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The course has been specifically designed to develop and enhance your skills as a public theologian. You will explore the important role and contribution of theological ideas to public debates and issues. Read more
The course has been specifically designed to develop and enhance your skills as a public theologian. You will explore the important role and contribution of theological ideas to public debates and issues. The course is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those with a background in theology seeking to improve significantly their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of important areas.

The course will develop a set of practical and public theological skills. At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with public issues. You may then undertake advanced study in important topics such as ethics, pluralism and diversity, liturgy and ritual, spirituality, biblical studies, and missiology.

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call. Email: or Tel: 01243 816191

Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £1920 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

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Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Read more
Creative research in humanities has become an important part of postgraduate study at Masters and Doctoral level. It has helped performers and practitioners remediate their work as research, and allowed practitioners to reflect on the processes of practice as much as its ramifications. Like all our courses, the DMus reflects the mission and values of University of West London. It enhances progression and quality in education, and encourages widening participation.

Its emphasis on creative research, and its 'submission pathway' attracts recently qualified postgraduates and professional musicians who want doctoral recognition of their skills and experience - and this is sympathetic with the School's academic plan to attract mature and part-time students, together with the University's vision to reach out to students of all ages through flexible education.

The DMus extends the rich and eclectic musical experience our students enjoy at undergraduate and Masters level, to doctoral level, and enhances the London College of Music's growing postgraduate community. The DMus also maximises our research strengths in composition, performance and music technology.

Course detail

The DMus is a practice-led doctorate, and an alternative to the traditional PhD for experienced practitioners who wish to show an outstanding and innovative contribution a specific area of expertise.

MPhil

After a year of full-time study or two years of part-time study, You will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 30 to 40 minutes in performance duration - you may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 5,000 words.

The MPhil portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, or just one structurally ambitious work. It may be part of an even larger work, which you can use for the DMus portfolio. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

DMus

After approximately three years of full-time study or six years' part-time study, you will have completed:

• a portfolio of notated music composition, 75 to 90 minutes in performance duration - of which the MPhil portfolio forms the first 30 to 40 minutes. You may submit a recording of the portfolio piece, but this is not compulsory

• a critical commentary of at least 20,000 words, of which the first 5,000 words will be your MPhil critical commentary.

The DMus portfolio may comprise several pieces to show a range of contrasting abilities, but must include one structurally ambitious work lasting 20 to 30 minutes. Alternatively, you may submit just one extended structurally ambitious piece, which your MPhil portfolio may be part of. Your portfolio piece should be innovative, and show a new technique within, or an extension to, an existing practice.

Proposal

Your proposal must not exceed 4,500 words. Unless you are studying for your DMus by Direct Entry or Submission, you will complete this proposal as part of the assessment regime for the Level 7 Research Methods module.

The proposal for the MPhil/DMus in Composition is different from a proposal for a PhD. The core of the proposal will be a list of works you intend for portfolio submission. It should also include the anticipated duration of and instrumentation for each piece. Proposals for DMus by Submission should also append the compositions, and you may choose to discuss the artistic ambition of each work. You must indicate, through backdated registration, the pieces intended for inclusion.

Although most of the pieces will be based on original ideas, you can also submit works developed from pre-existing material - for example, a folk-song arrangement or a fantasia on a theme.

Your proposal may discuss current musical or extra-musical influences on your work, and should explain how your portfolio constitutes an original and substantial contribution to the area of practice. For this, you should include:
• a 'literature review' of contemporary practice in the same field
• an analysis and explanation of existing techniques in the field
• an explanation of how the creative work represents an extension of, or reaction to, contemporary practice.

Your proposal should also include a timescale for each part of the project, and append an outline bibliography. You may also identify areas of technical development, analysing how your portfolio pieces might enable this transition.

You may also include a CV with your proposal.

Assessment

This will involve an oral examination, conducted in much the same way as a traditional PhD. A viva voce will also be necessary when you 'exit' with the MPhil qualification.

How to apply

Click the following link for information on how to apply to this course: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/how-apply

Scholarships and bursaries

Information about scholarships and bursaries can be found here: http://www.uwl.ac.uk/students/postgraduate/scholarships-and-bursaries

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The MA in Christian Ministry has been specially developed to meet the needs of Christian ministers, predominantly those working in local churches. Read more
The MA in Christian Ministry has been specially developed to meet the needs of Christian ministers, predominantly those working in local churches. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Your study will consistently ask what is the local and practical importance of key questions and issues. At the end of the course, in the dissertation, you will reflect theologically in depth on your own specific ministerial context.

The course is suitable for clergy and laity. There is an increasing diversity in Christian ministry and that provision is only likely to become more varied in the future. Teaching is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those ministers seeking to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of relevant theological areas.

Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

Find out more

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith or Canon Rebecca Swyer and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call.

The Revd Canon Rebecca Swyer

Director for Apostolic Life,

Diocesan Church House,

211 New Church Road,

Hove

BN3 4ED



Tel: 01273 425015

Dr Graeme Smith

Dept. of Theology, Philosophy & Religious Studies,

University of Chichester,

College Lane,

Chichester,

PO19 6PE.



Tel: 01243 816191



Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £1920 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

Read less
The course has been specially developed to meet the needs of school chaplains working in schools and academies. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Read more
The course has been specially developed to meet the needs of school chaplains working in schools and academies. A diverse and exciting range of modules will enhance your theological, liturgical, spiritual and pastoral skills. Your study will consistently ask what is the practical school importance of key questions and issues. At the end of the course, in the dissertation, you will reflect theologically in depth on your own specific ministerial context.

The course is suitable for ordained and lay individuals. There is an increasing diversity in Christian ministry and that provision is only likely to become more varied in the future. Teaching is ecumenical and would be appropriate for those ministers seeking to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in a range of relevant theological areas.


Course content
You will study a varied and exciting series of modules aimed to develop your theological skills and understanding and help you apply this new knowledge to your specific context and concerns.

The MA is studied part-time by following a two year taught module programme followed by a one year dissertation module. The taught modules are delivered at residential schools in August, January and May.

At the beginning of the course you will explore critically the methodological presumptions which underpin practical and public theology. This provides a grounding for your theological engagement with your context. Further core modules are a practical theology project, spirituality, and ritual and liturgy. You may then undertake advanced study in important public theology topics such as biblical studies, ethics, pluralism and diversity, and missiology.

Year One

August Residential: Practical and Public Theology (core)
January Residential: Pluralism and Diversity or The Bible and Public Theology
May Residential: Practical Theology Project (core)

Year Two

August Residential: Liturgy and Ritual in Contemporary Culture (core)
January Residential: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society or Christian Mission in Western Sociey
May Residential: Spirituality (core)

Year Three

All year: Dissertation

The modules are assessed through a variety of tasks including essays, book reviews, case studies, research project reports, and presentations. The final dissertation is 15,000 words.

You can find out more about the MA by contacting Dr Graeme Smith or SCALA and arranging an informal meeting or telephone call.

Dr Graeme Smith

Dept. of Theology, Philosophy & Religious Studies,

University of Chichester,

College Lane,

Chichester,

PO19 6PE.



Tel: 01243 816191

Paul Hansford

Administrator

SCALA (School Chaplains and Leaders Association)

01243 812134

http://www.scala.uk.net

Teaching and Assessment
Teaching is delivered in blocks lasting 3 days. You may either visit the University daily or if you live further away accommodation will need to be arranged. We can help find suitable accommodation, including on campus. A separate fee is charged for the accommodation.

Residential dates are:

Block Teaching dates are:

Tuesday, August 23rd – Thursday, August 25th 2016
Tuesday, January 10th – Thursday, January 12th 2017
Tuesday, May 9th – Thursday, May 11th 2017

Tuesday, August 22nd – Thursday, August 24th 2017
Tuesday, January 9th – Thursday, January 11th 2018
Tuesday, May 8th – Thursday, May 10th 2018

Tuesday, August 21st – Thursday, August 23rd 2018
Tuesday, January 8th – Thursday, January 10th 2019
Tuesday, May 7th – Thursday, May 9th 2019

Course fees
The full rate for the MA is £640 per module which equates to £19200 per year. This is payable for each of the 3 years of study.

Reduced fees are available for those recommended for study by their local church authorities, the department of Theology, Philosophy and Religious Studies department of the University of Chichester, or by SCALA.

The reduced fee is £480 per module equating to £1440 per year for each of the three years of study.

Accommodation costs are in addition to the academic fee.

Read less
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

Read less
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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