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Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Read more
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Energy Technology research covers many areas, including sustainable technology, conventional technology, and energy efficiency and conservation. The interdisciplinary postgraduate research program in Energy Technology in the School of Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology provides long-term support to our ongoing educational training and fast-developing research in technology in general.

Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of Energy Technology, research and training in the field is integrated with different disciplines so that students can be equipped with the necessary knowledge and experience. The School of Engineering has introduced an Energy Technology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management and Mechanical Engineering. Students can enroll in a particular discipline for research with a special focus on topic(s) in Energy Technology.

The Energy Technology Concentration is open exclusively to research postgraduates in the School of Engineering. Students interested in energy technology can enroll in one of the following research degree programs:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Computer Science and Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The School of Engineering has unrivaled strength in Energy Technology with a strong team of more than 40 faculty members working in one or multiple topics related to energy. The following core research areas represent the current expertise and research activities across the six departments in the School:

Sustainable Technology
Sustainable energy sources including all renewable sources, such as plant matter, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power, improving energy efficiency, fuel cells for transportation and power generation, nanostructured materials for energy storage devices including fuel cells, advanced batteries and supercapacitors, nanostructured electrodes, graphene-based anode and cathode materials, battery system and package management, organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, gasification of biomass for energy production, biorefinery and bioprocessing for energy generation, and innovative technologies for converting and recovering solid wastes into energy.

Production of Ethanol from Cellulosic Materials
Enhanced use of biogas produced from microbial conversion in landfills of municipal solid wastes, wastewater, industrial effluents, and manure wastes, use of planted forests for production of electricity either by direct combustion or by gasification, use of highly efficient gas turbines, energy scavenging for mobile and wireless electronics which enable systems to scavenge power from human activity or derive limited energy from ambient heat, light, radio, or vibrations.

Conventional Technology
Three main types of fossil fuels, namely coal, petroleum, and natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) derived from the production of natural gas, nuclear energy, solid waste treatment and management, radioactive waste treatment, reactor materials, durability and fracture mechanics of reactor materials and structure, nuclear reprocessing, environmental effect of nuclear power, hydropower dam structures, turbine materials and design, hydrology and sediment, water quantity and quality, sources of water, environmental consideration in the design of waterway systems, advanced technologies for conventional energy production, such as gas hydrates, microwave refining, and synthetic fuel involving the conversion process from coal, natural gas and biomass into liquid fuel.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In electronics: energy integration for chemical and energy industries, energy-efficient computation, high-efficiency power electronics, power management integrated circuits, low power ICs, green radio, customized building for energy-saving, LED for solid state lighting, smart grids, wireless sensor networks, battery-powered electronics, and mobile electronics. In energy-efficient building: lightweight heat-insulating building material, customized building for energy-saving, energy-saving from solid state lighting.

Economy and Society
Clean production process for reducing material consumption and pollution, software for waste minimization and pollution prevention, green materials for industrial application and building environment, hazards impacting environmental health, analysis of environmental risk, socio-economic and life-cycle analysis for policy-making and planning, novel compounds from marine organisms, and policy on efficient energy use.

Facilities

A total of six research centers are actively involved in energy-related topics: the Center for Sustainable Energy Technology, Center for Display Research, Center for Advanced Microsystems Packaging, Finetex-HKUST R&D Center, Photonics Technology Center, and Building Energy Research Center at Nansha.

Read less
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Read more
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Energy Technology research covers many areas, including sustainable technology, conventional technology, and energy efficiency and conservation. The interdisciplinary postgraduate research program in Energy Technology in the School of Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology provides long-term support to our ongoing educational training and fast-developing research in technology in general.

Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of Energy Technology, research and training in the field is integrated with different disciplines so that students can be equipped with the necessary knowledge and experience. The School of Engineering has introduced an Energy Technology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management and Mechanical Engineering. Students can enroll in a particular discipline for research with a special focus on topic(s) in Energy Technology.

The Energy Technology Concentration is open exclusively to research postgraduates in the School of Engineering. Students interested in energy technology can enroll in one of the following research degree programs:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Computer Science and Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The School of Engineering has unrivaled strength in Energy Technology with a strong team of more than 40 faculty members working in one or multiple topics related to energy. The following core research areas represent the current expertise and research activities across the six departments in the School:

Sustainable Technology
Sustainable energy sources including all renewable sources, such as plant matter, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power, improving energy efficiency, fuel cells for transportation and power generation, nanostructured materials for energy storage devices including fuel cells, advanced batteries and supercapacitors, nanostructured electrodes, graphene-based anode and cathode materials, battery system and package management, organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, gasification of biomass for energy production, biorefinery and bioprocessing for energy generation, and innovative technologies for converting and recovering solid wastes into energy.

Production of Ethanol from Cellulosic Materials
Enhanced use of biogas produced from microbial conversion in landfills of municipal solid wastes, wastewater, industrial effluents, and manure wastes, use of planted forests for production of electricity either by direct combustion or by gasification, use of highly efficient gas turbines, energy scavenging for mobile and wireless electronics which enable systems to scavenge power from human activity or derive limited energy from ambient heat, light, radio, or vibrations.

Conventional Technology
Three main types of fossil fuels, namely coal, petroleum, and natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) derived from the production of natural gas, nuclear energy, solid waste treatment and management, radioactive waste treatment, reactor materials, durability and fracture mechanics of reactor materials and structure, nuclear reprocessing, environmental effect of nuclear power, hydropower dam structures, turbine materials and design, hydrology and sediment, water quantity and quality, sources of water, environmental consideration in the design of waterway systems, advanced technologies for conventional energy production, such as gas hydrates, microwave refining, and synthetic fuel involving the conversion process from coal, natural gas and biomass into liquid fuel.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In electronics: energy integration for chemical and energy industries, energy-efficient computation, high-efficiency power electronics, power management integrated circuits, low power ICs, green radio, customized building for energy-saving, LED for solid state lighting, smart grids, wireless sensor networks, battery-powered electronics, and mobile electronics. In energy-efficient building: lightweight heat-insulating building material, customized building for energy-saving, energy-saving from solid state lighting.

Economy and Society
Clean production process for reducing material consumption and pollution, software for waste minimization and pollution prevention, green materials for industrial application and building environment, hazards impacting environmental health, analysis of environmental risk, socio-economic and life-cycle analysis for policy-making and planning, novel compounds from marine organisms, and policy on efficient energy use.

Facilities

A total of six research centers are actively involved in energy-related topics: the Center for Sustainable Energy Technology, Center for Display Research, Center for Advanced Microsystems Packaging, Finetex-HKUST R&D Center, Photonics Technology Center, and Building Energy Research Center at Nansha.

Read less
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Read more
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Energy Technology research covers many areas, including sustainable technology, conventional technology, and energy efficiency and conservation. The interdisciplinary postgraduate research program in Energy Technology in the School of Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology provides long-term support to our ongoing educational training and fast-developing research in technology in general.

Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of Energy Technology, research and training in the field is integrated with different disciplines so that students can be equipped with the necessary knowledge and experience. The School of Engineering has introduced an Energy Technology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management and Mechanical Engineering. Students can enroll in a particular discipline for research with a special focus on topic(s) in Energy Technology.

The Energy Technology Concentration is open exclusively to research postgraduates in the School of Engineering. Students interested in energy technology can enroll in one of the following research degree programs:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Computer Science and Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The School of Engineering has unrivaled strength in Energy Technology with a strong team of more than 40 faculty members working in one or multiple topics related to energy. The following core research areas represent the current expertise and research activities across the six departments in the School:

Sustainable Technology
Sustainable energy sources including all renewable sources, such as plant matter, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power, improving energy efficiency, fuel cells for transportation and power generation, nanostructured materials for energy storage devices including fuel cells, advanced batteries and supercapacitors, nanostructured electrodes, graphene-based anode and cathode materials, battery system and package management, organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, gasification of biomass for energy production, biorefinery and bioprocessing for energy generation, and innovative technologies for converting and recovering solid wastes into energy.

Production of Ethanol from Cellulosic Materials
Enhanced use of biogas produced from microbial conversion in landfills of municipal solid wastes, wastewater, industrial effluents, and manure wastes, use of planted forests for production of electricity either by direct combustion or by gasification, use of highly efficient gas turbines, energy scavenging for mobile and wireless electronics which enable systems to scavenge power from human activity or derive limited energy from ambient heat, light, radio, or vibrations.

Conventional Technology
Three main types of fossil fuels, namely coal, petroleum, and natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) derived from the production of natural gas, nuclear energy, solid waste treatment and management, radioactive waste treatment, reactor materials, durability and fracture mechanics of reactor materials and structure, nuclear reprocessing, environmental effect of nuclear power, hydropower dam structures, turbine materials and design, hydrology and sediment, water quantity and quality, sources of water, environmental consideration in the design of waterway systems, advanced technologies for conventional energy production, such as gas hydrates, microwave refining, and synthetic fuel involving the conversion process from coal, natural gas and biomass into liquid fuel.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In electronics: energy integration for chemical and energy industries, energy-efficient computation, high-efficiency power electronics, power management integrated circuits, low power ICs, green radio, customized building for energy-saving, LED for solid state lighting, smart grids, wireless sensor networks, battery-powered electronics, and mobile electronics. In energy-efficient building: lightweight heat-insulating building material, customized building for energy-saving, energy-saving from solid state lighting.

Economy and Society
Clean production process for reducing material consumption and pollution, software for waste minimization and pollution prevention, green materials for industrial application and building environment, hazards impacting environmental health, analysis of environmental risk, socio-economic and life-cycle analysis for policy-making and planning, novel compounds from marine organisms, and policy on efficient energy use.

Facilities

A total of six research centers are actively involved in energy-related topics: the Center for Sustainable Energy Technology, Center for Display Research, Center for Advanced Microsystems Packaging, Finetex-HKUST R&D Center, Photonics Technology Center, and Building Energy Research Center at Nansha.

Read less
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Read more
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Energy Technology research covers many areas, including sustainable technology, conventional technology, and energy efficiency and conservation. The interdisciplinary postgraduate research program in Energy Technology in the School of Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology provides long-term support to our ongoing educational training and fast-developing research in technology in general.

Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of Energy Technology, research and training in the field is integrated with different disciplines so that students can be equipped with the necessary knowledge and experience. The School of Engineering has introduced an Energy Technology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management and Mechanical Engineering. Students can enroll in a particular discipline for research with a special focus on topic(s) in Energy Technology.

The Energy Technology Concentration is open exclusively to research postgraduates in the School of Engineering. Students interested in energy technology can enroll in one of the following research degree programs:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Computer Science and Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The School of Engineering has unrivaled strength in Energy Technology with a strong team of more than 40 faculty members working in one or multiple topics related to energy. The following core research areas represent the current expertise and research activities across the six departments in the School:

Sustainable Technology
Sustainable energy sources including all renewable sources, such as plant matter, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power, improving energy efficiency, fuel cells for transportation and power generation, nanostructured materials for energy storage devices including fuel cells, advanced batteries and supercapacitors, nanostructured electrodes, graphene-based anode and cathode materials, battery system and package management, organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, gasification of biomass for energy production, biorefinery and bioprocessing for energy generation, and innovative technologies for converting and recovering solid wastes into energy.

Production of Ethanol from Cellulosic Materials
Enhanced use of biogas produced from microbial conversion in landfills of municipal solid wastes, wastewater, industrial effluents, and manure wastes, use of planted forests for production of electricity either by direct combustion or by gasification, use of highly efficient gas turbines, energy scavenging for mobile and wireless electronics which enable systems to scavenge power from human activity or derive limited energy from ambient heat, light, radio, or vibrations.

Conventional Technology
Three main types of fossil fuels, namely coal, petroleum, and natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) derived from the production of natural gas, nuclear energy, solid waste treatment and management, radioactive waste treatment, reactor materials, durability and fracture mechanics of reactor materials and structure, nuclear reprocessing, environmental effect of nuclear power, hydropower dam structures, turbine materials and design, hydrology and sediment, water quantity and quality, sources of water, environmental consideration in the design of waterway systems, advanced technologies for conventional energy production, such as gas hydrates, microwave refining, and synthetic fuel involving the conversion process from coal, natural gas and biomass into liquid fuel.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In electronics: energy integration for chemical and energy industries, energy-efficient computation, high-efficiency power electronics, power management integrated circuits, low power ICs, green radio, customized building for energy-saving, LED for solid state lighting, smart grids, wireless sensor networks, battery-powered electronics, and mobile electronics. In energy-efficient building: lightweight heat-insulating building material, customized building for energy-saving, energy-saving from solid state lighting.

Economy and Society
Clean production process for reducing material consumption and pollution, software for waste minimization and pollution prevention, green materials for industrial application and building environment, hazards impacting environmental health, analysis of environmental risk, socio-economic and life-cycle analysis for policy-making and planning, novel compounds from marine organisms, and policy on efficient energy use.

Facilities

A total of six research centers are actively involved in energy-related topics: the Center for Sustainable Energy Technology, Center for Display Research, Center for Advanced Microsystems Packaging, Finetex-HKUST R&D Center, Photonics Technology Center, and Building Energy Research Center at Nansha.

Read less
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Read more
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Energy Technology research covers many areas, including sustainable technology, conventional technology, and energy efficiency and conservation. The interdisciplinary postgraduate research program in Energy Technology in the School of Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology provides long-term support to our ongoing educational training and fast-developing research in technology in general.

Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of Energy Technology, research and training in the field is integrated with different disciplines so that students can be equipped with the necessary knowledge and experience. The School of Engineering has introduced an Energy Technology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management and Mechanical Engineering. Students can enroll in a particular discipline for research with a special focus on topic(s) in Energy Technology.

The Energy Technology Concentration is open exclusively to research postgraduates in the School of Engineering. Students interested in energy technology can enroll in one of the following research degree programs:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Computer Science and Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The School of Engineering has unrivaled strength in Energy Technology with a strong team of more than 40 faculty members working in one or multiple topics related to energy. The following core research areas represent the current expertise and research activities across the six departments in the School:

Sustainable Technology
Sustainable energy sources including all renewable sources, such as plant matter, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power, improving energy efficiency, fuel cells for transportation and power generation, nanostructured materials for energy storage devices including fuel cells, advanced batteries and supercapacitors, nanostructured electrodes, graphene-based anode and cathode materials, battery system and package management, organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, gasification of biomass for energy production, biorefinery and bioprocessing for energy generation, and innovative technologies for converting and recovering solid wastes into energy.

Production of Ethanol from Cellulosic Materials
Enhanced use of biogas produced from microbial conversion in landfills of municipal solid wastes, wastewater, industrial effluents, and manure wastes, use of planted forests for production of electricity either by direct combustion or by gasification, use of highly efficient gas turbines, energy scavenging for mobile and wireless electronics which enable systems to scavenge power from human activity or derive limited energy from ambient heat, light, radio, or vibrations.

Conventional Technology
Three main types of fossil fuels, namely coal, petroleum, and natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) derived from the production of natural gas, nuclear energy, solid waste treatment and management, radioactive waste treatment, reactor materials, durability and fracture mechanics of reactor materials and structure, nuclear reprocessing, environmental effect of nuclear power, hydropower dam structures, turbine materials and design, hydrology and sediment, water quantity and quality, sources of water, environmental consideration in the design of waterway systems, advanced technologies for conventional energy production, such as gas hydrates, microwave refining, and synthetic fuel involving the conversion process from coal, natural gas and biomass into liquid fuel.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In electronics: energy integration for chemical and energy industries, energy-efficient computation, high-efficiency power electronics, power management integrated circuits, low power ICs, green radio, customized building for energy-saving, LED for solid state lighting, smart grids, wireless sensor networks, battery-powered electronics, and mobile electronics. In energy-efficient building: lightweight heat-insulating building material, customized building for energy-saving, energy-saving from solid state lighting.

Economy and Society
Clean production process for reducing material consumption and pollution, software for waste minimization and pollution prevention, green materials for industrial application and building environment, hazards impacting environmental health, analysis of environmental risk, socio-economic and life-cycle analysis for policy-making and planning, novel compounds from marine organisms, and policy on efficient energy use.

Facilities

A total of six research centers are actively involved in energy-related topics: the Center for Sustainable Energy Technology, Center for Display Research, Center for Advanced Microsystems Packaging, Finetex-HKUST R&D Center, Photonics Technology Center, and Building Energy Research Center at Nansha.

Read less
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Read more
Energy has been considered a core research area within the broadly-based disciplines of environmental science and technology. It is one of the most salient emerging disciplines amongst many in the fields of engineering, science and social science. Energy Technology research covers many areas, including sustainable technology, conventional technology, and energy efficiency and conservation. The interdisciplinary postgraduate research program in Energy Technology in the School of Engineering at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology provides long-term support to our ongoing educational training and fast-developing research in technology in general.

Due to the multi-disciplinary nature of Energy Technology, research and training in the field is integrated with different disciplines so that students can be equipped with the necessary knowledge and experience. The School of Engineering has introduced an Energy Technology Concentration in different disciplines including Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electronic and Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management and Mechanical Engineering. Students can enroll in a particular discipline for research with a special focus on topic(s) in Energy Technology.

The Energy Technology Concentration is open exclusively to research postgraduates in the School of Engineering. Students interested in energy technology can enroll in one of the following research degree programs:
-MPhil/PhD in Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Civil Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Computer Science and Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Electronic and Computer Engineering
-MPhil/PhD in Industrial Engineering and Logistics Management
-MPhil/PhD in Mechanical Engineering

Research Foci

The School of Engineering has unrivaled strength in Energy Technology with a strong team of more than 40 faculty members working in one or multiple topics related to energy. The following core research areas represent the current expertise and research activities across the six departments in the School:

Sustainable Technology
Sustainable energy sources including all renewable sources, such as plant matter, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power, improving energy efficiency, fuel cells for transportation and power generation, nanostructured materials for energy storage devices including fuel cells, advanced batteries and supercapacitors, nanostructured electrodes, graphene-based anode and cathode materials, battery system and package management, organic and inorganic photovoltaic materials, gasification of biomass for energy production, biorefinery and bioprocessing for energy generation, and innovative technologies for converting and recovering solid wastes into energy.

Production of Ethanol from Cellulosic Materials
Enhanced use of biogas produced from microbial conversion in landfills of municipal solid wastes, wastewater, industrial effluents, and manure wastes, use of planted forests for production of electricity either by direct combustion or by gasification, use of highly efficient gas turbines, energy scavenging for mobile and wireless electronics which enable systems to scavenge power from human activity or derive limited energy from ambient heat, light, radio, or vibrations.

Conventional Technology
Three main types of fossil fuels, namely coal, petroleum, and natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) derived from the production of natural gas, nuclear energy, solid waste treatment and management, radioactive waste treatment, reactor materials, durability and fracture mechanics of reactor materials and structure, nuclear reprocessing, environmental effect of nuclear power, hydropower dam structures, turbine materials and design, hydrology and sediment, water quantity and quality, sources of water, environmental consideration in the design of waterway systems, advanced technologies for conventional energy production, such as gas hydrates, microwave refining, and synthetic fuel involving the conversion process from coal, natural gas and biomass into liquid fuel.

Energy Efficiency and Conservation
In electronics: energy integration for chemical and energy industries, energy-efficient computation, high-efficiency power electronics, power management integrated circuits, low power ICs, green radio, customized building for energy-saving, LED for solid state lighting, smart grids, wireless sensor networks, battery-powered electronics, and mobile electronics. In energy-efficient building: lightweight heat-insulating building material, customized building for energy-saving, energy-saving from solid state lighting.

Economy and Society
Clean production process for reducing material consumption and pollution, software for waste minimization and pollution prevention, green materials for industrial application and building environment, hazards impacting environmental health, analysis of environmental risk, socio-economic and life-cycle analysis for policy-making and planning, novel compounds from marine organisms, and policy on efficient energy use.

Facilities

A total of six research centers are actively involved in energy-related topics: the Center for Sustainable Energy Technology, Center for Display Research, Center for Advanced Microsystems Packaging, Finetex-HKUST R&D Center, Photonics Technology Center, and Building Energy Research Center at Nansha.

Read less
The Advanced Technology programme has been designed to allow you to study a range of engineering and technology subjects at postgraduate level. Read more
The Advanced Technology programme has been designed to allow you to study a range of engineering and technology subjects at postgraduate level. It offers a choice of flexible options – you can choose to study full time at the University, to combine work and study (where the majority of your study will be based in your place of work) or to study by distance learning, if that suits you best. This course provides an opportunity for you to earn a Masters degree by studying in different formats, in work, distance learning of full time. There are a number of prescribed subtitles of MSc Advanced Technology:
-Mechanical Engineering
-Electronic Engineering
-Electrical Engineering
-Technology Management
-Energy Technology
-Design Technology
-Sports Technology
-Digital Media Technology

You can also negotiate to study in a different area that the faculty can support using the MSc Advanced Technology title.

Course content

Work Based Study
Your work may already be of Masters level, using the MSc Advanced Technology award you can get full recognition for it by submitting it towards a Masters degree from Staffordshire University. This is also a way in which your employer may provide an opportunity for you to further your education in areas of study directly related to your employment thus making you a more efficient employee. Virtually all parts of the course can be studied at your place of work. You need to attend the University only to maintain contact with tutors and to present your work at seminars.

Part Time Study
This is for students who are employed in industry in a capacity which provides an appropriate setting for MSc study. You will be assigned a supervisor who will guide your studies throughout the course. Your supervisor will set assignments for you and will recommend material for you to study as required to complete your assignments by self study. Your supervisor will be available for consultation via email, phone etc.

Full Time Study
This course is primarily offered on a part time basis, but you can also study full time if you wish. You will need to be available at Staffordshire University full time during teaching semesters. You may be given taught classes to attend as part of your studies for Modules 1, 2 and 3. These classes will be selected to provide appropriate contributions to your course of study, but will not provide all the content required for all of the modules.

You will also be assigned a supervisor who will give you additional assignments for self study to complete the requirements for Modules 1, 2 and 3. Your supervisor will recommend study material as required for you to complete these assignments. Your supervisor will be available for consultation on a weekly or bi-weekly basis.

All students study the same four modules below, however, the contents of each module vary depending on the subject areas you have chosen for your project. Supervising staff assist students in identifying and defining the detail of the module content, much of which is based on research and project work. Whilst most study and assessment is assignment based, you also have the opportunity to attend appropriate formal lectures at the University.

Module 1 Project Management and Research Methods (30 credits) provides basic knowledge of project management techniques and research methods required for industrial research and development work and to undertake MSc project work. It also teaches you how to communicate the findings in a concise and professional manner.

Module 2 Advanced Technology (30 credits) refreshes and enhances your knowledge in a broad range of interrelated subject areas within the chosen discipline. If you plan to proceed to an MSc, the material studied in this module provides a broad foundation for the research topic chosen for Module 4.

Module 3 Specialist Technology (60 credits) provides a high level of technical expertise in a specialist area for students who wish to graduate with a postgraduate diploma. It also provides the required specialists technical knowledge required to proceed to the MSc project in Module 4.

Module 4 MSc Project and Thesis (60 credits) lets you apply the material studied in the previous modules to an advanced research project. It prepares you for planning and undertaking leading edge industry based research and development work with a high degree of competence and minimal supervision.

Employment opportunities

Many students take this course as a way of securing promotion or use it to cover the further learning requirements to gain Chartered Engineering status. Other options on graduation are progression to further study of MPhil or PhD qualifications.

Read less
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. Read more

About the programme

The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. The first year of courses is taught at the ULB Engineering Campus in Brussels, while the second year is taught at VUB.

This Master offers

- An in-depth understanding of the main aspects of analysis and design of all kinds of advanced load-bearing constructions, as well as of material technology.
- Strong links with a wide range of industrial organisations in all branches of engineering, including civil engineering consultants, contractors, public service organisations and materials suppliers.
These help to provide an exciting and industrially relevant environment for study and project work throughout the degree courses.

Focus on design and analysis of advanced structures

The main objectives of this master programme are to develop an in-depth understanding of the main aspects of analysis and design of all kinds of advanced load-bearing constructions, as well as of material technology. Important issues are the optimization of the form of the structure, the selection of the materials and the construction method in terms of mechanical properties, environmental impact, life cycle cost and sustainability. Both conventional reinforced and pre-stressed concrete or steel structures and systems in novel materials (fibre reinforced, cellular, hybrids...) are considered.

A competent civil engineer within broad range of technical skills

In addition, the objective is to provide civil engineers within a broad range of technical skills which will enable them to take a professional approach to civil engineering problems, to gather and assimilate the required information in an efficient manner, to formulate and implement a solution method and to execute and administer the projects they are involved in.

Conduct scientific research in critical and self-reliant manner

This balanced training is closely linked to scientific research in related fields. This will serve as a basis for 'lifelong learning'. In particular, the education shall provide the necessary knowledge and competences to conduct scientific research in a critical and self-reliant manner or as a member of a team. This Master provides a profound scientific background to the design and construction of all kinds of advanced load-bearing systems, as well as the required competences and attitudes to become a responsible staff member.

Generic skills

Practicing the profession of Civil Engineer involves a number of generic skills, including:
- reasoning skills: logical thinking and spatial vision
- communication skills: the ability to compile reports and hold presentations
- managerial skills: planning, organizing and leading activities, efficient time management
- interpersonal and social skills: a sense of responsibility and teamwork
- creativity and entrepreneurial spirit
- awareness of the necessity of ongoing training in recent technological, industrial and scientific developments

Student profile

You are interested in becoming a competent civil engineer with a broad range of technical skills
You are someone with good reasoning skills, logical thinking and spatial vision and would like to study in an international environment
You are someone who enjoys working in close contact with professors and wants to study in the capital of Europe

Curriculum

Available on http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/civil-engineering/programme

The standard track in Master of Science in Civil Engineering (120 ECTS) is made up of 4 modules:
1) compulsory common courses (60 ECTS)
2) option blocks (1 option to choose out of 3 that are provided, 16 ECTS each)
3) electives (thematic lists) (20 ECTS to choose)
4) the Master Thesis (24 ECTS)

Each of the modules should be succesfully completed to obtain the master degree. The student must respect the specified registration requirements. The Curriculum Board strongly suggests the student to follow the standard learning track. Only this model track can guarantee a timeschedule without overlaps of the compulsory course units.

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The 18-credit Graduate Diploma in Technology-enhanced Learning and Design combines the learnings from the Graduate Certificate in Instructional Design with three essential components of the Master of Arts in Learning and Technology program at Royal Roads University. Read more
The 18-credit Graduate Diploma in Technology-enhanced Learning and Design combines the learnings from the Graduate Certificate in Instructional Design with three essential components of the Master of Arts in Learning and Technology program at Royal Roads University. By combining the two programs you will have access to, and a better understanding of, the pedagogical foundation required to effectively design in a technology-enhanced learning environment.

To tailor your program to better fit your specific learning requirements, you will choose three courses from the RRU Master of Arts in Learning and Technology curriculum:
-Community Building Processes For Online Learning Environments
-Choosing and Using Learning Technology
-Supporting Learners In Technology-Mediated Environments (subject to enrolment)
-Leadership, Learning and Technology (subject to enrolment)
-International and Global Distance Education

Who Is it For?

This diploma program is ideal for educators, trainers, and developers from within the private and public sectors seeking new skills to advance their career or begin a new one. The current marketplace is seeking applicants with a formal background in instructional design as well as the ability to work within technology-enhanced learning environments.

You’ll have the opportunity to use your real-world experience and apply what you are learning through the use of a variety of proven-effective online methodologies and approaches, strategically paired with today’s best practices in the field of learning. You’ll practice the theoretical concepts learned in the classroom on a variety of situations, ensuring you develop practical experience with tools you can use within your organization. Today.

Core Competencies

Developing an effective learning environment that uses technology-assisted learning tools requires hard work, great leadership, and a thorough understanding of the current and future needs of your organization.

Through completion of this program, you will have demonstrated your ability to:
-Communicate effectively
-Research and recommend appropriate learning strategies
-Employ instructional technologies to support learning
-Apply knowledge of relevant learning theory to thoroughly critique online or blending learning materials
-Demonstrate your knowledge of the principles of graphic design

Outcomes

This 12-month, 18-credit program was developed to provide instructional designers in traditional education or corporate environments with the skills requested within the current job market. The online course provides opportunities to refine your skills to advance in your current position or begin a new career at your ideal organization.

Graduates of this diploma program will have displayed their proficiency within the following areas:
-Creating effective presentations using appropriate media and techniques
-Applying critical thinking to the integration of knowledge and practice
-Collecting information and data from a variety of sources
-Employing a critical analysis approach to make appropriate recommendations
-Facilitating effective teamwork
-Effectively producing written material
-Identifying appropriate research methodologies to investigate issues or problems
-Developing on-line curriculum that aligns with best practices in instructional design

The Graduate Diploma in Technology-enhanced Learning and Design is an applied program, meaning you’ll have multiple opportunities to test your new skills within a safe and supportive environment.

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This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

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This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine. Read more
This programme is unique in teaching the collective history of science, medicine, environment and technology. It is also unique as it offers modules that combine imperial, ethical, and military history with general areas of history of science and medicine.

You learn from experts working in these diverse fields, being taught how different societies, cultures, and races have conceptualised disease, reacted to changes in environment and created different technological artefacts and scientific knowledge. You are introduced to the major and recent historiographical and methodological approaches, become familiar with the main archives in the UK and encouraged to approach the history of medicine, science, environment and technology from past as well as contemporary concerns.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/83/history-of-science-medicine-environment-and-technology

About the School of History

The School of History at the University of Kent offers a great environment in which to research and study. Situated in a beautiful cathedral city with its own dynamic history, the University is within easy reach of the main London archives and is convenient for travelling to mainland Europe.

The School of History is a lively, research-led department where postgraduate students are given the opportunity to work alongside academics recognised as experts in their respective fields. The School was placed eighth nationally for research intensity in the most recent Research Excellence Framework, and consistently scores highly in the National Student Survey.

There is a good community spirit within the School, which includes regular postgraduate social meetings, weekly seminars and a comprehensive training programme with the full involvement of the School’s academic staff. Thanks to the wide range of teaching and research interests in the School, we can offer equally wide scope for research supervision covering British, European, African and American history.

At present, there are particularly strong groupings of research students in medieval and early modern cultural and social history, early modern religious history, the history and cultural studies of science and medicine, the medicine, the history of propaganda, military history, war and the media, and the history of Kent.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

HI878 - Methods and Interpretations of Historical Research (30 credits)
HI866 - Science and Medicine in Context (30 credits)
HI817 - Deformed, Deranged and Deviant (30 credits)
HI827 - Home Front Britain, 1914-18 (30 credits)
HI857 - Geiger Counter at Ground Zero: Explorations of Nuclear America (30 credits)
HI881 - Museums, Material Culture and the History of Science (30 credits)
HI883 - Work Placement (30 credits)

Assessment

All courses are assessed by coursework, and the dissertation counts for half the final grade (comprising one third assessed preparation, two thirds actual dissertation).

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- place the study of texts, images and documentaries in their historical contexts, at the centre of student learning and analysis

- ensure that students of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology acquire a comprehensive knowledge and understanding of the historical modes of theory and analysis

- enable you to understand and use concepts, approaches and methods of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology in different academic contexts and develop an understanding of the differing and contested aspects between, and within, the relevant disciplines

- develop your capacities to think critically about past events and experiences

- encourage you to relate the academic study of the history of science, medicine, environment and technology to questions of public debate and concern

- promote a curriculum supported by scholarship, staff development and a research culture that promotes breadth and depth of intellectual enquiry and debate

- assist you to develop cognitive and transferable skills relevant to your vocational and personal development.

Study support

Postgraduate resources
The resources for historical research at Kent are led by the University’s Templeman Library: a designated European Documentation Centre which holds specialised collections on slavery and antislavery, and on medical science. The Library has a substantial collection of secondary materials to back-up an excellent collection of primary sources including the British Cartoon Archive, newspapers, a large audio-visual library, and a complete set of British Second World War Ministry of Information propaganda pamphlets.

The School has a dedicated Centre for the Study of Propaganda and War, which has a distinctive archive of written, audio and visual propaganda materials, particularly in film, video and DVD. Locally, you have access to: the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archive (a major collection for the study of medieval and early modern religious and social history); the Centre for Kentish Studies at Maidstone; and the National Maritime Collection at Greenwich. Kent is also within easy reach of the country’s premier research collections in London and the national libraries in Paris and Brussels.

Dynamic publishing culture
Staff publish regularly and widely in journals, conference proceedings and books. Among others, they have recently contributed to: Journal of Contemporary History; English Historical Review; British Journal for the History of Science; Technology and Culture; and War and Society.

Global Skills Award
All students registered for a taught Master's programme are eligible to apply for a place on our Global Skills Award Programme (http://www.kent.ac.uk/graduateschool/skills/programmes/gsa.html). The programme is designed to broaden your understanding of global issues and current affairs as well as to develop personal skills which will enhance your employability

Research areas

Medieval and early modern history
Covering c400–c1500, incorporating such themes as Anglo-Saxon England, early-modern France, palaeography, British and European politics and society, religion and papacy.

Modern history
Covering c1500–present, incorporating such themes as modern British, European and American history, British military history, and 20th-century conflict and propaganda.

History of science, technology and medicine
Incorporating such themes as colonial science and medicine, Nazi medicine, eugenics, science and technology in 19th-century Britain.

Careers

As the job market becomes increasingly competitive, postgraduate qualifications are becoming more attractive to employers seeking individuals who have finely tuned skills and abilities, which our programmes encourage you to hone. As a result of the valuable transferable skills developed during your course of study, career prospects for history graduates are wide ranging. Our graduates go on to a variety of careers, from research within the government to teaching, politics to records management and journalism, to working within museums and galleries – to name but a few.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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MA Material Futures explores the intersection of craft, science and technology encouraging students to look beyond existing boundaries to anticipate future needs, desires, and challenges. Read more

Introduction

MA Material Futures explores the intersection of craft, science and technology encouraging students to look beyond existing boundaries to anticipate future needs, desires, and challenges. Taking materiality as the starting point of the design process we integrate high and low technological materials and processes, pursuing relevant applications across fashion, architecture, product design, and communication & critical design.

Observing and analysing how we live today allows us to consider how we can live better tomorrow. Considering the current and future context of design decisions is core to our ethos, combining social, political and economic inquiry to inform future, sustainable design applications.

Content

The 21st century marks the beginning of a new textile revolution - one we believe is smart, invisible, sustainable, ethical and poetic.

MA Material Futures is part of the Jewellery and Textiles programme. The MA Material Futures ethos is to approach textile design as a form of industrial design but with a focus on the language and codes inherent to textiles. By exploring key contextual questions to interrogate, critique and propose new design concepts, we invite our designers to engage fully with the challenges of designing for the 21st century. How do we reconcile ecology and smart technology? With current progress in nanotechnologies, how do we engineer invisible functions with new aesthetics? How can biomimicry principles inform the design of resilient textiles? Will scientists become designers? With digital fabrications becoming mainstream, what future for craft? How can textiles lead to the development of smart interactive interface? Can textiles inform a new way to imagine architecture? These are examples of questions MA Material Futures will consider over the two year postgraduate programme.

Smart textiles, invisible performance, sustainable and ethical issues as much as poetics and aesthetics call for new design perspectives. Crossover with other design disciplines as well as with science and socio-economics are more pertinent than ever. Rapid changes in culture, economics and technology need dynamic designers who can propose and realise intelligent, responsible innovations with strategic thought, leadership and personal vision. The MA Material Futures course aims at equipping designers with critical skills to design for our future selves and provides a 'think-tank' in which to cultivate ideas, reflect on individual practice, and challenge the boundaries of textile design.

Structure

MA Material Futures lasts 60 weeks structured as two consecutive periods of 30 weeks each (i.e. two academic years) in its 'extended full-time mode'.

MA Material Futures is credit rated at 180 credits, and comprises 2 units:

Unit 1 (60 credits) lasts 20 weeks
Unit 2 (120 credits) runs for 10 weeks in the first year and 30 weeks in the second year.

Both units must be passed in order to achieve the MA, but the classification of the award of MA derives from your mark for Unit 2 only.

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If you are a scientist or technologist wanting transition into an industry with exciting career opportunities or are already involved in the leather industry but wanting to increase your knowledge and skills, this is an ideal course for you. Read more
If you are a scientist or technologist wanting transition into an industry with exciting career opportunities or are already involved in the leather industry but wanting to increase your knowledge and skills, this is an ideal course for you.

Here at the Institute for Creative Leather Technologies (ICLT), you will cover the science and technology of leather manufacture in a way designed to suit graduates for senior tannery positions. Whilst developing the critical mind it provides an excellent base for a move into Research and Development departments within chemical companies, tanneries and brands or into academic careers.

Leather is returning to prominence as nearly all alternatives require using up non-renewable carbon-based materials. Scientific advances in conjunction with environmental responsibility have transformed the leather manufacture industry into a modern scientific process, creating a highly sustainable material with high value in many sectors such as sports, automobiles, luxury goods and fashion.

Northampton graduates have been at the forefront of these changes making our leather alumni one of the best bodies in the industry to be associated with. Successful graduates from this course can expect easy access into senior industry positions.

This course is ideal for embedding into corporate continuing personal development (CPD) programmes. Taking this into account, ICLT delivers the course in a way that enables employees to only be away from their place of work for three months between September and December. During this period the theoretical and practical elements of the course are delivered in an intensive manner, after which the employees are able to return to their workplace to continue with their assessments and research elements of the programme. The course also enables students to study in the traditional manner where they stay at University for the whole academic year if desired.

As one of the foremost centres for leather education in the world, ICLT is dedicated to providing cutting edge education and training in the theory and practice of leather technology at the highest level.

If you do not meet our standard entry requirements, it is possible to undertake a single or a number of modules. The non-credit bearing course is called ‘Professional Leather Development’ Course, for further information about this course please visit the Professional Leather Development Course page: https://www.northampton.ac.uk/study/courses/professional-leather-development-course/

Course content

The MSc Leather Technology (Professional) course is unique in that it aims to provide the opportunity to acquire and/or enhance technical skills within the subject of leather technology. Students will study within an environment that encourages the development of intellectual creativity as well as providing transferable skills to undertake research with respect to advanced technologies, developing skills and flexibility necessary to discriminate between technical and entrepreneurial issues and relating these to the needs of the leather industry such as successful management of the commercial operations.

This course offers students the opportunity to work and learn in a state-of-the-art teaching tannery for some of the modules, and will also be working with staff with a mix of academic and industrial experience. Many of the staff carry out research in various leather subjects and over the last 20 years Northampton leather research has built a leading world-wide reputation.

Industry leaders are frequent visitors to meet students and provide knowledge on current technical and commercial aspects of leather and its fascinating chain from farm to fashion or one of its many other end uses.

The MSc Leather Technology (Professional) course is delivered to meet student flexibility. In order for you to complete Master’s level qualification, you must complete up to seven modules and an independent research dissertation. During the course, you will complete six compulsory modules and choose up to two optional modules. This ensures that you have a basic understanding of principles pertinent to the leather industry with an added advantage in that you are able tailor the course to meet your particular needs and career aspirations.

Further information on the indicative content of the leather modules is available through the module catalogue for Leather Technology (Level 7).

Course modules (16/17)

-Leather Process Operations
-Performance Leather Process Operations
-Quality Evaluation and Systematic Problem Solving
-Sustainable Manufacture within the Leather Industry
-Research and Analytical Methods
-Dissertation
-From Hide to High Street
-Leather Science
-Marketing: Principles and Management
-International Marketing Strategy
-Managing Operations
-Podiatry: Applied to the Footwear Industry
-Wastes Management

Methods of Learning

Theoretical lectures and seminars are reinforced by practical examples, case studies and site visits. Our virtual learning environment allows you and course tutors to exchange ideas as well as submit assignments.

Assessments

A variety of approaches to teaching is used such as lectures, seminars, workshops, practical sessions with course teaching materials made available through our virtual learning environment. Modules are assessed by a wide range of methods and include the following: practical reports, seminar files, reflective portfolios, presentations and dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

As the UK’s only university to integrate leather technology with subjects such as fashion, marketing, business and the environment, we are proud to house an on campus working tannery for practical leather making as well as laboratories to enable leather testing.
-100% employment of graduates in 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014.
-This course is unique to the University of Northampton and not offered anywhere else in the UK or Europe.
-The University has an on campus tannery and laboratories for teaching.
-Modules to cater for leather career choices in practical leather making and testing.
-Industry-led practical workshops and seminars in technology and supply chain knowledge delivered by international experts.
-Continual networking with potential employers within the industry.
-Opportunities to attend international leather fairs in Hong Kong, Milan and Shanghai.
-Bursaries and scholarships available for leather students.

Careers

Graduates of this course are in high demand and are able to secure suitable posts in leather making or associated industries, including technical management, research and development, technical services, higher education and government bodies. When it comes to jobs in the leather industry, demand exceeds supply and opportunities are available worldwide with excellent progression prospects. Employment opportunities can also be found in other materials production or chemical industries. Successful graduates from this course can also proceed to undertake MPhil or PhD studies with us.

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The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. Read more

About the programme

The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. The first year of courses is taught at the ULB Engineering Campus in Brussels, while the second year is taught at VUB.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering educates students to become innovative engineers who will contribute to their profession and to society. Engineers in chemistry and materials play a unique role in sustainable development, where they must manage resources, energy and the environment in order to develop and produce novel materials and chemical commodities. Our graduates are prepared to face the demands of the modern technological employment field and for an international career with English as their professional language.

Course content

The Master in Chemical and Material Engineering (120 ECTS) offers a solid core of courses in both of these engineering fields. The integrated and the multidisciplinary approach provides students up-to-date knowledge enabling them to propose innovative engineering solutions in numerous modern technological sectors. Students have the possibility to specialize in Process technology or Material Science.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering program consists of two profiles: Process Technology and Materials.

Profile: Process Technology:
The Process Technology orientation trains students to become engineers who are employable and innovative both in production units (operation and optimization of production facilities) and in engineering groups (develop new production units that meet desired performance specifications). An emphasis is placed on the biotechnology and food industries. Students are also trained to identify, solve and avoid environmental problems including waste management, water, air and soil pollution.

Profile: Materials:
The Materials orientation prepares students for the materials and materials technology sectors (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites). Students are trained to become creative engineers capable of designing sustainable multi-functional materials which meet specific applications. Students also have the capacity to contribute to the whole life-cycle of materials from their processing into semi or full end products using environmentally friendly and safe production processes to their recycling.

Become a skilled scientific engineer

This Master offers:
- a unique interdisciplinary programme which prepares you for employment in a professional field related to chemical engineering, materials or environmental technology.
- a high level scientific education that prepares you to a wide range of job profiles.
- the possibility to work in close contact with professors who are internationally recognized in their own disciplines and favor interactive learning.

Curriculum

http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/chemical-and-materials-engineering/programme

The programme is built up modularly:
1) the Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS)
2) the Specific Profile Courses (30 ECTS)
3) the master thesis (24 ECTS)
4) electives (10 ECTS) from 1 out of 3 options.
Each of the modules should be succesfully completed to obtain the master degree. The student must respect the specified registration requirements. The educational board strongly suggests the student to follow the standard learning track. Only this model track can guarantee a timeschedule without overlaps of the compulsory course units.

Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering:
The Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS) is spread over 2 years: 46 ECTS in the first and 10 ECTS in the second year. The Common Core emphasizes the interaction between process- and materials technology by a chemical (molecular) approach. The Common Core consists out of courses related to chemistry, process technology and materials and is the basis for the Process Technology and the Materials profiles.

Specific Courses Profile Materials:
The profile 'Materials' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Materials I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Materials II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds material-technological courses to the common core.

Specific Courses Profile Process Technology:
The profile 'Process Technology' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Process Technology I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Process Technology II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds process technological courses to the common core.

Elective Courses:
The elective courses are divided into 3 options:
- Option 1: Internship (10 ECTS)
- Option 2: Elective courses (incl. internship of 6 ECTS)
- Option 3: Entrepreneurship
The student has to select one option and at least 10 ECTS within that option. All options belong to the 2nd year of the model learning track.

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