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Masters Degrees (Material Science)

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This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts. Read more
This programme gives you the opportunity to study the main contexts of contemporary science and technology; gain a broad base in science policy, communication, sociology and engagement; enjoy flexibility in specialisation; and work in an interdisciplinary environment with research experts.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in three disciplines: science policy and governance; science communication, engagement, and evaluation; and sociology of modern science and technology. This programme encourages specialised investigation. It also encourages interdisciplinary integration. Our degree works in dialogue with our sister MSc programme in History and Philosophy of Science, which adds historical and analytical depth to our offer.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) Postgraduate Diploma students undertake modules to the value of 120 credits: one core (15 credits), four optional (60 credits), and three ancillary (45 credits), studied over one year. Postgraduate Certificate students undertake modules to the value of 60 credits. The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), and three optional modules (45 credits), studied over one year.

Core module
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students must take three modules from a prescribed list of options including:
-Practical Science Communication and Engagement
-Curating the History of Science
-Responsible Science and Emerging Technologies
-Science in the 20th Century and Beyond
-Science Policy Beyond Borders
-Science, Media, and Culture
-Science, Security, and Social Research
-Sociology and the Sociology of Science
-Special Topics Seminar in STS
-Ancillary Modules

Students must take two ancillary modules which may be options from our own degrees, for example, Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century OR, Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science, OR, they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/report
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work, and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training and study for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in several fields, and also provides appropriate training and qualifications sought by individuals pursuing careers in areas such as education, museum and archival curatorship, or administration and policy-making in science, engineering and health care.

Employability
The programme offers a range of transferable skills and networking opportunities. No matter whether your career plan looks towards the public or private sector, we can help you build a portfolio of skills and contacts that will give your CV the edge. Highlights of the programme include:

the chance to develop practical media skills, including audio production
learning to write for different audiences
developing your skills in both practical and theoretical science communication, including working in a major London museum
to meet and network with policy makers.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation. Read more
This programme offers breadth across a wide range of historical and philosophical themes. It also encourages intensive investigation and specialisation: a survey of nearly 3,000 years of scientific ideas and communities, and an exploration of the inner workings of science's methods and theories.

Degree information

The programme provides broad-based training in the history of science, the philosophy of science, and an “integrated history and philosophy of science”. The historical coverage is broad, from antiquity to the present, while the philosophical coverage spans causality and the philosophy of medicine as well as the metaphysics of chemistry and computer science.

MSc students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), three ancillary modules (45 credits), and a dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma programme consists of one core module (15 credits), four optional modules (60 credits) and three ancillary modules (45 credits), available in full time mode. The Postgraduate Certificate programme consists of one core module (15 credits) and three optional modules (45 credits), available in full time mode.

Core modules
-Introduction to Science and Technology Studies

Optional modules - students choose four options from the following:
-Science in the 19th Century
-Material Culture and Science in the 18th Century
-Early Modern Science
-Medieval Science and Medicine in Global Perspective
-Science in Antiquity
-Causality, Mechanism, and Classification in Science
-Knowledge, Evidence, and Explanation in Science
-Science, Art, and Philosophy
-Special Topics Seminar in History and Philosophy of Science

One optional module from our sister MSc programme, Science, Technology, and Society, may be substituted here provided it contributes to a coherent programme of study.

Ancillary Modules - students choose three ancillary modules which may be options from our degrees, e.g. Science in the 20th Century and Beyond, and Curating the History of Science, or they might be selected from any other programme at UCL.

Dissertation/research project
All MSc students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 10,000–12,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of seminars, lectures, tutorials and research supervision. Student performance is assessed through coursework such as long and short essays, advocacy work and project work.

Careers

Our programme provides essential training for students wishing to pursue PhD level study in related fields. It also provides appropriate training for those pursuing careers in education, museum and archival curatorship, or governance and policy-making.

Employability
During the course of this programme, students will develop a wide range of transferable skills, including writing, research, critical thinking, and working in collaboration with others. Most graduates of this programme go on to follow careers that engage with the substance of the degree, including in the museums sector, or in academia. For these students, this programme provides an excellent opportunity to develop the specialist skills and personal connections necessary to succeed. These include basic curatorial skills, developing personal contacts in London museums, and developing personal and intellectual connections with key thinkers in the field.

Why study this degree at UCL?

There is no UK academic department quite like UCL Science & Technology Studies. The department combines award-winning teaching with award-winning public engagement.

We are research-active over an enormous range of topics. Our teaching builds on research not only in our subject specialties but also in the fundamentals of teaching and learning.

Our programme makes unique use of London’s attractions and resources. We have close links with the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Natural History Museum, the Wellcome Library, and UCL Museums & Collections. We also use the city as a classroom, with custom-made walking tours, site visits, and special excursions.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Advanced Computer Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Advanced Computer Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

On the MSc in Advanced Computer Science course you will be thoroughly prepared for a career in IT or related industries. The Advanced Computer Science course is for you if you are a Computer Science graduate or if you have gained experience of computing and programming in a different first degree. Willingness to work hard and an ability to problem solve are equally important for this MSc in Advanced Computer Science. The MSc in Advanced Computer Science course will develop the skills and knowledge you have gained from your first degree by broadening and deepening your knowledge of Computer Science through a variety of advanced modules and material. The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is accredited by the British Computer Society.

Key Features of Advanced Computer Science MSc

• We are top in the UK for career prospects*

• We are 3rd in the UK for teaching quality**

• 5th in the UK overall*

• 7th in the UK for student satisfaction with 98% [National Student Survey 2016]

• 7th in the UK overall and Top in Wales*

• High employability prospects - we are 8th in the UK for graduate prospects*

• 92% in graduate employment or further study six months after leaving University [HESA data 2014/15]

• UK TOP 20 for Research Excellence [Research Excellence Framework 2014]

• Our Project Fair allows students to present their work to local industry

• Strong links with industry

• £31m Computational Foundry for computer and mathematical sciences will provide the most up-to-date and high quality teaching facilities featuring world-leading experimental set-ups, devices and prototypes to accelerate innovation and ensure students will be ready for exciting and successful careers. (From September 2018)

*Guardian University Guide 2017

**Times & Sunday Times University Guide 2016

Modules of Advanced Computer Science MSc

Modules for the MSc in Advanced Computer Science include Computer Science Project Research Methods but please visit our course page for more information.

Facilities

The Department of Computer Science is well equipped for teaching, and is continually upgrading its laboratories to ensure equipment is up-to-date – equipment is never more than three years old, and rarely more than two. Currently, our Computer Science students use three fully networked laboratories: one, running Windows; another running Linux; and a project laboratory, containing specialised equipment. These laboratories support a wide range of software, including the programming languages Java, C# and the .net framework, C, C++, Haskell and Prolog among many; integrated programme development environments such as Visual Studio and Netbeans; the widely-used Microsoft Office package; web access tools; and many special purpose software tools including graphical rendering and image manipulation tools; expert system production tools; concurrent system modelling tools; World Wide Web authoring tools; and databases.

As part of the expansion of the Department of Computer Science, we are building the Computational Foundry on our Bay Campus for computer science and mathematical science.

Careers

All Computer Science courses will provide you the transferable skills and knowledge to help you take advantage of the excellent employment and career development prospects in an ever growing and changing computing and ICT industry.

94% of our Postgraduate Taught Graduates of Computer Science were in professional level work or study [DLHE 14/15]

Student Profile

Francesca Madeddu, originally from Italy, completed an outstanding Master’s thesis (which earned her a distinction) investigating interaction with augmented reality on mobile devices. More specifically, she investigated how to interact with virtual Egyptian artefacts placed in real scenes. The final game was deployed at Swansea's Egypt Centre last year and was evaluated by volunteers working at the museum. A Master’s thesis does not often lead to a publication. However, part of Francesca's research was written up as an extended abstract and presented at Computer Graphics and Visual Computing (CGVC), a Eurographics UK conference for visual computing last year. An exceptional achievement!



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Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. Read more

Program overview

Color science is broadly interdisciplinary, encompassing physics, chemistry, physiology, statistics, computer science, and psychology. The curriculum, leading to a master of science degree in color science, educates students using a broad interdisciplinary approach. This is the only graduate program in the country devoted to this discipline and it is designed for students whose undergraduate majors are in physics, chemistry, imaging science, computer science, electrical engineering, experimental psychology, physiology, or any discipline pertaining to the quantitative description of color. Graduates are in high demand and have accepted industrial positions in electronic imaging, color instrumentation, colorant formulation, and basic and applied research. Companies that have hired graduates include Apple Inc., Benjamin Moore, Canon Corp., Dolby Laboratories, Eastman Kodak Co., Hallmark, Hewlett Packard Corp., Microsoft Corp., Pantone, Qualcomm Inc., Ricoh Innovations Inc., Samsung, and Xerox Corp.

The color science degree provides graduate-level study in both theory and practical application. The program gives students a broad exposure to the field of color and affords them the unique opportunity of specializing in an area appropriate for their background and interest. This objective will be accomplished through the program’s core courses, selection of electives, and completion of a thesis or graduate project.The program revolves around the activities of the Munsell Color Science Laboratory within the College of Science. The Munsell Laboratory is the pre-eminent academic laboratory in the country devoted to color science. Research is currently under way in color appearance models, lighting, image-quality, color-tolerance psychophysics, spectral-based image capture, archiving, reproduction of artwork, color management, computer graphics; and material appearance. The Munsell Laboratory has many contacts that provide students with summer and full-time job opportunities across the United States and abroad.

Plan of study

Students must earn 30 semester credit hours as a graduate student to earn the master of science degree. For full-time students, the program requires three to four semesters of study. Part-time students generally require two to four years of study. The curriculum is a combination of required courses in color science, elective courses appropriate for the candidate’s background, and either a research thesis or graduate project. Students require approval of the program director if they wish to complete a graduate project, rather than a research thesis, at the conclusion of their degree.

Prerequisites: The foundation program

The color science program is designed for the candidate with an undergraduate degree in a scientific or other technical discipline. Candidates with adequate undergraduate work in related sciences start the program as matriculated graduate students. Candidates without adequate undergraduate work in related sciences must take foundation courses prior to matriculation into the graduate program. A written agreement between the candidate and the program coordinator will identify the required foundation courses. Foundation courses must be completed with an overall B average before a student can matriculate into the graduate program. A maximum of 9 graduate-level credit hours may be taken prior to matriculation into the graduate program. The foundation courses, representative of those often required, are as follows: one year of calculus, one year of college physics (with laboratory), one course in computer programming, one course in matrix algebra, one course in statistics, and one course in introductory psychology. Other science courses (with laboratory) might be substituted for physics.

Curriculum

Color science, MS degree, typical course sequence:
First Year
-Principles of Color Science
-Computational Vision Science
-Historical Research Perspectives
-Color Physics and Applications
-Modeling Visual Perception
-Research and Publication Methods
-Electives
Second Year
-Research
-Electives

Other admission requirements

-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
-Submit official transcripts (in English) for all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit two professional recommendations.
-Complete an on-campus interview (when possible).
-Have an average GPA of 3.0 or higher.
-Have completed foundation course work with GPA of 3.0 or higher (if required), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants who native language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Minimum scores of 94 (internet-based) are required. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores will be accepted in place of the TOEFL exam. Minimum scores will vary; however, the absolute minimum score required for unconditional acceptance is 7.0. For additional information about the IELTS, please visit http://www.ielts.org.

Additional information

Scholarships and assistantships:
Students seeking RIT-funded scholarships and assistantships should apply to the Color Science Ph.D. program (which is identical to the MS program in the first two years). Currently, assistantships are only available for qualified color science applicants to the Ph.D. program. Applicants seeking financial assistance from RIT must submit all application documents to the Office of Graduate Enrollment Services by January 15 for the next academic year.

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The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. Read more
The MSc Archaeological Science will provide you with a solid grounding in the theory and application of scientific principles and techniques within archaeology. The programme also develops critical, analytical and transferable skills that prepare you for professional, academic and research careers in the exciting and rapidly advancing area of archaeological science or in non-cognate fields.

The programme places the study of the human past at the centre of archaeological science enquiry. This is achieved through a combination of science and self-selected thematic or period-based modules allowing you to situate your scientific training within the archaeological context(s) of your choice. The programme provides a detailed understanding of the foundations of analytical techniques, delivers practical experience in their application and data processing, and the ability to design and communicate research that employs scientific analyses to address archaeological questions. Upon graduation you will have experience of collecting, analysing and reporting on data to publication standard and ideally equipped to launch your career as a practising archaeological scientist.

Distinctive features

The MSc Archaeological Science at Cardiff University gives you access to:

• A flexible and responsive programme that combines training in scientific enquiry, expertise and vocational skills with thematic and period-focused archaeology.

• Materials, equipment, library resources and funding to undertake meaningful research in partnership with a wide range of key heritage organisations across an international stage.

• A programme with core strengths in key fields of archaeological science, tailored to launch your career in the discipline or to progress to doctoral research.

• A department where the science, theory and practice of archaeology and conservation converge to create a unique environment for exploring the human past.

• Staff with extensive professional experience in researching, promoting, publishing, and integrating archaeological science across academic and commercial archaeology and the wider heritage sector.

• An energetic team responsible for insights into iconic sites (e.g. Stonehenge, Çatalhöyük), tackling key issues in human history (e.g. hunting, farming, food, and feasts) through the development and application of innovative science (e.g. isotopes, residue analysis, DNA, proteomics)

• A unique training in science communication at every level - from preparing conference presentations and journal articles, to project reports, press releases and public engagement, our training ensures you can transmit the excitement of scientific enquiry to diverse audiences.

• Support for your future career ambitions. From further study to science advisors to specialists – our graduates work across the entire spectrum of archaeological science as well as moving into other successful careers.

Structure

There are two stages to this course: stage 1 and stage 2.

Stage 1 is made up of:

• 40 credits of Core Skills and Discipline-Specific Research Training modules for Archaeology and Conservation Master's students
• A minimum of 40 credits of Archaeological Science modules
• An additional 40 credits of Archaeological Science or Archaeology modules offered to MA and MSc students across the Archaeology and Conservation department

Stage 2 comprises:

• 60 credit Archaeological Science Dissertation (16-20,000 words, topic or theme chosen in consultation with academic staff)

Core modules:

Postgraduate Skills in Archaeology and Conservation
Skills and Methods for Postgraduate Study
Archaeological Science Dissertation

Teaching

Teaching is delivered via lectures, laboratory sessions, interactive workshops and tutorials, in addition to visits to relevant local resources such as the National Museum Wales and local heritage organisations.

Lectures take a range of forms but generally provide a broad structure for each subject, an introduction to key concepts and relevant up-to-date information. The Archaeological Science Master's provides students with bespoke training in scientific techniques during laboratory sessions. This includes developing practical skills in the identification, recording and analysis of archaeological materials during hands on laboratory sessions. These range from macroscopic e.g. bone identification, to microscopic e.g. material identification or status with light based or scanning electron microscopy, to sample selection, preparation and analysis e.g. isotopic or aDNA and include health and safety and laboratory management skills. Students will be able to develop specialist practical skills in at least one area of study. In workshops and seminars, you will have the opportunity to discuss themes or topics, to receive and consolidate feedback on your individual learning and to develop skills in oral presentation.

This programme is based within the School of History, Archaeology and Religion and taught by academic staff from across Cardiff University and by external speakers. All taught modules within the Programme are compulsory and you are expected to attend all lectures, laboratory sessions and other timetabled sessions. Students will receive supervision to help them complete the dissertation, but are also expected to engage in considerable independent study.

Assessment

The 120 credits of taught Modules within Stage 1 of the Programme are assessed through in-course assessments, including:

Extended essays
Oral presentations
Poster presentations
Statistical assignments
Critical appraisals
Practical skills tests
Data reports
Research designs

You must successfully complete the taught component of the programme before progressing to Stage 2 where assessment is:

Dissertation (16-20,000 words)

Career prospects

After successfully completing this MSc, you should have a broad spectrum of knowledge and a variety of skills, making you highly attractive both to potential employers and research establishments. You will be able to pursue a wide range of professional careers, within commercial and academic archaeology and the wider heritage sector. Career paths will generally be specialist and will depend on the choice of modules. Graduates will be well placed to pursue careers as a specialist in isotope analysis, zooarchaeological analysis or human osteoarchaeology. They will also be in a position to apply for general laboratory based work and archaeological fieldwork. Working within science communication and management are other options. Potential employers include archaeological units, museums, universities, heritage institutions, Historic England and Cadw. Freelance or self-employment career routes are also common for animal and human bone analysts with postgraduate qualifications.

The archaeology department has strong links and collaborations across the heritage sector and beyond. British organisations that staff currently work with include Cadw, Historic England, English Heritage, Historic Scotland, National Museum Wales, the British Museum, the Welsh archaeological trusts and a range of other archaeology units (e.g. Wessex Archaeology, Oxford Archaeology, Cambridge Archaeology Unit, Archaeology Wales). In addition, staff are involved with archaeological research across the world. You will be encouraged to become involved in these collaborations via research projects and placements to maximise networking opportunities and increasing your employability.

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This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in. Read more

This programme will give you an insight into the complex history of technology, medicine, scientific knowledge and methodology, as well as how they have shaped the world we live in.

You’ll explore the themes, concepts and debates in the study of the history of science through core modules. These will also allow you to develop your historical research skills, using our excellent library resources to work with primary and secondary sources. But you’ll also choose from a range of optional modules that allow you to specialise in topics areas that suit your interests, from birth, death and illness in the Middle Ages to modern science communication.

Guided by leading researchers and supported by our Centre of History and Philosophy of Science, you’ll learn in a stimulating environment with access to a wide range of activities. You could even gain research experience by getting involved in the development of our Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

We have world-class research resources to support your studies. The Brotherton Library houses extensive manuscript, archive and printed material in its Special Collections, including Newton’s Principia, a first edition of his Opticks and thousands of books and journals on topics from the 16th century onwards on topics such as astronomy, botany, medicine, physiology, chemistry, inventions and alchemy. You’ll also have access to the collections of artefacts across campus that we have brought together through the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine.

The Centre also hosts a number of research seminars given by visiting speakers, staff members and doctoral students and which all postgraduate students are encouraged to attend. There are also regular reading groups on a wide range of topics and the seminar series of other centres within the School are also available.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module introducing you to different approaches and debates in history of science, technology and medicine, as well as how they have been used over time to help us understand scientific developments. You’ll build on this in the following semester with a second core module that will give you a foundation in historical skills and research methods, equipping you to work critically and sensitively with primary and secondary sources.

You’ll have the chance to demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve gained in your dissertation, which you’ll submit by the end of the year. This is an independently researched piece of work on a topic of your choice within the history of science, technology and medicine – and you can choose to take an extended dissertation if you want to go into even greater depth.

Throughout the year you’ll be able to choose from a range of optional modules, allowing you to develop your knowledge by specialising in a topic of your choice such as science and religion historically considered, or science in the museum. You’ll take one optional module if you take the extended dissertation, or two if you do the standard dissertation.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

You’ll take three compulsory modules, though you can choose whether to take a standard (60 credits) or extended (90 credits) dissertation. You’ll then choose one or two optional modules.

  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • Current Approaches in the History of Science, Technology & Medicine 30 credits

Optional modules

  • The European Enlightenment 30 credits
  • Lifecycles: Birth, Death and Illness in the Middle Ages 30 credits
  • Science and Religion Historically Considered 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits
  • Special Option (History of Science) 30 credits
  • Science in the Museum: Interpretations & Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read History of Science, Technology and Medicine MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Most of our taught modules combine seminars and tutorials, where you will discuss issues and concepts stemming from your reading with a small group of students and your tutor. You’ll also benefit from one-to-one supervision while you complete your dissertation. Independent study is also an important element of the programme, allowing you to develop your skills and pursue your own interests more closely.

Assessment

We assess your progress using a combination of exams and coursework, giving you the freedom to research and write on topic areas that suit your interests within each module you study.

Career opportunities

You’ll gain a range of in-depth subject knowledge throughout this programme, as well as a set of high-level transferable skills in research, analysis, interpretation and oral and written communication that are very attractive to employers.

As a result, you’ll be equipped for a wide range of careers. Some of these will make direct use of your subject knowledge, such as museum work or public engagement with science, while your skills will enable you to succeed in fields such as business and finance, publishing, IT and teaching.

Graduates of our School also regularly go onto careers in journalism, the media, social work, human resources, PR, recruitment and the charity sector. Many also continue with their studies at PhD level and pursue careers in academia.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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This Masters course will open the door to a fascinating and fast-moving sector of analytical science that will build on your previous undergraduate studies, in chemistry, biology or other appropriate science courses. Read more
This Masters course will open the door to a fascinating and fast-moving sector of analytical science that will build on your previous undergraduate studies, in chemistry, biology or other appropriate science courses. You will gain knowledge and scientific skills that are directly applicable to the field of forensic science, with prospects of employment in forensic science laboratories as well as in other analytical science laboratories.

The course involves a unique combination of forensic chemistry and forensic biology, covering subjects such as trace evidence, toxicology and DNA analysis. Once you have covered the underlying principles of both areas, you can then specialise in your chosen field for your MSc research project.

The course is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences, which enhances its credibility and currency among potential employers.

This course can also be taken part time - for more information, please view this web-page: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/forensic-science-dtpfrs6/

Learn From The Best

Our teaching team are active researchers who routinely incorporate their expertise and enthusiasm into their teaching. Many of the staff have worked in forensic science laboratories and have been involved in high profile cases such as the Stephen Lawrence, Joanna Yeates, Suffolk strangler and Jigsaw murder cases. Their areas of research include toxicology, the analysis of fibres and their transfer and persistence and the analysis of ancient DNA.

Academic staff include former forensic biologists, forensic toxicologists, and forensic fibre experts. They continue to maintain close links with the industry including the police and practising forensic scientists. Many of them are well-established within professional forensic science societies and organisations, which directly inform policy and practices within the field.

Teaching And Assessment

Our teaching will give you a solid grounding in all the technical areas that are key to forensic science, while simultaneously developing the higher level of independent thinking and advanced interpretation that is expected at Masters level. To support your learning journey, many of the staff have an ‘open door’ policy which makes it easy to ask questions; it’s also possible to book appointments with them so that you can work through queries about lab work, concepts and theories, and any other aspects of the subject.

We use different types of assessments: some will contribute to your final grade while others will be used to provide you with guidance on your progress and reinforce your learning. You can expect both your tutors and your peers to provide useful comments and feedback throughout the course.

Module Overview
AP0700 - Graduate Science Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0703 - Subject Exploration (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0708 - Applied Sciences Research Project (Core, 60 Credits)
AP0723 - Practices & Procedures in Forensic Science (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0724 - Forensic Toxicology & Drugs of Abuse (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0725 - Criminalistics (Core, 20 Credits)
AP0726 - Forensic Genetics (Core, 20 Credits)

Learning Environment

You will have access to a dedicated crime scene house to enable you to examine simulated crime scenes. Students can also access Return to Scene (R2S) software which provides a 360 degree interactive scan of a crime scene allowing you to perform further analysis in detail after you have left the scene. Northumbria University has also invested heavily in an impressive suite of analytical equipment allowing you to gain first-hand experience of the techniques used in operational laboratories.

We use a range of technologies to enhance your learning, with tools including web-based self-guided exercises, online tests with feedback, and electronic discussion boards. These tools support and extend the material that is delivered during lectures.

You will have 24/7 term-time access to Northumbria’s library, which was ranked #2 in the Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey for 2015 and has been accredited by the UK Government for Customer Service Excellence since 2010.

Research-Rich Learning

We host the Northumbria University Centre for Forensic Science and our research directly impacts on what and how you learn. Northumbria is helping to push the frontiers of knowledge in areas such as:
-Forensic fibre comparisons using statistical and chemometric approaches
-DNA profiling in contexts such as injuries to children and poaching of wildlife
-Human genetic and phenotypic variation
-Analytical toxicology

As part of the course, you will undertake a Masters project that will require you to evaluate relevant literature as well as to develop your ideas within the context of existing research. The project will involve information retrieval, critical appraisal, presentation of aims and strategy, development of advanced analytical and problem-solving skills, the discussion and interpretation of results, and the composition of a written dissertation. Each project will be aligned to an active area of research that is specific to an academic member of staff.

Give Your Career An Edge

This course is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. This reflects the relevance and rigour of the curriculum, and provides assurance of workplace-ready knowledge and application.

The focus on practical laboratory work, combined with the mix of group work, independent learning and professional practice, will help ensure that you develop skills that are transferable to a range of careers and disciplines.

Throughout your time at Northumbria we will prompt you to reflect on your self-development through the Higher Education Achievement Report process. We will also encourage you to take advantage of the services of our Careers and Employment Service such as CV advice and interview preparation.

Your Future

Forensic science has gained a high profile through TV dramas and, in the years ahead the sector is likely to be further transformed by technological advances in a number of fields. With an MSc Forensic Science you will be well-placed to take up a fascinating and rewarding role in forensic science laboratories.

What’s more, by developing the attributes of a Masters student, including the ability to solve complex problems, think critically, and work effectively with others and on your own, you will enhance your employability in all sectors of the analytical science industry. You will also be well equipped to pursue further studies at PhD level.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Sports Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Sports Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Swansea University has a flourishing research environment looking at elite sports performance and exercise health and medicine.

Key Features of MSc by Research in Sports Science

Sport and Exercise Science research at Swansea University takes place in the Applied Sports, Technology, Exercise and Medicine (A-STEM) research centre. Engaging in research, teaching and third mission activity that spans the artificial boundaries between traditional disciplines. Swansea University is unique as the only research-intensive university in the UK where Sport and Exercise Science is located in Engineering.

Research activity in Sport and Exercise Science is in two main areas:

Elite Sports Performance

Exercise Medicine and Health

Our research spans the areas of, science, technology, health and medicine applied to sport, exercise and health settings with children, older people, clinical groups and elite international sports people. Importantly, sport and exercise science research is applied in nature and populates teaching, third mission activities and work-related learning opportunities. It has impact on elite sport, students, industry, patients and the general public.

MSc by Research in Sports Science typically lasts one year full-time, two to three years part-time. This is an individual research project written up in a thesis of 30,000 words.

Facilities

Our new home at the innovative Bay Campus provides some of the best university facilities in the UK, in an outstanding location.

The A-STEM Research Centre has developed its own laboratories that rank alongside the most prestigious and well known universities in the UK.

Find out more about the facilities used by Sports Science students and Researchers at Swansea University.

Swansea University also has a proud reputation for sporting excellence and outstanding sporting facilities. See a 365 degree panoramic of the Sports Village: including the Wales National Pool, Gym, Indoor Courts, Running Track, Astroturf and Indoor Track.

Links with Industry

In addition to teaching and research, academic staff are actively engaged with applied practice and consultancy in sport and exercise settings.
 
Our well-established links include organisations such as:
 


Diabetes UK

Haemaflow

Swansea NHS Trust

Carmarthenshire NHS Trust


UK Sport

Sport Wales

Welsh Rugby Union

International Rugby Board (IRB)

We also work with elite sports teams including:


Scarlets Rugby

Ospreys Rugby

Swansea City AFC

West Ham United AFC

British Bobsleigh

British Bobskeleton

British Cycling

Wales 7s Rugby

Our staff also regularly consult in exercise settings with populations with chronic disease, including diabetes, cardiac rehabilitation and renal care.

Research

Sport and exercise science research occurs within the world-leading Applied Sports Technology Exercise Medicine (A-STEM) Research Centre.

Significant research in diabetes and health as well as sedentary behaviour, physical activity, fitness, fundamental movement skills in childhood obesity is undertaken by a number of clinical exercise science staff.

Our elite sport performance group is leading a project supported by the European Regional Development Fund through the Welsh Government to position Wales at the forefront of Science, Technology and Medicine in elite sport and to promote its wider application in health and education. This project represents a unique collaboration of leading Welsh academics, businesses and sport, with the overall objective of enhancing their respective performances.

Fundamental links integrating engineering and sport and exercise science research are being developed by the Sports Visualisation Group who analyse video material to rapidly produce data for immediate analysis of sports performance. Recently the Engineering Behaviour Analytics in Sport and Exercise (E-BASE) research group was set up to investigate the use of advanced sensor and processing technology to quantify training and activity in sport and clinical populations respectively.

We have international research links and projects with universities in Southern and Eastern Europe, Scandinavia, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USE, Italy and Austria.

Student quote

I chose Swansea University to study my MSc Sports Science by Research because Swansea has a great reputation for sports and exercise research and the A-STEM research project is an exciting environment to be part of. Swansea also has great funding opportunities for postgraduate study and it is a really friendly and supportive university.

Zoe Marshall, Sports Science, MSc by Research



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What's the "sexiest job of the 21st century"? According to Harvard Business Review, it's data scientist. A job devoted to giving structure to large quantities of formless data. Read more
What's the "sexiest job of the 21st century"? According to Harvard Business Review, it's data scientist. A job devoted to giving structure to large quantities of formless data. Ever-changing, ever-challenging big data.

The Master of Data Science (MDS) teaches you how to explore data and discover its potential – how to find innovative solutions to real problems in science, business and government, from technology start-ups to global organisations.With a degree in science, engineering, arts or computing, you can pursue a Master of Data Science, gaining skills in data management, data analytics and data processing – skills needed in this fast-growing field.

The MDS expands your knowledge of the analytical, organisational and computational aspects of data. You learn to manage data and gain an understanding of its impact on society.

The MDS caters to students from a variety of backgrounds by including foundation units in programming, databases and maths or statistics. However, if you have this background from previous studies or work experience, you may accelerate your study with an exemption from these units, or choose to take more data science electives.

The core coursework covers data science objectives, data analysis and data management. You then select data science electives such as applied data analysis, visualisation, data pre-processing, big data handling and data in society. You can also choose to take the Advanced Data Analytics stream where you build deeper skills in data analytics and machine learning.

Our highly regarded faculty takes great pride in developing the most up-to-date material while maintaining a solid core of established theory and platforms, including Python and R (two of the most popular open-source programming languages for data analysis), Hadoop and Spark (for distributed processing). You also gain hands-on experience with state-of-the-art tools and get exposure to key industry players.

In your final semester, you may take part in an Industry Experience team project, working with industry mentors to develop data-driven IT solutions. Or you may undertake a minor-thesis research project, investigating cutting-edge problems under the supervision of internationally recognised researchers.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/data-science-c6004?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts, A, B and C. All students complete Part B (core studies). Depending upon prior qualifications, you may receive credit for Part A (foundation studies) or Part C (advanced studies) or a combination of the two.

Note that if you are eligible for credit for prior studies you may elect not to receive the credit.

PART A. Foundations for advanced data science studies
These studies will provide an orientation to the field of data science at graduate level. They are intended for students whose previous qualification is not in a cognate field.

PART B. Core Master's study
These studies draw on best practices within the broad realm of data science practice and research. You will gain a critical understanding of theoretical and practical issues relating to data science. Your study will focus on your choice either of data science or advanced data analytics.

PART C. Advanced practice
The focus of these studies is professional or scholarly work that can contribute to a portfolio of professional development. You have two options.

The first option is a program of coursework involving advanced study and an Industry experience studio project.

The second option is a research pathway including a thesis. Students wishing to use this Masters course as a pathway to a higher degree by research should take this second option.

Students admitted to the course, who have a recognised honours degree in a discipline cognate to data science, will receive credit for Part C, however, should they wish to complete a 24 point research project as part of the course they should consult with the course coordinator.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/information-technology

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/data-science-c6004?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The Middlesex PGCE course in Secondary Science is a one year full-time course. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. Read more
The Middlesex PGCE course in Secondary Science is a one year full-time course. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. You receive personal attention through regular tutor visits to school placements and individual tutorials. Schools are carefully selected to suit individuals and expose them to imaginative and thought provoking teaching and learning strategies.

The course aims to prepare you for the teaching profession. It will:

Enable you to develop knowledge and understanding of pupils and their learning
Develop your expertise in highly specialised professional skills in a context where you'll need to exercise initiative and take personal responsibility for decision making in complex and unpredictable situations
Equip you with the pedagogic knowledge, understanding and skills to teach effectively across the 11-16 age range
Develop your knowledge and understanding of the Secondary Science curriculum
Enable you to understand, critically evaluate and respond to the needs of children in multicultural, multilingual and multifaith settings and schools in an international, urban environment.
We have a full range of specialist Science and teaching facilities on-site and the course includes specialist mentors fromm our partner schools. There is a strong emphasis on the use of ICT in Science and you will be expected to explore up to date developments in this area.

Two thirds (120 days) of the PGCE Secondary Science course will be on placement. We have excellent relationships with schools in north London, Essex and Hertfordshire and many of our graduates go on to work in their first teaching job at the schools where they had a placement.

In 2012, the secondary teacher training programmes at Middlesex were rated Good with Outstanding Features (by Ofsted), an excellent result for a large and diverse provider of teacher training.

The PGCE Secondary Science with Chemistry course involves students from all three science disciplines working together as a group. Teaching science at Key Stage 3 requires competence across the whole range of the National Curriculum Programme of Study for Science. This involves teaching the concepts and processes of how science works through the study of organisms, behaviour and health, chemical and material behaviour, energy, electricity and forces, and the environment, Earth and universe. This also involves integrating the knowledge, skills and understanding of how science works. The science with chemistry course therefore begins with a general mix of biology, chemistry and chemistry to enable you to teach all three sciences at KS3.

However, you will then be able to focus on teaching chemistry since, as well as being able to teach all the science specified in the National Curriculum Programme of Study for Science at Key Stage 3, you will also be required to specialise in the teaching of chemistry topics at KS4, within a broad and balanced science curriculum.

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The Middlesex PGCE course in Secondary Science is a one year full-time course. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. Read more
The Middlesex PGCE course in Secondary Science is a one year full-time course. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. You receive personal attention through regular tutor visits to school placements and individual tutorials. Schools are carefully selected to suit individuals and expose them to imaginative and thought provoking teaching and learning strategies.

The course aims to prepare you for the teaching profession. It will:

Enable you to develop knowledge and understanding of pupils and their learning
Develop your expertise in highly specialised professional skills in a context where you'll need to exercise initiative and take personal responsibility for decision making in complex and unpredictable situations
Equip you with the pedagogic knowledge, understanding and skills to teach effectively across the 11-16 age range
Develop your knowledge and understanding of the Secondary Science curriculum
Enable you to understand, critically evaluate and respond to the needs of children in multicultural, multilingual and multifaith settings and schools in an international, urban environment.
We have a full range of specialist Science and teaching facilities on-site and the course includes specialist mentors fromm our partner schools. There is a strong emphasis on the use of ICT in Science and you will be expected to explore up to date developments in this area.

Two thirds (120 days) of the PGCE Secondary Science course will be on placement. We have excellent relationships with schools in north London, Essex and Hertfordshire and many of our graduates go on to work in their first teaching job at the schools where they had a placement.

In 2012, the secondary teacher training programmes at Middlesex were rated Good with Outstanding Features (by Ofsted), an excellent result for a large and diverse provider of teacher training.

PGCE Secondary Science with Physics course involves students from all three science disciplines working together as a group. Teaching science at Key Stages 3 requires competence across the whole range of the National Curriculum Programme of Study for Science. This involves teaching the concepts and processes of how science works through the study of organisms, behaviour and health, chemical and material behaviour, energy, electricity and forces, and the environment, Earth and universe. This also involves integrating the knowledge, skills and understanding of how science works. The PGCE Secondary Science with Physics course therefore begins with a general mix of biology, chemistry and physics to enable you to teach all three sciences at KS3.

However you will then be able to focus on teaching physics since, as well as being able to teach all the science specified in the National Curriculum Programme of Study for Science at Key Stage 3, you will also be required to specialise in the teaching of physics topics at KS4, within a broad and balanced science curriculum.

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Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. Read more
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. This means you will be learning current research results, keeping you at the forefront of these areas. You will also learn a range of theories, principles and practical methods.

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who already have a good first degree in Computer Science, and would like to develop a level of understanding and technical skill at the leading edge of Computer Science.

You can choose modules on a range of topics, including Cryptography, Functional Programming, Interactive Technologies, Natural Language Processing, Quantum Computation and Model-Driven Engineering.

Course aims
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of topics on the frontiers of Computer Science in order to engage in research or development and application of leading-edge research findings.

By undertaking an individual project, you will become a specialist in your selected area. You will be encouraged to produce research results of your own. This will prepare you to undertake a PhD in Computer Science should you wish to continue studying within the subject.

Learning outcomes
-A knowledge of several difference topics in Computer Science at an advanced level.
-An understanding of a body of research literature in Computer Science in your chosen topic, and the underlying principles and techniques of research in this area.
-An ability to engage in independent study at an advanced level, and develop skills in self-motivation and organisation.

Research Project

You will undertake your individual research project over the Summer term and Summer vacation. This will be a culmination of the taught modules you have taken during the course, which will allow you to focus on a specialist area of interest.

You will be allocated a personal supervisor, who will be an expert in your chosen area of research. You will be hosted by the research group of your supervisor, and you will benefit from the knowledge and resources of the whole group. Being attached to a research group also allows you to take part in their informal research seminars, and receive feedback and help from other members of the group.

You can choose from projects suggested by members of our academic staff. You also have the option of formulating your own project proposal, with the assistance from your personal supervisor.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

The project aims to give you an introduction to independent research, as well as giving you the context of a research group working on topics that will be allied to your own. You will develop the skills and understanding in the methods and techniques of research in Computer Science.

As part of the assessment of the project, as well as your dissertation, you will give a talk about your work and submit a concise paper which we will encourage you to publish.

Information for Students

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science exposes you to several topics in Computer Science that are under active research at York. The material taught is preparatory to helping to continue that research, and perhaps continuing to a PhD. What we require from you are enthusiasm, hard work and enough background knowledge to take your chosen modules.

The modules on the MSc in Advanced Computer Science are mostly shared with our Stage 4 (Masters level) undergraduates. Your technical background will be different, and we acknowledge this.

During August we will send entrants a document describing the background knowledge needed for each module and, in many cases, references to where this knowledge is available (for example, widely available text books and web pages).

More generally, many of the modules expect a high level of mathematical sophistication. While the kind of mathematics used varies from module to module, you will find it useful to revise discrete mathematics (predicate and propositional calculi, set theory, relational and functional calculi, and some knowledge of formal logic), statistics and formal language theory. You should also be able to follow and produce proofs.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Health Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Health Data Science at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

Healthcare, with an already established strong relationship with Information & Communication Technologies (ICT), is continuously expanding the knowledge forefront as new methods of acquiring data concerning the health of human beings are developed.

Processing this data to extract valuable information about a population (epidemiological applications) or the individual (personalised healthcare applications) is the work of health data scientists. Their work has the potential to improve quality of life on a large scale.

Swansea University is the first institution in the UK to offer this taught master's programme in Health Data Science designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required of the Health Data Scientist.

Key Features of the Health Data Science Programme

- A one year full-time taught master's programme designed to develop the essential skills and knowledge required of the Health Data Scientist.

- The Health Data Science course is also available for three years part-time study.

- An integrated programme of studies tailored to the essential skill set required for Data Scientists operating within healthcare organisations covering key topics in computation, data modeling, visualisation, machine learning and key methodologies in the analysis of linked health data.

- Hands on experiential learning from the professionals behind the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank, a UK-exemplar project for the large scale mining of healthcare data within a secure environment.

- Strong collaboration links with colleagues from the Centre for Health Services Research of the University of Western Australia, a group of leading experts in the analysis of linked health data.

- The Health Data Science course is based within the award winning Centres for Excellence for Administrative Data and eHealth Research of Swansea University, awarded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and Medical Research Council (MRC), enhancing the quality of the course.

Who should study MSc Health Data Science?

The Health Data Science course is suitable for those working in healthcare with roles involving the analysis of health data and also computer scientists with experience in working with data from the healthcare domain, as well as biomedical engineers and other similar professions.

Course Structure

Students must complete 6 modules of 20 credits each and produce a 60 credits dissertation on a Health Data Science project. Each module of the programme requires a short period of attendance that is augmented by preparatory and reflective material supplied via the course website before and after attendance.

Attendance Pattern

Health Data Science students are required to attend the University for 1 week (5 consecutive days) for each module in Part One. Attendance during Part Two is negotiated with the supervisor.

Modules

Modules on the Health Data Science programme typically include:

Scientific Computing and Health Care

Health Data Modelling

Introductory Analysis of Linked Health Data

Machine Learning in Healthcare

Health Data Visualisation

Advanced Analysis of Linked Health Data

Professional Development

The College of Medicine offers the modules on the Health Data Science course as standalone opportunities for prospective students to undertake continued professional development (CPD) in the area of Health Data Science.

You can enroll on the individual modules for the Health Data Science programme as either an Associate Student (who will be required to complete the module(s) assessments) or as a Non-Associate Student (who can attend all teaching sessions but will not be required to complete any assessments).

For information and advice on applying for any of the continuing education opportunities, please contact the College directly at .

Employability

Postgraduate study has many benefits, including enhanced employability, career progression, intellectual reward and the opportunity to change direction with a conversion course.

From the moment you arrive in Swansea, specialist staff in Careers and Employability will help you plan and prepare for your future. They will help you identify and develop skills that will enable you to make the most of your postgraduate degree and enhance your career options. The services they offer will ensure that you have the best possible chance of success in the job market.

The student experience at Swansea University offers a wide range of opportunities for personal and professional development through involvement in many aspects of student life.

Co-curricular opportunities to develop employability skills include national and international work experience and study abroad programmes and volunteering, together with students' union and athletic union societies, social and leisure activities.

For the MSc Health Data Science course, we are in the process of identifying opportunities for our students to complete volunteering placements with a number of our collaborative partners.



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The Middlesex PGCE course in Secondary Science is a one year full-time course. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. Read more
The Middlesex PGCE course in Secondary Science is a one year full-time course. It equips you to inspire pupils through the use of engaging interactive workshops, lectures and structured debates. You receive personal attention through regular tutor visits to school placements and individual tutorials. Schools are carefully selected to suit individuals and expose them to imaginative and thought provoking teaching and learning strategies.

The course aims to prepare you for the teaching profession. It will:

Enable you to develop knowledge and understanding of pupils and their learning
Develop your expertise in highly specialised professional skills in a context where you'll need to exercise initiative and take personal responsibility for decision making in complex and unpredictable situations
Equip you with the pedagogic knowledge, understanding and skills to teach effectively across the 11-16 age range
Develop your knowledge and understanding of the Secondary Science curriculum
Enable you to understand, critically evaluate and respond to the needs of children in multicultural, multilingual and multifaith settings and schools in an international, urban environment.
We have a full range of specialist Science and teaching facilities on-site and the course includes specialist mentors fromm our partner schools. There is a strong emphasis on the use of ICT in Science and you will be expected to explore up to date developments in this area.

In 2012, the secondary teacher training programmes at Middlesex were rated Good with Outstanding Features (by Ofsted), an excellent result for a large and diverse provider of teacher training.

The PGCE Secondary Science with Biology course involves students from all three science disciplines working together as a group. Teaching science at Key Stage 3 requires competence across the whole range of the National Curriculum Programme of Study for Science. This involves teaching the concepts and processes of how science works through the study of organisms, behaviour and health, chemical and material behaviour, energy, electricity and forces, and the environment, Earth and universe. This also involves integrating the knowledge, skills and understanding of how science works. The PGCE Secondary Science with Biology course therefore begins with a general mix of biology, chemistry and biology to enable all you to teach all three sciences at KS3.

However, you will then be able to focus on teaching biology since, as well as being able to teach all the science specified in the National Curriculum Programme of Study for Science at Key Stage 3, you will also be required to specialise in the teaching of biology topics at KS4, within a broad and balanced science curriculum.

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There has been a recent upsurge in commercial interest in the new role of "data scientist". A data scientist is a person who excels at manipulating and analysing data, particularly large data sets that don't fit easily into tabular structures (so-called "Big Data"). Read more
There has been a recent upsurge in commercial interest in the new role of "data scientist". A data scientist is a person who excels at manipulating and analysing data, particularly large data sets that don't fit easily into tabular structures (so-called "Big Data").

Why study Data Science at Dundee?

The School of Computing has been working on 'big data' and data analysis for at least five years; not only working with data but also developing new algorithms and techniques for data scientists. The School already runs the most successful Business Intelligence Masters course in the UK.

This course will be led by Professor Mark Whitehorn and Andy Cobley. Mark is an emeritus professor at the University of Dundee and also runs a successful consultancy company that specialises in BI, Data Sciences and analytics. Andy is the course organiser for both the existing BI course and the new Data Science course.

This course will enhance your employability by providing you with knowledge, skills and understanding of data science research and implementation. You will also acquire skills in the professional procedures necessary to ensure that data science research and implementation is both valid and actionable and engage with contemporary debate about the role, ethics and utility of data science in commercial and other settings.

What is the difference between Data Science and Business Intelligence?

There is clearly a huge overlap with Business Intelligence. A BI specialist will need to understand data and data analytics. However there is a bias towards understanding how data is stored in the current operational systems within an enterprise the design and the implementation of an analytical system such as a data warehouse. A data scientist will be less concerned with the construction of a data warehouse and more interested in the message the specific sets of data can deliver.

However, without some understanding of data warehouses the data scientist will find it difficult to interrogate the data for its secrets. For this reason there is overlap between the two courses.

If you already have a strong grounding in Business Intelligence and would like to upgrade your knowledge to include topics from the Data Science MSc, we offer the relevant Data Science modules either on a stand alone basis or as a PGCert.

What's so good about Data Science at Dundee?

Our facilities will give you 24-hour access to our award winning and purpose-built Queen Mother Building. It has an unusual mixture of lab space and breakout areas, with a range of conventional and special equipment for you to use. It's also easy to work on your own laptop as there is wireless access throughout the building. Our close ties to industry allows us access to facilities such as Windows Azure and Teradata, and university and industry standard software such as Tableau for you to evaluate and use.

A booming Postgraduate culture where the School of Computing maintains a friendly, intimate and supportive atmosphere, and we take pride in the fact that we know all of our students - you're far more than just a matriculation number to us. We have a thriving postgraduate department with regular seminars and guest speakers.

Duncan Ross (Director of Data Sciences at Teradata) has said that: "The first and most important trait is curiosity. Insane curiosity. In many walks of life evolution selects against the kind of person who decides to find out what happens 'if I push that button'. Data Science selects for it."

How you will be taught

The programme will be delivered by Prof. Mark Whitehorn with input from Andy Cobley, Yasmeen Ahmad, Chris Hillman and other specialists from within the School of Computing in an innovative blend of live co-presented master-classes, video seminars and recorded materials. A series of guest speakers from industry will provide case studies across both semesters.

The programme will be provided predominantly on-campus, with two intensive study weeks in each of the semesters. Other classes may be taken off-campus using the university’s VLE, remote desktop, Adobe Connect and video conferencing systems along with telephone conferencing.

What you will study

Semester 1
Big Data - 20 Credits
Business Intelligent Systems - 20 Credits
Data Analysis and Visualisation - 20 Credits

Semester 2
Analytical Database Models and Design - 20 Credits
Advanced statistics and data mining - 20 credits
MDX - 20 Credits

Semester 3
Data Science Mini Project - 20 credits (for Certificate)
Data Science Research Project - 60 credits

PGCert:
The PGCert is intended for students who have a strong grounding in Business Intelligence and would like to upgrade their knowledge to include topics from the Data Science MSc. The modules are available stand alone for those who want to take their time studying the material and perhaps build up to a PGCert.

The three modules that make up the PGCert are:
Big Data
Advanced Anlaysis
Mini Project

For more information about the content of the course, please visit the course webpage on the School of Computing website.

How you will be assessed

Assessment will be by examination, practical coursework and research project.

Careers

Various job sites now report an increase in jobs carrying the title of data scientist. Other career opportunities are in intelligence analysis, data management/database maintenance, data processing manager, database development and research, business intelligence consultant and more.

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