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Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or… Read more
Do you want to contribute to an area of cutting-edge research in an awe-inspiring subject? Do you want to delve deeper into advanced topics in physics or astronomy? Develop valuable new knowledge and skills? Prepare for a research career, or embark on a completely new path? Whatever your motivation, a postgraduate degree from the School of Physics and Astronomy can help you achieve your ambitions.

The MSc Physics is available in three different pathways: Particle Physic, Theoretical Physics and Condensed Matter Physics. The School of Physics and Astronomy also offers an MSc in Astrophysics and a PGCert in Astronomy and Astrophysics.

Programme outcomes

The aim of the programme is to deepen your understanding of contemporary theoretical physics, covering advanced concepts and techniques, leaving you well prepared for further doctoral level study and research. The programme will also enable you to develop skills transferable to a wide range of other careers.

This programme will:

Teach you the fundamental laws and physical principles, along with their applications, in your chosen area of physics.
Introduce you to research methodology, and how to manage your own research, making use of journal articles and other primary sources.
Allow you to communicate complex scientific ideas, concisely, accurately and informatively.
Instruct you how to use mathematical analysis to model physical behaviour and interpret the mathematical descriptions of physical phenomena.

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This study program is comprised of classes in Physical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Material Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry. Read more

This study program is comprised of classes in Physical Chemistry, Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Material Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry. There is also an English language skill module available.

Mandatory for this course is a one year study stay abroad. Associated European Universities are located in Versailles (France), Florenz (Italy) and Lille (France).

Class language is English.



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The Physics master’s programme offers you a research intensive tailor-made study path on current topics in experimental and theoretical physics at an institute of international renown. Read more

The Physics master’s programme offers you a research intensive tailor-made study path on current topics in experimental and theoretical physics at an institute of international renown.

What does this master’s programme entail?

The Physics master’s programme is intimately related to the scientific research carried out at the Leiden Institute of Physics. You will spend approximately 50% of your programme on research, as a member of one of our top-level international research groups. We offer five research specialisations, with emphasis on either experimental or theoretical physics, which train you as an independent researcher. We also offer three specialisations that put Physics in broader societal contexts and train you for careers where a Physics background is an asset. Each of these specialisations aims at providing a combination of research independence and content proficiency that fully prepares you for a successful professional development for your professional development.

Learn more about the Physics programme.

Why study Physics at Leiden University?

  • The programme offers a wide choice of individual study paths that take into account individual needs and interests. You can either build a purely academic profile, or you may combine physics research with education, business studies or science communication.
  • You will carry out at least one research project with one of the research groups of the Leiden Institute of Physics. Research at the department is at the forefront of fundamental modern Physics at an internationally competitive level.
  • At the Leiden Institute of Physics you experience an open, inclusive, and collegial atmosphere. Your weekly routine includes attending colloquia of international speakers, partaking in symposia and participating in lively scientific discussions.

Find more reasons to choose Physics at Leiden University.

Physics: the right master’s programme for you?

Are you looking into furthering your education in fundamental questions in physics? Then our Physics master’s programme is the right choice. Whether you are interested in experimental or theoretical research, or cosmology, we offer it all. You will be trained for a career in research within or outside academia. You can also choose for a more practical-oriented specialisation where you combine one year of Physics research with one year of training in business, communication or education.

Read more about the entry requirements for Physics.

Specialisations



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The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. Read more
The M.Sc. in Medical Physics is a full time course which aims to equip you for a career as a scientist in medicine. You will be given the basic knowledge of the subject area and some limited training. The course consists of an intense program of lectures and workshops, followed by a short project and dissertation. Extensive use is made of the electronic learning environment "Blackboard" as used by NUI Galway. The course has been accredited by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (UK).

Syllabus Outline. (with ECTS weighting)
Human Gross Anatomy (5 ECTS)
The cell, basic tissues, nervous system, nerves and muscle, bone and cartilage, blood, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, gastrointestinal tract, nutrition, genital system, urinary system, eye and vision, ear, hearing and balance, upper limb – hand, lower limb – foot, back and vertebral column, embryology, teratology, anthropometrics; static and dynamic anthropometrics data, anthropometric dimensions, clearance and reach and range of movement, method of limits, mathematics modelling.

Human Body Function (5 ECTS)
Biological Molecules and their functions. Body composition. Cell physiology. Cell membranes and membrane transport. Cell electrical potentials. Nerve function – nerve conduction, nerve synapses. Skeletal muscle function – neuromuscular junction, muscle excitation, muscle contraction, energy considerations. Blood and blood cells – blood groups, blood clotting. Immune system. Autonomous nervous system. Cardiovascular system – electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. – the peripheral circulation. Respiratory system- how the lungs work. Renal system – how the kidneys work. Digestive system. Endocrine system – how hormones work. Central nervous system and brain function.

Occupational Hygiene (5 ECTS)
Historical development of Occupational Hygiene, Safety and Health at Work Act. Hazards to Health, Surveys, Noise and Vibrations, Ionizing radiations, Non-Ionizing Radiations, Thermal Environments, Chemical hazards, Airborne Monitoring, Control of Contaminants, Ventilation, Management of Occupational Hygiene.

Medical Informatics (5 ECTS)
Bio statistics, Distributions, Hypothesis testing. Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, T-tests, ANOVA, regression. Critical Appraisal of Literature, screening and audit. Patient and Medical records, Coding, Hospital Information Systems, Decision support systems. Ethical consideration in Research.
Practicals: SPSS. Appraisal exercises.

Clinical Instrumentation (6 ECTS)
Biofluid Mechanics: Theory: Pressures in the Body, Fluid Dynamics, Viscous Flow, Elastic Walls, Instrumentation Examples: Respiratory Function Testing, Pressure Measurements, Blood Flow measurements. Physics of the Senses: Theory: Cutaneous and Chemical sensors, Audition, Vision, Psychophysics; Instrumentation Examples: Evoked responses, Audiology, Ophthalmology instrumentation, Physiological Signals: Theory Electrodes, Bioelectric Amplifiers, Transducers, Electrophysiology Instrumentation.

Medical Imaging (10 ECTS)
Theory of Image Formation including Fourier Transforms and Reconstruction from Projections (radon transform). Modulation transfer Function, Detective Quantum Efficiency.
X-ray imaging: Interaction of x-rays with matter, X-ray generation, Projection images, Scatter, Digital Radiography, CT – Imaging. Fundamentals of Image Processing.
Ultrasound: Physics of Ultrasound, Image formation, Doppler scanning, hazards of Ultrasound.
Nuclear Medicine : Overview of isotopes, generation of Isotopes, Anger Cameras, SPECT Imaging, Positron Emitters and generation, PET Imaging, Clinical aspects of Planar, SPECT and PET Imaging with isotopes.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging : Magnetization, Resonance, Relaxation, Contrast in MR Imaging, Image formation, Image sequences, their appearances and clinical uses, Safety in MR.

Radiation Fundamentals (5 ECTS)
Review of Atomic and Nuclear Physics. Radiation from charged particles. X-ray production and quality. Attenuation of Photon Beams in Matter. Interaction of Photons with Matter. Interaction of Charged Particles with matter. Introduction to Monte Carlo techniques. Concept to Dosimetry. Cavity Theory. Radiation Detectors. Practical aspects of Ionization chambers

The Physics of Radiation Therapy (10 ECTS)
The interaction of single beams of X and gamma rays with a scattering medium. Treatment planning with single photon beams. Treatment planning for combinations of photon beams. Radiotherapy with particle beams: electrons, pions, neutrons, heavy charged particles. Special Techniques in Radiotherapy. Equipment for external Radiotherapy. Relative dosimetry techniques. Dosimetry using sealed sources. Brachytherapy. Dosimetry of radio-isotopes.

Workshops / Practicals
Hospital & Radiation Safety [11 ECTS]
Workshop in Risk and Safety.
Concepts of Risk and Safety. Legal Aspects. Fundamental concepts in Risk Assessment and Human Factor Engineering. Risk and Safety management of complex systems with examples from ICU and Radiotherapy. Accidents in Radiotherapy and how to avoid them. Principles of Electrical Safety, Electrical Safety Testing, Non-ionizing Radiation Safety, including UV and laser safety.
- NUIG Radiation Safety Course.
Course for Radiation Safety Officer.
- Advanced Radiation Safety
Concepts of Radiation Protection in Medical Practice, Regulations. Patient Dosimetry. Shielding design in Diagnostic Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy.
- Medical Imaging Workshop
Operation of imaging systems. Calibration and Quality Assurance of General
radiography, fluoroscopy systems, ultrasound scanners, CT-scanners and MR scanners. Radiopharmacy and Gamma Cameras Quality Control.

Research Project [28 ECTS]
A limited research project will be undertaken in a medical physics area. Duration of this will be 4 months full time

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Doctorate study in Computational Physics is an opportunity to engage in rigorous scholarly pursuit, and to contribute original research to a body of academia. Read more
Doctorate study in Computational Physics is an opportunity to engage in rigorous scholarly pursuit, and to contribute original research to a body of academia.

At the School of Mathematics and Physics, you will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge of computational physics, while developing your research skills and working with specialists. Computational Physics is a fundamental area of study that underpins a vast array of topics. During your research, you may have the opportunity to develop national and international collaborations.

Research in Computational Physics covers a broad spectrum, including the distinct areas of nanostructured soft matter, active matter, materials science and molecular biophysics. You benefit from dedicated academic supervisors, in-depth training programmes and specialist computational facilities.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Main Research Areas:
-Nanostructured Soft Matter
-Active Matter
-Materials Science
-Molecular Biophysics

For detailed information about the School’s research activity please visit: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/smp/research/

How You Study

You can benefit from specialist computational facilities, training programmes to enhance your research skills and support from dedicated academic supervisors. You will be supported and encouraged to submit papers to international scientific journals, present your findings at conferences and share knowledge with colleagues across the University.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

A PhD is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic.

Career and Personal Development

This research programme is designed to allow you to expand your knowledge and expertise in an area of specific interest. It provides the opportunity to develop an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers across the broad spectrum of computational physics-related industries and in academia.

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At the School of Mathematics and Physics, you will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge of computational physics, while developing your research skills and working alongside specialists. Read more
At the School of Mathematics and Physics, you will have the opportunity to advance your knowledge of computational physics, while developing your research skills and working alongside specialists.

Computational Physics is a fundamental area of study that underpins a vast array of topics. During your research, you will have the opportunity to work with specialists in the field and may have the chance to develop strong national and international collaborations.

Research in Computational Physics covers a broad spectrum, including the distinct areas of nanostructured soft matter, active matter, materials science and molecular biophysics. You benefit from dedicated academic supervisors, in-depth training programmes and specialist computational facilities.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research Areas:
-Nanostructured Soft Matter
-Active Matter
-Materials Science
-Molecular Biophysics

How You Study

You can benefit from specialist computational facilities, training programmes to enhance your research skills and support from dedicated academic supervisors. You will be supported and encouraged to submit papers to international scientific journals, present your findings at conferences and share knowledge with colleagues across the University.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The MSc by Research involves writing a Master's thesis under the supervision of a member of academic staff on a topic to be agreed with your supervisor. The MSc by Research is usually awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic.

Career and Personal Development

This research programme is designed to allow you to expand your knowledge and expertise in an area of specific interest. It seeks to provide an in-depth foundation for further research or progression to careers across the broad spectrum of computational physics-related industries and in academia.

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Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials. Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies. Read more

Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials

Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies.

As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. But how do you tackle a problem when there are no adequate theories and calculations become far too complicated? In the specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials you’ll be trained to take up this challenge in a field of physics that is still largely undiscovered: the interface between quantum and classical physics.

We focus on systems from two atoms to complete nanostructures, with time scales in the order of femtoseconds, picoseconds or nanoseconds. One of our challenges is to understand the origin of phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. As theory and experiment reinforce each other, you’ll learn about both ‘research languages’. In this way, you’ll be able to understand complex problems by dividing them into manageable parts.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Why study Physics of Molecules and Materials at Radboud University?

- At Radboud University there’s a strong connection between theory and experiment. Theoretical and experimental physicists will teach you to become acquainted with both methods.

- In your internship(s), you’ll have the opportunity to work with unique research equipment, like free electron lasers and high magnetic fields, and with internationally known scientists.

- We collaborate with several industrial partners, such as Philips and NXP. This extensive network can help you find an internship or job that meets your interests.

If you’re successful in your internship, you have a good chance of obtaining a PhD position at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM).

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Physics

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- A TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based

- An IELTS score of ≥6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university or at a company. However, many of our students end up in business as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:

- Solve complex problems

- Make accurate approximations

- Combine theory and experiments

- Work with numerical methods

Graduates have found jobs as for example:

- Consultant Billing at KPN

- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)

- Systems analysis engineer at Thales

- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security

- Business analyst at Capgemini

PhD positions

At Radboud University, we’re capable of offering many successful students in the field of Physics of Molecules and Materials a PhD position. Many of our students have already attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In this specialisation, you’ll discover the interface between quantum mechanics and the classical world, which is still a ‘terra incognita’. We focus on two-atom systems, multi-atom systems, molecules and nanostructures. This is pioneering work, because these systems are often too complex for quantum calculations and too small for the application of classical theories.

- Theory and experiment

At Radboud University, we believe that the combination of theory and experiments is the best way to push the frontiers of our knowledge. Experiments provide new knowledge and data and sometimes also suggest a model for theoretical studies. The theoretical work leads to new theories, and creative ideas for further experiments. That’s why our leading theoretical physicists collaborate intensively with experimental material physicists at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Together, they form the teaching staff of the Master’s specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials.

- Themes

This specialisation is focused on two main topics:

- Advanced spectroscopy

Spectroscopy is a technique to look at matter in many different ways. Here you’ll learn the physics behind several spectroscopic techniques, and learn how to design spectroscopic experiments. At Radboud University, you also have access to large experimental infrastructure, such as the High Magnetic field Laboratory (HFML), the FELIX facility for free electron lasers and the NMR laboratory.

- Condensed matter and molecular physics

You’ll dive into material science at the molecular level as well as the macroscopic level, on length scales from a single atom up to nanostructure and crystal. In several courses, you’ll get a solid background in both quantum mechanical and classical theories.

- Revolution

We’re not aiming at mere evolution of current techniques, we want to revolutionize them by developing fundamentally new concepts. Take data storage. The current data elements are near the limits of speed and data capacity. That’s why in the IMM we’re exploring a completely new way to store and process data, using light instead of electrical current. And this is but one example of how our research inspires future technology. As a Master’s student you can participate in this research or make breakthroughs in a field your interested in.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Master's specialisation in Social and Political Philosophy (Research). Social and political philosophy is part of a practical philosophy that aims to research fundamental questions regarding human society. Read more

Master's specialisation in Social and Political Philosophy (Research)

Social and political philosophy is part of a practical philosophy that aims to research fundamental questions regarding human society: What is a political order? How are new institutions formed? What are the differences between a community and a society? What is the ideal society like? What is justice? What is the relation between morality and politics?

In Nijmegen we focus on interpreting and critiquing classical texts that are part of the European political philosophy - from Plato to Habermas. Additionally, we engage in actual discussions on the crisis and conceptualisation of democracy. Also important are studies concerning spacial and metaphorical imaginations (city, garden, desert) in core political philosophical texts. Regarding these different fields, our research in Nijmegen takes a descriptive as well as a normative perspective.

Information for students of the Research Master

In Social and Political Philosophy you study ‘the political' as an essential but conflict-ridden aspect of the human condition, and politics as a way of coping with this. Spinoza, Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Zizek and Foucault are central figures in this specialisation.

The point of departure for the research conducted within the department of Social and Political Philosophy is the idea that ‘the political' is a ubiquitous dimension of all social phenomena and relations: everything is political, but nothing is only political. There is no such thing as ‘pure politics', but at the same time everything societal is ‘political' in the sense of entailing an ineradicable aspect of contestability and of decision. The very existence of a politically ordered society, liberal democracies or a secular polities, rests upon a contestable decision. (Recent developments in both world and domestic politics demonstrate a tendency to ‘forgetfulness' with respect to such decisions). As a result, we conceive of social and political philosophy not only as a matter of reflection about existing politics or political systems, but also as an investigation of the nature of the social (designated by notions such as ‘society', ‘community', ‘civil society') and the political as such, and an awareness that the political is also present in philosophy itself. Today's world is marked by a clash not of civilisations (Huntington), but of conceptualisations - and philosophy necessarily plays a significant role in the latter.

Both our research and teaching revolve around this focal insight. In 2005/6, our research seminar analysed the ‘dividing line' between church/religion and state/politics and between public and private. In 2006/7, the topic was the "Neutralisation of the Political" in the many forms this neutralisation took in modern times, notably in the writing by Carl Schmitt, Max Weber, Chantal Mouffe and in the recently published debate between Robert Audi and Jonathan Wolterstorff.

The scholarly competence of this group lies in classical, medieval, early modern and modern social and political philosophy, with a particular emphasis on 19th and 20th century Anglo-Saxon and continental thought (notably including Russia/USSR). Key authors for us are, in alphabetical order, Arendt, Aristotle, Augustine, Bulgakov, Colas, Foucault, Frank, Gauchet, Hegel, Hobbes, Lefort, Leibniz, Luhmann, Machiavelli, Mamardashvili, Marx, Mouffe, Plato, Rawls, Schmitt, Solov'ëv, Soviet Marxism, Spinoza, Leo Strauss, Taylor, Walzer, Weber, and Zizek.

The work of the research group is directly linked to that of the research group on political theology Res Mixtae, to the Centre for Russian Humanities Studies, and to the Institute of Eastern Christian Studies.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/social

Career prospects

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate, they require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

Job positions

This programme has been designed for people with the ambition to do research. Graduates tend to fall into three groups. A majority of the students continue their research within academia by applying for a doctoral programme in the Netherlands or abroad. We take particular pride in the fact that more than 75 percent of our graduates manage to obtain a PhD position within two years of graduating. A second group goes on to teach philosophy at secondary schools. And a third group enter research-related professions outside of education. Our graduates are also represented in journalism, science policy, and politics.

Our approach to this field

Philosophy has a unique role within contemporary society. Unlike other academic disciplines, its subject matter is not limited to one set of questions, or one domain of investigation. Philosophers poke delve into all aspects of science and society. In order to do this, they must possess two essential skills, namely the ability to analyse complex issues logically and conceptually and the ability to document their conclusions in clear and persuasive language. Such skills are not innate. They require intensive training. The Research Master's programme in Philosophy constitutes the first professional step towards the acquisition of these skills.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/philosophy/social

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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Master's specialisation in Particle and Astrophysics. A physics programme that covers the inner workings of the universe from the smallest to the largest scale. Read more

Master's specialisation in Particle and Astrophysics

A physics programme that covers the inner workings of the universe from the smallest to the largest scale

Although Particle Physics and Astrophysics act on a completely different scale, they both use the laws of physics to study the universe. In this Master’s specialisation you’ll dive into these extreme worlds and unravel questions like: What did our universe look like in the earliest stages of its existence? What are the most elementary particles that the universe consists of? And how will it evolve?

If you are fascinated by the extreme densities, gravities, and magnetic fields that can be found only in space, or by the formation, evolution, and composition of astrophysical objects, you can focus on the Astrophysics branch within this specialisation. Would you rather study particle interactions and take part in the search for new particles – for example during an internship at CERN - then you can choose a programme full of High Energy Physics. And for students with a major interest in the theories and predictions underlying all experimental work, we offer an extensive programme in mathematical or theoretical physics.

Whatever direction you choose, you’ll learn to solve complex problems and think in an abstract way. This means that you’ll be highly appealing to employers in academia and business. Previous students have, for example, found jobs at Shell, ASML, Philips and space research institute SRON.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/particle

Why study Particle and Astrophysics at Radboud University?

- This Master’s specialisation provides you with a thorough background in High Energy Physics, Astrophysics, and Mathematical Physics and the interface between them.

- Apart from the mandatory programme, there’s plenty of room to adapt the programme to your specific interests.

- The programme offers the opportunity to perform theoretical or experimental research.

- During this specialisation it is possible to participate in large-scale research projects, like the Large Hadron Collider at CERN or the LOFAR telescope.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university, at an institute (think of ESA and CERN) or at a company. However, many of our students end up in other business or government positions as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned:

- Thinking in an abstract way

- Solving complex problems

- Using statistics

- Computer programming

- Giving presentations

Some of our alumni now work as:

- National project manager at EU Universe Awareness

- Actuarial trainee at Talent & Pro

- Associate Private Equity at HAL Investments

- Consultant at Accenture

- ECO Operations Manager at Ofgem

- Scientist at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research

- Technology strategy Manager at Accenture

Working at a company

Other previous students have found jobs at for example:

- Shell

- KNMI

- Liander

- NXP

- ASML

- Philips

- McKinsey

- DSM

- Solvay

- Unilever

- AkzoNobel

Researchers in the field of Particle and Astrophysics develop advanced detector techniques that are often also useful for other applications. This resulted in numerous spin-off companies in for example medical equipment and detectors for industrial processes:

- Medipix

- Amsterdam Scientific Instruments

- Omics2Image

- InnoSeis

PhD positions

At Radboud University, there are typically a few PhD positions per year available in the field of Particle and Astrophysics. Many of our students attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In the Particle and Astrophysics specialisation, you’ll discover both the largest and the smallest scales in the universe. Apart from Astrophysics and High Energy Physics, this specialisation is also aimed at the interface between them: experiments and theory related to the Big Bang, general relativity, dark matter, etc. As all relevant research departments are present at Radboud University – and closely work together – you’re free to choose any focus within this specialisation. For example:

- High energy physics

You’ll dive into particle physics and answer questions about the most fundamental building blocks of matter: leptons and quarks. The goal is to understand particle interactions and look for signs of physics beyond the standard model by confronting theoretical predictions with experimental observations.

- Astrophysics

The Astrophysics department concentrates on the physics of compact objects, such as neutron stars and black holes, and the environments in which they occur. This includes understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies. While galaxies may contain of up to a hundred billion stars, most of their mass actually appears to be in the form of unseen ‘dark matter’, whose nature remains one of the greatest mysteries of modern physics.

- Mathematical physics

Research often starts with predictions, based on mathematical models. That’s why we’ll provide you with a theoretical background, including topics such as the properties of our space-time, quantum gravity and noncommutative geometry.

- Observations and theory

The Universe is an excellent laboratory: it tells us how the physical laws work under conditions of ultra-high temperature, pressure, magnetic fields, and gravity. In this specialisation you’ll learn how to decode that information, making use of advanced telescopes and observatories. Moreover, we’ll provide you with a thorough theoretical background in particle and astrophysics. After you’ve got acquainted with both methods, you can choose to focus more on theoretical physics or experimental physics.

- Personal approach

If you’re not yet sure what focus within this specialisation would best fit your interests, you can always ask one of the teachers to help you during your Master’s. Based on the courses that you like and your research ambitions, they can provide you with advice about electives and the internship(s).

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/particle

Radboud University Master's Open Day 10 March 2018



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The course is run jointly by the. Mathematical Institute. and the. Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. Read more

The course is run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Physics. It provides a high-level, internationally competitive training in mathematical and theoretical physics, right up to the level of modern research. It covers the following main areas:

  • quantum field theory, particle physics and string theory
  • theoretical condensed matter physics,
  • theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and physics of continuous media
  • mathematical foundations of theoretical physics

The course concentrates on the main areas of modern mathematical and theoretical physics: elementary-particle theory, including string theory, condensed matter theory (both quantum and soft matter), theoretical astrophysics, plasma physics and the physics of continuous media (including fluid dynamics and related areas usually associated with courses in applied mathematics in the UK system). If you are a physics student with a strong interest in theoretical physics or a mathematics student keen to apply high-level mathematics to physical systems, this is a course for you.

The course offers considerable flexibility and choice; you will be able to choose a path reflecting your intellectual tastes or career choices. This arrangement caters to you if you prefer a broad theoretical education across subject areas or if you have already firmly set your sights on one of the subject areas, although you are encouraged to explore across sub-field boundaries.

You will have to attend at least ten units' worth of courses, with one unit corresponding to a 16-hour lecture course or equivalent. You can opt to offer a dissertation as part of your ten units. Your performance will be assessed by one or several of the following means: 

  • invigilated written exams
  • course work marked on a pass/fail basis
  • take-home exams
  • mini-projects due shortly after the end of the lecture course.

The modes of assessment for a given course are decided by the course lecturer and will be published at the beginning of each academic year. As a general rule, foundational courses will be offered with an invigilated exam while some of the more advanced courses will typically be relying on the other assessment methods mentioned above. In addition, you will be required to give an oral presentation towards the end of the academic year which will cover a more specialised and advanced topic related to one of the subject areas of the course. At least four of the ten units must be assessed by an invigilated exam and, therefore, have to be taken from lecture courses which provide this type of assessment. A further three units must be assessed by invigilated written exam, take-home exam or mini-project. Apart from these restrictions, you are free to choose from the available programme of lecture courses.

The course offers a substantial opportunity for independent study and research in the form of an optional dissertation (worth at least one unit). The dissertation is undertaken under the guidance of a member of staff and will typically involve investigating and write in a particular area of theoretical physics or mathematics, without the requirement (while not excluding the possibility) of obtaining original results.



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The program deepens the knowledge of basic elements of modern physics (atomic and molecular physics, solid state physics, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics) and of theoretical physics (analytical mechanics, quantum mechanics, mathematical and numerical methods). Read more

The program deepens the knowledge of basic elements of modern physics (atomic and molecular physics, solid state physics, nuclear and particle physics, astrophysics) and of theoretical physics (analytical mechanics, quantum mechanics, mathematical and numerical methods). It is possible to strengthen the knowledge of specific fields like biophysics, nanoscience, physics of matter, nuclear and particle physics, physics of the fundamental interactions, astrophysics. Finally, the program provides direct experience of the laboratory techniques and computer calculation techniques and data analysis.

The graduate in Physics will know and understand the most relevant phenomena of the physical world at different scales, starting from the macroscopic world down to the atomic physics, the physics of condensed matter, nuclear and subnuclear physics up to the physics of the universe. The understanding of the physical world will be based on experimental evidence and a proper use of the theoretical modelling and its mathematical instruments, including numerical techniques.

Course structure

The second-cycle degree in Physics is divided in three curricula to be chosen by the student: Physics of the fundamental interactions, Physics of matter and Physics of the universe. For further information please check: http://en.didattica.unipd.it

Career opportunities

The graduate in Physics can have jobs opportunities in Italy and abroad in industries involving new technologies regardless of the final products, in service companies aiming to innovation and, more generally, in all activities requiring understanding and modelling of processes and ability in analysis and testing. These include startups and high tech industries, software and consulting companies, research centers and public administration. They can also teach physics and mathematics in schools of different levels.

Scholarships and Fee Waivers

The University of Padova, the Veneto Region and other organisations offer various scholarship schemes to support students. Below is a list of the funding opportunities that are most often used by international students in Padova.

You can find more information below and on our website here: http://www.unipd.it/en/studying-padova/funding-and-fees/scholarships

You can find more information on fee waivers here: http://www.unipd.it/en/fee-waivers



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A wide range of students with different interests and backgrounds come to this programme from world over in order to explore why media matter. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

A wide range of students with different interests and backgrounds come to this programme from world over in order to explore why media matter. They are highly qualified with very diverse international interests. It is particularly suitable for:

- Students with a degree in media or cultural studies
- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of media and cultural studies with special reference to Asia or Africa
- People with professional experience in film, television, journalism, advertising or public relations
- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist media-related topics along with regional or language-based study
- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

Our world is inescapably and continuously transformed through a proliferation of media. The MA in Anthropology of Media at SOAS takes up the challenge of understanding how and why media matter. The programme uniquely combines anthropology, media and cultural studies with specific regional expertise in Asia, Africa and the Middle East. It provides students with critical skills, research methods, a wide-ranging understanding of media and the opportunity to pursue original research projects. The MA in Anthropology and Media is the first and still the only programme in Europe that specialises in bringing together contemporary anthropological concerns with media and cultural studies.

The MA in Anthropology of Media is a recent and rapidly growing field within the larger academic discipline of Anthropology. It both incorporates and challenges the well-established anthropological concerns with visual culture and ethnographic film through a more extensive examination of contemporary media practices. Along with the parallel disciplines of media and cultural studies, Anthropology of Media is now widely recognized as playing an increasingly important and critical role in current debates about media. It provides an alternative approach, which puts the emphasis upon studying the multiple relationships between people and media and thus seeks to anthropologise media and cultural studies. More than just focussing on media texts or technology, Anthropology of Media is marked by the centrality of people and how they relate to media.

The SOAS programme in Anthropology of Media is designed to provide a detailed introduction to the study of media in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and their diasporas. We also use the theoretical and methodological contributions of Anthropology to build upon and challenge Euro-American media and cultural studies. The programme stresses ethnographic approaches to media as cultural practices in social and political contexts where people inhabit, create and engage with media worlds.

Special Features

The Department cultivates several specialist strengths which distinguish it from other anthropology departments in the UK. The most obvious of these is that all members of the Department are specialists on Africa and Asia. Particular attention is given to teaching and researching regional ethnographic areas of expertise. All staff members are simultaneously attached as anthropologists to this Department and as regional specialists to their appropriate regional studies centre within the School.

SOAS also offers strong interdisciplinary support for the study of media including the Centre for Media and Film Studies and a highly regarded Department of Music. We have a dedicated multi-media suite, a radio station and satellite access to a wide range of world television. Further, the Library houses a major collection of books and journals on world media as well as extensive audio-visual materials.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthofmedia/

Programme Overview

The programme consists of four units in total: three units of taught examined courses and a one unit dissertation of 10,000 words. Some courses may be taught in other departments in the school.

Core Courses:
- Comparative Media Studies - 15 PAN C009 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Anthropology of Media and the candidate’s supervisor.

- Additionally all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

Foundation Course:
- Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit). This is compulsory only for students without a previous anthropology degree.

Option Courses:
- The remaining unit(s) of your programme, either 1 unit of option courses (if taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology) or 2 units (if exempted from Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology), may then be selected from the Option Courses list below.

- Your 1 or 2 total units may be made up of any combination of 0.5 or 1 unit option courses.

- However, courses without a "15PANxxxx" course code are taught outside of the Anthropology Department. No more than 1 unit in total of these courses may be selected.

- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Programme Specification 2012/2013 (pdf; 119kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/maanthofmedia/file39767.pdf

Destinations

A Masters in the Anthropology of Media at SOAS develops students’ understanding of the world, other peoples’ ways of life and how society is organised. This programme will endow students with specialist understanding of producers, audiences, and other cultural and social aspects of mass media. Over the years the SOAS department has trained numerous leading anthropologists who have gone on to occupy lectureships and professorships throughout the world. Equally, students gain skills during their degree that transfer well to areas such as information and technology, government service, the media and tourism.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including analytical and critical skills; ability to gather, assess and interpret data; high level of cultural awareness; and problem-solving. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Aberystwyth University’s Masters in Practising Human Geography is specifically designed to provide you with the knowledge, skills and competencies required of an advanced, professionally trained researcher specialising in Human Geography. Read more

About the course

Aberystwyth University’s Masters in Practising Human Geography is specifically designed to provide you with the knowledge, skills and competencies required of an advanced, professionally trained researcher specialising in Human Geography. Based at Aberystwyth University’s internationally-renowned Department of Geography and Earth Sciences (DGES), this course will equip you with both subject-specific expertise and a broad base of professional skills which are transferrable into a wide range of employment contexts.

To help you become a thorough and professional researcher, you will receive a comprehensive grounding in the practical research methodologies of the discipline. You will also be trained in the philosophical, epistemological and theoretical approaches to Human Geography. Together, the uniquely practical and theoretical approaches to the subject will make you a balanced, adaptable and highly-competitive candidate for employment and further doctoral-level research.

Throughout the course you will demonstrate initiative and self-motivated learning, supported by the crucial self-awareness to be both flexible in working practice but always academically rigorous. Your skills in communication, teamwork and project-management will be strengthened, and you will become fully confident in framing coherent and insightful questions and expressing them in oral and written form in a range of group and individual settings.

These qualities, supported by comprehensive subject knowledge, will enable you to gain employment with government agencies, public bodies, research institutes and private consultancies.

The DGES invites applications from postgraduate students in a range of related disciplines including geologists, geographers and environmental earth scientists.

This degree will suit you:

- If you wish to obtain the expertise required for advanced research in Human Geography;
- If you are interested in pursuing a career in Human Geography;
- If you wish to obtain an excellent postgraduate qualification from an internationally-recognised, research-led institute;
- If you wish to build upon your a second class degree or higher in a related discipline.

Course content and structure

The course is a year-long, full-time programme divided into two parts over three semesters. In part one, you will establish a breadth of necessary skills in a number of core modules whilst directing your own study by choosing specialist modules. In part two, you will apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits. Contact time is approximately 10 -14 HOURS per week and our small, friendly classes provide a productive environment where you can engage with your subject matter fully supported by staff and your peers.

Core modules:

Advanced Research in Human Geography
Geographical Research Methodologies
Key Concepts and Debates in Human Geography
MA Dissertation
Principles of Research Design
Quantitative Data Collection and Analysis

Optional modules:

Postgraduate Work Experience
Rural Economy, Society and Policy
Risk Management and Resilience in a Changing Environment

Assessment

Assessment: Part 1 of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, tutorials and essay projects. In Part 2, the successful acceptance of your dissertation (up to 20,000 words) leads to the award of an MA. 

Employability

Every aspect of the MA in Practising Human Geography is designed to enhance your employability. Alongside the development of your subject-specific knowledge and experience, an especially noteworthy strength of this course is the emphasis on personal development. As an emerging specialist in Human Geography, your strengthened research and critical faculties will make you a strong candidate for any post where ideas and topics need research, analysis, discussion, expansion and classification.

In addition to gaining such specialised knowledge in the theoretical concepts of Human Geography, the course aims to develop your more general skills such as written and oral communication, data handling and statistics, team work, information technology and problem solving. These skills are highly prized by employers and can be applied across innumerable graduate and master’s level jobs. Because you will have secured and proved your competency in these areas, you will be very well equipped for entering the general employment market but also in pursuing positions in subject-related professions.

A host of employers look for accuracy, thoroughness, an eye for detail and the ability to find and prove connections across broad subject matter, and you certainly will have proven yourself, simply by graduating from this prestigious MA course.

Professional Exposure and Networking

You will have the opportunity to attend two major research groups (the Cultural and Historical Geography Group and the New Political Geographies Group) which are based in the Institute of Geography and Earth Science. These groups are comprised of experts in their fields who regularly contribute to international debates. By attending meetings and seminars, you will experience Practising Human Geography at the cutting edge; you will be aware of the most up-to-date debates, theories and methodologies in the context of a lively and robust working department. This will give you an enviable edge and fluency in your professional and doctoral applications.

You will also be strongly advised to take every opportunity you can to widen your professional exposure. The department’s regular guest seminars and the residential ‘theory school’ in conjunction with Cardiff and Swansea Universities, are such opportunities. These provide excellent opportunities for you to network and socialise with your teachers and peers in a professional context.

Project Management in the Dissertation

The dissertation project will require you to work independently and to pursue your own individual topic. You will be required to cultivate a professional work ethic to deliver the combination of research, analysis, communication and presentation demanded by this project. This rigorous part of the MA will require you to employ project management skills which are entirely transferrable to almost any work context that Master’s graduates apply for.

Studying for this Master’s degree will allow you to sharpen up all your core scientific disciplines, your professional work ethos and your presentation and communication skills. Once secured by obtaining your Masters Degree, you will have gained confidence in the level of your academic expertise and practical field skills, which in turn will enhance your employability in both highly specialised related professions and also on broader, unrelated professional paths.

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The Certificate in Intellectual Property Law is designed exclusively for trainee patent and trade mark attorneys. Read more

The Certificate in IP Law M3EC

The Certificate in Intellectual Property Law is designed exclusively for trainee patent and trade mark attorneys. It is a one-semester (13 week) course with a high concentration on many of the practical aspects of patents, trade marks and designs and greater involvement of patent and trade mark practitioners to complement the academic treatment of the subject matter.

Overview

Intellectual Property (IP) Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. The Certificate in Intellectual Property Law is designed exclusively for trainee patent and trade mark attorneys. It is a one semester (13 week) course with a high concentration on many of the practical aspects of patents, trade marks and designs, and features greater involvement of patent and trade mark practitioners to complement the academic treatment of the subject matter. This course is approved by IPReg, CIPA and ITMA and is a recognised foundation exempting programme by these organisations.

The teaching term runs from 12 September or the first Monday following this date annually and finishes in mid-December. Exams run over two weeks in January annually.

This programme will:
◦Feature the involvement of patent and trade mark practitioners.
◦Offer you exemption from some professional exams. If you complete your examinations successfully, you will be exempt from the foundation level papers of the Joint Examination Board of the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys and three out of four of the foundation exams for the Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys.

Programme structure

The Certificate in Intellectual Property Law is available to study over one semester (13 weeks).
Compulsory modules:

You must obtain 60 credits in total.
◦Copyright and designs (15 credits) examined by one 3hr 15 min exam.
◦Law of trade marks and unfair competition (15 credits) examined by one 2hr 30 min and one 3hr 15 min exam.
◦Patent law (15 credits) examined by one 2hr 30 min and one 3hr 15 min exam.
◦Competition law (15 credits) examined by one 3hr 15 min exam.
◦Basic principles of English law, practice and evidence (non-credit bearing but assessed).

All students must attend Basic Principles of English law, practice and evidence, which is non-credit bearing but is of special relevance to intellectual property practitioners.

Professional Exams exemption

If you successfully complete the programme you will be exempt from the foundation level papers of the Joint Examination Board of the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys and three out of four of the foundation exams for the Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys.

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This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities. Read more
This is a two-year MSc offered by Royal Holloway as part of its South East Physics Network Partnership (SEPnet). SEPnet is a consortium of six universities: University of Kent, Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London, University of Southampton, University of Surrey, and University of Sussex. This consortium consists of around 160 academics, with an exceptionally wide range of expertise.

The first year consists mainly of taught courses in the University of London; the second research year can be at Royal Holloway or one of the other consortium members. This is a unique opportunity to collaborate with physics research groups and partner institutions in both the UK and Europe. You will benefit from consortium led events as well as state of the art video conferencing.

With some of the leading physics departments in the world, all the universities have their own accolades in both urban and countryside locations, with a wide choice of accommodation options, sporting facilities, international student organisations and careers services. South East England, with its close connections to continental Europe by air, Eurotunnel, and cross channel ferries, is an ideal environment for international students.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/physics/coursefinder/mscphysics(euromasters).aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is taught in collaboration with other University of London Colleges and the Universities of Kent, Southampton, Surrey and Sussex, providing an incomparably wide range of options.

- The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway is known internationally for its top-class research. Our staff carry out research at the cutting edge of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Experimental Quantum Computing, Quantum Matter at Low Temperatures, Theoretical Physics, and Biophysics, as well as other areas.

- We offer exceptional teaching quality and are consistently near the top of the league tables.

- The Department has strong links with leading international facilities, including CERN, ISIS and Diamond.

- We hold a regular series of colloquia and seminars on important research topics and host a number of guest lectures from external organisations.

Department research and industry highlights

- The Physics Department is one of the major centres for Physics research within the University of London.

- We have excellent clean rooms for the nanofabrication and testing of devices within the centre for nanophysics and nanotechnology.

- The London Low Temperature Laboratory is a centre for fundamental research in the mK and μK temperature regime and the development of new instrumentation and thermometry.

- The Hubbard Theory Institute combines theoretical studies of strongly correlated matter with experimental activities on the Harwell Campus.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness of current problems and/or new insights at the forefront of the discipline

- a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research or advanced scholarship

- originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and

- enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different physics-related areas, including careers in industry, information technology and finance. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued studies in physics, and many of our graduates have gone on to study for a PhD.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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