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Masters Degrees (Mathematical)

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BECOME A DESIRED MATHEMATICIAN. This research oriented Master’s will provide you with a rich toolkit of creative problem solving skills that will turn you into a desired scientist, both in and outside academia. Read more

BECOME A DESIRED MATHEMATICIAN

This research oriented Master’s will provide you with a rich toolkit of creative problem solving skills that will turn you into a desired scientist, both in and outside academia. You will dive deep into mathematics, develope genuine research skills in pure, applied and industrial areas and learn to think out of the box. 

CHOOSE FROM AN EXCEPTIONAL LIST OF COURSES

This Master's is part of the national Mastermath Programme, a collaboration of Dutch Mathematics Departments who joined efforts to enhance their Master's programmes. Due to this collaboration you can benefit from an exceptional list of mathematical courses, offered either by Utrecht University or another Dutch University. Check the courses page for more information and a full overview of the courses you can choose from.

WHY UTRECHT?

We combine our course offerings with personal and small-scale teaching, including:

  • a lively colloquium with distinguished international speakers;
  • research training in small group projects in pure-, applied- and industrial mathematics;
  • a unique special training in using historical sources;
  • student seminars in which you practice your own scientific presentation skills; 
  • collective learning of very advanced topics in pure or applied mathematics.

PERSONALIZE YOUR MASTER'S: CHOOSE YOUR TRACK

Within this Master's you can choose from 8 different tracks, allowing you to tailor the programme to your own personal interest. Depending on the track you choose, you can pursue your degree either in the direction of Fundamental Mathematics or in Mathematical Modeling. 

Fundamental Mathematics tracks:

Mathematical Modeling tracks:

You can also choose to do a Research project in History of Mathematics

DOUBLE MASTER DEGREE

If you are up for it, you can also combine the Mathematical Sciences programme with another Master's programmes of the Graduate School of Natural Sciences (e.g. Theoretical Physics, Climate Physics or Computing Science). This will result in a double Master's degree.

PROGRAMME OBJECTIVE

The Mathematical Sciences programme will prepare you for a challenging career, either in or outside academia. Mathematicians are desired employees in today's job market since they can easily deal with complex problems and large data sets in an abstract way. About 40% of our students continue with a PhD in mathematics or related research areas such as imaging or physics (in recent years at Harvard, London, Oxford, Stanford, etc). Many find employment in a research oriented environment at governments or in industry. Work fields include risk analysis, security, forensics, consultancy, data analytics, IT, logistics and more.



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Program highlights. The recent progress in several fields of theoretical physics (such as high energy physics, astrophysics, quantum and nonlinear optics or condensed matter physics) required numerous very sophisticated mathematical tools. Read more

Program highlights

The recent progress in several fields of theoretical physics (such as high energy physics, astrophysics, quantum and nonlinear optics or condensed matter physics) required numerous very sophisticated mathematical tools. In these frontline research fields, it became clear that a new understanding of physical systems going from cold atom gases to black holes is impossible without a new insight into underlying mathematical structures. This kind of problems requires a new interdisciplinary approach and specialists with double competence: in Physics and in different fields of modern Mathematics.

The main aim of the Master Program In Mathematical Physics (Math4Phys) is to provide advanced lectures on the mathematical methods of modern theoretical physics in the framework of a mathematical curriculum. Such an offer exists in France only in Dijon as the Mathematical Physics group of the IMB (Burgundy Mathematical Institute) provides a unique environment for a program requiring a double competence in Mathematics and Physics. The Mathematical Physics group of the IMB laboratory in Dijon is a unique research team in France with a capacity to provide advanced lectures in mathematical problems of modern physics. It permits to create a scientific environment for a master program focused on the most important problems of modern Physics from the mathematical perspective.

We offer lecture courses for the students with background in mathematics or mathematical physics giving an introduction to the mathematical methods used for such branches of theoretical physics as quantum field theory, statistical mechanics, general relativity, gauge theories, string theory, etc. The coursework covers different fields of mathematics (algebra, geometry, analysis) and highlights their applications to the problems of modern theoretical physics. The students are integrated from the very beginning into the mathematical physics group of the IMB and have to prepare by the end of each year a master dissertation.

The first year (M1) of the program is designed to provide the necessary background courses (mostly in mathematics but also in physics) to comply with the coursework of the more advanced second year. In particular, the M1 program includes the following subjects:

1.  Differential geometry

2.  Fourier analysis

3.  Functional analysis

4.  Groups and representations

5.  Mathematical methods of classical mechanics

6.  Partial differential equations

7.  Quantum physics

8.  Numerical methods

The second year lecture coursework includes the following lecture courses:

1.  Mathematical methods of quantum physics

2.  Riemann geometry and integrable systems

3.  Lie groups and Lie algebras

4.  Cohomological field theories

5.  Quantum groups

6.  Geometry and physics of blackhole spacetimes

We will also provide several mini courses by the research visitors of IMB. More detailed program of the second year courses can be found on the program webpage

Graduate destinations

The main aim of the master program is to provide sufficient training to start a PhD preparation.

Application

Maximum enrolment 20 in M1 and 15 in M2

To apply for the Master program in Mathematical Physics students should send a CV, a short description of their previous coursework (in Mathematics and Physics) and eventually a motivation letter to the program coordinator:

For M1: Giuseppe Dito ()

For M2: Nikolai Kitanine ()

Accepted students should proceed with the formal application procedure available here.

Requirements

The students applying for the M1 have to complete their undergraduate studies with major in Mathematics or Physics. The students can apply directly for the second year (M2) if they have completed at least one year of graduate courses in Mathematics or Mathematical Physics.

To follow the program the students should have a sufficient proficiency in English (we don’t require TOEFFL or an equivalent certificate but we can suggest an online interview to candidates). 

Grants

Several fellowship grants (600 € per month, during up to 9 months) will be awarded each year to high quality foreign students,



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The University of Dundee has a long history of mathematical biology, going back to Professor Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Chair of Natural History, 1884-1917. Read more

Mathematical Biology at Dundee

The University of Dundee has a long history of mathematical biology, going back to Professor Sir D'Arcy Wentworth Thompson, Chair of Natural History, 1884-1917. In his famous book On Growth and Form (where he applied geometric principles to morphological problems) Thompson declares:

"Cell and tissue, shell and bone, leaf and flower, are so many portions of matter, and it is in obedience to the laws of physics that their particles have been moved, molded and conformed. They are no exceptions to the rule that God always geometrizes. Their problems of form are in the first instance mathematical problems, their problems of growth are essentially physical problems, and the morphologist is, ipso facto, a student of physical science."

Current mathematical biology research in Dundee continues in the spirit of D'Arcy Thompson with the application of modern applied mathematics and computational modelling to a range of biological processes involving many different but inter-connected phenomena that occur at different spatial and temporal scales. Specific areas of application are to cancer growth and treatment, ecological models, fungal growth and biofilms. The overall common theme of all the mathematical biology research may be termed"multi-scale mathematical modelling" or, from a biological perspective, "quantitative systems biology" or"quantitative integrative biology".

The Mathematical Biology Research Group currently consists of Professor Mark Chaplain, Dr. Fordyce Davidson and Dr. Paul Macklin along with post-doctoral research assistants and PhD students. Professor Ping Lin provides expertise in the area of computational numerical analysis. The group will shortly be augmented by the arrival of a new Chair in Mathematical Biology (a joint Mathematics/Life Sciences appointment).

As a result, the students will benefit directly not only from the scientific expertise of the above internationally recognized researchers, but also through a wide-range of research activities such as journal clubs and research seminars.

Aims of the programme

1. To provide a Masters-level postgraduate education in the knowledge, skills and understanding of mathematical biology.
2. To enhance analytical and critical abilities and competence in the application of mathematical modeling techniques to problems in biomedicine.

Prramme Content

This one year course involves taking four taught modules in semester 1 (September-December), followed by a further 4 taught modules in semester 2 (January-May), and undertaking a project over the Summer (May-August).

A typical selection of taught modules would be:

Dynamical Systems
Computational Modelling
Statistics & Stochastic Models
Inverse Problems
Mathematical Oncology
Mathematical Ecology & Epidemiology
Mathematical Physiology
Personal Transferable Skills

Finally, all students will undertake a Personal Research Project under the supervision of a member of staff in the Mathematical Biology Research Group.

Methods of Teaching

The programme will involve a variety of teaching formats including lectures, tutorials, seminars, journal clubs, case studies, coursework, and an individual research project.

Taught sessions will be supported by individual reading and study.

Students will be guided to prepare their research project plan and to develop skills and competence in research including project management, critical thinking and problem solving, project reporting and presentation.

Career Prospects

The Biomedical Sciences are now recognizing the need for quantitative, predictive approaches to their traditional qualitative subject areas. Healthcare and Biotechnology are still fast-growing industries in UK, Europe and Worldwide. New start-up companies and large-scale government investment are also opening up employment prospects in emerging economies such as Singapore, China and India.

Students graduating from this programme would be very well placed to take advantage of these global opportunities.

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The objective of this programme of study is to prepare professionals able to deal with complex systems using sophisticated mathematical tools, yet with an engineering attitude. Read more

Mission and goals

The objective of this programme of study is to prepare professionals able to deal with complex systems using sophisticated mathematical tools, yet with an engineering attitude. It harmonises a solid scientific background with a command of advanced methodologies and technologies. The programme is characterised by a continuous synergy between Applied Mathematics and Engineering disciplines- The students may choose among three specialisations:
- Computational Science and Engineering
- Applied Statistics
- Quantitative Finance

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

Career opportunities

The professional opportunities offered by this course are rather ample and varied: engineering consultancy companies that deal with complex computational problems; manufacturing or civil engineering companies where analyses based on the use of advanced mathematical tools are needed; banks, insurance companies and financial institutions making use of quantitative finance for risk analysis or forecast; companies that require statistical interpretation and the processing of complex data, or the simulation of different scenarios; public and private research institutes and laboratories.

Eligible students

Students holding a Bachelor degree in Mathematical Engineering, or in a related area with a solid background in the core disciplines of the programme, i.e. Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, Applied Physics or other Engineering disciplines are eligible for application. In particular, eligible students' past studies must include courses in different areas of Engineering (among Informatics, Economics & Business Organization, Electrotechnics, Automation, Electronics, Applied Physics, Civil Engineering) for at least 25% of the overall courses, as well as courses in different areas of Mathematics (Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Geometry, Probability, Statistics, Numerical Analysis, Optimization) for at least 33% of the overall courses.
The following tracks are available:
1. Computational Science and Engineering
2. Applied Statistics
3. Quantitative Finance

Eligible students must clearly specify the track they are applying for in their motivation letter.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Mathematical_Engineering.pdf
The Master of Science in Mathematical Engineering (MSME) aims to form an innovative and flexible professional profile, endowed with a wide spectrum of basic scientific notions and engineering principles, together with a deep knowledge of modern pure and applied mathematical techniques. MSME is characterized by a continuous synergy between Mathematics and Engineering methods, oriented to the modelling, analysis and solution of complex planning, control and management problems, and provides the students with the possibility to face problems from various scientific, financial and/or technological areas. The MSME graduates can find employment in Engineering companies specialized in handling complex computational problems, requiring a multidisciplinary knowledge; in companies manufacturing industrial goods for which design analysis based on the use of advanced mathematical procedures are required; in service societies, banks, insurance companies, finance or consultant agencies for the statistical interpretation and the simulation of complex situations related to the analysis of large number of data (e.g. management and optimization of services, data mining, information retrieval) or for handling financial products and risk management; in public and private institutions. The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

Three main tracks available:
1. Computational Science for Engineering
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; numerical and theoretical analysis for partial differential equations; fluid mechanics; computational fluid dynamics advanced programming techniques for scientific computing;

2. Statistics
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; stochastic dynamical models; applied statistics, model identification and data analysis; Bayesian statistics

3. Mathematical Finance
Real and functional analysis; algorithms and parallel programming; stochastic differential equations; mathematical finance; financial engineering; model identification and data analysis.

In the motivation letter the student must clearly specify the track he/she is applying for.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/mathematical-engineering/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

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The Oxford Master's in Mathematical Sciences (OMMS), provides a broad and flexible training in mathematical sciences, essential for research and innovation in the 21st century. Read more

The Oxford Master's in Mathematical Sciences (OMMS), provides a broad and flexible training in mathematical sciences, essential for research and innovation in the 21st century.

This MSc is run jointly by the Mathematical Institute and the Department of Statistics. It spans interdisciplinary applications of mathematics as well as recognizing fundamental questions and themes. Oxford has a world-class reputation in the mathematical sciences, and this master's degree offers students the opportunity to work with an international group of peers, including other mathematical leaders of the future.

This course draws on subjects in mathematics, statistics and computer science: from number theory, geometry and algebra to genetics and cryptography; from probability and mathematical geoscience to data mining and machine learning. You have the opportunity to choose from many different pathways, tailoring the programme to your individual interests and requirements. Examples of pathways include:

  • research in fundamental mathematics
  • data science
  • interdisciplinary research in fluid and solid mechanics
  • mathematical biology
  • industrially focused mathematical modelling
  • (stochastic) partial differential equations.

You will attend at least six units worth of courses (with one unit corresponding to a 16-hour lecture course supported by classes) in addition to writing a dissertation (worth two units). You will be encouraged to work collaboratively in classes, to develop your understanding of the material. Those wishing to extend themselves further might take one or two additional courses. 

The master's offers a substantial opportunity for independent study and research in the form of a dissertation. The dissertation is undertaken under the guidance of a supervisor and will typically involve investigating and writing in a particular area of mathematical sciences, without the requirement (while not excluding the possibility) of obtaining original results. A dissertation gives students the opportunity to develop broader transferable skills in the processes of organizing, communicating, and presenting their work, and will equip students well for further research or for a wide variety of other careers.

The Mathematical Institute is proud to have received an Athena SWAN silver award in 2017, reflecting its commitment to promoting diversity and to creating a working environment in which students and staff alike can achieve their full potential. The Department of Statistics is currently applying for a silver award. The departments offer extensive support to students, from regular skills training and career development sessions to a variety of social events in a welcoming and inclusive atmosphere.

This course runs from the beginning of October through to the end of June. Performance on the master's degree is assessed by invigilated written examinations and mini projects, and by the dissertation.



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This MSc provides an ideal foundation for students wishing to advance their mathematical modelling skills. The programme teaches students the basic concepts which arise in a broad range of technical and scientific problems and illustrates how these may be applied in a research context to provide powerful solutions. Read more

This MSc provides an ideal foundation for students wishing to advance their mathematical modelling skills. The programme teaches students the basic concepts which arise in a broad range of technical and scientific problems and illustrates how these may be applied in a research context to provide powerful solutions.

About this degree

Students develop an understanding of the processes undertaken to arrive at a suitable mathematical model and are taught the fundamental analytical techniques and computational methods used to develop insight into system behaviour. The programme introduces a range of problems - industrial, biological and environmental - and associated conceptual models and solutions.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), and a research dissertation (60 credits). 

The part-time option normally spans two years. The eight taught modules are spread over the two years. The research dissertation is taken in the summer of the second year.

Core modules

  • Advanced Modelling Mathematical Techniques
  • Nonlinear Systems
  • Operational Research
  • Computational and Simulation Methods
  • Frontiers in Mathematical Modelling and its Applications

Optional modules

  • Asymptotic Methods & Boundary Layer Theory
  • Biomathematics
  • Cosmology
  • Evolutionary Game Theory and Population Genetics
  • Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
  • Mathematical Ecology
  • Quantitative and Computational Finance
  • Theory of Traffic Flow
  • Waves and Wave Scattering

Dissertation/report

All MSc students undertake an independent research project, which culminates in a dissertation of approximately 15,000-words and a project presentation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through seminar-style lectures and problem and computer-based classes. Student performance is assessed through a combination of unseen examination and coursework. For the majority of courses, the examination makes up between 90–100% of the assessment. The project is assessed through the dissertation and an oral presentation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Mathematical Modelling MSc

Careers

Our graduates have found employment in a wide variety of organisations such as Hillier-Parker, IBM, Swissbank, Commerzbank Global Equities, British Gas, Harrow Public School, Building Research Establishment and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather-Forecasting. 

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Actuarial Analyst, KPMG
  • Data Scientist, Echobox
  • Graduate Technical Professional, AVEVA
  • PhD in Biochemical Engineering, UCL
  • Engineer, Erds (EDF)

Employability

Finance, actuarial and accountancy professionals are constantly in demand for their high-level mathematical skills and recent graduates have taken positions in leading finance-related companies such as UBS, Royal Bank of Scotland, Societe Generale, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Deloitte, and KPMG.

In the engineering sector, one recent graduate has progressed to a mathematical modelling role at a leading transportation planning consultancy; another became a graduate trainee at a business segment of Schlumberger that provides reservoir imaging, monitoring, and development services.

In addition, a number of graduates have remained in education either progressing to a PhD or entering the teaching profession.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Mathematics is internationally renowned for its excellent individual and group research that involves applying modelling techniques to problems in industrial, biological and environmental areas.

The department hosts a stream of distinguished international visitors. In recent years four staff members have been elected fellows of the Royal Society, and the department publishes the highly regarded research journal Mathematika.

This MSc enables students to consolidate their mathematical knowledge and formulate basic concepts of modelling before moving on to case studies in which models have been developed for issues motivated by industrial, biological or environmental considerations.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Mathematics

82% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. Read more

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, Complexity Theory, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Mathematics or Computer Science

In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor's in mathematics or computer science that have a strong mathematical background and theoretical interests. We will select students based on their motivation and their background. Mathematical maturity is essential and basic knowledge of logic and discrete mathematics is expected.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based)

- IELTS score of ≥6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our approach to this field

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, General Topology, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Our research in this field

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations



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This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Read more

This one-year master's course provides training in the application of mathematics to a wide range of problems in science and technology. Emphasis is placed on the formulation of problems, on the analytical and numerical techniques for a solution and the computation of useful results.

By the end of the course students should be able to formulate a well posed problem in mathematical terms from a possibly sketchy verbal description, carry out appropriate mathematical analysis, select or develop an appropriate numerical method, write a computer program which gives sensible answers to the problem, and present and interpret these results for a possible client. Particular emphasis is placed on the need for all these parts in the problem solving process, and on the fact that they frequently interact and cannot be carried out sequentially.

The course consists of both taught courses and a dissertation. To complete the course you must complete 13 units.

There are four core courses which you must complete (one unit each), which each usually consist of 24 lectures, classes and an examination. There is one course on mathematical methods and one on numerical analysis in both Michaelmas term and Hilary term. Each course is assessed by written examination in Week 0 of the following term.

Additionally, you must choose at least least one special topic in the area of modelling and one in computation (one unit each). There are around twenty special topics to choose from, spread over all three academic terms, each usually consisting for 12 to 16 lectures and a mini project, which culminates in a written report of around 20 pages. Topics covered include mathematical biology, fluid mechanics, perturbation methods, numerical solution of differential equations and scientific programming. 

You must also undertake at least one case study in modelling and one in scientific computing (one unit each), normally consisting of four weeks of group work, an oral presentation and a report delivered in Hilary term.

There is also a dissertation (four units) of around 50 pages, which does not necessarily need to represent original ideas. Since there is another MSc focussed on mathematical finance specifically, the MSc in Mathematical and Computational Finance, you are not permitted to undertake a dissertation in this field.

You will normally accumulate four units in core courses, three units in special topics, two units in case studies and four units in the dissertation. In addition, you will usually attend classes in mathematical modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills during Michaelmas term.

In the first term, students should expect their weekly schedule to consist of around seven hours of core course lectures and seven hours of modelling, practical numerical analysis and additional skills classes, then a further two hours of lectures for each special topic course followed. In addition there are about three hours of problem solving classes to go through core course exercises and students should expect to spend time working through the exercises then submitting them for marking prior to the class. There are slightly fewer contact hours in the second term, but students will spend more time working in groups on the case studies.

In the third term there are some special topic courses, including one week intensive computing courses, but the expectation is that students will spend most of the third term and long vacation working on their dissertations. During this time, students should expect to work hours that are equivalent to full-time working hours, although extra hours may occasionally be needed. Students are expected to write special topic and case study reports during the Christmas and Easter vacations, as well as revising for the core course written examinations.



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Overview. The MSc Mathematical Medicine and Biology will provide you with skills suitable for a research career in the exciting and growing field of mathematical medicine and biology. Read more

Overview

The MSc Mathematical Medicine and Biology will provide you with skills suitable for a research career in the exciting and growing field of mathematical medicine and biology.

You will take core modules in biology and the application of mathematics to medicine and biology. More advanced modules will introduce research topics in biomedical mathematics, including options in Computational Biology and Theoretical Neuroscience.

The taught training programme will be followed by a substantial individual project leading to a dissertation.

Throughout the course, the exceptional strength of the Centre for Mathematical Medicine and Biology will facilitate your hands-on experience of interdisciplinary biomedical research.

Some teaching activities will take place at the Sutton Bonington campus. The University provides a regular hopper bus between University Park and Sutton Bonington.

Key facts:

- This course is informed by the work being carried out in the Centre for Mathematical Medicine and Biology.

- The School of Mathematical Sciences is one of the largest and strongest mathematics departments in the UK, with over 60 full-time academic staff.

- In the latest independent Research Assessment Exercise, the school ranked eighth in the UK in terms of research power across the three subject areas within the School of Mathematical Sciences (pure mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and operational research).

Module details

Biomolecular Data and Networks

Cell Structure and Function for Engineers

Computational and Systems Biology

Mathematical Medicine and Biology

Mathematical Medicine and Biology Dissertation

Practical Biomedical Modelling

Theoretical Neuroscience

Topics in Biomedical Mathematics

English language requirements for international students

IELTS: 6.0 (with no less than 5.5 in any element)

Further information



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What's the Master of Mathematical Engineering all about? . The Master of Science in Mathematical Engineering is unique in Flanders and is supported by high quality research that has led to several spin-off companies. Read more

What's the Master of Mathematical Engineering all about? 

The Master of Science in Mathematical Engineering is unique in Flanders and is supported by high quality research that has led to several spin-off companies.

The ever increasing computer capacity for treatment of data, storage of measurements and data, and computing models, offers solutions to important challenges in business and society. Often mathematical techniques are crucial. A few examples:

  • How does an auto-pilot work?
  • How do you trace credit card fraud?
  • How do you find out which genes play an important role in cancer?
  • How do you simulate the evolution of greenhouses gases in the atmosphere?
  • How do you determine the value of financial products such as options?
  • How do you compress the images of fingerprints?
  • How do you compute airplane noise?
  • How do you optimise the process in a chemical reactor?
  • How do you analyse customer data and model consumer profiles?
  • How do you find abnormalities in brain images caused by epileptic seizures?

At first sight, these applications have little in common. However, for each of those, large amounts of data and various models are available. Mathematical techniques are crucial for the efficient treatment of these data and for fast and accurate simulation and optimisation.

Structure 

The programme consists of a technical core education on advanced topics on mathematics, process control, system identification, numerical optimisation, numerical simulation of differential equations, scientific software, and a project where students solve a problem that requires a combination of knowledge and skills taught at the core education.

The students freely choose among the many elective courses. They are stimulated to select courses from different tracks in order to obtain a broad overview of techniques and applications of mathematics in engineering science.

The elective courses include technical courses on mathematical techniques, as well as courses that are taught in other Master’s programmes that focus on modelling and the use of these mathematical techniques.

International

The Erasmus+ programme gives you the opportunity to gain valuable international experience by completing (usually) one semester at a participating European university. Student exchange agreements are also in place with a number of Japanese and American universitiesThis arrangement does not lengthen the duration of your degree programme, nor does it result in a separate degree.

It is also possible to complete an internship at a company abroad. Ask the internship coordinator for more information.

These studying abroad opportunities and internships are complemented by the short courses offered via the Board of European Students of Technology (BEST) network. The Faculty of Engineering Science is also member of the international networks CESAER, CLUSTER and T.I.M.E.

You can find more information on this topic on the website of the Faculty.

Strengths

The programme is generally perceived positively by alumni.

There are many elective courses, which gives freedom to develop an individual study programme tuned to the student’s interest. This fact is often mentioned by students and alumni as one of the strong points of the programme.

Since September 2014, the EC (Educational Committee) can rely on the expertise of the Industrial Advisory Board.

The programme is organised by the departments of computer science and electrical engineering. The students can use the computer infrastructure of both departments. The students become familiar with different fields of research which broadens their view.

This is an initial Master's programme and can be followed on a full-time or part-time basis.

Career perspectives

Many small, dynamic, young companies are active in the field of mathematical engineering. But even big players in materials, chemistry, automotive, aerospace, biomedical industries, as well as finance, are increasingly interested in mathematical engineering thanks to the ever increasing complexity of mathematical models and more stringent environmental standards and comfort expectations. Many of our young graduates start their careers in the R&D departments of high-tech companies or matriculate into one of the university’s PhD programmes.



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The School of Mathematics and Alliance Manchester Business School at the University of Manchester have combined their academic strength and practical expertise to deliver the  . Read more

The School of Mathematics and Alliance Manchester Business School at the University of Manchester have combined their academic strength and practical expertise to deliver the  MSc in Mathematical Finance  (UK 1 year), ensuring that students can experience both the mathematical and economic perspective of the subject.

This is also supported by invited lectures from senior staff members of leading financial institutions and outstanding mathematicians who are internationally recognised for contributions to Mathematical Finance. Past lectures include:

  • Professor M. Schweizer (ETH Zurich and Swiss Finance Institute) An overview of quadratic hedging and related topics
  • Professor H. Follmer (Humboldt University of Berlin) Monetary valuation of cash flows under Knightian uncertainty
  • Professor M. H. A. Davis (Imperial College London) Contagion models in credit risk

The course provides students with advanced knowledge and understanding of the main theoretical and applied concepts in Mathematical Finance delivered from a genuinely international and multi-cultural perspective with a current issues approach to teaching. The focus is on mathematical theory and modelling, drawing from the disciplines of probability theory, scientific computing and partial differential equations to derive relations between asset prices and interest rates, and to develop models for pricing, risk management and financial product development.

The finance industry demands recruits with strong quantitative skills and the course is intended to prepare students for careers in this area. The course provides training for those who seek a career in the finance industry specialising in derivative securities, investment, risk management and hedge funds. It also provides research skills for those who subsequently wish to pursue research and/or an academic career (e.g. university lecturer) or continue the study at doctoral level, particularly those wishing to pursue further/advanced studies in Mathematical Finance.

Coursework and assessment

Teaching is shared by the School of Mathematics and Alliance Manchester Business School, and delivered through lectures, case studies, seminars and group project-based work.

Course unit details

There are (i) eight course units to attend over two academic terms and (ii) a dissertation project to be completed in the summer term. Teaching of the course units is shared by the School of Mathematics and the Manchester Business School and delivered through lectures, case studies, seminars and group project-based work.

First term course units (autumn): Derivative Securities; Foundations of Finance Theory; Martingales with Applications to Finance; Stochastic Calculus.

Second term course units (spring): Brownian Motion; Computational Finance; Time Series Analysis and Forecasting in Finance; Stochastic Modelling in Finance.

Third term dissertation project (summer): In this term students will conduct an original study of a topic relating to the programme and write an MSc dissertation.

Additional fee information

The fees quoted above will be fully inclusive for the course tuition, administration and computational costs during your studies.

All fees for entry will be subject to yearly review and incremental rises per annum are also likely over the duration of courses lasting more than a year for UK/EU students (fees are typically fixed for International students, for the course duration at the year of entry). For general fees information please visit:  postgraduate fees . Always contact the department if you are unsure which fee applies to your qualification award and method of attendance.

Self-funded international applicants for this course will be required to pay a deposit of £1000 towards their tuition fees before a confirmation of acceptance for studies (CAS) is issued. This deposit will only be refunded if immigration permission is refused. We will notify you about how and when to make this payment.

Facilities

The School of Mathematics is one of the largest integrated departments of mathematical sciences in the UK with an outstanding reputation and superb  facilities .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The finance industry demands recruits with strong quantitative skills and the course is intended to prepare students for careers in this area. The course provides training for those who seek a career in the finance industry specialising in derivative securities, investment, risk management and hedge funds. It also provides research skills for those who subsequently wish to pursue research and/or an academic career (e.g. university lecturer) or continue the study at doctoral level, particularly those wishing to pursue further/advanced studies in Mathematical Finance.



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Who is it for?. To successfully complete this course, you must have a good understanding of mathematics. You may well have studied finance, economics, engineering or maths or physics as an undergraduate. Read more

Who is it for?

To successfully complete this course, you must have a good understanding of mathematics. You may well have studied finance, economics, engineering or maths or physics as an undergraduate. Or you might have a bachelor’s degree in a science subject, in particular computer science. You should have a general interest in mathematics and statistics.

You should have a general interest in learning the more technical and mathematical techniques used in financial markets, but you don’t need to have a background in finance.

Objectives

The difference between the MSc Mathematical Trading and Finance to the other two quants courses (MSc Financial Mathematics and MSc Quantitative Finance) are core modules which focus on quantitative trading and structuring.

You’ll study core modules which focus on the theory of finance and different financial assets. You will look at how these assets are priced and used for asset management or risk management purposes.

The second type of core modules cover the mathematical and statistical aspects needed in quantitative finance, including some stochastics. This also includes learning some programming languages, in particular Matlab, but also VBA.  Finally, Term three offers you flexibility within your masters; either by writing a dissertation or undertaking a project. You can complete your degree entirely choosing electives.

What will you learn

  • You will have learned a good understanding of the technical aspects used in financial
  • markets, starting from the financial theory, looking at different financial instruments and showing various applications of the theoretical concepts.
  • You will gain a good understanding of stochastics, mathematical finance and econometrics as well as some programming.
  • You will also obtain a very good understanding of different financial assets, in particular derivatives, and how they can be used in different context, such as risk management, asset management or structuring.
  • The MSc Mathematical Trading and Finance will also help you do understand the financial theory used in financial markets with an emphasis on practical applications.
  • You will three different possibilities to complete your degree in the third term, including writing a dissertation or an applied project.
  • You can also opt to get all the credits through taught electives. Popular
  • electives include Behavioural Finance, Trading and Hedging in the FOREX Market, Technical Analysis, Hedge Funds or Python.

Assessment

We review all our courses regularly to keep them up-to-date on issues of both theory and practice.

To satisfy the requirements of the degree course students must complete:

  • nine core courses (Eight at 15 credits each, one at 10 credits)

and either

  • five electives (10 credits each)
  • three electives (10 credits each) and an Applied Research Project (20 credits)
  • one elective (10 credits) and a Business Research Project (40 credits)

Assessment of modules on the MSc in Mathematical Trading and Finance in most cases, is by means of coursework and unseen examination. Coursework may consist of standard essays, individual and group presentations, group reports, classwork, unseen tests and problem sets. Please note that any group work may include an element of peer assessment.

Induction Weeks

The Mathematical Trading and Finance course starts with two compulsory induction weeks, focused on:

  • an introduction to careers in finance and the opportunity to speak to representatives from over 75 companies during a number of different industry specific fairs.
  • a reminder course of advanced financial mathematics, statistics and basic computing which forms a prerequisite of the core modules in term 1.

Career pathways

The job opportunities for students from the three quants Masters programmes are very similar. They usually find employment with large investment banks, but also some smaller boutique finance firms, hedge funds or other specialist companies.

Working as an analysis or quantitative analysts, in risk management, on fixed income security desks or in the asset management industry including hedge funds are typical jobs for students from the MSc Mathematical Trading and Finance. Some students also secure positions on trading desks.

You will also have the skills to study for a PhD in the area of quantitative finance and financial markets.



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Working at a frontier of mathematics that intersects with cutting edge research in physics. Mathematicians can benefit from discoveries in physics and conversely mathematics is essential to further excel in the field of physics. Read more

Working at a frontier of mathematics that intersects with cutting edge research in physics.

Mathematicians can benefit from discoveries in physics and conversely mathematics is essential to further excel in the field of physics. History shows us as much. Mathematical physics began with Christiaan Huygens, who is honoured at Radboud University by naming the main building of the Faculty of Science after him. By combining Euclidean geometry and preliminary versions of calculus, he brought major advances to these areas of mathematics as well as to mechanics and optics. The second and greatest mathematical physicist in history, Isaac Newton, invented both the calculus and what we now call Newtonian mechanics and, from his law of gravity, was the first to understand planetary motion on a mathematical basis.

Of course, in the Master’s specialisation in Mathematical Physics we look at modern mathematical physics. The specialisation combines expertise in areas like functional analysis, geometry, and representation theory with research in, for example, quantum physics and integrable systems. You’ll learn how the field is far more than creating mathematics in the service of physicists. It’s also about being inspired by physical phenomena and delving into pure mathematics.

At Radboud University, we have such faith in a multidisciplinary approach between these fields that we created a joint research institute: Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP). This unique collaboration has lead to exciting new insights into, for example, quantum gravity and noncommutative geometry. Students thinking of enrolling in this specialisation should be excellent mathematicians as well as have a true passion for physics.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/physics

Why study Mathematical Physics at Radboud University?

- This specialisation is one of the few Master’s in the world that lies in the heart of where mathematics and physics intersect and that examines their cross-fertilization.

- You’ll benefit from the closely related Mathematics Master’s specialisations at Radboud University in Algebra and Topology (and, if you like, also from the one in Applied Stochastics).

- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your thesis supervisor.

- You partake in the Mastermath programme, meaning you can follow the best mathematics courses, regardless of the university in the Netherlands that offers them. It also allows you to interact with fellow mathematic students all over the country.

- As a Master’s student you’ll get the opportunity to work closely with the mathematicians and physicists of the entire IMAPP research institute.

- More than 85% of our graduates find a job or a gain a PhD position within a few months of graduating. About half of our PhD’s continue their academic careers.

Career prospects

Mathematicians are needed in all industries, including the industrial, banking, technology and service industry and also within management, consultancy and education. A Master’s in Mathematics will show prospective employers that you have perseverance, patience and an eye for detail as well as a high level of analytical and problem-solving skills.

Job positions

The skills learned during your Master’s will help you find jobs even in areas where your specialised mathematical knowledge may initially not seem very relevant. This makes your job opportunities very broad indeed and is why many graduates of a Master’s in Mathematics find work very quickly.

Possible careers for mathematicians include:

- Researcher (at research centres or within corporations)

- Teacher (at all levels from middle school to university)

- Risk model validator

- Consultant

- ICT developer / software developer

- Policy maker

- Analyst

PhD positions

Radboud University annually has a few PhD positions for graduates of a Master’s in Mathematics. A substantial part of our students attain PhD positions, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our research in this field

The research of members of the Mathematical Physics Department, emphasise operator algebras and noncommutative geometry, Lie theory and representation theory, integrable systems, and quantum field theory. Below, a small sample of the research our members pursue.

Gert Heckman's research concerns algebraic geometry, group theory and symplectic geometry. His work in algebraic geometry and group theory concerns the study of particular ball quotients for complex hyperbolic reflection groups. Basic questions are an interpretation of these ball quotients as images of period maps on certain algebraic geometric moduli spaces. Partial steps have been taken towards a conjecture of Daniel Allcock, linking these ball quotients to certain finite almost simple groups, some even sporadic like the bimonster group.

Erik Koelink's research is focused on the theory of quantum groups, especially at the level of operator algebras, its representation theory and its connections with special functions and integrable systems. Many aspects of the representation theory of quantum groups are motivated by related questions and problems of a group representation theoretical nature.

Klaas Landsman's previous research programme in noncommutative geometry, groupoids, quantisation theory, and the foundations of quantum mechanics (supported from 2002-2008 by a Pioneer grant from NWO), led to two major new research lines:

1. The use of topos theory in clarifying the logical structure of quantum theory, with potential applications to quantum computation as well as to foundational questions.

2. Emergence with applications to the Higgs mechanism and to Schroedinger's Cat (aka as the measurement problem). A first paper in this direction with third year Honours student Robin Reuvers (2013) generated worldwide attention and led to a new collaboration with experimental physicists Andrew Briggs and Andrew Steane at Oxford and philosopher Hans Halvorson at Princeton.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/physics



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Postgraduate degree programme in Mathematical Modelling Masters/MSc. Most things in the real world are complex and difficult to understand, from biological systems to the financial markets to industrial processes, but explaining them is essential to making progress in the modern world. Read more

Postgraduate degree programme in Mathematical Modelling Masters/MSc:

Most things in the real world are complex and difficult to understand, from biological systems to the financial markets to industrial processes, but explaining them is essential to making progress in the modern world. Mathematical modelling is a fundamental tool in the challenge to understand many of these systems, and is an essential part of contemporary applied mathematics. By developing, analysing and interpreting mathematical and computational models we gain insight into these complex processes, as well as giving a framework in which to interpret experimental data. 

To fully capitalise on these tools, there is a fundamental need in both academic research and industry for a new generation of scientists trained to work at the interdisciplinary frontiers of mathematics and computation. These scientists require the ability to assimilate and understand information from other disciplines, communicate with and enthuse other researchers, as well as having the advanced mathematical and computational skills needed.

Course details

In the Autumn and Spring semesters, you will take masters-level courses in both advanced mathematical modelling and computation, in addition to the core interdisciplinary skills needed for a career in this field. In the summer you will undertake a research skills project, working with research leaders in a related area such as biosciences, systems biology, chemical engineering or medicine, alongside mathematics and computation. This will provide directly relevant training for a career in academic, industrial or clinical research, for example biotechnology, industrial engineering or the pharmaceutical industry. A key component will be training specifically in multidisciplinary research and communication, a vital skill for whichever career path the MSc leads you to. 

Related Links

Learning and teaching

In the Autumn and Spring semesters, you will take masters-level courses in both advanced mathematical modelling and computation, in addition to the core interdisciplinary skills needed for a career in this field. 

In the summer you will undertake a research skills project, working with research leaders in a related area such as biosciences, systems biology, chemical engineering or medicine, alongside mathematics and computation. This will provide directly relevant training for a career in academic, industrial or clinical research, for example biotechnology, industrial engineering or the pharmaceutical industry. 

A key component will be training specifically in multidisciplinary research and communication, a vital skill for whichever career path the MSc leads you to.

Employability

Career Opportunities

This course is tailored to train students for careers in scientific research, and for employment in a wide range of industrial contexts, for example biotechnology, industrial engineering or the pharmaceutical industry. There is a considerable need for scientists with a strong mathematical and computational background who can communicate with experimental scientists; this MSc will provide you with specialised training, and through your research skills project, evidence that you can work in this multidisciplinary context.

Further transferrable skills developed through this course include team-working, oral and written presentation, problem-solving and time-management, particularly developed through the summer research skills project. Additional careers support is available through the School of Mathematics and from the University's career support team.  



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Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance. Read more
Candidates who have a good undergraduate (BSc) degree or equivalent but whose mathematical background is insufficient for direct entry to the MSc programme may apply for a place on the conversion year for the MSc in Mathematical Finance.

A place on the conversion year is normally offered together with a conditional offer for the MSc in Mathematical Finance in the following year, subject to successfully completing the conversion year. The normal progression requirement for progression from the conversion year to the MSc in Mathematical Finance is a final weighted average at 2:1 level (60% or above) for the modules taken in the conversion year.

Programme structure

The conversion year consists of a selection of modules to the value of 120 credits being part of the undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Finance at the University of York, with emphasis on the mathematical aspects of the course. Module choice is subject to prerequisites, timetabling constraints, availability of modules, and is subject to approval by the programme director.

The available modules may vary from year to year but are likely to include:

Term 1 (Autumn)
-Calculus (30 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Algebra (20 credits) (continues into Spring and Summer Terms)
-Introduction to Probability and Statistics (20 credits)
-Statistics I (10 credits)
-Applied Probability (10 credits)
-Differential Equations (10 credits)
-Mathematical Finance I MAT00015H (10 credits)

Terms 2 and 3 (Spring and Summer Terms)
-Calculus (30 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Autumn, continues through Spring and completes in Summer Term)
-Introduction to Applied Mathematics (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Real Analysis (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Linear Algebra (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Vector Calculus (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Statistics II (20 credits) (starts in Spring Term, continues into Summer Term)
-Numerical Analysis (10 credits) (Spring Term only)
-Mathematical Finance II (10 credits) (Spring Term only)

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