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This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Read more
This innovative course focuses on dissident writing and transgressive texts, from the early modern period to the present. Engaging with recent developments in theoretical and critical practice, the course will develop your knowledge and understanding of English literature and will sharpen your skills of literary research, writing and analysis.

Key features

-This course enables you to become part of a vibrant postgraduate community and attend lectures and events organised by the London Graduate School and the Kingston Writing School.
-Capitalising on our location, several modules are complemented by field trips (for example, to the British Library, museums and theatres) to enhance and support your learning experience.
-The English department is home to two archives relating to the work of Iris Murdoch, as well as the Sheridan Morley archive of theatrical life writing and ephemera. It also contributes to the Cultural Histories and Suburban Studies at Kingston, the Life Narrative Research Group, the Iris Murdoch Centre and the Victorian Popular Fiction Association.

What will you study?

The core module, Transgression and Dissidence, introduces the course's central themes by focusing on texts that explore the limits of human experience and contravene cultural boundaries. You will explore how literature, through such transgression, has provided opportunities for dissent and resistance, and will consider the extent to which writing has acted as a catalyst for social and political change. You will then study various conceptual approaches to literature through your choice of option modules, which provide the opportunity to analyse and discuss a range of contentious issues across a number of historical periods and with respect to different genres.

The option modules involve the study of traumatic experience, human rights work and life narrative (Trauma and Justice); the complex relationships between desire, embodiment and writing (Sex and Text); gender, culture and international exchange in early modern Europe (Markets and Materiality); the construction of place and identity in 19th-century travel writing and adventure fiction (Mappings and Crossings); and the 'post-human' and interspecies interaction in recent global literature (Humans and Animals).

The MA programme has been devised to allow you to study diverse topics and periods or, if you prefer, to focus on areas in which the Department of English Literature has particular research strengths: Renaissance literature and culture; Victorian literature, 20th-century and contemporary writing; literature, sex and gender; and writing, space and the environment.

Your 15,000-word dissertation will allow you to research a subject of your choice, produced under the supervision of a specialist academic member of staff.

Assessment

Essays and other written coursework, presentations, and dissertation.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-English Literature Dissertation
-Transgression and Dissidence

Optional modules
-Diffractive Creativities, Transversal Practices
-Humans and Animals
-Mappings and crossings
-Markets and Materiality
-Sex and Text
-Special Study: American Dreaming: Suburbia, Literature and Culture
-Special Study: Bruce Springsteen and Contemporary American Culture
-Special Study: Monsters: Theory, Fiction, Culture
-Special Study: Music and Theory
-Special Study: Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama
-Special Study: Writing Women in the 20th and 21st Century
-Trauma and Justice

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Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. Read more
Digital technologies are now ubiquitous in nearly every part of our lives, and today's students need to become proficient with digital technologies as research and communication tools. The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL combines technical skill with anthropological research methodologies in order to train students for research and involvement in this emergent world.

Degree information

Students gain skills training in digital technologies, from internet and digital film editing to e-curation and digital ethnography; study the anthropological theories of virtualism, materiality/immateriality and social networks; and develop an understanding of the consequences of digital culture through the ethnographic study of its social and regional impact in a global and comparative context.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits. The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Digital Anthropology and Digital Anthropology Practical

Optional modules
-The Anthropology of Art and Design
-Mass Consumption and Design
-The Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Advanced Topics in Digital Ethnography
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Practical Ethnographic and Documentary Filmmaking
-Digital Infrastructure: Materiality, Information and Politics
-Anthropology and Photography
-Social Construction of Landscape

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, practicals and laboratory sessions. It includes a weekly seminar series, with invited international speakers. Assessment is through essays, methodology practicals, written examination and the substantial research dissertation.

Careers

In addition to its importance for careers such as in media, design and museums, digital technology is also integral to development, theoretical and applied anthropology. Companies and institutions collaborating with the MSc are: British Telecom, UCL Computer Sciences, UCL Information Studies, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Skype, Intel, the British Museum, NESTA, NOKIA, the Home Office and Inventi V.

The programme is also developing relationships with: Cultural Informatics Research Centre for the Arts and Humanities (CIRCAh), Slade Centre for Electronic Media in Fine Art, Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Centre for Museums, Heritage and Cultural Studies, UCL Interaction Centre, UCL Digital Humanities and UCL Urban Laboratory.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Digital Strategist, Canopy Brand Group.
-Researcher, River Research
-Principal Lecturer and Course Director, University of the Arts, London
-Assistant Print Analyst, GroupM
-Graduate Worker, Dare

Employability
New media and technology companies are showing considerable interest in Digital Anthropology as a degree that qualifies students for positions in all fields of user interaction and research. In the last few years students graduating from the MSc have been recruited by the best international agencies doing research on users' digital practices. In the non-profit sector students have joined organisations involved in policymaking, open access and citizen journalism. The subject is also a good grounding for students who are interested in continuing to a variety of PhD programmes.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The Digital Anthropology MSc at UCL is becoming a world leader in the training of researchers in the social and cultural dimensions of information technologies and digital media.

UCL Anthropology is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK and offers an exceptional breadth of expertise. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK. The programme combines ethnographic methods, critical thinking and practical explorations of the digital world and encourages in-depth research to develop the next generation of understanding about the impact, consequences, aesthetics and politics of digital technologies and infrastructures.

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What can this Master Interior Architecture offer you?. Perception and expression in the architecture of the interior. Read more
What can this Master Interior Architecture offer you?

Perception and expression in the architecture of the interior
What makes a certain place so characteristic? Is it the light, falling in a specific angle through the glass windows? The material and colors of the chairs, tables, curtains, walls, floor? The specific sounds of the room? The touch, the smell of things? The people …? Phenomenological aspects determine the atmosphere of an interior.

The core
Interior at our Master Interior Architecture is no niche, nuance or aspect of architecture, but a fundamental attitude towards the surrounding world. The core of this Master is the understanding of a place in all its manifestations, before you start to transform it because of changing needs and requirements.

What will you learn?
You will learn to develop a concept for a space based on your own ideas and artistic vision and realize that concept. Important part is how to present your conclusions as an essential component of your architectural design. At each assignment you will be asked to draw connections between your own work and that of others and between your work and the audience. Also you will make an active contribution in collaborative projects. In the two years you study in Maastricht you will get the chance to deepen your design skills, personal interpretation of the professional situation and artistic talent. You will obtain subject matter knowledge, insights and skills based on your own applied research.

Language
English/Dutch. The lecturers also speak German.

Study Programme

The first year
Your own atelier
In the first year you will work in your own atelier, where you fulfill hypothetical assignments and where you evaluate your design process step-by-step with your lecturers. In these assignments you will explore materiality, light, time, scale and composition.

Assigments
We start an assignment with excursions to different places, where you test these with your senses and explore it with our time’s state of mind, from within. You research the place’s anatomy, induce empathy and construct understanding. You formulate an intention of how to rebalance the choreography meaningfully and you exemplify the intended meaning as a built structure of explicit materiality. In these assignments the theoretical research and analysis play a key role.

Your graduation project
Final master assessment
In the second year you will focus on your thesis and final work piece. Your graduation project is the final master assessment. With this assessment you will proof that you are able to practice the profession. You will position yourself as an interior architect and present you to the outside world so that you can build the foundation for a future career. It also offers the possibility of a critical contribution to the debate on topical issues, and is valuable for the further development of the field.

Free to choose
The subject of your final project is free to choose but still fairly close in the broad sense of the interior. It is a hypothesis in a built-up area context. The selection and motivation of your graduation project is part of the graduation plan that is submitted. You will have to conclude the place and the primary idea of the intention.

Thesis and anatomical model
Your graduation project consists of two connected layers: the thesis and the anatomical model. The thesis should form the foundation of your project, based of language and theoretical research in historical, philosophical, cultural and socio-political sense. The anatomical model is the concrete implementation of your intention and includes all spatial elements.

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MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Read more

What is this programme about?

MA Design for Cultural Industries is an innovative programme for students who want to develop their career in cultural and creative sectors. Through the application of design theory and practice, incorporating new technologies into the discourse, students will be able to create or initiate solutions and experiences in the context of the cultural industries.

This MA programme provides its graduates with the advanced skills necessary to confront their professional challenges and move forward in this highly competitive industry. Integrating materiality and object interpretation through applied imagination, developing innovative creative-thinking, enterprise skills and research-led projects, the programme's multidisciplinary and critical approach gives students a distinctive insight into the collaborative nature of these industries.

The programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. With an international outlook, our graduates will be sought after across an array of arts, design, events, culture, entertainment, media and creative technology departments globally.

The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, policy making, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms. Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind OR http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries/

Who is this programme for?

This MA programme is relevant for those wishing to pursue an advanced career in cultural and creative organisations such as private and social enterprises, design agencies, museums, galleries and research centres. The programme will also be applicable to artists, curators, designers and policy-makers wishing to advance their design thinking by bringing their own projects to life, or create outputs for their own clients and industry partners.

How is the programme organised and what will I learn?

The programme is run in two modes: full-time over one year and part-time over two years, with the taught content made up of core and option courses totalling 180 credits.

Core courses
* Experience Design (XD) - 30 Credits
* Materiality & Interpretation - 30 Credits
* Design Management and Cultural Enterprise - 30 Credits
* MA Final Project - 60 Credits

Option courses (two to choose from):
* Curatorial practice - 15 Credits
* Coding in Creative Contexts- 15 Credits
* Sound Design- 15 Credits
* Social Media and SEO - 15 Credits

What do students do after this programme?

Graduates of the MA Design for Cultural Industries will be equipped with advanced skills to go to wide range of leadership or senior creative roles in the cultural and creative industries, both in the private and public sector. The career paths that our graduates can look forward to include arts and cultural management, design management, curatorship (museum, gallery, festival), creative direction, education advisory, cultural publishing, policy making, and art/design criticism. Alternatively, the programme can inspire graduates to open their own cultural start-ups or work for international consultancy firms.

Graduates of the programme can also develop academic profiles and research interests to go into teaching or advanced study at MPhil and PhD level.

How are we taught?

Typically, in full-time mode, you can expect 10 hours attendance per week over two days in a class of around 15-20 students. Teaching is a mixture of studio work, seminars, lectures and workshops. The full-time mode should only be considered by students who are able to dedicate at least 25 hours per week to the programme. The part-time mode is recommended for students in full-time employment.

How do I apply for this programme?

Apply directly on our website (link below). Selected applicants will be invited to attend a personal or skype interview. We recommend early applications, as the places are limited. Overseas applications for this course should be received no later than the end of July for entry in September to allow the sufficient time for visa applications.

Where can I find more information?

For more information, please see the course page at our online prospectus and take a look at the CPDA website.

MA Design for Cultural Industries Blog: http://blogs.gre.ac.uk/design-for-cultural-industries

MA Design for Cultural Industries Prospectus Page http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/art/des-cul-ind

Department Website and Student Work http://cpda.gre.ac.uk

How to Apply: http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply/pg

For more information, you can also contact Programme Leader Dr. Isil Onol by email:

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Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. Read more
Our innovative MA in Classics and Ancient History gives you the chance to study for a world-class degree with the flexibility to tailor the programme to match your own interests. We will give you a supportive and stimulating environment in which to enhance the knowledge and skills you picked up at Undergraduate level.
You can choose to follow an open pathway to mix your modules and interests or one of the specially designed research streams that match our own specialisms. The research streams we currently offer are:
• Ancient Philosophy, Science and Medicine
• Ancient Politics and Society
• Classical Receptions
• Cultural Histories and Material Exchanges
• Literary Interactions
At the heart of the Department is the A.G. Leventis Room, our dedicated Postgraduate study space, which you will have full access to. You might also take the opportunity to participate in Isca Latina, our local schools Latin outreach programme. We have a vibrant Postgraduate community which we hope you will become an active part of.

Programme Structure

The programme is divided into units of study(modules).

Compulsory modules

Research Methodology and the Dissertation are compulsory.

Optional modules

The optional modules determine the main focus of your MA study. Some examples of the optional modules are as follows; Food and Culture; Ancient Drama in its Social and Intellectual Context; Hellenistic Culture and Society – History; Hellenistic Culture and Society – Literature ; Cultural Transformations in Late Antiquity; Migration and the Migrant Through Ancient and Modern Eyes; Ancient Philosophy: Truth and Ancient Thought; Roman Myth; Rome: Globalisation, Materiality; The City of Rome (subject to availability); Greek; Latin; Fast-Track Greek; Classical Language and Text: Greek and Latin Epic

The modules listed here provide examples of what you can expect to learn on this degree course based on recent academic teaching. The precise modules available to you in future years may vary depending on staff availability and research interests, new topics of study, timetabling and student demand.

Research areas

Our academic staff have a broad range of expertise and ground-breaking research interests, some of the research streams available on our MA reflect these. We regularly review and update our MA programme to reflect both the needs of our students and the latest emerging research within the field.

Research expertise

Some of the areas we have a special research interest include:
• Ancient and modern philosophy, especially ethics
• Classical art and archaeology
• Classics in the history of sexuality
• Comparative philology and linguistics
• Food in the ancient world
• Greek and Roman epic, tragedy and comedy
• Greek and Roman mythology, religion and magic
• Greek and Roman social history, especially sexuality
• Hellenistic history, especially the barbarian interface and the Greek culture of Asia Minor and dynastic studies
• History of medicine in antiquity, especially Galen
• Later Greek literature, including Lucian, Athenaeus, ecphrasis
• Latin literature
• Palaeography

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This MA Creative Writing (specialist pathway) provides an intensive opportunity for you to focus on a single writing form. Fiction, Fiction for Young Readers or Poetry. Read more

Summary

This MA Creative Writing (specialist pathway) provides an intensive opportunity for you to focus on a single writing form: Fiction, Fiction for Young Readers or Poetry.

This programme is designed for ambitious, committed writers who are developing their independent writing practice. Taught by published, working writers including acclaimed poets, novelists, journalists and screenwriters, this programme provides you with the opportunity to focus on your passion, whether that’s Fiction, Poetry or Fiction for Young Readers.

Every module on this course has a strong focus on the writing industry, which means that it will prepare you for working in this competitive sector or for further academic study. Topics include the specifics of manuscript preparation; editing and redrafting; getting published and performance opportunities. Our strong links with the writing industry give you the chance to attend events and seminars with agents, editors and publishers from across the field of writing. These provide opportunities to network and get your work in front of the people who matter in the literary world.

The department has thriving partnerships with Wimbledon Bookfest, Barnes Children’s Literature Festival, and local schools, giving you the chance to volunteer or undertake paid work experience during your time at Roehampton. Our in-house publishing imprint, Fincham Press, means you could see your work published or be involved in publishing other people’s work.

You’ll be part of a department that combines tradition and innovation, excellent teaching and world-class research - 80% of our research publications are ranked as “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” for their impact. Plus, we are home to the National Centre for Research in Children’s Literature, which is regarded as the premier institution for children’s literature research in the UK. We also house the Roehampton Poetry Centre, which places the department at the forefront of the UK poetry scene.

The department also offers an MA in Creative Writing, which is suitable for individuals who wish to try two different forms of writing before specialising in one for the dissertation.

Content

Fiction pathway

This pathway is ideal for people who are committed to producing fiction of the highest professional calibre. You will examine two primary forms: the short story and the novel to produce a portfolio of fiction. The emphasis is on craft, technique and practical guidance, and you will engage with a variety of storytelling tools and models. You will learn how to make your writing practice more effective, how to break bad habits and how to professionally assess your work in progress.

Fiction for Young Readers pathway

On the Fiction for Young Readers pathway, you will focus on the practice and theory of writing fiction for children. You will read a wide range of theoretical texts exploring definitions and concepts of children’s literature concerning picture-books, fiction for young readers (6-12 years old) and texts for Young Adults (YAs), enabling you to contextualise your own creative practice.

Poetry pathway

On the Poetry pathway, you will explore the contemporary context of poetry and poetics, with a special focus on writing formally innovative work. You will have the opportunity to engage with topics including poetry as process; the materiality of language; literary affiliations and schools of poetry; intertextuality and found text; the contemporary long poem; non-narrative poetry.

The compulsory module, Creative Contexts, introduces you to theoretical and research-based issues faced by creative writers, investigates “critical” writing as a form in its own right, and provides guidance on study skills.

Your seminars, workshops and tutorials will be complemented by guest lectures from industry specialists and off-site visits. Recent guest lectures have been given by Hellie Ogden at Literary Agency Janklow and Nesbitt, and trips have been organised to Tate Modern, the London Bookfair and Apiary Studios. Each pathway will prepare you for writing your extended portfolio and self-critical analysis, which you will undertake during the final section of the programme year.

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Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more
Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

- A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's

- Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations

- Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/early-modern-english-literature-text-and-transmission-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This MA programme focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts makes it unlike any other programme of its kind. Transmission is understood both as the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print and their reception. Students will therefore learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts and to edit them for the modern reader.

By focusing on transmission, this MA programme will also make students aware of the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re)production on its interpretation. The specific process whereby a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is always central to its interpretation.

The core module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

- Course purpose -

Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

- Course format and assessment -

Core and optional modules assessed by coursework, plus a dissertation.

Career propsects:

We expect some students will pursue PhD level study in the area, leading to a teaching or academic career. Other students will be ideally placed for jobs in the arts, creative and cultural industries, curatorship and broadcasting.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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This course focuses on management development in the global hospitality industry - not only addressing core business and management subjects, but also hospitality as a global phenomenon and how it is consumed by cultures and societies. Read more

Course in brief

This course focuses on management development in the global hospitality industry - not only addressing core business and management subjects, but also hospitality as a global phenomenon and how it is consumed by cultures and societies.

The course is ideally suited for graduates wishing to increase their knowledge in a specialist sector, people in the early stages of their careers looking to develop them further, or for people seeking a change in career direction.

The university is one of the founding corporate members of the Institute of Customer Service, and currently remains the only university with membership. We are therefore able to access a very high-profile industry network, including many blue chip organisations.

Course structure

Full-time students attend workshops on two days per week with the part-time route usually requiring one day per week. Teaching methods include group work, case studies, presentations, and live projects. The course is delivered through a variety of approaches including lectures, presentations, tutorials and case studies, with an emphasis on interactive learning.

Areas of study

Management subjects address key issues of strategy, marketing, operations, human resources and financial planning, studied in parallel with international hospitality development. Options include consultancy and multi-unit management. Students acquire research skills, which they can apply to academic or industrial projects.

Modules

Critical Perspectives in Hospitality Management
Globalisation, Society and Culture
Management Strategy in a Global Business Environment
Managing Resources in Hospitality and Tourism Operations

Two from:

International Hospitality Development
Ethical and Social Responsibility: Theory and Application
Human Resource Strategy in Multi-Unit Service Organisations
Contemporary Issues in Cruise Management
Professional Enquiry
Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development
The Visual and Visuality: Performing Culture
Digital Marketing Strategies
Sport Tourism
Risk and Crisis Management
Anthropology: Critical Perspectives
Tourism, Landscape and Materiality
Ethnography
Events Project Management
Consultancy

Career and progression opportunities

Graduates are often fast-tracked into senior management, operational or consultancy positions within the hospitality industry, both in the UK and overseas.

Extended masters route

This course offers the extended masters route. This involves English language study for between two and sixth months at the university before starting the MSc. Visit https://www.brighton.ac.uk/international/study-with-us/courses-and-qualifications/brighton-language-institute/courses/extended-masters-route/index.aspx

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Our MSc in International Event Management requires an open, critical and inquiring mindset for the social-scientific and applied study of events and management. Read more

Course in brief

Our MSc in International Event Management requires an open, critical and inquiring mindset for the social-scientific and applied study of events and management. You will be expected to critically evaluate existing knowledge in the field of event management, debate key issues such as sustainability, ethical event production, or legacy planning, and consider strategic responses to forces impacting on events from the global operating environment.

This is an academic course with a high degree of vocational relevance. The content and delivery of the course is strongly underpinned by the course team's expertise, research activities and in many cases first hand experience of the industry. Industry expertise and application is drawn from areas as diverse as festivals, business events, marketing, consultancy, sport and leisure, all of which enrich the design and delivery of the course.

Course structure

Full-time students attend workshops on two days per week with the part-time route usually requiring one day per week. Teaching methods include group work, case studies, presentations, and live projects. The course is delivered through a variety of approaches including lectures, presentations, tutorials and case studies, with an emphasis on interactive learning.

Areas of study

Adopting a social scientific approach to the analysis of the international event industry, specialist subjects include international event strategy analysis and development, critical issues surrounding risk in modern societies, event project management and international event marketing, sponsorship and fundraising. Conceptual analysis is applied through use of a variety of case studies from mega sport and cultural events to more localized cultural, business or charity events.

Modules

Event Policy and Practice
Event Project Management
Globalisation, Society and Culture
Management Strategy in a Global Business Environment

Two from:*
International Event Marketing, Sponsorship and Fundraising
Risk and Crisis Management
Digital Marketing Strategies
Sport Tourism
Consultancy
Contemporary Issues in Global Sport
Professional Enquiry
Ethical and Social Responsibility: Theory and Application
Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development
The Visual and Visuality: Performing Culture
Anthropology: Critical Perspectives
Tourism, Landscape and Materiality
Ethnography
Tourism and International Co-operation
International Hospitality Development
Contemporary Issues in Cruise Management

*Please note that the above list is an indication of the optional modules available at present. These modules may change in accordance with the latest developments in the international event industry.

Career and progression opportunities

This course is aimed at a broad spectrum of students and practitioners from a variety of backgrounds. It has been designed for those who wish to pursue senior management positions within the events industry or as preparation for further study in international events, such as a PhD.

Extended masters route

This course offers the extended masters route. This involves English language study for between two and sixth months at the university before starting the MSc. Visit https://www.brighton.ac.uk/international/study-with-us/courses-and-qualifications/brighton-language-institute/courses/extended-masters-route/index.aspx

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For international organisations such as the World Bank and the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO), and also national ministries and regional development agencies, tourism is an important means of economic diversification, poverty reduction and socio-economic integration. Read more

Course in brief

For international organisations such as the World Bank and the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO), and also national ministries and regional development agencies, tourism is an important means of economic diversification, poverty reduction and socio-economic integration.

It offers a way to bring relative prosperity to a region through additional revenue streams and a raised public profile. UNWTO argue that developing countries in particular benefit from this process and make it their aim to faciliate it, all the while minimising the potentially negative impact on the environment and cultural integrity.

Our Tourism and International Development MSc aligns with the missions of UNWTO and focuses on the role of tourism as an agent of development and as a vehicle to sustainable change both at a micro and a macro level. The programme is delivered through the Tourism Policy, Practice and Performance (TPPP) hub, a research organisation and affiliate member of UNWTO.

Course structure

Full-time students attend classes two days per week, while part-time students usually attend once per week. Some modules and field-based activities may require attendance on consecutive days.

Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, workshops and live scenarios. You are also expected to engage in a high degree of self-directed learning.

For international students, the MSc also offers an extended masters route with English language study for between two and sixth months before the course begins.

Areas of study

Coming from diverse cultures and backgrounds and with a broad range of career histories, students can expect to gain valuable insights into themes such as: development in the era of globalisation; sustainable tourism development in local economies; tourism and structural economic and regional change; myths and realities of tourism development; international cooperation, philanthropy and consultancy; global and local conflicts in tourism; and tourism's role in poverty alleviation.

Modules

Tourism and Development: Critical Perspectives
Consultancy
Globalisation, Society and Culture
Ethical and Social Responsibility: Theory and Application

Two from:

Tourism and International Cooperation
Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Small Business Development
Risk and Crisis Management
Sport for International Development and Peace
Professional Enquiry
The Visual and Visuality: Performing Culture
Digital Marketing Strategies
Sport Tourism
Anthropology: Critical Perspectives
Tourism, Landscape and Materiality
Ethnography
Contemporary Issues in Cruise Management

Careers and employability

This course provides a solid grounding in international development and globalisation concepts, theories and approaches. It provides graduates with the skills needed to operate with organisations requiring knowledge about and strategic approaches to sustainable tourism development, for example tourism offices, NGOs, development agencies and consultancies.

Those thinking of starting a career in development or those already working in the sector who wish to consolidate and build on their professional experience will find in this MSc programme an excellent opportunity to gain theoretical and applied knowledge, to actively engage in development issues and debates from a interdisciplinary perspective and to work across sectors such as development policy, research and practice.

Extended masters route

This course offers the extended masters route. This involves English language study for between two and sixth months at the university before starting the MSc. Visit https://www.brighton.ac.uk/international/study-with-us/courses-and-qualifications/brighton-language-institute/courses/extended-masters-route/index.aspx

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This course allows you to develop and grow your own creative practice whilst positioning yourself within a theoretical context. You will engage in the exploration of space conceptually and pragmatically, encouraging your own response to the functionality and visual design of existing sites. Read more

Why take this course?

This course allows you to develop and grow your own creative practice whilst positioning yourself within a theoretical context.

You will engage in the exploration of space conceptually and pragmatically, encouraging your own response to the functionality and visual design of existing sites. You’ll also inspect the consideration of materiality and the relationship of the interior idea to architecture.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Have the opportunity to 'earn and learn' by working on real life contracts through our Projects Office. This experience will enable you to develop your professional portfolio.
Develop a personal area of study, get involved with some regional regeneration projects and test and develop your ideas and your interior research.

What opportunities might it lead to?

Interior design can be transient or durable, small or large, can engage at a detailed product design level or at an urban level, but at whichever level, the demand for skilled professionals is increasing, as is the requirement for innovative sustainable designs.

This course provides a firm grounding for employment in a range of design offices, as well as other property-related jobs.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Interior design practice
Exhibition design
Retail consultant
Working for local and public authorities
Teaching in HE

Module Details

This course uses the experience and skills of teaching staff with a proven track record in interior design studies, practice and research. You will also benefit from a multi-disciplinary learning environment where more than 100 postgraduate students in architecture, interior design, urban design, sustainable design and historic building conservation can meet and work.

Here are the units you will study:

Practice: This unit provides you with the opportunity to evaluate your own design practice and the design discipline from which you come and to contextualise this within interior design practice. Practice-based methods will be used to explore the interior through inter-disciplinary means and you will build on and develop your own creative practice through real-world situations, through doing. You will also be involved in discussions around the social, political, economic and professional contexts that drive the construction of interior space. You will be expected to analyse and critically evaluate the interior context, develop briefs, strategies and a proposal for a given area.

Theory: This unit aims to interrogate the history of interior design and its relationship to practice. Interior design is a relatively youthful profession, whose history is situated in the gaps between architectural history and design history. In this unit you will explore the intellectual idea of the interior through debate and discussion, catalysed through a series of workshops and critical readings, developing an understanding of the interior condition. We bring in specialists from other disciplines, actively encouraging debate. You will also be expected to explore and build on your own understanding of interior space by keeping a reflective journal.

Research Methods and Research Proposal: In this unit you will develop research skills, which will aid you throughout your course and particularly in producing your thesis. You will be asked to establish a critical position within an Outline Research Proposal. You will develop techniques, which will allow you to engage proactively within your area of study. You will be encouraged to explore methods of investigation that are responsive to, as well as inquisitive of, the conditions presented and which therefore speculate around possible critical scenarios. Implicit within these explorations is the need to investigate diverse means of representation and depiction through a variety of possible media and discourse.

Integration: This unit allows you to work in a multi-disciplinary context through groups within your own subject area and across the areas of interior design, urban design, sustainable architecture and historic building conservation, as well as explore the interrelationships of all disciplines. You will need to work collectively on given projects or problems related to staff-run studios, which explore a range of given themes. These themes will be introduced at the start of the course and connect to research areas within the School.

Work-Based Learning: This unit gives you the opportunity to replace a 30-credit core unit with a work-based version of that unit. Not all units can be replaced and you will need to discuss the appropriateness of a unit with tutors. Work-based learning requires you to engage in critical and reflective learning in the workplace. This will be developed through a learning contract, negotiated by you, your employer and School. The work undertaken in practice will be appraised through critical reflective writing that engages with the practice of the particular subject discipline and this will form the assessment artefacts.

Thesis: Your thesis is a substantial research-based project that enables you to carry out an in-depth investigation into a subject area of personal interest, which is related to or developed from a theme studied during the course. The proposed research theme should have a clearly defined focus to allow for in depth theoretical, contextual and visual research.

Programme Assessment

This course is lecture and studio-based, culminating in a written or design-led thesis project. It will involve case study investigations, group work, discussion and planning of interior environments, as well as independent study to develop design or research-based responses to interior problems.

Design assessment is through studio review and taught courses are assessed by various forms of evidence-based interior design decisions and proposals. You will also carry out an in-depth research project into an area of your choice.

Student Destinations

On completing this course, you will be adept in spatial practice and able to work within your specialist discipline in design practices, architectural firms and cross-disciplinary environments. The creative skills, professional competencies and expansive learning environment that we provide has also led graduates into a range of careers in marketing, advertising, journalism, virtual design and modelling through to people-centred careers such as project management.

Alternatively, you can choose to pursue freelance opportunities, continue your studies to PhD level or even set up your own interior design practice.

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The Photographic History and Practice MA is uniquely focused on the social, cultural and material histories of photography. Read more
The Photographic History and Practice MA is uniquely focused on the social, cultural and material histories of photography. You will explore photographic history through primary source materials, including negatives, photographs, technical apparatus, ephemera and manuscripts, as well as new developments in digital research under the guidance of internationally recognised scholars, practitioners, and museum professionals.

The programme offers you outstanding industry links with major collections including the National Media Museum, Birmingham City Library and the Pitt Rivers Museum. It is aimed at those from a variety of disciplines including conservationists, archivists, historians of science and from various fields of visual studies; such as visual anthropology, photography or art history. Working closely with programme staff, you will enhance your handling skills, research methods, writing and public speaking that will equip you for a wide range of careers or for further study.

You will learn in a variety of different formats including lectures, workshops, tutorials and seminars, as well as group activities. The course is underpinned by an innovative wiki environment that is a space for sharing and collaboration between students and tutors, as well as for presentation of content and communication.

You will also attend a week-long archival residency at one of a number of major internationally-recognised photographic archives. Throughout the programme there are visits to different types of museums, libraries and archives that engage photographic history. Previous visits have included major exhibitions at Nottingham Contemporary, important private collections organising for international exhibition loans, and the Royal Photographic Collection at Windsor as it prepared for the Queen's Diamond Jubilee.

The programme is delivered by a team of experienced tutors with international research profiles as well as visiting lecturers from museums, archives, collections and research institutions. These experts all approach photographic history from different perspectives, presenting important challenges to you, and enabling you to study both the materiality of photography and its relationship with the digital age.

The Photographic History and Practice MA provides you with a solid grounding of practical skills, theory and dialectics that will equip you for a wide range of careers in heritage industries and research. Some of our graduates have received fellowships to pursue PhDs here in the UK and abroad while others have embarked upon careers in curating, museum and gallery administration, digital cataloguing and publishing throughout Europe.

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Glass is a medium that crosses a range of disciplines and is used by artists, craftspeople and designers alike. This award-winning programme explores glass as a design tool that encourages process-led risk and play, in parallel with the prototyping and resolution of designed objects. Read more

Programme description

Glass is a medium that crosses a range of disciplines and is used by artists, craftspeople and designers alike. This award-winning programme explores glass as a design tool that encourages process-led risk and play, in parallel with the prototyping and resolution of designed objects.

Courses cover contemporary design issues including material narratives, interdisciplinary crossover and post-digital practices, as well as studio and client-based projects.

You will focus on the materiality of glass, explore new boundaries through the integrated relationship between process and theory, and be encouraged to position yourself within and beyond the disciplines of glass.

This programme is unique in Scotland and ECA is one of the few centres of excellence in this discipline in the UK. Comprehensive glass and plaster workshops are complemented by state-of-the-art digital fabrication labs, woodwork, metalwork and bronze foundry, enabling you to experience the complete design journey from conception to the production of glass at the highest level.

You will benefit from visiting professional practitioners and lecturers and will have the opportunity to participate in live projects and competitions. The curriculum combines programme and student-led activity, delivered through workshops, group seminars and individual tutorials.

You will negotiate and develop a programme of study based on personal areas of practice-based research. We foster interdisciplinary collaboration with other departments creating a unique student experience and rich opportunities for learning.

Programme structure

This programme combines directed and self-directed practice-based studio projects with theoretical and written studies, including professional practice elements to prepare you for employment in the industry, and a lecture/seminar series to examine the wider context of your studies.

The programme focuses on providing the tools of craft and design through comprehensive professional practice workshops, focused on the specific requirements of the designer maker. You will produce a body of practical and written work on an agreed, self-initiated project. MFA students produce an additional extended body of work.

Career opportunities

As a graduate you will discover a diverse range of career opportunities. Alumni have worked within the production of individual designed objects, as lead designers within industry, as gallery representation, on commissioned major public artworks, and in teaching and leading positions within creative practices.

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The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics. Read more

Course Overview

The MA Ceramics Programme’s aim is to enable each student to identify their true interests and concerns as artists, designers or makers and to develop appropriate methods to explore their ideas and articulate or express them effectively in imaginative or innovative ways, through the medium of ceramics.

It also engages students with the key theories and contemporary debates, thus fostering their understandings of the ways in which these influence the development, expression and communication of their ideas, which will impact upon the success of their future practice as artists, makers or academics

Ceramics is a medium in which the practitioner occupies very different positions and frequently has opposing priorities and values drawn from previous personal experiences, technical competence and tacit knowledge.

The MA Ceramics programme is for individuals seeking to extend and develop their practice as well as deepen their knowledge and understandings of the subject, as future practitioners, researchers or academics.

The MA programme allows each student to:
- Develop their authorship of advanced studio work
- Be analytically rigorous
- Develop a greater capacity for reflection

Students are encouraged to challenge norms and question conventions through fusing materiality and concept. This approach is underpinned by a critical and historical approach discourse – a critical language for both fine and applied art and design.

See the website https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/artanddesign/courses/Pages/maceramics.aspx

Course Content

The MA programme is offered as One Year Full Time, or Two Years Part Time.

Students undertake a sequentially designed course to lead seamlessly from one module to the next and finally into the Major study (equivalent to Dissertation of a more theory based MA). There are no options or electives or alternatives to the scheme. The development of these skills have been embedded into specific modules.

The following Modules will be undertaken by MA Ceramics students:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20 Credits)
- MAC7004 Studio Project 1 (40 Credits)
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2 (40 Credits)
- MAC7008 Dissertation (20 Credits)
- MAC7007 Major Project (60 Credits)

Exit points/Awards
- On completing 120 credits in total students will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma.
- On completing 180 credits in total students will be awarded a Master’s Degree (MA Ceramics).

Learning & Teaching

The MA is taught through lecture and seminar with individualised supervisory meetings to develop a learning contract (part of the early Personal Development Planning process [PDP]) and an individualised programme of learning and individualised supervision towards a creative research outcome, defined and monitored by developing PDP.

Our approach to learning and teaching is based on negotiation and dialogue, encouraging students to develop their own, self-directed project to a professional standard within a rigorous yet supportive academic environment. To support this, each student is allocated a Personal Tutor and an additional subject-specialist member of staff (academic tutor) from within the design expertise in a respective design department.

Together, they form the Supervisory Team. The CSAD web application form includes a personal statement, and an outline of the professional or research project that the student wishes to pursue at Masters level. This informs the allocation of personal tutor and subject-specialist member of academic staff (academic tutor) with whom the learning contract is established, which in turn forms the basis for the student’s personal plan, reflected on in the continuing PDP process.

There are opportunities for all MA students to come together in common teaching and presentations, to engage in peer learning groups and peer review of work, and to reflect on the outcomes of these peer reviews in PDP. At several key stages in the MA programme we stress the importance of self-directed and negotiated learning. This is in part a response to what we perceive to be a growing demand for programmes of study that allow students to integrate work, study, career, personal aspirations and other commitments.

All course documentation, including Cardiff Metropolitan University’s Research Studies Manual, CSAD’s Research Study Guide, the MA Ceramics Handbook with module descriptors, assessment guidelines and criteria, will be available as hard copy and electronically. In addition, lecture PowerPoint presentations and workshop-generated material, for example, paragraphs and textual or visual analyses composed during workshops, will be available on the Cardiff Metropolitan University Virtual Learning Environment (VLE).

Remote or electronic contact with staff will be available by email and/or VLE. The supervisory team will deliver, manage and monitor each student's progress through a number of individual and team meetings. Students will also be encouraged to form and maintain peer-learning groups, either face-to-face or online. Learning will be supported through the use of the VLE, electronic communications, and other relevant methods. Any students requiring learning support are advised to contact Learning Support in Student Services. Throughout the programme, students are expected to maintain their own Personal Development Plan/Portfolio (PDP), intended to provide evidence of their knowledge and understanding in relation to the learning outcomes of each module.

Each 20 credits is equivalent to 240 learning hours (80 typically are taught and 160 are directed study or independent study).

Assessment

For each module, assessment is in the form of:
- MAA7001 Research Methods (20credits) Written 3000 word paper
- MAC7004 Studio Project1. (40 credits) Constructing a Discourse’ Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript
- MAC 7006 Studio Project 2. (40 credits)Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation, with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.
- MAC7008 (20 credits) ‘Developing a Theoretical Context for Student’s Studio-Based Practice’. Written 5000 word paper
- MAC7007 Major Project. (60 credits) Presentation of Practical Work Power Point Presentation with 1,000-1500 word transcript Viva Voce.

Support will be available through weekly individual tutorials, group seminars, workshops where practical demonstrations, involving student participation. This may include, for example (Theory), communal writing (via computer and data projector) or group discourse analysis.

Students are encouraged to instigate discussion within and outside of the formal delivery Programme Face book pages and blogs further contribute and facilitate this shared learning experience.

Employability & Careers

The MA Ceramics programme enables students to enhance their careers as, or to become, established artist, designers, makers leading towards a career, or towards a PhD or to a Professional Doctorate in either art or design. Cardiff School of Art and Design offers Professional Doctoral programs in both Art and Design.

The MA Ceramics programme is designed to enable students to achieve the attributes of greater flexibility, adaptability, and individual responsibility and autonomy as professional artists, makers and designers or researchers. It is Internationally recognised that the MA Ceramics programme develops individuality , creativity, self-reliance, initiative, and the ability to perform in rapidly changing environments as well as increasing competence with research skills and methods which will make graduates highly employable as academics and or researchers or enable them to develop an active and sustained practice as artists makers or designers.

The MA Ceramics programme particularly characteristic is that it enable graduates, mid- career and professional practitioners from within and outside of the discipline of Ceramics to negotiate and examine strategies of Practice through the medium of Ceramics and yet being able to create their own hybrids of material based practice that can further enhance the territory that Ceramics can occupy.

All students receive individual Semester based PDP tutorials to support employability and life-long learning. Learning Journal blogs, and continuous visual documentation /text that integrates opportunities for self-reflection in programmes in order to help them develop as effective and confident learners are expected to be maintained throughout the programme of study.

At the conclusion of the programme, a very high percentage of MA graduates establish or continue their professional practice, enabled by the links they have made with galleries or organisations associated with the visual arts. Some elect to continue with ceramics at CSAD by undertaking a PhD.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/scholarships

Find out how to apply here https://www.cardiffmet.ac.uk/howtoapply

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This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. Read more
This course has been designed to offer a genuinely creative methodology and understanding of current and future potential for film experimentation in artists' moving image. This places the programme at the forefront of postgraduate studies exploring moving image in its most creative form. The course offers a range of input from staff in filmmaking, and will enable you to develop a major body of practical work created within the context of a critical understanding of contemporary experimental film theory.

You will have access to our moving image resources and specialised filmmaking equipment, augmented by excellent technical and academic support. To complete a specific project brief, other materials will also be provided, enabling you to meet the learning outcomes of the course and/or project. However, if you choose to develop your own film options requiring additional resources, then you will have to meet any further costs associated with that. View a full list of our current moving image resources.

Key features
-The course provides an exploration of the relationship between film, moving image, sound and critical frameworks. This is supported by the excellent moving image resources at the Knights Park campus, including a moving-image studio, post-production facilities and high-end film equipment. One-to-one tutorials, seminars, exhibitions and discussion all feature in the programme.
-Taught by filmmakers, creative practitioners, curators and writers, including many off-site visits and visits by professional artists, filmmakers and curators. This includes the opportunity to participate in a public screening programme at BFI Southbank, and a seminar forum at FID Marseille International Film Festival.
-Every year, the course nominates a graduate to participate in the European workshop on artists' moving image at the Schermo dell'Arte film festival in Florence, where they receive professional mentoring.

What will you study?

The curriculum offers three distinct areas of critical and practical inquiry options, supported by a specialised seminar/lectures series: artists' moving image; independent film; and the materiality of film.

You will undertake self-initiated research supported by taught modules and an experienced group of research-active staff, and will explore the critical and historical frameworks within which experimental film work can be understood and conceptualised.

Assessment

Presentation and exhibition/screening/documentation, tutorials and seminar/discussion.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list. Those listed here may also be a mixture of core and optional modules.

Core modules
-Project 1
-Theory – Seminar
-Experimental Filmmaking Practices
-Experimentation in Moving Image
-Masters Project (Exhibition and Research Publication)

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