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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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The aim of the course is to provide preparation appropriate for undertaking a PhD programme in computer science. Read more
The aim of the course is to provide preparation appropriate for undertaking a PhD programme in computer science. Students select five taught modules from a wide range of advanced topics in computer science from biomedical information processing to denotational semantics, and from natural language processing to current applications and research in computer security. Students may also choose from a selection of topics borrowed from the Department of Engineering. Additionally, students take a mandatory, ungraded course in Research Skills which includes core and optional topics.

Students also undertake a research project over two terms and submit a project report in mid-June. Research topic selection and planning occurs in the first term and the work is undertaken in subsequent terms. The taught modules are delivered in a range of styles. For example, there are traditional lecture courses, lecture courses with associated practical classes, reading clubs, and seminar style modules.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/cscsmpacs

Course detail

The course aims:

- to give students, with relevant experience at first-degree level, the opportunity to carry out directed research in the discipline;
- to give students the opportunity to acquire or develop skills and expertise relevant to their research interests;
- to provide preparation appropriate for undertaking a PhD programme in computer science;
- to provide the Faculty with an extended period in which to train students and then to judge the suitability of students for PhD study;
- to offer a qualification that is valuable and highly marketable in its own right that equips its graduates with the skills and expertise to play leading roles in industry and the public sector.

By the end of the programme, the students will have:

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques, and a thorough knowledge of the literature, applicable to their chosen area;
- demonstrated some originality in the application of knowledge, together with an understanding of how research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in their chosen area;
- shown abilities in the critical evaluation of current research and research techniques and methodologies;
- demonstrated some self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and acted autonomously in the planning and implementation of research.

Format

The M.Phil in Advanced Computer Science covers advanced material in both theoretical and practical areas as well as instilling the elements of research practice. It combines lectures, seminars and project work in various combinations tailored to the individual student. Students choose a from an extensive list of topics.

Assessment

- Thesis -

All students submit a research project on a topic approved by the Degree Committee, of no more than 15,000 words (excluding bibliography, photographs and diagrams but including tables, footnotes, and appendices), to the Secretary of the Degree Committee no later than 12:00 noon on the second Friday in June.

- Individual modules may include a final assessment piece by an essay or a mini-project report of up to 5,000 words.
- Individual modules may include weekly assignments of up to 1,500 words.
- Individual modules may be assessed by written in-class test or by take-home test.
- Students taking modules borrowed from the Engineering Tripos, Part IIB, may be required to take written examinations in Easter Term.
- Modules offered by the Computer Laboratory may be assessed by written in-class test or by take-home test.
- Modules may also include a proportion of practical assessment.
- Modules may include a proportion of assessment of student presentations and participation in reading group discussion.
- Modules may also include a proportion, not more than 20% of the overall assessment, of ungraded exercises which are assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.
- The examination may include, at the discretion of the Examiners, an oral examination on the work submitted by the candidate, and on the general field of knowledge within which such work falls.

Continuing

The minimum requirement for continuation to the PhD programme in Computer Science is that MPhil students achieve an overall Pass in the taught modules and, separately, the project. Continuation is dependent on the approval of the Department and Degree Committee.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

The Department has limited funds to support partial and full scholarships for UK and eligible EU students. Applicants will automatically be considered for these awards. Since only limited funds are available, applicants should not rely on receiving financial support from the Department and should explore all available funding opportunities.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmaspmm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Essay supervision and support for lectures by means of examples classes is approximately 30 hours per year.

Formal examinable lectures and non-examinable lectures total approximately 184 hours per year, of which on average 112 hours are for examinable courses.

Some statistics courses may involve practical data analysis sessions.

There is an opportunity to participate in the Part III seminar series, either by giving a talk or through attendance. This is encouraged but does not contribute to the formal assessment.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law. Read more

M3CC (minimum - one year, part-time)

The Institute of Computer and Communications Law (ICCL) offers online distance learning programmes that leads to the award of a Queen Mary University of London, Postgraduate Certificate in Computer and Communications Law.

The programme draws on our established teaching and research expertise in IT law, e-commerce law, communications law, computer law and media law.

Law as a subject is particularly suitable for online learning in that it is primarily text-based, so delivery of teaching materials is not restricted by bandwidth limitations. Most of the relevant materials for computer and communications law are available in digital format from databases such as Lexis and Westlaw to which you gain access through your Queen Mary Student account. We use a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) as a platform to deliver clear course structures, teaching materials and to create interactive courses. Your e-learning experience is enhanced by tutorials using discussion boards, blog postings and live chat for class discussions and question and answer sessions. We have designed the course to allow as much interaction and feedback between students and tutors as possible. Your understanding will be deepened by discussing your reading with fellow students and your course tutor and carrying out short tasks related to the course. We also use audio and audio-visual presentations. You will not need to have access to a local law library, a basic internet connection and browser is all that is needed to do the course.

Flexible Learning

Completion of the Certificate takes one to two years, part-time and is tailored for the needs of busy practitioners or other lawyers who would like to obtain knowledge in the computer and communications law field. Students may switch to the Diploma (120 credits) or the LLM (180 credits) after completing the Certificate.

Programme structure
You can study Computer and Communications Law to Postgraduate Certificate, Diploma or LLM level, by distance learning.

The programme is tailored for you if you wish to obtain a specialist Certificate in Digital Media Law, Certificate in IT or IP Law, Certificate in E-commerce Law or a Certificate in Communications Law. The certificate requires the successful completion of 60 credits over a minimum of one year, which can be completed as follows:
◦four taught modules, or
◦three taught modules and the optional research seminar paper/presentation

On successful completion of the certificate you may switch to the diploma. The diploma must be completed within a minimum of two years, and a maximum of six years. The diploma requires the successful completion of 120 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation), or
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as one 10,000-word dissertation

If you choose to continue to the LLM, you will need to complete 180 credits, which can be completed as follows:
◦six taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as three 10,000-word dissertations, (or one 20,000-word dissertation in addition to one 10,000-word dissertation), or
◦eight taught modules (may include the optional research seminar paper/presentation) as well as two 10,000-word dissertations, (or, with approval, one 20,000-word dissertation)
Modules:
The year is divided into three four-month terms, with a selection of modules and dissertations being offered each term.

◦Taught modules (15 credits)
◦Each module requires around seven and a half hours of work a week over one term. Each module will consist of assessed tasks, a module essay and final assessment exercise (take-home exam).

◦Research seminar paper/presentation (optional) (15 credits) (January – May)
◦This involves a 30 minute presentation at the residential weekend on a topic of your choice agreed with your supervisor followed by the submission of a 5,000-word essay during the May – August term.

◦Dissertations (for the diploma and LLM only) – on a topic of your own choice
◦10,000-word dissertations (30 credits) – taken over two consecutive terms
◦20,000-word dissertation (60 credits) – taken over four consecutive terms

Modules

Certificate in Digital Media Law Module options
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM028 Online Media Regulation
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM037 Broadcasting Regulation
◦CCDM038 Regulation of Cross-border Online Gambling


Certificate in IP and IT Law Module options
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM013 Advanced IP Issues: Protection of Computer Software
◦CCDM015 Advanced IP Issues: Digital Rights Management
◦CCDM016 Intellectual Property: Foundation
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in E-commerce Law Module options
◦CCDM008 Online Banking and Financial Services
◦CCDM009 Computer Crime
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM011 IT Outsourcing
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM018 Internet Content Regulation
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM020 Internet Jurisdictional Issues and Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM025 Mergers and Acquisitions in the IT Sector
◦CCDM027 E-Commerce Law
◦CCDM029 Taxation and Electronic Commerce
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law
◦CCDM040 Online Trademarks
◦CCDM043 – Cloud Computing

Certificate in Communications Law Modules
◦CCDM010 Online Dispute Resolution in E-commerce
◦CCDM014 Privacy and Data Protection Law
◦CCDM019 Information Security and the Law
◦CCDM021 European Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM026 International Telecommunications Law
◦CCDM031 Information and Communications Technology and Competition Law

Application Dates

You can start the programme in either the autumn term or the spring term. You should return your completed application forms two months before the start of term. For example, for an autumn start you will need to return your forms by mid-July and for a spring start you will need to return your forms by the beginning of November.

As this is a distance learning programme, we understand that applicants may live overseas or outside London. To comply with official admissions procedures if you are made an offer all applicants will be expected to submit by post (courier) or in person certified copies of qualifications which were uploaded when making an online application.

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This programme approved by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) for training teachers of deaf children seeking the Mandatory (MQ) qualification is offered as a distance learning course. Read more

This programme approved by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) for training teachers of deaf children seeking the Mandatory (MQ) qualification is offered as a distance learning course. Successful completion of this programme leads to General Teaching Council recognition as a qualified teacher of the deaf. An alternative programme is also open to teachers (as well as other professionals with appropriate qualifications) working with children and young people with hearing impairment who are not seeking the MQ.  

Course details

This distance learning programme approved by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) has been offered at the University of Birmingham since 1989. It is open to teachers who are qualified to teach learners in England (from 0 to 25 years of age) who wish to gain the mandatory qualification of teacher of the deaf. The programme aims to equip teachers who are already qualified to teach learners in England to meet the relevant NCTL standards to achieve qualified teacher of the deaf status.

It is also open to other professionals who do not wish, or are not eligible, to obtain qualified teacher of the deaf status – for example lecturers of deaf students, communication support workers and educational psychologists. Applicants who are not qualified teachers of school-aged pupils may take the University (non mandatory) Award but will not be eligible to obtain qualified teacher of the deaf status from the NCTL.

Study is supported through study packs, tutorial groups, telephone, email, web based learning and online materials, and through an allocated tutor in a small tutorial group which allows students to learn with each other. Internet access is required for the programme. There is a University based study week in January each year, at which attendance is compulsory. 

Students who successfully complete all modules for the Postgraduate Diploma may choose to transfer to the MEd. 

Nature of the Programme

Those candidates who successfully complete the Postgraduate Diploma may use this as credits towards the degree of MEd. The course content is identical for both levels of study, but students studying for the higher Postgraduate Diploma level will be expected to submit assignments which are both longer and display a greater degree of reflection and insight. 

This is a distance education programme and regular attendance at the University is not required. Course content is embodied in a series of written and online course Units with accompanying recommended reading and resource materials. Attendance is compulsory at two annual Residential Schools at the University of Birmingham, and students are expected to attend seminars/workshops held in the students’ region. The most common pattern is six seminars lasting three hours each academic year, held on Saturdays, but there may be some regional groups may negotiate a different pattern. Regional tutors are appointed by the University to organise regional seminars and help in course assessment.

The Residential Schools provide opportunities for demonstrations and practice in the use of materials and equipment, lectures, discussions and tutorials.

Support for Deaf and Disabled students

The University of Birmingham welcomes applications from deaf and disabled students. We strongly encourage students applying to this course who may require support (including communication support) or who may require reasonable adjustments to be made as a result of a physical, sensory, mental health or learning support need to register with the disability, learning support and mental health team. Eligible students are also encouraged to apply for Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) which may provide funding towards equipment, software and support where required.   

Support for all Students

The University appoints Honorary Tutors who are responsible for organising and providing regional seminars for small groups of students. The University team works closely with these tutors to ensure an effective system of academic, practical and pastoral support. These seminars are essential components of the Programme of Study. Candidates must be prepared to undertake some travelling, within a region, in order to meet with their group.

Also, each student is expected to obtain the services of a local qualified teacher of the deaf who will act as a ‘mentor’ and assist them throughout the course. Mentors are asked to support the student in a number of ways, for example, setting ideas presented in the course materials within a local context, helping with the arrangements for visits, and facilitating access to equipment.

A further level of student support is offered via the programme’s elearning web pages, and students need to have access to the internet. Students must also have regular access to e-mail throughout the course.

The Role of the Education Authority/School

The employing authority/school in which the student is located needs to:

  • Identify for the University a qualified experienced teacher of deaf children who will act as mentor for the student (see above). On average approximately one hour a week of local support is needed. In some small schools and authorities it might be necessary to buy in this support. 
  • Release the candidate from teaching duties for at least half a day per week for work related to the Programme of Study and for the seventeen days practical placement during year 1.
  • Release the candidate for the two annual Residential Schools.
  • Note that as the regional seminars, the visits programme and teaching placements may involve considerable travelling for the student, and authorities might wish to cost such travelling into their estimates for the total cost of the course.

The Teaching Placement

Those teachers who wish to obtain the mandatory qualification of teacher of the deaf will need to undertake a teaching placement.



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This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/maamasapm

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibility of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

Read less
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. Read more
This course, commonly referred to as Part III, is a one-year taught Master's course in mathematics. It is an excellent preparation for mathematical research and it is also a valuable course in mathematics and in its applications for those who want further training before taking posts in industry, teaching, or research establishments.

Students admitted from outside Cambridge to Part III study towards the Master of Advanced Study (MASt). Students continuing from the Cambridge Tripos for a fourth year, study towards the Master of Mathematics (MMath). The requirements and course structure for Part III are the same for all students irrespective of whether they are studying for the MASt or MMath degree.

There are over 200 Part III (MASt and MMath) students each year; almost all are in their fourth or fifth year of university studies. There are normally about 80 courses, covering an extensive range of pure mathematics, probability, statistics and the mathematics of operational research, applied mathematics and theoretical physics. They are designed to cover those advanced parts of the subjects that are not normally covered in a first degree course, but which are an indispensable preliminary to independent study and research. Students have a wide choice of the combination of courses that they offer, though naturally they tend to select groups of cognate courses. Normally classes are provided as back-up to lecture courses.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/mapmasmst

Course detail

The structure of Part III is such that students prepare between six and nine lecture courses for examination. These lecture courses may be selected from the wide range offered by both Mathematics Departments. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. Examinations usually begin in late May, and are scheduled in morning and afternoon sessions, over a period of about two weeks. Two or three hours are allocated per paper, depending on the subject. Details of the courses for the current academic year are available on the Faculty of Mathematics website. Details for subsequent years are expected to be broadly similar, although not identical.

Most courses in the Part III are self-contained. Students may freely mix courses offered by the two Mathematics Departments. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they last for 16 or 24 lectures respectively. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units. An essay (should a candidate choose to submit one) counts for 3 credit units. Part III is graded Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail. A Merit or above is the equivalent of a First Class in other Parts of the Mathematical Tripos.

Learning Outcomes

After completing Part III, students will be expected to have:

- Studied advanced material in the mathematical sciences to a level not normally covered in a first degree;
- Further developed the capacity for independent study of mathematics and problem solving at a higher level;
- Undertaken (in most cases) an extended essay normally chosen from a list covering a wide range of topics.

Students are also expected to have acquired general transferable skills relevant to mathematics as outlined in the Faculty
Transferable Skills Statement http://www.maths.cam.ac.uk/undergrad/course/transferable_skills.pdf .

Format

Courses are delivered predominantly by either 16 or 24 hours of formal lectures, supported by additional examples classes. As an alternative to one lecture course, an essay may be submitted. There is also the possibiltiy of taking a reading course for examination. There are normally additional non-examinable courses taught each year.

Twice a year students have an individual meeting with a member of academic staff to discuss their progress in Part III. Students offering an essay as part of their degree may meet their essay supervisor up to three times during the academic year.

Assessment

Candidates may substitute an essay for one lecture course. The essay counts for 3 credit units.

Lecture courses are assessed by formal examination. Courses are worth either two or three credit units depending on whether they are 16 or 24 hours in length respectively. A 16 hour course is assessed by a 2 hour examination and a 24 hour course, a 3 hour examination. Candidates for Part III may offer a maximum of 19 credit units for examination. In the past it has been recommended that candidates offer between 17 and 19 units.

Continuing

MASt students wishing to apply for the PhD must apply via the Graduate Admissions Office for readmission by the relevant deadline. Applicants will be considered on a case by case basis and offer of a place will usually include an academic condition on their Part III result.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Our MSc in Data Science and Analytics aims to provide you with a comprehensive set of skills needed to handle, collect, store and analyse large and complex sets of data. Read more
Our MSc in Data Science and Analytics aims to provide you with a comprehensive set of skills needed to handle, collect, store and analyse large and complex sets of data. You will be taught by subject experts from both the School of Mathematics and the School of Computer Science and Informatics, which will allow you to see the topic from different perspectives and provides access to a wide range of modules across both Schools.

Throughout the course you will develop data handling and extraction skills, programming skills, machine learning and informatics skills, and problem solving and modelling skills. You will undertake case studies and project work which will give you the opportunity to put your skills into practice and provides valuable experience of working in the field. The dissertation project, typically undertaken with an industrial partner, will allow you to work with complex data in a creative manner and a problem-solving environment, as well as to communicate your ideas and findings effectively.

This programme is available on a one year full-time basis or a three-year part-time basis.

Distinctive features:

• A three-stage degree with exit points at PG Certificate, PG Diploma and Master’s level, allowing you to go into as much depth as you like.

• Acquire transferable data science and analytics skills that are highly sought after in a broad range of sectors.

• Learn from experts across the Schools of Mathematics and Computer Science and Informatics, and related University research groups specialising in various applications of data science and analytics, for example the Data Innovation Research Institute, Social Data Science Lab, and Health Modelling Centre Cymru.

• Gain valuable work experience; we have some placement opportunities available with industrial partners in the UK and abroad.

Structure

There are three stages to this programme. During the first stage, you will study a number of core modules covering fundamental subjects such as statistics, pattern recognition, data mining and optimisation. You may choose to exit after this first stage, at which point you may be able to obtain a PG Certificate qualification.

The second stage consists of a range of optional modules where you can explore subjects of interest to you and relevant your potential career path, for example web and social computing, time series and forecasting, supply chain modelling and visual communication and information design. You may choose to exit after the second stage, at which point you may be able to obtain a PG Diploma qualification.

The third and final stage consists of a three-month dissertation project, which will typically involve working with a company on a real problem of importance. Following successful completion of all modules and the dissertation, you may be able to obtain a Master’s qualification.

As a full-time student, you will complete all modules and your dissertation project in year one.

Part-time students will typically only need to be in the University for lectures and workshops for the equivalent of one day per week over 24 weeks for years 1 and 2. The dissertation project is undertaken during year 3.

Core modules:

Pattern Recognition and Data Mining
Statistical Methods
Optimisation Methods
Dissertation

Optional modules:

Information Processing in Python
Computer Science Topic 1: Web and Social Computing
Web Application Development
Distributed and Cloud Computing
Informatics
Visual Communication and Information Design
Time Series and Forecasting
Supply Chain Modelling
Statistics and Operational Research in Government
Credit Risk Scoring

Teaching

The methods of teaching we employ will vary from module to module, as appropriate depending on the subject matter and the method of assessment. We teach using a mixture of lectures, seminars, computer workshops and tutorials.

Programming skills and the use of relevant software packages will be taught in our dedicated computer suites. We often invite industry experts to give presentations, which our students are welcome to attend.

We will allocate three supervisors to you for your dissertation project. Usually your supervisors will be two members of academic staff with an interest or specialism in your field of research and a sponsor supervisor from the organisation you will work with during your project. You should meet regularly with your supervisor throughout your project.

Support

All of our students are allocated a personal tutor when they enrol on the course. A personal tutor is there to support you during your studies, and can advise you on academic and personal matters that may be affecting you. You should have regular meetings with your personal tutor to ensure that you are fully supported.

You will have access to the Trevithick Library, which holds our collection of mathematical and computer science-related resources, as well as to the other Cardiff University Libraries.

We will provide you with a copy of the Student Handbook, which contains details of each School’s policies and procedures. We also support students through the University’s virtual learning environment, Learning Central, where you can ask questions in a forum or find course-related documents.

Cardiff University also offers a wide range of support services which are open to our students, such as the Graduate Centre, counselling and wellbeing, financial and careers advisors, the international office and the Student Union.

Feedback:

We offer written and oral feedback, depending on the coursework or assessment you have undertaken. You will usually receive your feedback from the module leader. If you have questions regarding your feedback, module leaders are usually happy to give advice and guidance on your progress. We aim to provide you with feedback in a timely manner after you have submitted an assessment.

Assessment

We will assess your progress throughout the course. These assessments may take the form of written exam papers, in-module assignments, and the project dissertation, where knowledge and technical competence will be appraised. We may also use group work, oral presentations and poster displays to test communication, critical thinking and problem solving skills.

Career prospects

Data is increasingly cheap and ubiquitous, and is being collected on a massive scale. There is a significant and growing demand for professionals who can work efficiently and effectively with handling such complex and sizeable data and to extract insights to help inform decision-making. The skills you gain during the programme will equip you for graduate roles in this field. This new MSc programme enhances the already well-established related postgraduate taught programmes that the School of Mathematics offers, and is expected to be as successful in the recruiting of our graduates. Previous postgraduates have gone on to work with a variety of companies and Government organisations including the Office for National Statistics, Lloyds Banking Group, Nationwide, British Airways, Network Rail, UK Government, The Financial Times, Virgin Media, Welsh Water and Admiral Insurance.

If you prefer to continue on a more academic career pathway, you may choose to continue your studies with a PhD.

Placement

You will undertake a three-month placement for your dissertation project, based with one of our industrial partners in the UK or abroad.

We employ a dedicated Knowledge Exchange Officer who will work with you to obtain a placement and support you throughout your project.

Past placements achieved by our students have been with companies such as Admiral, British Airways, Lloyds Banking Group, Welsh Water, Office for National Statistics, Sainsbury’s, Virgin Media, Transport for London, and Deloitte.

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The master of science degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials. Read more
The master of science degree in materials science and engineering, offered jointly by the College of Science and the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, is designed with a variety of options to satisfy individual and industry needs in the rapidly growing field of materials.

The objectives of the program are threefold:

- With the advent of new classes of materials and instruments, the traditional practice of empiricism in the search for and selection of materials is rapidly becoming obsolete. Therefore, the program offers a serious interdisciplinary learning experience in materials studies, crossing over the traditional boundaries of such classical disciplines as chemistry, physics, and electrical, mechanical, and microelectronic engineering.

- The program provides extensive experimental courses in diverse areas of materials-related studies.

- The program explores avenues for introducing greater harmony between industrial expansion and academic training.

Plan of study

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required for the completion of the program. This includes five required core courses, graduate electives, and either a thesis or project. The core courses are specially designed to establish a common base of materials-oriented knowledge for students with baccalaureate degrees in chemistry, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, physics, and related disciplines, providing a new intellectual identity to those involved in the study of materials.

The program has an emphasis on experimental techniques, with one required experimental course as part of the core. Additional experimental courses are available for students who wish to pursue course work in this area. These courses are organized into appropriate units covering many aspects of the analysis of materials. This aspect of the program enhances a student’s confidence when dealing with materials-related problems.

- Electives

Elective courses may be selected from advanced courses offered by the School of Chemistry and Materials Science or, upon approval, from courses offered by other RIT graduate programs. Elective courses are scheduled on a periodic basis. Transfer credit may be awarded based on academic background beyond the bachelor’s degree or by examination, based on experience.

- Thesis/Project

Students may choose to complete a thesis or a project as the conclusion to their program. Students who pursue the thesis option take two graduate electives, complete nine semester credit hours of research, and produce a thesis paper. The project option includes four graduate electives and a 3 credit hour project.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in materials science and engineering, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree in chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, or a related field from an accredited college or university,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) from all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work,

- Submit two letters of recommendation, and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Written English (TWE). A minimum TOEFL score of 575 (paper-based) or 88-89 (Internet-based) is required. A 4.0 is required on the TWE. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores are accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 6.5. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org. In addition, upon arrival at RIT, international students are required to take the English language exams, administered by the English Language Center. Individuals scoring below an established minimum will be referred to the center for further evaluation and assistance. These students are required to follow the center’s recommendations regarding language course work. It is important to note that this additional course work may require additional time and financial resources to complete the degree requirements. Successful completion of this course work is a requirement for the program.

Candidates not meeting the general requirements may petition for admission to the program. In such cases, it may be suggested that the necessary background courses be taken at the undergraduate level. However, undergraduate credits that make up deficiencies may not be counted toward the master’s degree.

Any student who wishes to study at the graduate level must first be admitted to the program. However, an applicant may be permitted to take graduate courses as a nonmatriculated student if they meet the general requirements mentioned above.

Additional information

- Part-time study

The program offers courses in the late afternoon and evenings to encourage practicing scientists and engineers to pursue the degree program without interrupting their employment. (This may not apply to courses offered off campus at selected industrial sites.) Students employed full time are normally limited to a maximum of two courses, or 6 semester credit hours, each semester. A student who wishes to register for more than 6 semester credit hours must obtain the permission of his or her adviser.

- Maximum limit on time

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science. The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Read more
See the department website - http://www.cis.rit.edu/graduate-programs/master-science

The master of science program in imaging science prepares students for positions in research in the imaging industry or in the application of various imaging modalities to problems in engineering and science. Formal course work includes consideration of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, the applications of physical and geometrical optics to electro-optical systems, the mathematical evaluation of image forming systems, digital image processing, and the statistical characterization of noise and system performance. Technical electives may be selected from courses offered in imaging science, color science, engineering, computer science, science, and mathematics. Both thesis and project options are available. In general, full-time students are required to pursue the thesis option, with the project option targeted to part-time and online students who can demonstrate that they have sufficient practical experience through their professional activities.

Faculty within the Center for Imaging Science supervise thesis research in areas of the physical properties of radiation-sensitive materials and processes, digital image processing, remote sensing, nanoimaging, electro-optical instrumentation, vision, medical imaging, color imaging systems, and astronomical imaging. Interdisciplinary efforts are possible with other colleges across the university.

The program can be completed on a full- or a part-time basis. Some courses are available online, specifically in the areas of color science, remote sensing, medical imaging, and digital image processing.

Plan of study

All students must earn 30 credit hours as a graduate student. The curriculum is a combination of required core courses in imaging science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background and interests, and either a research thesis or graduate paper/project. Students must enroll in either the research thesis or graduate paper/project option at the beginning of their studies.

Core courses

Students are required to complete the following core courses: Fourier Methods for Imaging (IMGS-616), Image Processing and Computer Vision (IMGS-682), Optics for Imaging (IMGS-633), and either Radiometry (IMGS-619) or The Human Visual System (IMGS-620).

Speciality track courses

Students choose two courses from a variety of tracks such as: digital image processing, medical imaging, electro-optical imaging systems, remote sensing, color imaging, optics, hard copy materials and processes, and nanoimaging. Tracks may be created for students interested in pursuing additional fields of study.

Research thesis option

The research thesis is based on experimental evidence obtained by the student in an appropriate field, as arranged between the student and their adviser. The minimum number of thesis credits required is four and may be fulfilled by experiments in the university’s laboratories. In some cases, the requirement may be fulfilled by work done in other laboratories or the student's place of employment, under the following conditions:

1. The results must be fully publishable.

2. The student’s adviser must be approved by the graduate program coordinator.

3. The thesis must be based on independent, original work, as it would be if the work were done in the university’s laboratories.

A student’s thesis committee is composed of a minimum of three people: the student’s adviser and two additional members who hold at least a master's dgeree in a field relevant to the student’s research. Two committee members must be from the graduate faculty of the center.

Graduate paper/project option

Students with demonstrated practical or research experience, approved by the graduate program coordinator, may choose the graduate project option (3 credit hours). This option takes the form of a systems project course. The graduate paper is normally performed during the final semester of study. Both part- and full-time students may choose this option, with the approval of the graduate program coordinator.

Admission requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS in imaging science, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

- Hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution (undergraduate studies should include the following: mathematics, through calculus and including differential equations; and a full year of calculus-based physics, including modern physics. It is assumed that students can write a common computer program),

- Submit a one- to two-page statement of educational objectives,

- Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate or graduate course work,

- Submit letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with the applicant’s academic or research capabilities,

- Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) (requirement may be waived for those not seeking funding from the Center for Imaging Science), and

- Complete a graduate application.

- International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 600 (paper-based) or 100 (Internet-based) are required. Students may also submit scores from the International English Language Testing System. The minimum IELTS score is 7.0. International students who are interested in applying for a teaching or research assistantship are advised to obtain as high a TOEFL or IELTS score as possible. These applicants also are encouraged to take the Test of Spoken English in order to be considered for financial assistance.

Applicants seeking financial assistance from the center must have all application documents submitted to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

Additional information

- Bridge courses

Applicants who lack adequate preparation may be required to complete bridge courses in mathematics or physics before matriculating with graduate status.

- Maximum time limit

University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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If you want to teach three to seven-year-olds, this National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited PGCE Early Years course is an exciting opportunity to launch your teaching career. Read more
If you want to teach three to seven-year-olds, this National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited PGCE Early Years course is an exciting opportunity to launch your teaching career. You’ll study issues of multiculturalism, diversity and more while combining your theoretical training with practical placements in schools. Trainees of our PGCE Early Years courses achieve high results, with 95% receiving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with one of their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL-accredited PGCE Early Years course trains you to teach three to seven-year-olds (Key Stage 1) and leads to Qualified Teacher Status.

The course consists of study sessions at London Met combined with two school placements of 11 and 13 weeks. You’ll extend your knowledge, develop your classroom practice and explore the underlying principles and values that inform current debates around educational issues.

At the University, you’ll learn about teaching in urban, multicultural and multilingual schools as well as addressing the issues of language, diversity and equality across the curriculum. Studying within the framework and principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) means you’ll be well equipped to help maximise every child's’ development.

During your school placements, you'll be supported by both school-based mentors and university-linked tutors. The tutors will also deliver your university sessions, ensuring you have continual guidance throughout the course.

Our dedication to training teachers who are reflective, creative, imaginative and responsive to all children’s needs has led to positive reviews from Ofsted:

"The recent Ofsted on-line trainee survey now indicates very high confidence rates [in the course]…trainees are pushed to reach the highest standards."
Ofsted, 2016.

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience
-The Educational Research Assignment, which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

Professional accreditation

This PGCE course is accredited by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL).

Modular structure

This is a year-long course.

Module 1, Curriculum Studies, includes:
-The theoretical underpinning of the practice that you'll implement in the classroom
-Access to the pedagogical knowledge and understanding required to effectively plan and teach well-structured lessons in Early Year’s curriculum
-Lessons on subjects including pedagogy, English and mathematics, science and foundation subjects
-Training to assess school pupil’s progress in each of these curriculum areas

Module 2, Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (PIP), includes:
-Support for your wider professional development as a teacher
-Discussion of the role of children’s rights and how this underpins effective learning relationships
-Understanding of the different aspects of inclusive education
-Introduction to the school structure and wider children’s workforce
-Teamwork and collaborative discussion across different subject areas

Work placements:
-120 days in two London placements learning to teach with a mentor in Early Years Key Stage 1 settings

After the course

This PGCE School Direct course leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which enables you to teach three to seven year-olds. Our trainees from this course have gone on to become teachers at schools like Grafton Primary, Tudor Primary and Willow Tree Primary.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teaching subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

PGCE Schools Direct

The School Direct school placements work around the training calendar for the student teacher with the PGCE offered at the university. This means we can only offer places in Early Years / Primary and in Secondary teaching Maths, Modern Languages and Science with a specialism in Biology, Chemistry or Physics.

You will attend the training workshops at the university with other regular PGCE students and carry out placements of 120 days in a school or consortium of schools with a School Direct allocation. This time could be divided between two schools with some flexibility.

London Met has School Direct partnership with nearly 100 schools. This large body of schools have joined with us to build a cross-capital alliance, providing diverse contexts in which to train the new generation of London teachers.

Most of our trainees follow a programme modelled on the traditional PGCE, with time spent under tutor supervision at London Metropolitan University and the school placement divided between two partner schools.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Learn to teach five to 11-year-olds on this National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited course. You’ll address the challenges of teaching in multicultural and diverse environemnts, while your school placements will back this up with hands-on practical experience. Read more
Learn to teach five to 11-year-olds on this National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL)-accredited course. You’ll address the challenges of teaching in multicultural and diverse environemnts, while your school placements will back this up with hands-on practical experience. With both a diverse teacher and student population, London is an ideal location if you want to teach in urban environments. Trainees of our PGCE Primary courses attain high results, with 95% achieving an Ofsted good or outstanding grade by the end of the course and 96% going on to obtain employment, often with one of their placement schools.

More about this course

This NCTL-accredited PGCE Primary course leads to Qualified Teacher Status and prepares you to teach five to 11-year-olds in a primary school environment. You’ll also be able to work in an early years setting.

The course structure gives you room to develop your classroom practice as well as examine the underlying principles and values around educational issues.

The Curriculum Studies module introduces you to the challenges of teaching within urban, multicultural and multilingual schools. You’ll also learn how to teach core subjects including English, Mathematics and Science.

The Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (PIP) module includes two extended school placements of 11 and 13 weeks. With its clear links to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC), you’ll have a responsible framework for meeting the needs of every child you teach.

Throughout your school placements, you'll be supported by school-based mentors and university-linked tutors. The latter will also teach your university sessions, providing you with a continuity of support throughout your training. By working in both environments, you also have the chance to reflect on the links between your own teaching theory and practice.

Our emphasis on educational support and high-quality teaching means this course is rated positively by Ofsted:

"Outcomes for trainees are improving strongly. Trainees’ attainment is rising and employment and completion rates are above the sector average for all routes."
Ofsted, 2016

Your assessment will consist of four elements:
-School placement A
-School placement B, where your teaching ability will be assessed in relation to the standard for Qualified Teacher Status
-A Professional Practice Portfolio, which is compiled throughout the year, detailing personal experiences and reflections on your development as a teacher, largely in relation to your practical teaching experience the Educational Research Assignment which allows you to explore an educational issue

There are no examinations.

Professional accreditation

This course is accredited by the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL).

Modular structure

This is a year long course.

Module 1, Curriculum Studies, includes:
-The theoretical underpinning of the practice that students take into the classroom
-Access to the pedagogical knowledge and understanding required to effectively plan and teach well structured lessons in the primary curriculum
-Sessions on pedagogy, English language and literature, mathematics, science and foundation subjects
-Training to assess pupils’ progress in each of the curriculum areas

Module 2, Professionalism and Inclusive Practice (PIP) includes:
-Support for the wider professional development of each student teacher
-Discussion of the role of children’s rights and how this underpins effective learning relationships
-Understanding of different aspects of inclusive education
-Introduction to the whole school and wider children’s workforce
-Teamwork and collaborative discussion across different subject areas

Work placement:
-120 days in two London placements learning to teach with a mentor in primary schools

In both university and classroom contexts, your self-directed study is extremely important in order to support your development of purposeful educational enquiry, preparing effective teaching resources and ensuring up-to-date subject knowledge.

After the course

This intensive PGCE leads to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS),which enables you to teach 5 to 11 year olds. Our trainees have gone on to secure primary teacher roles at schools including Whitings Hill Primary School, Stanford Primary School, Godwin Primary School and more. Whether you have applied through London Met or School Direct, you’ll have the same opportunities for employment upon successful completion of the course.

Funding

Funding is available for many postgraduate courses leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Depending on your teaching subject and degree classification, you may be eligible for a bursary or scholarship of up to £30,000 through the teacher training bursary.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This programme is intended for graduates already working in Medical Microbiology laboratories, or in a closely-related field, who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in health and disease. Read more

This programme is intended for graduates already working in Medical Microbiology laboratories, or in a closely-related field, who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in health and disease.

You will study the theoretical aspects of medical microbiology, which encompasses: the biological and pathogenic properties of microbes; their role in health and disease; the reactions of the host to infection; and the scientific basis for the detection, control and antimicrobial treatment of infectious disease.

Upon successful completion of the course, you will possess a deeper knowledge of medical microbiology and highly developed management and research skills which will enhance your professional activities.

Programme structure

This programme is studied part-time over two academic years. It consists of eight taught modules and a research project.

Example module listing

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.

Short courses

All our lecture modules are offered as stand-alone short courses and are accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Sciences for the purposes of Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

Each module lasts for five or six weeks, with the lectures taking place on Wednesdays throughout the academic year. Individuals wishing only to attend the lectures may do so; alternatively, you may decide to take the assessment and acquire credits which may contribute to a postgraduate qualification, either at the University of Surrey or elsewhere.

You may take up to three modules as stand-alone courses before registering retrospectively for the MSc and counting the accumulated credits towards your degree.

The fee structure for short courses is different to that for registered students and details may be obtained upon enquiry to the programme administrator. Also contact the programme administrator for information regarding the timing of each module.

Who is the programme for?

The programme is intended for graduates already working in medical microbiology laboratories, or in a closely-related field, who want to enhance their understanding of the role of microorganisms in health and disease. This includes:

  • Diagnostic microbiology staff
  • Pharmaceutical research personnel
  • Veterinary laboratory staff
  • Food and water laboratory personnel

Other applicants seeking an understanding of the advances in modern medical microbiology and its associated disciplines will also be considered. This includes:

  • Clinicians
  • Public health personnel
  • Nurses

Educational aims of the programme

This part-time two year programme is intended primarily for those who are already working in the field of Medical Microbiology who aspire to become leaders in their profession.

The programme has been designed to increase your scientific understanding of medical microbiology and develop your critical and analytical skills so that you may identify problems, formulate hypotheses, design experiments, acquire and interpret data, and draw conclusions.

It will allow you to study theoretical aspects of medical microbiology encompassing the biological and pathogenic properties of microbes, their role in health and disease, the reactions of the host to infection, and the scientific basis for the detection, control and anti-microbial treatment of infectious disease.

Programme learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

  • Medical Microbiology and its underlying scientific basis
  • Analytical skills to allow interpretation of data and formulation of conclusions
  • Managerial and research skills required for further professional development as scientists

Intellectual / cognitive skills

  • Appraise scientific literature
  • Critically analyse new developments in technology
  • Formulate hypothesis
  • Critically analyse experimental data
  • Design experiments

Professional practical skills

  • Analyse numerical data using appropriate statistical packages and computer packages
  • Articulate experimental data effectively through oral and written work
  • Apply key Medical Microbiology laboratory skills to academic research
  • Compose an original experiment independently

Key / transferable skills

  • Critically analyse literature and data
  • Solve problems
  • Evaluate and exploit new technology
  • Reason effectively
  • Time management whilst working independently and as a team member
  • Interrogate data using statistical and numerical skills
  • Prepare high quality assignments using Information Technology including specialist packages

Global opportunities

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Learn more about opportunities that might be available for this particular programme by using our student exchanges search tool.



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Summary. The School of Health Sciences aims to provide quality education for both the current and future NHS workforce thereby improving the experience for people and their families who may now, and in the future, require help from Allied Health Professionals (AHPs). Read more

Summary

The School of Health Sciences aims to provide quality education for both the current and future NHS workforce thereby improving the experience for people and their families who may now, and in the future, require help from Allied Health Professionals (AHPs).

We provide programmes of study and research opportunities by a diversity of means such as modules delivered in a short course and conference format and distance learning. This course offers Continual Professional Development (CPD) for AHPs thereby advancing allied health practice for the benefit of patients.

The School’s innovative and highly reputable CPD provision responds to the needs of all stages of the UK and Ireland’s AHP career frameworks. Our postgraduate programme enables AHPs to focus on their chosen specialism (diagnostic radiography, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, podiatry, speech and language therapy, therapeutic radiography).

The content of the course is directly relevant to AHPs working in an ever-developing workforce. The material is produced and delivered by teaching staff, national and international experts in the subject areas.

The masters programme has been produced with clearly identified, efficient, processes for applicants to engage with short courses, and to facilitate students to move on to award programmes, using flexible but clear module opportunities to build up to the Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma/Masters awards.

Structure

This course is designed to enable students to undertake a Postgraduate Certificate/Diploma/MSc: a student initially registers for a Postgraduate Certificate and on completion of this may either exit with the award or progress to Diploma level. On completion of the Diploma they may choose to exit or transfer to the Masters level. Please also note that there are compulsory modules associated with the Postgraduate Diploma and Masters and that awards should normally be completed within 5 years.

Modules may also be taken as stand alone i.e. without registration for an award.

Compulsory modules and course

MSc

  • Project (60 points)

Postgraduate Diploma

  • Additional 60 credit points

To exit with Diploma:

  • One compulsory module (15 points each) - research evidence for health science

If progressing on to MSc level:

  • Must also take research project preparation (15 points) in addition to those above

Postgraduate Certificate

  • Free selection of modules from course list up to 60 credit points

Attendance

The part-time MSc programme is normally six semesters completed over 2-4 academic years. However students may opt to exit with a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credit points) after 1-2 years or a Postgraduate Diploma (120 points) after 2-3 years. In order to facilitate student attendance many of the modules involve on average 3-6 days attendance per module, these may be delivered in one block or in two shorter blocks of attendance during the semester. Some modules may require longer attendance due to professional body requirements and/or HCPC regulations. Each module coordinator will be able to advise on the expected attendance. Several modules are taught through the online environment and where these modules do not require attendance, students are expected to regularly participate in the online learning environment.

Career options

Participation in the postgraduate framework may enhance the opportunities for AHPs within the health service and beyond. The development of the programme was as a direct consequence of the need for profession-specific and interdisciplinary modules to facilitate AHPs in their career progression.

Participation in the postgraduate activity will provide the development opportunity for AHPs to progress to doctoral level activity.



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