• University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
University of Kent Featured Masters Courses
University of Sussex Featured Masters Courses
University of Leeds Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"material" AND "culture"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Material Culture)

  • "material" AND "culture" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 412
Order by 
This postgraduate course in Material Culture and Gàidhealtachd History is delivered entirely through Scottish Gaelic. It offers students a unique opportunity to develop original, in-depth perspectives on Gaelic-speaking areas in Scotland (and further afield). Read more
This postgraduate course in Material Culture and Gàidhealtachd History is delivered entirely through Scottish Gaelic. It offers students a unique opportunity to develop original, in-depth perspectives on Gaelic-speaking areas in Scotland (and further afield). You will use material culture (artefacts), environment, language and traditions to understand the socio-economic, cultural background and changing circumstances of the region.

You will also explore new concepts of land use, conservation and sustainable development.

Dig deep and discover more about the Gaelic past, its present and its future potential.

Special Features

• Loans for tuition fees are available from the Students Award Agency for Scotland (SAAS) for eligible Scotland domiciled and EU students, and loans for living costs for eligible Scottish students.
• A ground-breaking interdisciplinary postgraduate degree about the Gàidheadltachd, taught in Gaelic, from a Gaelic perspective, by internationally recognised scholars
• Emphasis on developing skills in fieldwork, oral interviewing and archival research
• Building strong links with local communities, local and national museums and agencies

Modules

PgCert

Mandatory units: Material culture and European ethnology; Material culture: research methods; Settlement and land use

PgDip

Mandatory units: Historical perspectives; Contemporary issues

Optional units: Environment and Sustainability; Regions and identities; Migration: cultural continuity and change

Msc

To achieve the award of MSc, you must complete a research dissertation

Locations

This course is available online with support from Sabhal Mor Ostaig UHI, Slèite, An t-Eilean Sgitheanach, IV44 8RQ

Study Options

You will study through supported online learning using the University's Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)
Assessment by formal exams, projects, field work
You are also required to attend an induction session offered face-to-face at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig UHI on the Isle of Skye or through distance online delivery
This course may be studied by international students from your home country

Funding

From 2017, eligible Scotland domiciled students studying full time can access loans up to 10,000 from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).This comprises a tuition fee loan up to £5,500 and a non-income assessed living cost loan of £4,500. EU students studying full time can apply for a tuition fee loan up to £5500.

Part-time students undertaking any taught postgraduate course over two years up to Masters level who meet the residency eligibility can apply for a for a tuition fee loan up to £2,750 per year.

See Scholarships tab below for full details

Top five reasons to study at UHI

1. Do something different: our reputation is built on our innovative approach to learning and our distinctive research and curriculum which often reflects the unique environment and culture of our region and closely links to vocational skills required by a range of sectors.
2. Flexible learning options mean that you can usually study part time or full time. Some courses can be studied fully online from home or work, others are campus-based.
3. Choice of campuses – we have campuses across the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Each campus is different from rich cultural life of the islands; the spectacular coasts and mountains; to the bright lights of our city locations.
4. Small class sizes mean that you have a more personal experience of university and receive all the support you need from our expert staff
5. The affordable option - if you already live in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland you don't have to leave home and incur huge debts to go to university; we're right here on your doorstep

How to apply

If you want to apply for this postgraduate programme click on the ‘visit website’ button below which will take you to the relevant course page on our website, from there select the Apply tab to complete our online application.
If you still have any questions please get in touch with our information line by email using the links beow or call on 0845 272 3600.

International Students

An exciting and diverse student life awaits our international students. Choose to study in one of the larger urban centres of the region, such as Perth, Inverness or Elgin, or in one of the smaller towns or island communities, including the Western and Northern Isles. http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international

English Language Requirements

Our programmes are taught and examined in English. To make the most of your studies, you must be able to communicate fluently and accurately in spoken and written English and provide certified proof of your competence before starting your course. Please note that English language tests need to have been taken no more than two years prior to the start date of the course. The standard English Language criteria to study at the University of the Highlands and Islands are detailed on our English language requirements page http://www.uhi.ac.uk/en/studying-at-uhi/international/how-to-apply-to-uhi/english-language-requirements

Read less
Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more
Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

-This MLitt in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
-You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
-You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MLitt you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses
-Material culture in context
-The process of artefact studies

Optional courses include modules such as:
-Lithic analysis
-Independent study
-Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
-Early medieval artefacts
-Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350).
-Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement.

Read less
The optional Visual and Material Culture Track (VMC) within the Master of Art in Global Communications (MAGC) offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural consideration of the increasing importance of visuality and interactivity in today’s world. Read more
The optional Visual and Material Culture Track (VMC) within the Master of Art in Global Communications (MAGC) offers an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural consideration of the increasing importance of visuality and interactivity in today’s world.

Students acquire in-depth knowledge of visual theories, contexts, and practices and their relationship to the global media—and develop critical thinking about the cultural forces behind visuality as a communicative practice.

Vision and visuality: more than meets the eye

Social, political, and economic conditions shape seeing and the production of objects and events for visual consumption. Reaching beyond traditional understandings of media and communication, we examine such things as imaging systems, screen practices, data graphics, architecture, tourism, performance, gaming, body ornamentation, race, gender, and sexuality—and all of these on both a global scale and within regional traditions.

Incorporating non-Western contributions to the field, this track combines a critical approach to theoretical and scientific understandings of vision and visuality with a rigorous consideration of the functions of the viewer, object, and environment in specific circumstances.

Ideal candidates—and outcomes

Students pursuing this track will likely have studied or worked in art, anthropology, cultural studies, psychology, design, publishing, marketing, image-based journalism or film—or be interested in pursuing careers in those fields.

The VMC track prepares students for professional careers in communications or further graduate study.

Structure of the specialized track

As in the regular MA in Global Communications program, coursework can be completed in three semesters, including the summer. The length of the internship or thesis may vary, however—many students choose to take additional time for these components.

The program requirements for the MAGC Visual and Material Culture Track are as follows:
-Three core courses (12 credits)
-Three core electives (12 credits)
-Four elective courses from the general Global Communications graduate course offerings (16 credits)
-Final project: thesis or internship (8 credits)

Core courses focus on the fundamentals of global communications and the physical and cultural conditions of vision. You may explore how people come to identify—and believe in—brands, or study representations of gender in a globalized media environment.

As for electives, you have the choice of several practicums, including in video, broadcasting, branding, and advertising, as well as courses as diverse as identify formation to color as communication in marketing and art.

Coursework and Research Masters

The MA in in Global Communications, Visual and Material Culture Track is a 48 credit Coursework and Research Masters that can be completed in one calendar year. The length of the internship or thesis may vary, however—many students choose to take additional time for these components. Coursework and Research Masters at AUP open up international horizons and enable career-transition through an extensive range of classes blending theory and practice. Students develop precision in their problem-solving skills through challenging hands-on modules and the choice of an internship or a personalized research project.

Read less
The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is ideal for students wishing to pursue a career in the museum, heritage and arts sectors with a focus on non-Western art and culture, and both tangible and intangible heritage. It will suit practicing museum and heritage professionals who are interested in strengthening their knowledge of contemporary debates in critical museology, critical heritage studies and material culture studies. With its interdisciplinary focus, it will suit students interested in broadening their expertise across anthropology, art history and archaeology. It will also provide an excellent postgraduate foundation for students interested in pursuing PhD research concerned with museums, heritage, and material/visual culture in Asian, African, Middle Eastern and transnational/transcultural contexts.

This interdisciplinary programme brings together anthropological, art historical and archaeological perspectives to explore the interconnecting fields of museums, heritage and material culture studies. The MA disprivileges Western museum and heritage discourses and practices, and explores tangible and intangible cultural heritage as spheres of global interaction.

The MA will equip students with a theoretically-informed critical understanding of museums, heritage and material/visual culture. Taught across the Department of Anthropology and School of Arts, the MA provides a unique opportunity to learn about current debates in World Art and World Heritage, combining ethnographic, art historical and archaeological approaches.

Students will be introduced to a wide range of thematic and theoretical issues, and will have the opportunity to curate a small exhibition in the Curating Cultures module, and put into practice anthropological research techniques in the Ethnographic Research Methods course.

Situated in London’s ‘Museum Mile’, a few hundred meters from the British Museum, and with its own Brunei Gallery, SOAS provides a unique environment in which to study the cultural heritage of Asia, Africa and the Middle East.

Programme Overview

The programme consists of 180 credits in total: 120 credits of modules and a dissertation of 10,000 words at 60 credits.

All students are expected to take the core and compulsory modules listed here - https://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-museums-heritage-and-material-culture-studies/

Students are advised to take one or both of the recommended modules listed below or may wish to select from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology or the School of Arts (Departments of Centre for Media Studies, History of Art and Archaeology or Music) options lists.

The remaining credits can be selected from the Department of Anthropology and Sociology list or the School of Arts options. See below for a detailed programme structure.

Language Entitlement Programme:

Many students choose to pursue a language through the SOAS Language Entitlement Programme (LEP). Languages normally available include Arabic, Chinese, French, Hebrew, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Swahili, Turkish and Urdu. Others may also be offered.

Teaching & Learning

Students taking the MA in Museums, Heritage and Material Culture Studies will have the opportunity to achieve:

- A critical awareness of contemporary theoretical debates in museum studies, cultural heritage studies, and material/visual culture studies;
- A familiarity with the distinctive contributions of anthropology, art history and archaeology to these interdisciplinary fields;
- A critical awareness of World Art/World Cultures/World Heritage, with an emphasis on SOAS’s regional specialisms (Asia, Africa and the Middle East) as well as transnational/diasporic contexts;
- An understanding of ethnographic approaches to tangible and intangible heritage research;
- Experience of object-based knowledge and museological research methods.

Read less
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. Read more
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. You’ll undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy that will equip you for further PhD study in these fields, or for a career in museum work or education.

The course includes a core module in Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture, plus a core language module, as well as the Core module in Rome. You will also select one optional module at Warwick.

Students on the MA in Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Rome will participate in the British School at Rome’s ‘City of Rome’ postgraduate course, a two-month residential programme. This involves a busy schedule of expert presentations and onsite seminars.

Admission to the course in Rome is subject to the discretion of the BSA/BSR and cannot be guaranteed. Students are responsible for funding their travel to Italy and for accommodation costs in Rome.

Read less
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. Read more
This course enables you to apply the study of ancient material and visual culture to a particular historical and geographical context. You’ll undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy that will equip you for further PhD study in these fields, or for a career in museum work or education.

The course includes a core module in Approaching Ancient Visual and Material Culture, plus a core language module, as well as the Core module in Greece. You will also select one optional module at Warwick.

The MA in the Visual and Material Culture of Ancient Greece is the first in the UK to give you access to the postgraduate training courses of the British School at Athens, an institute for advanced research based in Greece. You will have the opportunity to spend two to three weeks in Athens or Knossos, following a full programme of site visits and seminars from visiting scholars.

Admission to the course is subject to the discretion of the BSA/BSR and cannot be guaranteed. Students are responsible for funding their travel to Greece.

Read less
The specific character of this programme lies in the way it unites the close study of objects and related images, with historical research and cultural theory. Read more
The specific character of this programme lies in the way it unites the close study of objects and related images, with historical research and cultural theory. Emphasis is placed on the design, production, diffusion and consumption of domestic goods - whether for elite markets or everyday use - rather than capital goods. Approaches to the history of the decorative arts and design are inter-disciplinary and make use of methodological developments in ethnography, gender studies, economic history and other academic fields. Students can either pick a specialist or generalist pathway on this programme to suit their own specific interests, depending upon their personal choice of essay and dissertation research directions.

The University of Brighton is recognised nationally and internationally as one of the leading institutions for the study of the history of decorative arts and design. This course is the only MA in the field based in a school which gained a grade 5 in the national Research Assessment Exercise, an indication of international excellence.

The course draws on the wide-ranging academic expertise of staff in the fields of the history of decorative arts and design, dress history, material culture, museology and social history. The department is based in a Regency building overlooking the famous Royal Pavilion of Brighton constructed in the late eighteenth-early nineteenth century period, close to Brighton's famous sea front and in the heart of the city.

Career and progression opportunities
The course has a healthy employment record, many graduates taking up careers in museums, galleries, arts administration, auction houses, journalism, publishing and education. Others study for further professional qualifications or postgraduate study.

Read less
Are you interested in exploring classical material and visual culture, and its impact upon subsequent historical conceptions of antiquity? If so, this course is the ideal foundation for a career in museum work or education. Read more
Are you interested in exploring classical material and visual culture, and its impact upon subsequent historical conceptions of antiquity? If so, this course is the ideal foundation for a career in museum work or education. It also equips you for further PhD study in related fields.

You will undertake specialist research training in art, numismatics and epigraphy, with museum visits forming an important part of the programme. Teaching comprises two core modules — one language module and the other focusing on issues of reception, historiography and museum display — plus your choice of optional modules.

Options can be taken from within the Classics Department or you may decide to study a module from a related department, such as History of Art. Over the summer, you will complete a supervised dissertation, enabling you to research independently an area of personal academic interest in more depth.

Read less
Based at the University’s internationally recognised Centre for the History of the Book, this programme brings together theory and practice to explore cultural history, intensive archival research and the latest intellectual developments in this specialised field. Read more

Programme description

Based at the University’s internationally recognised Centre for the History of the Book, this programme brings together theory and practice to explore cultural history, intensive archival research and the latest intellectual developments in this specialised field.

This programme provides an introduction to Book History as a concept and provides a general overview of the key developments in the field, tracing the movement from scribal culture to hand printing, from industrialisation to new technologies.

You will be taught by leading international experts, combining traditional bibliography, special collections training and advanced theoretical approaches, to advance your knowledge and practical skills.

As well as the major manuscript and printed collections held by the University, you will have access to the National Library of Scotland (which holds one of the most important collections for the study of bibliography in Europe).

Programme structure

Over two semesters, you will complete two compulsory and two option courses, along with a course in research methods, followed by an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Cultures of the Book
Working with Collections
Option courses may include:

Working with Pre-modern Manuscripts
Expanding the Book: Image and Literacy in Valois France
Print Culture and the Enlightenment: Edinburgh and London, 1710-1814
Working with Pre-modern Manuscripts
Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
Digital Humanities for Literary Studies
Shakespeare Adapted
Poor Things: Capitalism, Reification and 20th Century Literature
Modernism: Text, Image, Object

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

Read less
The MA is for people with a personal passion for material culture, materials innovations, crafts, designs, heritage, and the cultural issues which they present. Read more
The MA is for people with a personal passion for material culture, materials innovations, crafts, designs, heritage, and the cultural issues which they present. Some are social scientists rethinking the engagement of anthropology, ethnography and material culture; others are designers or makers exploring cultural and social issues.

Degree information

Students will study anthropological and material culture theory, apply social science and ethnographic methodologies to the problems of design, explore the technical, aesthetic and symbolic properties of materials, and examine how these interact with production technologies and consumption choices. They will develop understanding of how working with materials, crafts, and design helps us to rethink, understand, and critique socio-cultural issues in ways beyond other disciplines, and in cutting-edge anthropological ways.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a departmental seminar series and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Materials, Anthropology and Design

Optional modules
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Anthropology of Cultural Heritage and Museum Anthropology
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Ethnographic Film
-Archaeobotanical Analysis in Practice
-Archaeometallurgy 1: Mining and Extractive Technology
-Archaeometallurgy 2: Metallic Artefacts
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Interpreting Pottery
-Lithic Analysis
-Archaelogical Ceramics and Plaster
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 15,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars, and tutorials. Several courses entail practical instruction, including visits to product design companies and trade fairs; archaeological field sites; Kew Botanical Archive and the British Museum. Assessment is through unseen examination, long essays, research methodology project and the dissertation.

Careers

The unique combination of scientific and social science training offers students career pathways in a range of areas including:
-Design research
-Design consultancy and policy
-Heritage and museums
-Materials consultancy: advising industry on different materials, old and new, and their technical and aesthetic properties
-Product marketing
-Fashion marketing and buying
-Academia (PhDs, lecturing)

Employability
In addition to analytic and ethnographic skills honed by the core academic training, graduates develop a solid grounding in materials and design literacy, communication and interpersonal skills, new ways of thinking about culture and society and presentational and studio groupwork skills.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL is a world leader in anthropological work, specialising in material culture, and also a pan-disciplinary leader in materials innovation and making. This MSc is the only specific design anthropology programme with a material culture emphasis, and the only one dedicated to seriously exploring materials and making in cultural terms.

The programme involves interdisciplinary engagements in: looking at materials expertise across London through visits to makespaces and materials libraries; a project for an external design client (in commerce, heritage, or the third sector); weekly high-profile academic speakers on material culture; and optional vocational seminars in spring. In some years we facilitate participation in conferences or workshops abroad.

UCL is located in central London, within walking distance to the British Museum and the British Library. UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research.

Read less
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

-Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
-Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
-If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
-Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
-There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
-We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered. The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Core and optional courses

Strands

Theory and Practice
-Museum Interpretation and Learning (Core)
-Museum Practice
-Heritage and Cultural Informatics
-Curating the Sciences
-American Material Culture
-Phenomenology
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Collecting and Provenance (in conjunction with History of Art)
-Cultures of Collecting (Core)
-Object Biography
-Provenance
-Collecting and Display
-Restitution
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Artefact and Material Culture (in conjunction with Archaeology)
-Material Culture in Context (Core)
-Process of Artefact Studies (Core)
-Critical Themes in the Display and Reception of Objects
-Science Based Analysis of Archaeological Material
-Early Medieval Artefacts
-Viking & Late Norse Artefacts
-2D Digitisation
-Approaching the Ancient World
-Work Placement
-Hunterian Exhibition Course
-International Trafficking in Cultural Objects

Career prospects

Career opportunities exist in a variety of roles within the cultural heritage sector; these include museums and galleries as well as historic houses, heritage sites and consultancy. Roles range from front of house, education and outreach to collections management, curation, marketing and management.

Read less
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Read more
This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history.

Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it.

Among the teachers involved in this MA are Jennie Batchelor (English), Jonathan Friday (History and Philosophy of Art), Donna Landry (English), Paddy Bullard (English) and Ben Thomas (History & Philosophy of Art).

The Eighteenth-Century Studies MA is also available at Canterbury and Paris (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/221/eighteenth-century-studies-paris). After spending your first term at our Canterbury campus, you relocate to our Paris centre for the spring term to study in the heart of historic Montparnasse.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/220/eighteenth-century-studies

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Course structure

You take two modules in the autumn term and two in the spring term; two core modules and two optional modules. You are also expected to attend the Faculty and School Research Methods Programmes.

You then write a dissertation or an editorial project between the start of the Summer Term and the end of August.

Modules

In the 2014/15 academic year the following two core specialist modules were available: EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eighteenth Century and EN895 - Jane Austen and Material Culture. These should be considered indicative of the types of modules available, which may vary from year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation.

EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
HI826 - Literary Undergrounds and Anarchists in the Basement (12 credits)
HI874 - Religion and Society in Seventeenth-Century England (30 credits)
MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture and its political and cultural contexts

- develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of eighteenth-century studies today

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement.

- introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced study in the field

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills for those intending to teach eighteenth-century studies, especially in higher education

- provide an interdisciplinary context for the study of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture.

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge

- develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

Read less
Study at the cutting edge of post-medieval archaeological investigation. Historical Archaeology is the study of relatively recent documented periods, from the end of the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Read more
Study at the cutting edge of post-medieval archaeological investigation.

Why choose this course?

Historical Archaeology is the study of relatively recent documented periods, from the end of the Middle Ages to the 21st century. It is one of the most rapidly expanding aspects of archaeology, dealing with many exciting issues that relate directly to the world we have inherited today, drawing on a diverse range of material and documentary sources.

The skills you develop working with material culture, landscapes and archival sources, as well as presenting short papers and writing essays and your dissertation, will provide an unrivalled insight into the past and present and prepare you for a wide range of jobs and careers, as well as further research.
-Explore dynamic and globally significant themes, from capitalism to colonialism.
-Gain practical training in analysing and interpreting evidence, from excavations and standing buildings to landscapes and material culture.
-Develop knowledge and skills that will give you a head start in many heritage, historic-environment and other post-graduate careers and research.
-Study in the archaeological capital of Britain – experience historical archaeology in action.
-Access state-of-the-art facilities, including laboratories, libraries and internationally important archives, resources and collections in York.
-Receive career and research advice and guidance from staff with significant professional knowledge and experience.

What does the course cover?
The MA in Historical Archaeology examines themes such as the development of consumption and capitalism, colonialism and globalisation from British and international perspectives. It builds out from the unique experience of Britain in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to consider the global impact of changing economic, political and cultural values as the modern world took shape.

We examine data sources including excavated material alongside material culture from museums and collections, standing buildings, landscapes and documentary sources of all kinds, which relate to both the UK, its former colonies and the wider world.

Who is it for?
This course is ideally suited for students from a wide range of backgrounds, which need not necessarily include Archaeology. The course appeals to anyone interested in the material culture and landscapes of the post-medieval period. Past students have included graduates of History, Art History, Heritage, English Literature and many more subjects, as well as mid-career professionals looking to enhance their knowledge, expertise and qualifications.

What can it lead to?
The course provides you with highly valued and transferrable skills, knowledge and experience essential for a wide variety of careers. Many students go on to further study or take up employment with a range of organisations both within and outside the heritage sector, including the civil service and law firms, heritage consultancies and museums.

Careers

This course will give you a thorough grounding in the rapidly growing field of Historical Archaeology and equip you with valuable skills and experience for a career in this and related fields. It also provides valuable transferable skills which are recognised across a wide range of professional graduate careers.

By the end of the course you will:
-Be familiar with current research agendas and a broad range of issues in historical archaeology.
-Have detailed knowledge of topics and themes using material from Britain, Europe, North America, Africa and the Caribbean.
-Have developed key skills to organise information and arguments in a critical and independent manner in written form and in presentations.
-Have undertaken an extended piece of independent research on a topic of your choice in the field of historical archaeology.
-Have delivered a short lecture on a chosen topic in historical archaeology.

Course postgraduates have gone on to work with many organisations, including landscape and environmental consultancies, professional bodies, heritage organisations such as English Heritage and the National Trust, the media and museums.

Others have used the skills gained to pursue careers in other sectors, including:
-Local government and development
-Civil service and law
-Chartered surveying
-Computing and IT services
-Business and administration
-Marketing and public relations
-Education
-Accountancy and financial services

Others have gone on to pursue PhDs in the UK and overseas.

Read less
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media. Read more
This MA provides a broad based training in social science approaches to the analysis of material and visual media: ranging from art, photography, film and media within visual anthropology, to consumption, museum anthropology and cultural heritage, landscape and genres (such as clothing and the built environment), within material culture.

Degree information

The programme covers a range of contexts such as production, exchange and consumption, and uses anthropological perspectives based on the comparative study of societies, historically and culturally. Skills training is given in social anthropological field research and analysis, and in specific methods for the study of material and visual forms.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (45 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a research dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Critical Issues

Optional modules - the following is a selection of possible option modules:
-Anthropology and Photography
-Advanced Topics in Digital Culture: Ethnographies of the Digital
-Documentary Film and the Anthropological Eye
-Anthropology of Art and Design
-Social Construction of Landscape
-Transforming and Creating the World
-Anthropology of the Built Environment
-Mass Consumption and Design
-Risk, Power and Uncertainty
-Anthropologies of Religion
-Issues in Power and Culture

Dissertation/report
All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, group presentations and discussion, tutorials, independent directed reading, interactive teamwork, laboratory and practical work, video, film and web based courses. There will also be visits to museums, galleries and other relevant sites. Assessment is through coursework, unseen examination and the dissertation.

Careers

The programme can lead to careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, commerce and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Top career destinations for this degree:
-Senior Curator, Frifthdi School of Art, Design and Technology
-Research Executive, Basis Research
-Web Designer, Elena Boykova Sirakova
-MSc Anthropology, Københavns Universitet (University of Copenhagen)
-Associate Director, DA and Company

Employability
The programme is designed as an advanced research degree providing exposure to a vanguard and creative field within anthropology and related disciplines. Students learn how to apply ethnographic theory and methodology in material and visual culture to a wide range of case studies highlighting material culture in the wider world - ranging from art, through photography, clothing, consumption, cultural memory, monuments and the built environment.

The degree can lead to further doctoral research or careers in a wide range of areas such as architecture, media, museums, business and aspects of development work where an emphasis on the material and visual environment is central.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL Anthropology is the world's leading centre for the study of material and visual culture. We publish the Journal of Material Culture and several relevant book series, and have nine specialist staff in this field.

The department is one of the largest anthropology departments in the UK. Our excellent results in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercises and 2014 Research Excellence Framework show that we are the leading broad-based anthropology department in the UK.

Students are encouraged to take full advantage of the wider anthropological community in London and the department's strong links with European universities and international institutions.

Read less
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

-If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
-You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses
-Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
-Research Skills

Optional courses - three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following
-Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
-Early Christian monuments of Scotland
-Early Medieval artefacts
-Viking and late Norse artefacts
-Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
-Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options
-Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies).
-Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
-Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies.
-Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X