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Masters Degrees (Materials Development)

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Prepare for, or further, your career in English language teaching. Learn the key concepts and theories in second language acquisition, and use them to create and test your own teaching materials. Read more
Prepare for, or further, your career in English language teaching. Learn the key concepts and theories in second language acquisition, and use them to create and test your own teaching materials.

Overview

Our course will help you to become a leader in language teaching, curriculum design and materials writing. You’ll gain a solid foundation in many aspects of applied linguistics, and teaching skills that will meet the needs of language learners from different ethnic, educational and socio-economic backgrounds.

Through lectures and seminars, you’ll be introduced to the key concepts and theories of language teaching, materials development and second language acquisition. You’ll use this knowledge to create original materials for different purposes, teaching contexts and modes of delivery, like literary, audio and visual media.

Thanks to our links with local organisations, you’ll meet experts from educational institutions and publishing houses, such as Cambridge Assessment and Cambridge University Press, who’ll be happy to talk to you about teaching methods and materials.

Throughout the course, you’ll also reflect critically on all aspects of your developing professional practice and discuss them with other students and our experienced team of lecturers.

Teaching times: Mondays and Thursdays from 6-8pm (full-time); Thursdays from 6-8pm (part-time).

See the website http://www.anglia.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/tesol-and-materials-development

Careers

This course will prepare you to start, or further, your career in many professions in the UK or internationally, including teaching English as a foreign/second language, materials writing, language consultancy, language curriculum design, language testing, teacher training and EFL/ESL publishing.

You’ll have the knowledge and skills to supply global publishers with high-quality materials for local English as a Foreign Language (EFL) markets, such as China, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, Nigeria and Mexico. You’ll also be able to produce e-learning materials for the worldwide education and training industry.

Core modules

Materials and Course Design
Selection and Evaluation of Instructional Materials
Classroom Theory and Practice
The Process of Materials Writing
Major Project

Assessment

You’ll show your progress through a combination of essays, presentations, observation reports, projects and portfolios. For the Major Project at the end of the course, you’ll produce a critical review of relevant literature, a collection of original teaching materials and a reflection on your professional practice/development.

Events

You’ll be able to attend the regular guest lectures held by our Research Unit for Intercultural and Transcultural Studies (RUITS), which explore issues around language and multiculturalism. We also host research seminars and conferences, like the Identity in Language conference in 2014 and the 2016 BAAL conference, which you can attend or contribute to.

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Materials are substances or things from which something is or can be made. Technological development is often based on the development of new materials. Read more
Materials are substances or things from which something is or can be made. Technological development is often based on the development of new materials. Materials research plays an important part in solving challenging problems relating to energy, food, water, health and well-being, the environment, sustainable use of resources, and urbanisation.

An expert in materials research studies the chemical and physical bases of existing and new materials; their synthesis and processing, composition and structure, properties and performance. As an expert in materials research, your skills will be needed in research institutions, the technology industry (electronics and electrotechnical industry, information technology, mechanical engineering, metal industry, consulting), chemical industry, forest industry, energy industry, medical technology and pharmaceuticals.

This programme combines expertise from the areas of chemistry, physics and materials research at the University of Helsinki, which are ranked high in international evaluations. In the programme, you will focus on the fundamental physical and chemical problems in synthesising and characterising materials, developing new materials and improving existing ones. Your studies will concentrate on materials science rather than materials engineering.

Upon graduating from the programme you will have a solid understanding of the essential concepts, theories, and experimental methods of materials research. You will learn the different types of materials and will be able to apply and adapt theories and experimental methods to new problems in the field and assess critically other scientists’ work. You will also be able to communicate information in your field to both colleagues and laymen.

Depending on the study line you choose you will gain in-depth understanding of:
-The synthesis, processing, structure and properties of inorganic materials.
-Modelling methods in materials research.
-The structure and dynamics of biomolecular systems.
-The synthesis, structure and properties of polymers.
-Applications of materials research in industrial applications.
-The use of methods of physics in medicine.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

In the programme, all teaching is based on the teachers’ solid expertise in the fundamental chemistry and physics of materials. All teachers also use their own current research in the field in their teaching.

Your studies will include a variety of teaching methods such as lectures, exercises, laboratory work, projects and summer schools.

In addition to your major subject, you can include studies in minor subjects from other programmes in chemistry, physics and computer science.

Selection of the Major

At the beginning of your studies you will make a personal study plan, with the help of teaching staff, where you choose your study line. This programme has the following six study lines representing different branches of materials research.

Experimental Materials Physics
Here you will study the properties and processing of a wide variety of materials using experimental methods of physics to characterise and process them. In this programme the materials range from the thin films used in electronics components, future fusion reactor materials, and energy materials to biological and medical materials. The methods are based on different radiation species, mostly X-rays and ion beams.

Computational Materials Physics
In this study line you will use computer simulations to model the structures, properties and processes of materials, both inorganic materials such as metals and semiconductors, and biological materials such as cell membranes and proteins. You will also study various nanostructures. The methods are mostly atomistic ones where information is obtained with atomic level precision. Supercomputers are often needed for the calculations. Modelling research is closely connected with the experimental work related to the other study lines.

Medical Physics
Medical physics is a branch of applied physics encompassing the concepts, principles and methodology of the physical sciences to medicine in clinics. Primarily, medical physics seeks to develop safe and efficient diagnosis and treatment methods for human diseases with the highest quality assurance protocols. In Finland most medical physicists are licensed hospital physicists (PhD or Phil.Lic).

Polymer Materials Chemistry
In this line you will study polymer synthesis and characterisation methods. One of the central questions in polymer chemistry is how the properties of large molecules depend on the chemical structure and on the size and shape of the polymer. The number of applications of synthetic polymers is constantly increasing, due to the development of polymerisation processes as well as to better comprehension of the physical properties of polymers.

Inorganic Materials Chemistry
Thin films form the most important research topic in inorganic materials chemistry. Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is the most widely studied deposition method. The ALD research covers virtually all areas related to ALD: precursor synthesis and characterisation, film growth and characterisation, reaction mechanism studies, and the first steps of taking the processes toward applications. The emphasis has been on thin film materials needed in future generation integrated circuits, but applications of ALD in energy technologies, optics, surface engineering and biomaterials are also being studied. Other thin film deposition techniques studied include electrodeposition, SILAR (successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction) and sol-gel. Nanostructured materials are prepared either directly (fibres by electrospinning and porous materials by anodisation) or by combining these or other templates with thin film deposition techniques.

Electronics and Industrial Applications
Sound and light are used both to sense and to actuate across a broad spectrum of disciplines employing samples ranging from red hot steel to smooth muscle fibres. Particular interest is in exploiting the link between the structure and mechanics of the samples. The main emphasis is on developing quantitative methods suitable for the needs of industry. To support these goals, research concentrates on several applied physics disciplines, the main areas being ultrasonics, photoacoustics, fibre optics and confocal microscopy.

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Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?. Read more
Would you like to develop the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector?

The MSc International Development course will equip you with a critical and up-to-date understanding of this broad sector.

You will engage with contemporary debates on the issues that are currently defining the sector, whilst critically examining key international development policies, theories, strategies and practices. You will also analyse the operation of development organisations, and the ways in which individuals and communities experience and challenge poverty and marginalisation.

As part of your dissertation, you will have the opportunity to undertake a research placement to allow you to apply your knowledge in a real-world environment.

This course is delivered by our specialist teaching team, who draw on their extensive experience to ensure that you graduate with knowledge that is at the forefront of the sector.

Our relationship with the MSc International Development programme at Northumbria University gives COCO the opportunity to tap into the minds of students who are up to speed on current development thinking and possess the drive and determination to help us expand our research. The findings from university research projects are invaluable, allowing us to monitor and evaluate our work, learn from each project and put this learning into action to deliver more robust and effective programmes year on year. - Lucy Philipson, CEO COCO

This course has several available start dates and learning methods - for more information, please view the relevant web-page:
January full time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtfitd6/

September part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/international-development-dtpitz6/

January part time - https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/msc-international-development-dtpitd6/

Learn From The Best

This course is delivered by a team of internationally-recognised academics with extensive experience in international development research and practice across the global south.

Our staff research specialisms and diverse range of national and international practitioner links will further enhance your learning experience.

In addition to the teaching delivered by our team, you will have the opportunity to attend enhancement sessions on ‘Working in International Development’, where experts who are currently working within the industry will share their first-hand experience of what it’s like to work in the sector.

We also work with the Centre for International Development to provide additional opportunities for real-world engagement with key organisations and individuals.

Teaching And Assessment

This course examines a wide range of subjects such as conflict and security, civil society and non-government organisations (NGOs), the impacts of China and India’s rising economic power, gender, the environment and resource conflicts, advocacy and citizenship.

On graduation you will be able to understand and critically engage with key development theories, tools and techniques, including participatory methodologies, rights-based approaches and monitoring and evaluation strategies.

This course is delivered via interactive workshops, involving a mixture of small group discussion, lectures, and seminar activities, which are further supported by networking and placement opportunities.

The assessment methods utilised on this course have been specifically developed to prepare you for employment, and incorporate the writing of funding bids, policy briefs, stakeholder statements and academic poster presentations. Traditional essays and a dissertation also form part of the assessment process.

If you choose to do a placement, you will have the opportunity to develop your own real-world research project.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
SO7001 - Advanced Study Skills (Core, 0 Credits)
SO7002 - Social Sciences Postgraduate Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
SO7005 - Development Research, Management and Practice (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7006 - Critical Development Thinking (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7007 - Changing Geopolitics and New Development Actors (Core, 30 Credits)
SO7008 - Contemporary Development Challenges (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

When studying the MSc International Development course you will be part of the Centre for International Development – a vibrant, multidisciplinary virtual research centre that provides an engaging, supportive and research-rich learning environment.

The Centre brings together academics, practitioners and students to promote research, consultancy, teaching, training and public engagement on issues of global poverty and inequality, the communities and individuals who experience this, and the policies, practices and approaches that seek to address it.

Technology is embedded throughout all areas of this course. Learning materials such as module handbooks, assessment information, lecture presentation slides and reading lists are available via our innovative e-learning platform, Blackboard. You can also access student support and other key University systems through your personal account.

Research-Rich Learning

When studying the MSc International Development course you will benefit from our multidisciplinary teaching team’s cutting-edge research experience which they bring into the classroom through case studies, problem-solving activities and group discussion.

Research is integrated into all aspects of teaching and each member of our team boasts their own individual specialisms, in subjects such as environmental governance and development; natural resource conflicts, including anti-mining activism; public engagement and development education; cosmopolitanism and global citizenship; wellbeing and development; international volunteering; transnationalism, migrant mobilities and their impacts on development. Staff research expertise spans Africa, Asia and Latin America.

All members of the MSc International Development teaching team are internationally recognised academics who publish in high impact international journals and regularly receive research funding from prestigious organisations such as the ESRC, the British Academy, the Leverhulme Trust and the Newton Fund.

You are also encouraged to undertake your own research projects to further aid your learning and will have the opportunity to engage with development organisations such as Traidcraft, Lifeworlds Learning, Shared Interest Foundation, and COCO, as well as development NGOs working in India and Latin America.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course has been designed to enhance your employability in international development practice and research thanks to the diverse range of knowledge and skills you will acquire whilst you study.

You will regularly engage in real-world research and problem-solving, in addition to developing the practical skills required to successfully pursue a career in this sector.

Core employability skills are also embedded throughout all aspects of this degree, ensuring you leave with skills that can be transferred to a broad spectrum of organisations.

Completion of an optional research placement will also help to further enhance your career edge by providing you with industry contacts and experience of international development in a real-world environment. You will also benefit from bespoke careers development support throughout the programme.

Your Future

On graduation you will possess the specialist skills and knowledge required to work in a range of careers across the international development sector.

Our graduates are able to work in a broad range organisations such as charities and third sector organisations, UK and international government agencies, NGOs and international organisations. They may also wish to pursue careers in research, consultancy or to launch their own NGO.

The MSc International Development course will also prepare you for doctoral study should you wish to further advance your learning.

Former graduates have gone on to work for national and international organisations including Barnardo’s, Leprosy Mission, and International Service.

The MSc International Development course regularly attracts students from a wide variety of professional and disciplinary backgrounds including government, the private sector and NGOs. It is also popular with continuing students who have just graduated from a wide range of undergraduate programmes, including Social Sciences, Law, Human Geography and Business.

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We provide academic and professional development for English language teachers looking for career advancement. This includes innovative teaching, curriculum and creative materials development, teacher education or training and other teaching-related activities. Read more
We provide academic and professional development for English language teachers looking for career advancement. This includes innovative teaching, curriculum and creative materials development, teacher education or training and other teaching-related activities.

You will gain practical classroom experience, hands-on development of multimedia resources and materials development. There is the opportunity to pursue a specialism, such as ESOL, English for Academic Purposes, Teaching English to Young Learners or teacher training.

We currently offer two routes of study:

- Route One

This route is designed for experienced English language teachers, who are native speakers or have a high level of English. It will offer you professional training and development (including teaching practice) and can include entry for the widely recognised Delta qualification. If you already have the Delta or an equivalent qualification you can enter directly into semester two of this route or study with us by distance learning in September or January, with an expected completion time of approximately 18 months.

- Route Two

This route will offer you practical classroom experience, observation and language awareness for teaching purposes. It is designed for native and non-native speakers of English with some experience of, or an interest in, English language teaching. You can study this course full-time, part-time or distance learning in September or by distance learning starting in January, and you can expect to complete the course in approximately two and a half years.

- Teaching and Learning

Learning will take place through seminars, small group and individual tutorials, as well as independent learning. The course will include practical classroom experience and hands-on development of multi-media resources for English language teaching.

- Assessment

The assessments on the course aim to reflect real-life tasks for English language teaching professionals and include practical assignments such as developing resources, writing journal articles, giving conference presentations, reflecting on practice and analysing texts or language. The dissertation module involves a practical or research project related to English language teaching with a report or rationale. Route 1/Delta students will also complete the Cambridge ESOL assessments for Delta modules 1-3.

- Research Excellence Framework 2014: twice as many of our staff - 220 - were entered into the research assessment for 2014 compared to the number entered in 2008.

Visit the website http://courses.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/elt_ma

Mature Applicants

Our University welcomes applications from mature applicants who demonstrate academic potential. We usually require some evidence of recent academic study, for example completion of an access course, however recent relevant work experience may also be considered. Please note that for some of our professional courses all applicants will need to meet the specified entry criteria and in these cases work experience cannot be considered in lieu.

If you wish to apply through this route you should refer to our University Recognition of Prior Learning policy that is available on our website (http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/studenthub/recognition-of-prior-learning.htm).

Please note that all applicants to our University are required to meet our standard English language requirement of GCSE grade C or equivalent, variations to this will be listed on the individual course entry requirements.

Careers

On successful completion of this course you will have the skills and experience to be an effective English language teacher or to enter or gain promotion in a range of careers. These include teaching, publishing and other educational management roles.You can also choose to remain in education and obtain a PhD in a related area.

- English Language Teacher
- Materials Writer
- Director of Studies or other educational manager
- Teacher Educator

Careers advice:
The dedicated Jobs and Careers team offers expert advice and a host of resources to help you choose and gain employment. Whether you're in your first or final year, you can speak to members of staff from our Careers Office who can offer you advice from writing a CV to searching for jobs.

Visit the careers site - https://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/employability/jobs-careers-support.htm

Course Benefits

Our highly qualified and expert team have many years of experience successfully training teachers and developing innovative materials including a range of multimedia resources.

English Language Teaching at Leeds Beckett University is an approved Cambridge Delta Centre. This highly renowned professional qualification confers TEFLQ status as defined by the British Council accreditation scheme.

Modules

- Students on Route one will study:

Understanding Language, Methodology & Resources for Teaching (Delta Module one, 20 credits):
This will include first and second language acquisition; approaches and methods; and learner error and error analysis. (This module is not available for online learning)

Developing Professional Practice (Delta Module two, 20 credits):
This covers the following topics of teaching practice; lesson observation; evaluating, selecting and using resources and materials; and professional development. (This module is not available for online learning)

Extending Practice & ELT Specialism (Delta Module three, 20 credits):
This will look into researching a specialist area; course/ syllabus design; testing and assessment; and monitoring and evaluating courses.

Multimedia Resources & Independent Learning (20 credits):
You will learn about learner autonomy; virtual learning environments; and web-based technologies.

Materials Development (20 credits):
You will learn about issues such as materials evaluation and adaptation; authenticity; cultural considerations; and task design.

Methodology in Context (20 credits):
This area covers world English; intercultural awareness; sociolinguistics; English for academic purposes; English for young learners; English for specific purposes; and curriculum and syllabus.

Research in English Language Teaching (20 credits):
This will include research theories and methods; qualitative and quantitative research; and interpreting and analysing data. You will undertake a research project.

Dissertation (40 credits):
This double module involves either producing a practical project such as a set of materials; a corpus; a teacher training course; a syllabus or conducting a primary research project.

- Students on Route two will study:

Language Awareness (20 credits):
This will cover lexis; grammar; discourse analysis; phonology; and analysing language and texts for teaching purposes.

Methodology & Second Language Acquisition (20 credits):
You will learn about communicative language teaching; task-based learning; language content and integrated learning; lexical approach; total physical response; text-based approaches; language skills and strategies; and second language learning and acquisition.

Classroom Practice (20 credits):
This will include classroom observation; professional development; classroom management; lesson planning; and micro-teaching.

Multimedia Resources & Independent Learning (20 credits):
This will explore learner autonomy; virtual learning environments; and web-based technologies.

Materials Development (20 credits):
You will learn about issues such as materials evaluation and adaptation; authenticity; cultural considerations; and task design.

Methodology in Context (20 credits):
This subject will cover world English; intercultural awareness; sociolinguistics; English for academic purposes; English for young learners; English for specific purposes; and curriculum and syllabus.

Research in English Language Teaching (20 credits):
You will learn about research theories and methods; qualitative and quantitative research; and interpreting and analysing data.

Dissertation (40 credits):
This double module involves either producing a practical project such as a set of materials; a corpus; a teacher training course; a syllabus or conducting a primary research project.

Facilities

- Libraries
Our libraries are two of the only university libraries in the UK open 24/7 every day of the year. However you like to study, the libraries have got you covered with group study, silent study, extensive e-learning resources and PC suites.

- Dedicated Support Team
A highly-skilled and dedicated support team whose job is to work with you through every step of your online learning.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.leedsbeckett.ac.uk/postgraduate/how-to-apply/

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Materials Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Materials Engineering at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

Engineering at Swansea University has key research strengths in materials for aerospace applications and steel technology. As a student on the Master's course in Materials Engineering, you will be provided with the depth of knowledge and breadth of abilities to meet the demands of the international materials industry.

Key Features of MSc in Materials Engineering

Through the MSc Materials Engineering course you will be provided with training and experience in a broad range of topic areas, including metallurgy and materials selection, modern methods used for engineering design and analysis, the relationship between structure, processing and properties for a wide range of materials, materials and advanced composite materials, structural factors that control the mechanical properties of materials, and modern business management issues and techniques.

The MSc Materials Engineering course is an excellent route for those who have a first degree in any scientific or technical subject and would like to become qualified in this field of materials engineering.

MSc in Materials Engineering programme is modular in structure. Students must obtain a total of 180 credits to qualify for the degree. This is made up of 120 credits in the taught element (Part One) and a project (Part Two) that is worth 60 credits and culminates in a written dissertation. Students must successfully complete Part One before being allowed to progress to Part Two.

The part-time scheme is a version of the full-time equivalent MSc scheme, and as such it means lectures are spread right across each week and you may have lectures across every day. Due to this timetabling format, the College advises that the scheme is likely to suit individuals who are looking to combine this with other commitments (typically family/caring) and who are looking for a less than full-time study option.

Those candidates seeking to combine the part-time option with full-time work are unlikely to find the timetable suitable, unless their job is extremely flexible and local to the Bay Campus.

Modules

Modules on the MSc Materials Engineering course can vary each year but you could expect to study:

Composite Materials
Polymer Processing
Environmental Analysis and Legislation
Communication Skills for Research Engineers
Simulation Based Product Design
Aerospace Materials Engineering
Structural Integrity of Aerospace Metals
Ceramics
Environmental Analysis and Legislation
Physical Metallurgy of Steels

Accreditation

The MSc Materials Engineering course at Swansea University is accredited by the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3).

This degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree.

Accreditation is a mark of assurance that the degree meets the standards set by the Engineering Council in the UK Standard for Professional Engineering Competence (UK-SPEC). An accredited degree will provide you with some or all of the underpinning knowledge, understanding and skills for eventual registration as an Incorporated (IEng) or Chartered Engineer (CEng). Some employers recruit preferentially from accredited degrees, and an accredited degree is likely to be recognised by other countries that are signatories to international accords.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

Within Engineering at Swansea University there are state-of-the-art facilities specific to Materials Engineering.

- Comprehensive computer systems for specialist and general purposes.
- World-leading equipment for characterisation of the mechanical properties of metallic, ceramic, polymeric and composite materials.
- Extensive range of laboratories housing scanning electron microscopes with full microanalysis and electron backscatter diffraction capabilities.

Careers

Materials engineering underpins almost all engineering applications and employment prospects are excellent.

Employment can be found in a very wide range of sectors, ranging from large-scale materials production through to R&D in highly specialised advanced materials in industries that include aerospace, automotive, manufacturing, sports, and energy generation, as well as consultancy and advanced research.

Materials engineering knowledge is vital in many fields and our graduates go on to successful careers in research and development, product design, production management, marketing, finance, teaching and the media, and entrepreneurship.

Links with Industry

The internationally leading materials research conducted at Swansea is funded by prestigious organisations including:

Rolls-Royce
Airbus
Tata Steel

Rolls-Royce

The Institute of Structural Materials at Swansea is a core member of the Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre in Materials.

This venture supports a wide ranging research portfolio with a rolling value of £6.5 million per annum addressing longer term materials issues.

Airbus

Over £1m funding has been received from Airbus and the Welsh Government in the last three years to support structural composites research and development in the aerospace industry and to support composites activity across Wales.

Tata Steel

Funding of over £6 million to continue our very successful postgraduate programmes with Tata Steel.

Other companies sponsoring research projects include Akzo Nobel, Axion Recycling, BAE Systems, Bayer, Cognet, Ford, HBM nCode, Jaguar Land Rover, Novelis, QinetiQ, RWE Innogy, Timet, TWI (Wales), as well as many smaller companies across the UK.

These industrial research links provide excellent opportunities for great research and employment opportunities.

Research

The Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 ranks Engineering at Swansea as 10th in the UK for the combined score in research quality across the Engineering disciplines.

The REF assesses the quality of research in the UK Higher Education sector, assuring us of the standards we strive for.

The REF shows that 94% of research produced by our academic staff is of World-Leading (4*) or Internationally Excellent (3*) quality. This has increased from 73% in the 2008 RAE.

Research pioneered at the College of Engineering harnesses the expertise of academic staff within the department. This ground-breaking multidisciplinary research informs our world-class teaching with several of our staff leaders in their fields.

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The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is for students who want to analyse and work on social change for the working poor in developing countries. It is highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work on labour and labour-related social movements in development agencies and NGOs, labour and solidarity movements, corporate social responsibility initiatives, and to activists in both developed and developing countries. We welcome students with a strong background in the social sciences in their first degree, as well as practitioners and professionals working in the areas of development, labour and employment relations, social movements and other related fields.

A unique Programme

This innovative new programme offers students the opportunity to study labour conditions and relations, social movements of labour and their contributions to development processes and changes in the South. It is the first and only MSc programme in the UK dedicated to Labour, Social Movements and Development. It provides a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty. It investigates labour in contemporary social and economic development of the South as well as classic and newly emerging social movements of labour in local, national and international spaces. Students will also have the opportunity to experience labour campaigns and policy-making in practice by participating in our interactive sessions on designing and implementing international, regional and national labour campaigns and policies. The MSc draws on the expertise of Department of Development Studies staff in labour, social movements and development in Latin America, Africa and Asia, and on our contacts within such movements, as well as with NGOs and international organisations.

The MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development explores different theories and methods for the study of the working poor in the South, and offers a critical examination of the links between labour, capitalism, development and poverty, and of the role of social movements and international initiatives for labour.

Highlights include:

- Labour process and organisations: development trajectories and divisions in the South

- A comparative history of labour and social movements in countries such as China, Korea, India, South Africa, Brazil and the Middle East

- Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives, codes of conduct and anti-sweatshop campaigning

- The impact of neoliberalism and globalisation on workers in the South

- Informalisation of labour, casualization and precarious work

- Feminisation of labour

- The worst forms of exploitation: forced labour and child labour

- Rural labour, migrant labour and labour in Export Processing Zones

- Household and reproductive labour

- The International Labour Organisation, international labour standards and decent work

- Practices and theories of local, national and international labour campaigns.

The unique regional expertise at SOAS allows students of the MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development to specialise in some of the most dynamic parts of the developing world. The programme’s emphasis on transferable analytical skills will be of great benefit to graduates who return to, or take up, professional careers in international organisations, government agencies and non-governmental organisations and movements. Students also benefit from the wide range of modules on offer, both within the department and across the School, allowing them to create individualised interdisciplinary programmes.

The department has a Labour, Movements and Development research cluster (http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/research/labour/) which carries out research activities linked to labour, social movements and development.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Labour, Social Movements and Development. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and potentially to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 79kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-labour-social-movements-and-development/file101781.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Labour, Social Movements and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Labour, Social Movements and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Materials have always played a significant and defining role in human development, from the Stone Age to the material world of today. Read more
Materials have always played a significant and defining role in human development, from the Stone Age to the material world of today. Materials are central to our prosperity and new materials hold the key to our future development. Material engineers therefore have an essential role in developing the materials of today and the future and in taking performance to the next level.

Programme description

Material related issues can be found in all areas of life and engineering e.g. in biomedical, telecommunications, aeronautical, construction, chemical and mechanical, and in all aspects of a products life, from an idea or discovery to a prototype or finished product and recycling. In the puzzle of innovation, material engineers focus on the application of materials, where they test, develop and modify materials that are used in a wide range of products, from jet engines and snow skis to smartphones and diapers.

The ultimate performance of most products and processes is limited by the performance of materials, which are linked to the structure and resulting properties of a material. This in turn is affected by how the material is manufactured and processed. Materials must also perform in an economical and societal context. The challenge for the materials engineer lies in understanding the relationship between these aspects of materials, to improve their properties and to communicate these findings.

In addition, materials science and engineering is a key technology for environmentally sustainable development, and the importance of materials engineering is therefore growing in society.

The overall aim of the Materials Engineering Master’s programme is to offer both depth and flexibility in a comprehensive materials education focused on the application of materials. Courses are closely linked to the industry as well as contemporary research; the degree you receive here will have a wide application.

You will become an engineer of reality, a problem finder and developer both in theory and practice and besides becoming an expert on materials, you will also represent a bridge between researchers and constructors.

Educational methods

Contemporary challenges in materials cut across the traditional lines of engineering and science. Methods of modern materials engineering rely on the mix of competence and knowledge, presence where the problems occur, effective testing and model building. This is reflected in the education, which provides for example advanced experimental equipment, modern software for materials simulation applied on real material problems. In labs, with real life problems provided by the industry, you will learn through a make and brake pedagogy, exploring the limits of new materials and concepts through experiments in both theory and practice. We also emphasise that interdisciplinary intercultural international communication and teamwork are essential parts in successful projects.

Courses are run by faculty from departments of Materials and Manufacturing, Chemical and Biological engineering, applied Mechanics, Microtechnology and nanoscience, and applied Physics. Courses cover metals, ceramics, polymers and composites as well as topics of particular current interest in industry, such as material selection and design, environmental adaptation, failure analysis or materials innovation processes.

As a student, you will gain knowledge and skills to handle the complexity of materials problems and to find solutions to problems within the entire chain of a product from design, manufacturing and use to recycling. You will learn how to understand failures, select materials, develop processes and develop properties, making processes more efficient, cost-competitive, reliable and environmentally sustainable.

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The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The Violence, Conflict and Development programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of development and/or conflict, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs.

As the pioneering programme of its kind internationally, this MSc programme develops detailed empirical knowledge and analytical skills for understanding the complex linkages between violent conflict and development, both historically and today. It enables students to explore these linkages both within specific country and regional contexts and in the context of global interdependencies and the ways these affect peace, war, and non-war violence.

The programme introduces students to competing analytical approaches. It is multi-disciplinary though shaped by a particular interest in political economy. It encourages deep case study knowledge. And it offers students the ability to tailor their choice of optional courses and dissertation research to their own interests.

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

The programme is of interest for development practitioners, activists, and students with a scholarly interest in the patterns of violence internationally, in how violence affects development, and in how the uneven processes of development themselves may both generate violence and generate mechanisms for containing violence.

Highlights include:

- Zoe's Blog! (http://vcd-soas.blogspot.co.uk/) A convenor's-eye view of the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme

- Exploration of the long history of theories of human violence

- Relationships between violence and long-run historical change

- The concept of a continuum of violence

- The relevance of historical and more recent evidence that the process of structural change involved in ‘development’ is inherently conflictual and often violent

- To what extent democratisation is a mechanism for securing perpetual peace

- The challenges of understanding gender based violence

- Whether abundant natural resources, or high levels of inequality, or clear markers of religious or ethnic difference are clear sources of violent conflict

- How highly localised violent conflicts are connected to processes of global economic development

- The challenges of post-conflict reconstruction and ‘war to peace transitions’

- The role of NGOs in causes of, dynamics of, and responses to conflict

- Explaining the prevalence of high levels of non-war violence

- Explanations of the political economy of – and alternative perspectives on – terrorism

- Students can draw on SOAS's unique expertise to specialise further in particular regions or topics. Please see Postgraduate modules for details on core and optional modules.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Political Economy of Violence, Conflict and Development. They then select one of three ‘development’ modules: Political Economy of Development; Theory, Policy and Practice of Development; or Anthropology of Development. Through these modules, students build their analytical skills and their knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students put together a group case study presentation.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full unit module or two half-unit modules). By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 97kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/mscviolconfdev/file101806.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars and supervised individual study projects.

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Students are encouraged to take up topics which relate the study of a particular region to a body of theory.

Employment

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include analytical skills, presentation skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates from MsC Violence, Conflict & Development have gone on to work in a range of different organisations, including Development and Human Rights Organisations, and many have continuted in the field of research.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work, in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs and students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.The programme attracts applicants with a variety of academic and working backgrounds. We welcome those who have worked in the field of migration and / or development, but we also welcome applications from students without relevant work experience who can demonstrate a strong interest in the major themes of the programme and a strong first degree, preferably in a social science.

This innovative new programme in the Department of Development Studies offers students the opportunity to combine study and analysis of critical perspectives on development and the increasingly important and related field of migration studies.

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will focus attention on the political economy of migration from a historical perspective, major trends in migration theories, and different forms of and approaches to the study of migration and displacement. The programme draws on the expertise of staff in development, migration and forced migration contexts from the Development Studies department, and encourages inter-disciplinary dialogue with other relevant departments and centres within SOAS.

The programme’s 20-week core modules will focus on the migration–development nexus, broadly conceived and defined. It will also expose students to a range of interlocking theoretical approaches which set out to account for constructions of and responses to migration and migrants, as well as to the scope and scale of migratory processes. Broadly, Term 1 provides analysis of the institutional, political, social and economic contexts where migration takes place and considers differentiated/mitigated effects. Term 2 builds on this to discuss types of migration via case study and other material, placing more emphasis on migrants’ perspectives and how these are mitigated by ‘contexts’.

Topics and themes include:

Sedentarism and the study of migration
Polities & economies of migration
Colonialism
Nations, states and territory
Globalisation
(Illegal) workers in the global economy
Place and emplacement
Assimilation/acculturation/discrimination
Transnational migrants & mobile lives
Trafficking
Development and migration
Diasporas and development
Refugees and internally displaced persons
Development-induced displacement
Environment and refugees/displacement
Climate change-related migration
Policy responses to migration
Transformations North and South

The MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development will provide a thorough analytical grounding in international migration including different types of forced and voluntary migration, facilitating the development of specialized knowledge of particular case studies, as well as overall trends and theoretical frameworks. A rigorous academic programme, it will also give students the confidence to think in policy relevant terms and will be equally valuable to those proceeding to professional employment in the sector with international organizations, NGOs and government bodies, and for students intending to go on to carry out PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/

Structure

- Overview
There are four main components to this degree: three taught modules and a 10,000 word dissertation. All students take a core module, Migration, Mobility and Development. A distinctive feature of the core module is that students work together in small groups to produce a migration related research report. They then select one of two further modules: Political Economy of Development or Theory, Policy and Practice of Development. Through these modules students build their analytical skills and knowledge of the main issues and debates in Development Studies.

- Specialisation
Students also take optional modules (one full module or two half modules), allowing them to specialise in particular areas of development and possibly use them to develop a dissertation in a related theme. By tying these to their individual dissertation topic, students design their degree to suit their own interests and career development goals.

Students should be aware that not all optional modules may run in a given year. Modules at other institutions are not part of the approved programme structure.

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 78kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/prog/file101784.pdf

Materials

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

The MSc programme consists of three taught modules (corresponding to three examination papers) and a dissertation. Courses are taught by a combination of methods, principally lectures, tutorial classes, seminars, collaborative research projects and supervised individual study projects.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a two hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Seminars

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work. Students make full-scale presentations for each unit that they take, and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

A quarter of the work for the degree is given over to the writing of an adequately researched 10,000-word dissertation. Dissertation work requires students to make use of theoretical and empirical material and relate this to a migration related topic.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Migration, Mobility and Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Migration, Mobility and Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. Read more

About the programme

The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. The first year of courses is taught at the ULB Engineering Campus in Brussels, while the second year is taught at VUB.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering educates students to become innovative engineers who will contribute to their profession and to society. Engineers in chemistry and materials play a unique role in sustainable development, where they must manage resources, energy and the environment in order to develop and produce novel materials and chemical commodities. Our graduates are prepared to face the demands of the modern technological employment field and for an international career with English as their professional language.

Course content

The Master in Chemical and Material Engineering (120 ECTS) offers a solid core of courses in both of these engineering fields. The integrated and the multidisciplinary approach provides students up-to-date knowledge enabling them to propose innovative engineering solutions in numerous modern technological sectors. Students have the possibility to specialize in Process technology or Material Science.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering program consists of two profiles: Process Technology and Materials.

Profile: Process Technology:
The Process Technology orientation trains students to become engineers who are employable and innovative both in production units (operation and optimization of production facilities) and in engineering groups (develop new production units that meet desired performance specifications). An emphasis is placed on the biotechnology and food industries. Students are also trained to identify, solve and avoid environmental problems including waste management, water, air and soil pollution.

Profile: Materials:
The Materials orientation prepares students for the materials and materials technology sectors (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites). Students are trained to become creative engineers capable of designing sustainable multi-functional materials which meet specific applications. Students also have the capacity to contribute to the whole life-cycle of materials from their processing into semi or full end products using environmentally friendly and safe production processes to their recycling.

Become a skilled scientific engineer

This Master offers:
- a unique interdisciplinary programme which prepares you for employment in a professional field related to chemical engineering, materials or environmental technology.
- a high level scientific education that prepares you to a wide range of job profiles.
- the possibility to work in close contact with professors who are internationally recognized in their own disciplines and favor interactive learning.

Curriculum

http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/chemical-and-materials-engineering/programme

The programme is built up modularly:
1) the Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS)
2) the Specific Profile Courses (30 ECTS)
3) the master thesis (24 ECTS)
4) electives (10 ECTS) from 1 out of 3 options.
Each of the modules should be succesfully completed to obtain the master degree. The student must respect the specified registration requirements. The educational board strongly suggests the student to follow the standard learning track. Only this model track can guarantee a timeschedule without overlaps of the compulsory course units.

Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering:
The Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS) is spread over 2 years: 46 ECTS in the first and 10 ECTS in the second year. The Common Core emphasizes the interaction between process- and materials technology by a chemical (molecular) approach. The Common Core consists out of courses related to chemistry, process technology and materials and is the basis for the Process Technology and the Materials profiles.

Specific Courses Profile Materials:
The profile 'Materials' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Materials I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Materials II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds material-technological courses to the common core.

Specific Courses Profile Process Technology:
The profile 'Process Technology' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Process Technology I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Process Technology II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds process technological courses to the common core.

Elective Courses:
The elective courses are divided into 3 options:
- Option 1: Internship (10 ECTS)
- Option 2: Elective courses (incl. internship of 6 ECTS)
- Option 3: Entrepreneurship
The student has to select one option and at least 10 ECTS within that option. All options belong to the 2nd year of the model learning track.

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of both development practitioners and researchers on international development, including those wishing to pursue an MPhil/PhD in International Development. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of both development practitioners and researchers on international development, including those wishing to pursue an MPhil/PhD in International Development. The programme will suit students with a variety of backgrounds in social sciences, including politics, sociology, economics, and so on. It would also meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs. Students with a strong interest in research and research methods will thrive on the MSc distinctive focus on training in research methods.

The MSc Research for International Development is a newly established interdisciplinary Taught Masters programme at SOAS, offered jointly by the departments of Economics and Development Studies. This cutting-edge degree is funded and supported by the UK’s ESRC (The Economic and Social Research Council) as part of the Bloomsbury Doctoral Training Centre.

The programme’s unique twenty-week core module Battlefield of Methods: Approaches to International Development equips students with the theoretical background and analytical skills to inquire into the relationship between theory and method in the domain of international development. The module provides students with knowledge about the plurality of methodological approaches in key areas of international development research, and the policy choices and strategies associated with these. The module offers students the opportunity to engage with a selection of methods used in international development research.

Further training in a variety of research methods is the focus of the other two core modules: Research Methods in Political Economy I and II. RMI covers the necessary statistical methods for social sciences including survey design and regression analysis. It aims to a) introduce students to statistical inference; b) encourage the clear and coherent expression of statistical results; and c) promote the critical reading of statistics within the development literature. RMII addresses sources and methods for the social sciences in the context of the political economy of development.

This programme gives students advanced interdisciplinary training in research methods and topics in Research for International Development. While the programme structure emphasises research methods, students will also have the opportunity to choose from a large number of substantive optional modules. The interdisciplinary nature of the programme is by virtue of both the core modules and options available for study being drawn from two departments within SOAS: Economics and Development Studies. Students will therefore benefit from studying with experts in a variety of fields of international development, and from the wide regional expertise in developing countries and development issues.

SOAS Development Studies student Matthew Juden wins first DSA/ICEA Masters dissertation prize 2015: https://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem109127.html

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-research-for-international-development/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 72kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-research-for-international-development/file101805.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught in lectures and tutorial groups. Degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. Modules are generally assessed on the basis of a final examination (70%) and essay or project based coursework (30%). MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a 1 or 2 hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Tutorials

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on tutorial work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

Students are required to complete a 13,000-word dissertation in ‘Research Methods for International Development’.

- Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course

Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative modules are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative modules focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary module in mathematics, statistics and computing. Each student must attend this module, and sit its exam. The preliminary module runs in September prior to the start of teaching in term one. The objective of the module is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This module is compulsory. Further details on the Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course (http://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html).

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Research for International Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Research for International Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year. Read more

Why take this course?

This course will allow students to gain specialism in a chosen topic through a production of an extended piece of academic writing building on their choice of optional units taken in the second year covering the areas of health, education, gender, international relations, criminology and making use of the applied research methods in development skills acquired in the first year.

The distance learning and part time mode of the programme provides a flexible learning framework with opportunities for students to undertake a full Master's qualification, a postgraduate Diploma or a postgraduate Certificate.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Critically engage with an international development studies topic of choice, assembling information from a variety of sources to compose clear detailed and logical argument;
Learn to formulate a systematic and methodologically sound research process through undertaking a literature review and empirical research;
Where applicable, justify ethical considerations surrounding research carried out.

What opportunities might it lead to?

You can expect to graduate from this course with enhanced career prospects in the international development sector, greater knowledge of development issues and an increasing professional network that may allow you to identify career opportunities. You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Module Details

You will study the following core units:

Theory & Practice of Development:
Explore the history, theory and practice of international development studies, through topics from colonialism to globalisation. You will be introduced to the tools, such as social enterprise, that are used in development practice. Assessment includes a social enterprise project alongside a traditional essay.

Applied Research Methods for Development:
Learn the strategies and methods of collecting and analysing quantitative and qualitative data in the social sciences. You will learn to use SPSS for data manipulation, quantitative data analysis and interpretation, using a range of data sets relevant to international development studies.

Dissertation:
Demonstrate your achievement on the course as a whole, through the production of a 15,000-word research project on a topic of your choice, informed by the optional units you have selected, under the advice and guidance of a personal supervisor.

You will also select two optional units:

International and Comparative Criminal Justice:
Compare differing systems of criminal justice, including international courts and criminal tribunals, as well as international norms and standards. You will examine the role of international criminal justice bodies within the UN and the EU, institutional development, and criminal justice capacity building.

Gender for Development Cooperation:
Combine study of theories in gender (including masculinities) with practical knowledge of the tools used by practitioners to approach gender mainstreaming in development. You will also look at the application of a gendered lens to the design and implementation of development programmes.

Contemporary Security in International Relations:
Examine the most pressing international security challenges facing policy makers, reflect on new debates in security studies, and explore the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges.

Education and Development:
Consider key issues in contemporary debates relating to education and international development, through a range of approaches, theories and research in historical and regional contexts. Themes include fair access, inclusivity, diversity and equity in education and skills policy.

Health and Development:
Examine the challenges in defining and measuring population health, and explore a variety of health topics relevant to both the developed and developing countries including obesity, ageing, health and migration, health inequalities and child under-nutrition.

Economics of Development:
Gain insights into the ways in which economics and economists play a critical role in terms of development policy. You will examine resource endowment and exploitation, poverty and inequality, historic trade theory and the role of finance and microfinance in economic development.

Units (30 credits per unit, 60 credits for the dissertation) are offered individually as credit-bearing short courses, or as part of the Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits), or MSc International Development Studies (180 credits).

Programme Assessment

This course will be offered entirely through distance learning methods. All course materials and readings, lecture notes, as well as additional links to useful organisational sites, social media hubs and further resources, will be posted and regularly updated in our virtual learning environment. Human contact will be an important part of the programme too, with regular ‘webinars’, discussion forums, one-on-one tutorials with lecturers, email correspondence and skype meetings where necessary.

The assessment methods used on this programme are varied and test all the skills developed in the different modules at different stages of the learning process. These include essays, leading and participating in discussion forums and blogs, portfolios, policy briefs and research projects, allowing for a balance between formative and summative assessment.

Student Destinations

The course is designed to support the needs of those who hope to be, or are already, engaged in the international development sector. It offers highly desirable transferable skills such as communication, qualitative data collection, quantitative data manipulation and data analysis and writing skills. Additionally, the applied nature of this course means that students will be working within ‘live’ development contexts from the start. This will ensure that they are able to develop their professional networks and identify career opportunities. Additionally students will benefit from the advice and guidance regarding career progression given by the experts and development practitioners who teach on this course.

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This MA in Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching is for experienced EFL teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice. Read more
This MA in Applied Linguistics and English Language Teaching is for experienced EFL teachers wanting to learn more about current ELT/ESL research, theory, pedagogy and practice. A great opportunity to develop your career in TEFL/TESOL and develop expertise in specialist fields such as language assessment and testing, materials development, teaching EAP, becoming a teacher educator, management and evaluation and ESOL.

Key benefits

- An opportunity to expand your knowledge of current theoretical and practical aspects of language teaching.

- Develop professional expertise relevant to your career development in areas such as EAP, teaching ESOL, materials development, language testing and assessment, teacher education.

- Excellent tutorial support and extensive programme-specific training in research methods and academic writing.

- Exchange ideas with other experienced language teaching professionals from many different contexts.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/applied-linguistics-and-english-language-teaching-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme provides opportunities to explore recent research in the field and find out more about specialist areas such as teacher education, materials development, teaching English for academic purposes, management and evaluation in ELT and intercultural studies.

Core modules deal with language teaching methodology and curriculum design, linguistic analysis for language teaching, issues in language acquisition and use (sociolinguistics, social & psychological aspects of second language learning) and research methods. The programme also places particular emphasis on the notion of informed teaching and the need for teachers to mediate between theory and practice in constructing pedagogies according to specific teaching-learning contexts.

- Course purpose -

For experienced language teachers who want to reflect upon and further develop their understanding of the various theoretical and practical issues that impact on the field of language learning and teaching.

- Course format and assessment -

Students on the standard programme follow all the core modules and choose two optional modules. Students who have the Cambridge ESOL DELTA or Trinity House Diploma in ELT may be eligible for the part time "fast track" version of the programme which gives them exemption from Principles & Practice in ELT, and one of the optional modules. Assessment is by coursework assignments and dissertation. There are no examinations.

Career prospects

This programme is especially popular with UK-based and international students who are at a point in their career when a master's degree is helpful in professional advancement. Our graduates have found that their promotion opportunities have been greatly enhanced by this advanced qualification. More recently, some of our graduates have returned to take up MPhil/PhD studies.

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

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Materials are at the forefront of new technologies in medicine and dentistry, both in preventative and restorative treatment. Read more
Materials are at the forefront of new technologies in medicine and dentistry, both in preventative and restorative treatment. This programme features joint teaching within the School of Engineering and Materials Science and the Institute of Dentistry, bringing together expertise in the two schools to offer students a fresh perspective on opportunities that are available in the fields of dental materials.

* This programme will equip you with a deep understanding of the field of dental materials and the knowledge necessary to participate in research, or product development.
* An advanced programme designed to develop a broad knowledge of the principles underlying the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of Dental Materials.
* Special emphasis is placed on materials-structure correlations in the context of both clinical and non clinical applications.
* Provides an introduction to materials science, focusing on the major classes of materials used in dentistry including polymers, metals, ceramics and composites.
* Provides up-to-date information on dental materials currently used in Clinical Dentistry and in developments for the future It covers the underlying principles of their functional properties, bioactivity and biocompatibility, and also covers specific dental materials applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering and regulatory affairs.

Why study with us?

Dental Materials is taught jointly by staff from the School of Medicine and Dentistry (SMD), and School of Engineering and Materials Science (SEMS).

Our school of medicine and dentistry is comprised of two world renowned teaching hospitals, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, which have made, and continue to make, an outstanding contribution to modern medicine. We are ranked sixth in the UK for medicine (Complete University Guide 2012), and Dentistry was placed at number two in the UK in last Research Assessment Exercise (2008). Our Materials Department was the first of its kind established in the UK, and was placed at number 1 in the UK in the 2011 National Student Survey.

This degree is aimed at dental surgeons, dental technicians, materials scientists and engineers wishing to work in the dental support industries, and the materials health sector generally. On completion of the course you should have a good knowledge of topics related to dental materials, and in addition, be competent in justifying selection criteria and manipulation instructions for all classes of materials relevant to the practice of dentistry.

There has been a general move away from destructive techniques and interventions towards less damaging cures and preventative techniques. This programme will update your knowledge of exciting new technologies and their applications.

* The programme is taught by experts in the field of dentistry and materials; they work closely together on the latest developments in dental materials.
* Innovations in medical practice, drug development and diagnostic tools are often tested in the mouth due to simpler regulatory pathways in dentistry.
* The programme allows practitioners the opportunity to update their knowledge in the latest developments in dental materials.

Facilities

You will have access to state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment, including:

* Cell & Tissue Engineering Laboratories; five dedicated cell culture laboratories, a molecular biology facility and general purpose laboratorie
* Confocal microscopy unit incorporating two confocal microscopes, enabling advanced 3D imaging of living cells
* Mechanical Testing Facilities
* NanoVision Centre; our state-of-the-art microscopy unit bringing together the latest microscope techniques for structural, chemical and mechanical analysis at the nanometer scale
* Spectroscopy Lab
* Thermal Analysis Lab.

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This programme challenges the assumptions behind the media and development industries and development studies, and offers new ways of thinking about the issues. Read more
This programme challenges the assumptions behind the media and development industries and development studies, and offers new ways of thinking about the issues. The approach balances critical theoretical analysis of the hegemony implied by the ideas and practices of development with the practical issues surrounding the use of contemporary media, including notably digital technologies.

It draws on media theory, practical knowledge and experience, alongside critical debates within and about development, to challenge assumptions about the role of media and development industries. Students combine critical theoretical analysis of the role of media in development with a focus on practical issues surrounding the use of media, including digital technologies.

The programme differs from other degrees in the field by placing the onus on the role of media to further the Development agenda, especially post the Second World War. Students benefit from the unique position of the Centre for Media Studies as a specialist institution for the study of media in the global south.

It is designed for those with an interest in global media and development, including media and development professionals seeking alternative ways of thinking about their roles. It provides an excellent foundation for MPhil/PhD research.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/media-studies/ma-media-and-development/

Teaching & Learning

- Learning Outcomes

Knowledge:

1. How to assess data and evidence critically from texts, manuscripts, audio and video sources, both analog and digital, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, develop skills in critical judgements of complex source materials, locate materials in print and on line, use research resources (particularly research library catalogues and websites) and other relevant traditional and electronic sources.

2. Knowledge and understanding of the dynamics and debates about the role of media and Information Communication Technologies in the development process: to be able to critically examine the discourses of development, the roles of national and international organizations, NGOs, citizens in defining and producing development and the emergence of critical and alternative paradigms for sustainable societies; to be aware of the key theoretical issues surrounding the role of media and Information Communication Technologies in development processes; to be able to analytically disaggregate economic, political, social and cultural strands of development and the nature of mediated practices within each; develop awareness of emergent models of sustainable development in which contemporary media practices play a key role; analyze the role of the media in hegemonic representations of social change and development.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

1. To be critical and precise in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents and electronic sources can and cannot tell us. Such skills should improve and be refined throughout the programme.

2. Question theories and interpretations, however authoritative, and critically reassess evidence for themselves. Students will learn how to question and challenge the accepted tenets both of development and media as the means of transmission of messages. These skills should improve and be refined throughout the programme.

3. Critically interrogate situated empirical examples of specific media and Information Communication Technologies practices in development contexts in Asia, Africa, Middle East

Subject-based practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing

2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of conventional and electronic sources

3. Communicate orally to a group. Listen and discuss ideas introduced during seminars and classes.

4. Practise research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.

5. Have developed some new competencies in digital media production and dissemination

Transferable skills:

1. Write good essays and dissertations

2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing

3. Understand unconventional ideas

4. Study a variety of written and digital materials, in libraries, on line and research libraries of a kind they will not have used as undergraduates.

5. Present material orally to a group.

6. Have developed a range of on-line competencies

Employment

As well as academic expertise, MA Media in Development graduates from SOAS gain a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek. These include; written and oral communication skills, attention to detail, analytical and problem-solving skills and the ability to research, amass and order information from a variety of sources. This postgraduate degree provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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