Research Council (ESRC) shows that the demand for Social Science Masters students with quantitative research skills far outstrips supply. This degree programme course has strong emphasis in this area, but the optional modules allow you to tailor the course to your personal career ambitions.

Previous students from our other MSc programmes have gone on to work for local authority planning departments, the General Registrars Office Scotland (census office), GIS analysts for Tayside Police, ONS social analysis unit, and also as research assistants within the University sector.

"The course allowed me to develop on an academic and personal level through its range of critical thinking and skill based modules. I appreciated the broad themes set out by lecturers as it provided an opportunity to integrate my own research interests into class assignments and discussions, enhancing the individual relevancy it had for my classmates and I. Since completing the course in September 2012, I have started working towards a PhD in the Geography department at Dundee, incorporating many of the attributes that I learned at MSc level. The training, support and enthusiasm offered on the course gave me the confidence to undertake fieldwork overseas and inspired me to pursue a future career in academia"

Jade Catterson, studied full-time 2011-12
ESRC-funded PhD student, University of Dundee

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See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/sustainable-engineering-0. Sustainable engineering refers to the integration of social, environmental, and economic considerations into product, process, and energy system design methods. Read more
See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/sustainable-engineering-0

Sustainable engineering refers to the integration of social, environmental, and economic considerations into product, process, and energy system design methods. Additionally, sustainable engineering encourages the consideration of the complete product and process lifecycle during the design effort. The intent is to minimize environmental impacts across the entire lifecycle while simultaneously maximizing the benefits to social and economic stakeholders. The master of engineering in sustainable engineering is multidisciplinary and managed by the industrial and systems engineering department.

The program builds on RIT’s work in sustainability research and education and offers students the flexibility to develop tracks in areas such as renewable energy systems, systems modeling and analysis, product design, and engineering policy and management. The program is offered on campus, and available on a full- or part-time basis.

Educational objectives

The program is designed to accomplish the following educational objectives:

- Heightened awareness of issues in areas of sustainability (e.g., global warming, ozone layer depletion, deforestation, pollution, ethical issues, fair trade, gender equity, etc.).

- Clear understanding of the role and impacts of various aspects of engineering (design, technology, etc.) and engineering decisions on environmental, societal, and economic problems. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential trade-offs between environmental, social, and economic objectives.

- Strong ability to apply engineering and decision-making tools and methodologies to sustainability-related problems.

- Demonstrated capacity to distinguish professional and ethical responsibilities associated with the practice of engineering.

Plan of study

Technical in nature, the program equips engineers with the tools they need to meet the challenges associated with delivering goods, energy, and services through sustainable means. In addition to basic course work in engineering and classes in public policy and environmental management, students are required to complete a capstone project directly related to sustainable design challenges impacting society. Many of these projects can be incorporated into sustainability themed research by RIT faculty in the areas of fuel-cell development, life-cycle engineering, and sustainable process implementation.

Students must successfully complete a total of 36 credit hours through course work and a capstone project. This program is designed to be completed in three semesters.

Curriculum

- First Year

Fundamentals of Sustainable Engineering
Engineering of Systems I
Renewable Energy Systems
Lifecycle Assessment
Engineering Elective

- Second Year

Engineering Elective
Social Context Elective
Technology Elective
Engineering Capstone

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See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-1. Read more
See the Department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-1

The master of engineering in microelectronics manufacturing engineering provides a broad-based education for students who are interested in a career in the semiconductor industry and hold a bachelor’s degree in traditional engineering or other science disciplines.

Program outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

- Design and understand a sequence of processing steps to fabricate a solid state device to meet a set of geometric, electrical, and/or processing parameters.

- Analyze experimental electrical data from a solid state device to extract performance parameters for comparison to modeling parameters used in the device design.

- Understand current lithographic materials, processes, and systems to meet imaging and/or device patterning requirements.

- Understand the relevance of a process or device, either proposed or existing, to current manufacturing practices.

- Perform in a microelectronic engineering environment, as evidenced by an internship.

- Appreciate the areas of specialty in the field of microelectronics, such as device engineering, circuit design, lithography, materials and processes, and yield and manufacturing.

Plan of study

This 30 credit hour program is awarded upon the successful completion of six core courses, two elective courses, a research methods course, and an internship. Under certain circumstances, a student may be required to complete bridge courses totaling more than the minimum number of credits. Students complete courses in microelectronics, microlithography, and manufacturing.

Microelectronics

The microelectronics courses cover major aspects of integrated circuit manufacturing technology, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, metalization, plasma etching, etc. These courses emphasize modeling and simulation techniques as well as hands-on laboratory verification of these processes. Students use special software tools for these processes. In the laboratory, students design and fabricate silicon MOS integrated circuits, learn how to utilize semiconductor processing equipment, develop and create a process, and manufacture and test their own integrated circuits.

Microlithography

The microlithography courses are advanced courses in the chemistry, physics, and processing involved in microlithography. Optical lithography will be studied through diffraction, Fourier, and image-assessment techniques. Scalar diffraction models will be utilized to simulate aerial image formation and influences of imaging parameters. Positive and negative resist systems as well as processes for IC application will be studied. Advanced topics will include chemically amplified resists; multiple-layer resist systems; phase-shift masks; and electron beam, X-ray, and deep UV lithography. Laboratory exercises include projection-system design, resist-materials characterization, process optimization, and electron-beam lithography.

Manufacturing

The manufacturing courses include topics such as scheduling, work-in-progress tracking, costing, inventory control, capital budgeting, productivity measures, and personnel management. Concepts of quality and statistical process control are introduced. The laboratory for this course is a student-run factory functioning within the department. Important issues such as measurement of yield, defect density, wafer mapping, control charts, and other manufacturing measurement tools are examined in lectures and through laboratory work. Computer-integrated manufacturing also is studied in detail. Process modeling, simulation, direct control, computer networking, database systems, linking application programs, facility monitoring, expert systems applications for diagnosis and training, and robotics are supported by laboratory experiences in the integrated circuit factory. The program is also offered online for engineers employed in the semiconductor industry.

Internship

The program requires students to complete an internship. This requirement provides a structured and supervised work experience that enables students to gain job-related skills that assist them in achieving their desired career goals.

Students with prior engineering-related job experience may submit a request for internship waiver with the program director. A letter from the appropriate authority substantiating the student’s job responsibility, duration, and performance quality would be required.

For students who are not working in the semiconductor industry while enrolled in this program, the internship may be completed at RIT. It involves an investigation or study of a subject or process directly related to microelectronic engineering under the supervision of a faculty adviser. An internship may be taken any time after the completion of the first semester, and may be designed in a number of ways. At the conclusion of the internship, submission of a final internship report to the faculty adviser and program director is required.

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/industrial-engineering-1. The master of engineering in industrial and systems engineering focuses on the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of people, materials, information, equipment, and energy. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/industrial-engineering-1

The master of engineering in industrial and systems engineering focuses on the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of people, materials, information, equipment, and energy. The program emphasizes specialized knowledge and skills in the mathematical, physical, computer, and social sciences together with the principles and methods of engineering analysis and design. The overarching goal of industrial and systems engineering is the optimization of the system, regardless of whether the activity engaged in is a manufacturing, distribution, or a service-related capacity. Students graduate with a variety of skills in the areas of applied statistics/quality, ergonomics/human factors, operations research/simulation, manufacturing, and systems engineering.

Curriculum

- First Year

Systems Modeling and Optimization
Engineering of Systems I
Design of Experiments
Electives

- Second Year

Electives
Engineering Capstone

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See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/engineering-management. The engineering management curriculum is a combination of engineering courses from the industrial and systems engineering program and management courses from Saunders College of Business. Read more
See the department website - http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/engineering-management

The engineering management curriculum is a combination of engineering courses from the industrial and systems engineering program and management courses from Saunders College of Business. The program combines technical expertise with managerial skills to focus on the management of engineering and technological enterprises. Students understand the technology involved in engineering projects and the management process through which the technology is applied. The objective is to provide a solid foundation in the areas commonly needed by managers who oversee engineers and engineering projects. In addition to industrial engineering expertise, students gain valuable knowledge in areas such as organizational behavior, finance, and accounting.

Curriculum

- First Year

Systems and Project Management
Engineering of Systems I
Cost Management in Technical Organizations
Design of Experiments
Engineering Management Elective
Elective

- Second Year

Engineering Management Electives
Electives
Engineering Capstone

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This degree is designed for high calibre graduates who intend to undertake research for a doctoral degree in Politics or International Relations and need to acquire all-round training in research methods and methodologies in the political and social sciences. Read more
This degree is designed for high calibre graduates who intend to undertake research for a doctoral degree in Politics or International Relations and need to acquire all-round training in research methods and methodologies in the political and social sciences. The object is to equip students with comprehension of basic principles of research design and strategy.

This MA programme is specifically focused to provide research training. It is assumed that students taking this MA do so with the intention of proceeding to a PhD. It has received official recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and eligible candidates can apply for (ESRC) (1+3) studentships. Anyone proposing to do this should apply as early as possible in order to meet the ESRC deadlines.

Student Profiles

“I choose the Research Methods Masters because it offered me the most diverse skillset. The programme has a strong interdisciplinary character and I chose modules offered by Psychology and Sociology schools as well as the School of Government. This diversity has given me a broader skillset than a more focused master’s degree. Moreover this master’s has given me the confidence and ability to consider a wider variety of career options than that offered by my single-honours history undergraduate degree. I fully recommend this course for anyone looking to enlarge their knowledge in research methods and especially when applied to the fields of politics and international relations.” Jack Ekinsmyth, 2015/16

“The MA Research Methods, by spanning across two departments, allowed me to experience more of Durham University. The course was challenging, but prepared me for transitioning to a PhD. It also helped me secure ESRC funding, as the course offers ESRC-recognised research training modules. Durham University, with its reputation and beautiful city setting, was an easy choice and I enjoyed my busy year there.” Alex, 2014/15

Course Content

This degree is offered in collaboration with other departments in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Health and is designed to provide a strong all-round training in research methods allied to further specialisation within the field of politics and international relations/studies. It is assumed that in taking this MA, you do so with the intention of proceeding to a PhD in Politics or International Relations. It has received official recognition from the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and eligible candidates can apply for (ESRC) (1+3) studentships. The programme includes compulsory elements in a wide variety of techniques including statistics and quantitative methods, but contains less subject-specific content than the other MA courses.

Core Modules:
-Perspectives on Social Research
-International Relations Theory

Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-Statistical Exploration and Reasoning
-Quantitative Research Methods in Social Science
-Applied Statistics
-Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science
-Fieldwork and Interpretation

Additional Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain Since 1850
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-European Security
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
-Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-Categorical Data Analysis with SPSS and R
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into one core and seven/eight optional modules. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 45 credits of not more than 12,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

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This programme combines a sound basis of advanced knowledge and understanding in the broader and more disparate field of International Studies with the opportunity to choose optional specialist areas of study from among those offered in the School, and other schools such as Modern Languages and Cultures. Read more
This programme combines a sound basis of advanced knowledge and understanding in the broader and more disparate field of International Studies with the opportunity to choose optional specialist areas of study from among those offered in the School, and other schools such as Modern Languages and Cultures. The particular interests reflected in the choice of options may then be developed through the researching and writing of a dissertation.

Through the programme, you will gain advanced knowledge and understanding of:
-The extent to which an international community has developed and the driving forces shaping its development
-Factors determining humanitarian interventions
-The processes of globalisation in the political, economic, cultural and scientific fields
-The governance role of international organisations
-How the degree of integration of countries into the international political and economic system varies and the determinants of those variations
-Historical and/or contemporary issues and debates in the politics and political economy of specific states and/or areas and/or international institutions and organisations
-Regime analysis and the concept of soft power governance
-An appropriate topic in international politics of their choice

Student Profiles

The time I spent as an International Relations student at SGIA was one of the most precious moment in my life. In this course, there is a large number of modules that I can choose to study based on my interest. Furthermore, these modules are interdisciplinary, which help to develop the knowledge and enhance knowledge adaptability skill of the students. Besides, class discussion with foreign classmates, along with the contribution of skillful teaching staff, not only help me to create friendships across the border and engage in international community, but also, help to develop my analytical skills, and provide me the different perspective to view the world that help me to get the better understanding of human beings and the society. I feel really honoured that I had a chance to study in this course and become the member of this school and this university.” Poramet "Jay" Tangsathaporn, 2015/16

“As I have been extensively involved in development projects implemented by different international organisations such as the Asian Development Bank, Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Voluntary Services Overseas, and the UNDP for 7 years, I have had acquired the practical skills of working in different fields with international experts with diverse backgrounds. While doing my master’s programme in International Studies at the School of Government and International Affairs of Durham University, I have captured very good academic skills that should help me successfully pursue my career at regional and worldwide development organisations. I chose the MA International Studies programme for its focus on international political economy and development as well as regional studies. I have been grateful that my goal of studying the topics where I have had very limited knowledge matched the areas where Durham is recognised as number one in the UK. Therefore, I went deeper into economic, political, and security issues of particular regions such as Asia and the Middle East within my optional modules, which enabled me to fully understand and assess the whole world issues based on evidence. Learning to always ask ‘why’ to understand the root of the problem, and to ask ‘how’ to offer solutions has been one of the delicious fruits that I have harvested during my journey of original, creative, and critical thinking in Durham. Finally, I feel grateful to Durham University and the Chevening Secretariat for providing me with the greatest opportunity of studying at one of the top universities of the world with full scholarship.” Onon Sukhbaatar, 2015/16

“Participating in the MA International Relations programme has been a really positive experience. Students can choose from a wide range of modules, allowing for specialisation in a particular region or a more eclectic approach. The style of teaching in the department encourages independent thought and research, critical analysis and active contribution meaning students develop important skills relevant to further study as well as the workplace. The number of extra-curricular talks organised by the faculty enriches the learning experience while the diverse nature of the student body facilitates the sharing of different perspectives and ideas. Finally, learning is supported by several well-resourced libraries, IT facilities, and knowledgeable and enthusiastic staff.” Sarah Clowry, 2015/16

Course Content

Students will take four core modules to the value of 135 credits and optional modules to the value of 45 credits.

Core Modules:
-Research Methods and Dissertation Production
-Model United Nations
-International Relations Theory

Optional Modules - Optional modules in previous years have included:
-European Institutions and the Policy Process
-The European Union as a Global Actor
-German Foreign Policy
-Collective Memory and Identity in Post-War Europe
-Collective Identities and Political Thought in Britain Since 1850
-Contemporary Socio-Political Issues in Muslim Religious Thought
-European Security
-International Relations and Security in the Middle East
-Issues in the Politics of Military Occupation
-Just War in Political Theory and Practice
-The Contemporary Politics of the Middle East
-The Political Economy of Development in the Middle East
-America and the World: The Making of US Foreign Policy
-Region, Nation and Citizen in SE Asia
-Political Economy and Development in Chinese Business
-Nationalism, Revolution and Reform in Contemporary China
-Human Rights
-Political Ideology
-Strategic Asia: Policy and Analysis
-Theories of Capitalism
-A module offered by the School of Modern Languages

Learning and Teaching

At the beginning of the academic year, students go through five-day induction events in which they are informed about University, the School, the MA/MSc programmes and the facilities available for their learning.

The 180 credits one-year MA degree programme is divided into three core and three optional modules of 15 credits each. Furthermore, students have to submit a dissertation of 75 credits of not more than 15,000 words. Most of the modules are delivered during the first two terms and students spend the remaining time to write the dissertation.

Usually a module has 18 contact hours spread over 9 weeks and 132 hours of self-directed learning. The modules are mainly delivered through weekly 2 hours sessions which can either take the form of seminars or one hour of lecture and one hour of tutorial. The form in which seminars are conducted can differ from one module to another. Typically modules would have elements of lectures, discussions, and presentations from students—the extent of each of these components would differ from one module to another.

All modules have written exercise for formative assessments. Upon getting feedback on these assignments, students can meet their lecturers to discuss their marks before then eventually completing a summative assessment. Typically summative assessments are 3000 word essays but some modules may be assessed by examination. Students can also meet their module coordinators during their weekly contact hours or by making an appointment. When students are working on their dissertations during the later half of the year, they meet their assigned supervisors for a minimum of 6 hours. Students also have access to the academic advisors whenever there is a need.

SGIA has a wide variety of resources available to students such as: computer room/work room with networked PC’s, printing facilities including scanner and photocopier, audio system, Wi-Fi and a relaxation area with satellite television system.

SGIA conducts weekly seminars and organises lectures and conferences which all postgraduate students can attend. These events provide students the opportunity to engage with, and debate, the most important issues in current political and international studies.

Towards the end of the programme students can contact the Careers Office of the University to get advice on available job prospects and get assistance on applying for these.

Read less

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