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Masters Degrees (Material Artefact)

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Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context. Read more
Material culture and artefact studies combines the archaeological recovery and specialist examination of an object with its presentation, management and understanding within a cultural context.

Why this programme

◾This MLitt in Material Culture & Artefact Studies will prepare you to participate at both a practical and theoretical level within the field of specialist artefactual analysis.
◾You will be able to undertake a work placement to gain valuable work experience in a museum, archaeological unit or other cultural institution.
◾You will benefit from the involvement of staff from Glasgow Museums, National Museums Scotland and other institutions within Scotland, and will have the opportunity to work with collections from local museums, including the University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.

Programme structure

The taught component consists of core courses and optional courses, running over two semesters.

Assessment is normally focused on written performance, but oral presentation skills and other modes of assessment allow you to develop your writing skills in a number of formats. This is in addition to the practical emphasis on developing your ability to interpret and analyse artefacts.

For the MLitt you can opt to do either a dissertation or an extended work placement (assessed by work placement eportfolio and either a research report or a student exhibition design).

Core courses
◾Material culture in context
◾The process of artefact studies.

Optional courses include modules such as:
◾Lithic analysis
◾Independent study
◾Critical themes in the display and reception of objects
◾Early medieval artefacts
◾Viking and late Norse artefacts (AD 750-1350).
◾Optional courses drawn from Archaeology or from other programmes across the University can be taken by agreement with the programme convener.

Career prospects

The two strands to the degree enable you to prepare for further doctoral research whilst also providing opportunities for valuable vocational experience in a commercial environment.

The wealth of experience and knowledge provided by the interdisciplinary nature and focus of the degree and the networks and relationships developed during their time here, has stood past graduates in good stead upon graduation. They have found full-time positions with Historic Scotland, Headland Archaeology Ltd, Guard Archaeology Ltd. While others are working with various heritage organisations and some are continuing with their postgraduate studies.

Several of our international graduates have found employment working at the Smithsonian, Washington D.C and at the Pink Palace Museum, Memphis Tennessee. Others continue to work in the Cultural Resource Management sector. Several students have gone on to further doctoral research at Glasgow University and beyond, on prehistoric stone tools, Shetland lace knitting, Bronze Age ceramics and medieval settlement..

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This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis. Read more
This MA provides training in the documentation and interpretation of artefacts from archaeological sites and museum collections. Students benefit from a placement within a museum or an archaeological unit where experience will be gained in the practice of finds analysis.

Degree information

Students are introduced to the skills of finds specialists, practical issues of artefact study, and debates about the collection, interpretation, reporting and curation of archaeological materials. They develop the ability to evaluate different approaches to artefact studies and undertake the cataloguing and analysis of an artefact assemblage.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (30 credits), four optional modules (60 credits), an optional work placement and a research project (90 credits).

Core modules - all students are required to take the following:
-Working with artefacts and assemblages
-Technology within Society

Optional modules - students choose to follow further optional modules up to the value of 60 credits from an outstanding range of Master's options available at the UCL Institute of Archaeology. For this degree, some of the most popular choices include:
-Antiquities and the Law
-Archaeological Ceramic Analysis
-Archaeological Glass and Glazes
-Archaeometallurgy I: Mining and Extractive Metallurgy
-Archaeometallurgy II: Metallic Artefacts
-Art: Interpretation and Explanation
-British and European Prehistory: Neolithic to Iron Age
-Experimental Archaeology
-Funerary Archaeology
-Geoarchaeology
-Intangible Dimensions of Museum Objects from Egypt
-Interpreting Pottery
-Issues in Conservation: Understanding Objects
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Greek Art
-Making and Meaning in Ancient Roman Art
-Prehistoric Stone Artefact Analysis

Dissertation/report
The 15,000–word dissertation normally combines a professional standard finds report with an academic overview.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through formal lectures, seminars and practical sessions. It can include a placement at a relevant museum or archaeological unit where students gain experience in the practical study and the recording of an artefact assemblage. Assessment is through an essay, a portfolio, a project proposal and the dissertation.

Careers

Some recent graduates of the programme have gone on to PhD studies while others have pursued a very wide range of professional careers both within and beyond archaeology. The main career path is working as assistants, museum curators or working in the antiquities service recording finds.

Top career destinations for this degree
-Project Team Officer, English Heritage
-Archaeologist, Museum of London Archaeology
-Museum Building Manager, Hainan and Haopioen Arts Museum
-Artefacts Assistant, Maidstone Council
-Freelance Numismatist, Self-Employed Numismatist

Employability
The degree is tailored to give graduates a solid grounding in systematically recording and documenting artefacts as well as analysing artefact assemblage. They will also have a basic understanding of creating graphs and diagrams, and analysing and assembling finds-catalogues. Without concentrating on any specific epoch, we give students the tools for understanding and systematically analysing any artefact assemblages.

Why study this degree at UCL?

Whether you plan a career as finds assistant, museum curator or plan a materials based PhD, this course provides you with the skills you need to successfully identify, describe and document artefacts and analyse assemblages. The emphasis of the course is very much on practical application, so there will be numerous handling sessions and praxis-related tasks.

The UCL Institute of Archaeology is the largest and most diverse department of archaeology in the UK, and provides a stimulating environment for postgraduate study. Its outstanding archaeological library is complemented by UCL's Main Library, University of London Senate House and other specialist libraries. UCL is located in central London, within walking distance of the British Museum and the British Library.

UCL's own museums and collections form a resource of international importance for academic research. Students will work on material from the institute's collection as part of their assessment. Past students on this programme have made effective use of the resources at the British Museum, the Museum of London and the Museum of London archives, the Petrie Museum, Victoria and Albert Museum and other British and international museums. The Wolfson Labs provide a unique facility for scientific analyses of materials and have been used by numerous artefact students for their dissertations after the required training.

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Internationally recognised as a pioneering incubator of original designers who challenge the notion of how fashion products change and influence the world we live in. Read more

Introduction

Internationally recognised as a pioneering incubator of original designers who challenge the notion of how fashion products change and influence the world we live in.

Content

MA Fashion Artefact is as original as its name suggests. The course is recognised as a pioneering incubator of ideas and philosophies and has been hailed as a leader in educational studio practice. It has developed and nurtured an impressive roster of alumni who have been awarded top prizes at many international competitions and had their work showcased at prestigious international exhibitions.

Students within Fashion Artefact develop both a comprehensive and personal perspective on fashion in its widest context. The course defines its position within education and the wider creative industries by focusing on the provocative possibilities of an ever-changing spectrum of arenas and audiences.

We believe that fashion is one of the most influential forms of expression in contemporary culture, serving as a reflection of our social behavior. We define fashion artefact as a post-modern metaphor of what occurs in today’s society. Consideration of the fashion artefact in its theoretical and social contexts allows us to gain an insight into complex underlying meanings and open them up for discussion and contemplation.

We strive for perfection and originality in both the exploration and pursuit of material methodologies in construction and manufacture, exploiting both hand-crafted and new technologies. The course leader and teaching team are all internationally recognised practicing artists and designers and are at the forefront of research within studio practice.

Structure

Term One

Creative and Technical Innovation (40 credits)
Research Methods (20 credits)

Term Two

Collaborative Unit (20 credits)
Technical Analysis and Development (40 units)

Term Three

Masters Project (60 credits)

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Programme description. Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. Read more

Programme description

Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. This programme brings together theory and practice in new and innovative ways. We study the production, circulation and reception of books from manuscript to e-books, paying attention to the histories of reading and authorship.

The programme integrates traditional bibliography, advanced theoretical approaches, training in special collections, and hands-on experience. You will be taught by leading experts at the University’s renowned Centre for the History of the Book. Field trips and work placements will allow you to take advantage of the exceptional collections in Edinburgh.

The programme attracts outstanding students from a variety of academic and professional backgrounds. The degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Programme structure

You will complete two core and two option courses, along with training in research methods. You will then complete a supervised, independently-researched dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Compulsory courses:

  • Cultures of the Book
  • Working with Collections

Option courses may include:

  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
  • Shakespeare's Sister: Archival Research and the Politics of the Canon
  • Sex and God in Victorian Poetry
  • Exploring the Novel
  • Censorship

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

  • the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
  • the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
  • advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with the detailed knowledge and research skills you need to progress to a research degree and continue a career in academia; or you may pursue a career in publishing, libraries, and the cultural heritage sector. You will graduate with a number of highly transferable skills in communication, project management and analysis that will give you an advantage, whatever your chosen career.



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The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development. Read more
The Masters in Celtic & Viking Archaeology provides an introduction to both theory and practice in approaches to early medieval archaeology, based on our particular research strengths in the settlements and material culture of Celtic, Pictish and Viking peoples, and in the archaeology of kingship and political development.

Why this programme

◾If you want to further your career in archaeology, our new approaches to early medieval studies bring fresh insights into the life and ideas of the period and provide you with a stimulating environment, learning from internationally-renowned scholars
◾You will have the opportunity to take fieldtrips to a number of sites relevant to your studies.
◾Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum, and Glasgow Life giving you access to primary source material, including objects and archives.

Programme structure

You will take two core courses and three optional courses. For the MLitt you will produce a dissertation on a specialist topic agreed with the course convenor.

The core courses provides you with a theoretical background to the study of early medieval archaeology, examining themes such as burial, settlement, material culture, religion through a series of case studies. You will also get training and support in a wide variety of research methods including library skills, humanities computing, writing and presenting papers.

Core courses

◾Approaches to Celtic and Viking Archaeology
◾Research Skills

Optional courses

Three optional courses must be selected, two of which from the following
◾Themes in Early Medieval Scottish archaeology
◾Early Christian monuments of Scotland
◾Early Medieval artefacts
◾Viking and late Norse artefacts
◾Norse in the North Atlantic, AD 800–1500
◾Viking and late Norse British Isles.

You may also choose one of the following options
◾Thematic studies: any one of the thematic courses offered via other MLitt programmes, by agreement with the course convener. These may include courses available via other Masters programmes within the University (most relevant are those offered as part of Celtic Studies and Scottish Medieval Studies)
◾Independent study on a topic agreed with the course convenor.
◾Artefact studies: any one of the specialist courses offered in the MLitt Material Culture & Artefact Studies
◾Multimedia analysis and design or 2D digitisation.

Career prospects

Graduates have gone on to work for various heritage bodies such as the National Museum of Scotland, and for UK-based commercial archaeology firms.

The programme provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career. The wide variety of specialist optional courses allow you to tailor your particular programme experience towards a direction that best suits your future plans upon completion.

Positions held by recent graduates include Field Archaeologist, Open Learning Tutor, University lectureships and research managers.

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Take your love of ceramics to the next level through our highly engaging programme! We are perfect for both newly qualified and long-time professional ceramics artists, helping you develop new skills within your subject. Read more
Take your love of ceramics to the next level through our highly engaging programme! We are perfect for both newly qualified and long-time professional ceramics artists, helping you develop new skills within your subject. Our strong creative community works with artists from multiple specialisms to promote cross discipline approaches to art, helping to inspire your work to new places.

We will help you extend your practical techniques, material research, firing and glaze development, digital design and traditional methods of working. You'll study both the historical and contemporary context of the clay as an artefact within society and decorative material. You'll gain experience of exhibition proposals, design and execution, which will open up valuable networking opportunities that will help you gain success as an artist in ceramics!

Course outline

We focus on three studio-based practice modules which allow you to manage the practical elements of your research. Through an initial proposal, you'll set your practical MA curriculum dependant on your experience, research focus and practice based career goals. The course is taught by academic practitioners and supported by highly trained technicians in ceramics, wood and metal and digital print. Access to all three dimensional workshops is a major advantage of this programme.

You'll look at the design and production of attachments, utilising other materials or combinations of materials to create form. This can include functional wares (both hand-built or moulded), architectural ceramic, and sculpture. This is done alongside material research which looks at surface development, glaze production, body development al and firing techniques.

It is likely you will produce three or two dimensional objects with a focus on form, vessel, and surface or applied decoration. You may though wish to follow a purely material based research project, extending the subject knowledge and playing a significant role in extending the material science of this subject.

Graduate destinations

An MA in Ceramics can prepare you for a wide range of careers, including work as a ceramics maker/producer/designer, pattern maker, mould maker, sculptor or architectural designer for surface or brickwork to name just a few.

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The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. Read more
The Masters in Museum Studies will help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of today’s versatile museum professional. It has been designed in conjunction with employers to meet their needs for well-rounded museum professionals trained in the latest theoretical and practical approaches.

Why this programme

◾Glasgow’s civic and university collections are the richest and most diverse outside of London and are of international standing.
◾Taught alongside staff from the University's own museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, the degree programme provides a combination of academic and practitioner input.
◾If you want to develop a career in the cultural heritage sector, this programme has been developed for you.
◾Three versions of the degree allow you follow standard or specialist strands.
◾There are great opportunities for you to take practice based courses or work placements at the museums and galleries that partner the programme.
◾We welcome applicants from across the arts and sciences, current professionals or career changers, from the UK or abroad.

Programme structure

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered.

The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

Career prospects

Three different strands of the MSc Museum Studies are offered.

The Theory and Practice strand is our standard Museum Studies programme where the museum itself is the primary object of study.

Two specialist strands: Collecting and Provenance; and Artefact and Material Culture, enable you to combine courses in Museum Studies with specialist courses from Masters programmes provided by Archaeology and History of Art.

Each strand will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take two 20 credit common core courses in Museology and Research and Professional Skills. You also take four 20 credit courses from your strand (a combination of strand core and optional courses) and one 60 credit research project.

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The MA in Archaeology at Kent introduces you to the archaeology of selected periods and regions, through a distinctive programme that relates this to wider spheres of evidence and understanding in archaeology. Read more
The MA in Archaeology at Kent introduces you to the archaeology of selected periods and regions, through a distinctive programme that relates this to wider spheres of evidence and understanding in archaeology.

Archaeology involves the material study of past human activity across a range of time periods, though a variety of techniques such excavation and artefact examination. This MA provides you with a robust grounding in theories, methods and approaches within contemporary archaeology (covering, for instance, phenomenology and post-processualism) through a core taught module. You can then specialise in selected periods (such as later prehistory or the Roman era) and regions through a range of taught and directed study modules provided by the Department of Classical & Archaeological Studies (http://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/index.html).

The programme gives you the opportunity to engage directly with first-hand archaeological evidence, exploring areas such as the relationship of sites to their wider landscape and cultural setting, processes of continuity and change within the archaeological record, and the interpretation of material culture. The teaching is geared towards students’ interests and career needs where possible and is especially geared to skills acquisition and preparation for PhD study. In the summer, you write a 15,000-word dissertation with advice from one of our experts to demonstrate the skills that you will have gained during your MA.

This is an ideal programme for graduates of history, ancient history, classics or the wider humanities, wanting to gain practical experience in applying their expertise.

Visit the website: https://www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics/postgraduate/taught-archaeology.html

Assessment

The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules and by the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- introduce you to the archaeology of selected periods and regions, through a distinctive and unique programme, relating this to wider spheres of evidence and understanding in archaeology

- provide you with a robust grounding in theories, methods and approaches within contemporary archaeology (covering, for instance, phenomenology, materiality), examining too areas of controversy and differing expression

- explore a range of types of evidence appropriate to the periods and regions studied.

- establish the relationship of sites to their wider landscape and cultural setting

- identify processes of continuity and change with the archaeological record and to examine explanations for such trends

- confirm the extent of participation in broad European processes through time

- firmly develop your practical archaeological abilities, for instance in handling, characterising, assessing and reporting types of material culture finds (artefacts) and other classes of evidence of the past

- enable you to engage critically with a selected theme or topic within the field of archaeology and history.

- assist you to acquire the critical and organisational skills necessary for successful completion of research for your supervised dissertation and other project work (this work being on an approved topic/s or theme of your choice)

- assist you to develop the necessary range of generic and subject-specific skills – in research, in data handling, in writing, and in the communication of ideas, using both traditional resources and the full range of contemporary IT resources.

Careers

Our MA programmes include much scope for vocational training, skills acquisition and guided project work, often with use of our extensive facilities. These aspects of our programmes have been praised by external assessors in recent years. Recent graduates have progressed to careers in a wide range of related professional and leadership areas, including national and local museums, teaching and senior roles with archaeological organisations (national government institutions, contracting units and trusts). A large proportion of completing Master’s students have progressed onto PhD study.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present. Read more
Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical and social significance of works of art, artefacts and other cultural products from classical antiquity to the present.

Art is an expression of the human spirit. The study of art deals with cultural, social, religious, political and aesthetic meaning in the time it was created, the present and the eras in between. Think of how the Greek mythology of Narcissus – who has been portrayed in countless sculptures and paintings over the ages – was used by Freud to name a psychological disorder and is today used by politicians to symbolise the flaws of modern society. And think of how the destruction of art, be it by Byzantine iconoclasts, sixteenth-century Dutch protestants, or present-day adherents of IS, teaches us that the emotional and political significance of art goes far beyond the loss of objects.

The research Master’s in Art and Visual Culture studies the relationship between art, the past and the present from various angles, including the interpretation of the cultural contexts of visual expressions and their transformations throughout the ages up to now. This programme is geared towards classical archaeologists, art historians and cultural scholars alike. You’ll gain insight into general humanities methods and theories as well as those specific for those three fields. You can then go to focus on your own topic in the field of Art-Historical, Cultural Studies and Archaeology.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

Europe and ‘its worlds’

The programme welcomes students with interest in all forms of art and visual culture. Our own research primarily focuses on Europe and ‘its worlds’, including how European artefacts interact with and differ from the rest of the world. Our research studies artefacts in the broadest sense, ranging from the more traditional forms as sculptures, paintings and architecture to modern ones as film, digital art, the performing arts and even fashion. All our research is performed in collaboration with scientists from other fields within the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS). We are joined in thirteen themed research groups .

Why study Art and Visual Culture at Radboud University?

- We teach you to look at the physical, artistic and visual qualities of an artwork or artefact, seen from the perspectives of three different disciplines: Classical Archaeology, Cultural Studies and Art History.
- In your first year, you take several courses with students from the other HLCS research Master’s specialisations in Historical Studies, and in Literary Studies. This unique construction will allow you to view your own field from the perspective of the other humanities.
- A personal tutor will guide you throughout the entire programme. He/she will give you advice on how to tailor our programme to best suit your interests, act as a sounding board for your research ideas, and help you make the right connections in the academic arena.
- You’ll receive thorough preparation for PhD research, including the writing of a publishable scholarly article and a proposal for a PhD project.
- This programme strongly encourages you to go abroad for at least a semester. Students can use our connections to other universities (IRUN network ) and research institutes to find a place that meet their academic interests.

Our research in this field

Any research done by students of the Master’s in Art and Visual Culture will be supervised by a researcher at the Institute for Historical, Literary and Cultural Studies (HLCS) in Nijmegen. HLCS research focuses around the theme Europe and its Worlds and questions whether ‘Europe’ consists of different worlds, how it is addressed, how it differs from the rest of the world, and how it interacts with other worlds. Researchers from a variety of humanities disciplines collaborate in thirteen different thematic groups to explore the spaces, cultural practices, beliefs, texts and ideas related to Europe and its World.

Thematic research groups
There are art and cultural scientists in many of these thematic groups. Although all the groups could be of interest to an art and cultural researcher, our experience is that the following generate a lot of interest among the Art and Visual Culture students:

- Matter And Culture: Analysis, Discourse & Aesthetics of/in Material Culture
The common framework of this group is research into material culture as the bearer of meaning in the broadest sense.

- Creative Industries: Society, Culture and Aesthetics in the 21st century
This group aims to gain a socio-cultural understanding of the creative industries. The group views the creative industries as a dynamic sector of autonomous and applied arts that range from theatre, music, media, literature and museums; to gaming, film, fashion and television, as well as to design, arts education, heritage and festivals.

- Memory, Materiality and Meaning in the Age of Transnationalism
This group studies the material as well as immaterial media and forms of embodiment through which we create memory through meaning-making and performative practices.

Master’s thesis topics in Art and Visual Culture:
For their Master’s thesis research, students can work together with researchers from one of the HLCS research groups or choose a topic in a non-related area. A small sample of thesis topics that you could research in this programme:
- Understanding the Post-Pompeian Era: Wall painting in the Roman Empire (AD 79-395)
- Crime in a Nordic Space: The Production of Space in Forbrydelsen
- William Marlowe in his time: an eighteenth-century view painter rediscovered
- Unravelling the Fabrics of Time: A New Materialist Perspective on Slow Fashion Becomings
- A Pyramidal Structure along the Via Appia. Documentation and reconstruction


See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/arts-culture 

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If you are looking to undertake research in a specific area of humanities, the creative arts, culture, journalism or media, this Masters in Research (MRes) is the ideal postgraduate course. Read more
If you are looking to undertake research in a specific area of humanities, the creative arts, culture, journalism or media, this Masters in Research (MRes) is the ideal postgraduate course.

The MRes is designed for individuals with a clear idea of which direction they want their academic studies to go in by enabling you to study your chosen cultural or creative field in depth and develop the necessary research and study skills.

The MRes is staffed by experts in a range of different disciplines who have extensive experience in research and who are actively engaged in a number of varied research projects.

Course detail

The MRes differs in a number of ways to a taught MA through its emphasis on an in-depth independent study. You will select the subject you want your research to focus on which will determine the name of the award you are working towards. Your research project can take the form of either a solely written dissertation or a combination of writing and practice.

Award titles available include: Creative Practice, Culture, Media, English Literature, History, Film, Linguistics, English Language, Journalism, Applied Arts, Art, Design, and Digital Media.

Structure

In the first semester (October - February), you will take the following compulsory module:

• Module 1: Research Methodologies (30 credits)

Over the first two semesters (October - April) you will take:

• Module 2: Research Portfolio (30 credits)

From February, you will work to complete your extended project, which will be handed in by the beginning of September.

Format

Teaching will consist of a mix of scheduled lectures and seminars to the whole group, and one-to-one supervision with your designated supervisor. You will be supported through directed learning and independent study, and will engage in essential reading, research, assignment preparation and completion.

You will benefit from a higher level of close supervision than you would on a taught MA, allowing you to hone and develop your research skills. You will also learn valuable presentation skills, covering not only how to present your research to your peers and at conferences, but also how to present yourself online by developing a compelling research portfolio.

Assessment

Research Methodologies is assessed by:
• A presentation lasting approximately ten minutes examining different disciplinary and methodological approaches to your study (30%)
• A Research Proposal that contains a detailed description and justification of your proposed research (70%)

Research Portfolio is assessed by:
• A literature/texts review of material supplied by your supervisor (30%)
• A portfolio containing analytical readings of key texts/sources/artefacts relevant to your project that includes material you have generated through your own research (70%)

Extended Project is assessed by either:
• A written dissertation of up to 25,000 words
• If practice-based, a 12,500 written component and an artefact (for example, a film, sculpture, exhibition, installation, online material or other creative or cultural output)depending on what is appropriate to your practice

Careers / Further study

The MRes at UWE Bristol is designed primarily to provide a foundation for further study at doctoral level. It also suited to those wishing to establish or advance their career in the creative and cultural industries.

You will be equipped with a range of transferable skills, including skills in research, communication, presentations, critical analysis, independent study and intellectual rigour all of which will prove invaluable, whether you are looking to pursue further academic study or establish yourself as an expert in your chosen creative or cultural field.

You will have access to career planning and employability support while you are studying with us (and for three years after you graduate) through the University's careers service.

How to apply

Information on applications can be found at the following link: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/study/applyingtouwebristol/postgraduateapplications.aspx

Funding

- New Postgraduate Master's loans for 2016/17 academic year –

The government are introducing a master’s loan scheme, whereby master’s students under 60 can access a loan of up to £10,000 as a contribution towards the cost of their study. This is part of the government’s long-term commitment to enhance support for postgraduate study.

Scholarships and other sources of funding are also available.

More information can be found here: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/students/feesandfunding/fundingandscholarships/postgraduatefunding.aspx

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This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. Read more
This is a two-year course, which educates and trains graduate students to be conservators capable of researching, analysing, cleaning, preserving and caring for a wide range of archaeological and museum objects. It is intended for those who wish to become practising artefact conservators, or work in the fields of artefact research or preventive conservation. Graduates of the course will normally work in museums or large heritage organisations such the National Trust or English Heritage.

Graduate students are drawn from a wide range on disciplines, but manual dexterity, a very basic knowledge of chemistry and an enthusiasm and desire to work with museum objects are essential.

Course Structure

Modules:
-Conservation Theory
-Conservation Skills
-Artefact Studies
-Care of Collections
-Conservation Practice
-Professional Practice

Learning and Teaching

The programme is delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes as well as an industrial placement. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate among Conservators in that area. Practicals then provide opportunities for students to implement and develop their skills, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programmes formal contact hours. Self-learning development packages allow students to continue their learning in a structured way outside the practical sessions. The industrial placement forms a major part of the contact time in the programme for Professional Practitioners, allowing students to gain direct experience of practical and applied skills in Conservation. Industrial partners include the Museum of London, National Museum of Wales and Victoria & Albert Museum.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge, skills and the ability as independent learners and practitioners that is one of the key attributes that the programme develops in its students. The programme therefore prepares students for work or further study once they have completed the programme, with an emphasis on taking their learning from the classroom to real life situations in Museums and conservation laboratories. All teaching is delivered by qualified conservators.

In the first two terms of the first year students typically attend 4-5 hours a week of lectures, 6 hours of practical work including seminars, 3 hours of structured self-development learning and up to 9 hours of conservation skills working in the conservation laboratory. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge.

The balance shifts in the third term, as students develop their abilities as independent learners through supervised practical conservation work for 4 days a week over 10 weeks and create a portfolio of their work and reflections.

This move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and acting in the role of professional conservator continues in the final year, where students have a placement in a working conservation lab for 9 months. They gain experience of working with a wide range of material and develop further their practical skills, within a real-life working environment. A focus is placed upon problem solving and organisational and managerial skills, under the supervision of a professional conservator. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which students are strongly encouraged to attend.

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Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. Read more
Through our Archaeology MPhil/ you will conduct original and advanced research into a specialist area of archaeology. This is a perfect programme to advance your academic career in archaeology; you will also develop employability skills including project management, report writing, problem-solving, independent working, and research.

Our Archaeology MPhil programme research degree, conducted as supervised independent study, assessed through a single written document that is supported with a viva voce examination.

Both degrees involve the production of new knowledge through original research and advanced scholarship, exploring a field of academic study in detail. This involves detailed understanding of the methods, techniques and approaches needed to produce such knowledge, and the wider context of the subject of study.

These programmes are based in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and cover a wide range of specialisms. Research supervision is available in the following periods and regions:

Later Prehistory

-Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in north-west Europe
-Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Britain and north-west Europe
-Copper and Bronze Age in Italy and the Mediterranean
-Iron Age/Roman transition

Classical Archaeology

-Roman Britain
-Roman Europe and Mediterranean
-Roman urbanism
-Greek and Byzantine archaeology
-The Roman/medieval transition

Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology

-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Byzantine archaeology
-Medieval and post-medieval landscapes
-Church archaeology, historic buildings
-Post-medieval archaeology, colonialism, slavery

Thematic research is also strong at Newcastle and research supervision is available in the following areas of enquiry:

Bodies and Identity

-Personhood and identity
-The archaeology of the body and mortuary archaeology
-Art and identity

Landscapes

-Landscape archaeology
-Ritual landscapes
-Historic landscape characterisation

Material Culture

-Ancient technology and economy
-Ancient metallurgy
-Artefact analysis and material culture studies

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The Archaeology MLitt gives you an opportunity to learn the latest research skills in archaeology. This research programme will prepare you for doctoral study and an academic career in archaeology, or to enter a profession requiring high-level skills in literacy, research and project management. Read more
The Archaeology MLitt gives you an opportunity to learn the latest research skills in archaeology. This research programme will prepare you for doctoral study and an academic career in archaeology, or to enter a profession requiring high-level skills in literacy, research and project management.

The Archaeology MLitt is based in the School of History, Classics and Archaeology and covers a wide range of specialisms. Research supervision is available in the following periods and regions:

Later Prehistory

-Mesolithic/Neolithic transition in north-west Europe
-Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Britain and north-west Europe
-Copper and Bronze Age in Italy and the Mediterranean
-Iron Age/Roman transition

Classical Archaeology

-Roman Britain
-Roman Europe and Mediterranean
-Roman urbanism
-Greek and Byzantine archaeology
-The Roman/medieval transition

Medieval and Post-Medieval Archaeology

-Early medieval Britain and Europe
-Byzantine archaeology
-Medieval and post-medieval landscapes
-Church archaeology, historic buildings
-Post-medieval archaeology, colonialism, slavery

Thematic research is also strong at Newcastle and research supervision is available in the following areas of enquiry:

Bodies and Identity

-Personhood and identity
-The archaeology of the body and mortuary archaeology
-Art and identity

Landscapes

-Landscape archaeology
-Ritual landscapes
-Historic Landscape Characterisation

Material Culture

-Ancient technology and economy
-Ancient metallurgy
-Artefact analysis and material culture studies

Profiles of our staff, who will supervise you, are available on the School website. You can also view our current postgraduate research projects and our recent postgraduate research projects.

Inter-disciplinary research is supported, and research projects can be co-supervised by staff from other subject areas, such as history, ancient history, classics, or fine art.

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Songwriting remains one of the UK’s biggest exports, with UK music stronger than ever. Popular song is the heart of the industry; global demand for new songs is high. Read more
Songwriting remains one of the UK’s biggest exports, with UK music stronger than ever. Popular song is the heart of the industry; global demand for new songs is high. Focusing your portfolio through research prepares you to contribute to this field.

The MA is for students with a thorough grounding in their own specialism who wish to extend and develop their songwriting knowledge and skills at advanced academic level, in a creative environment.

Therefore, the course is aimed at both unpublished songwriters wishing to develop their craft to professional level, and published songwriters wishing to achieve academic accreditation while exploring their creativity and formalising their prior experience.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

From day one you’ll write songs, using alternative strategies designed to work alongside your current creative approaches. Applying practice-based learning at our world-heritage research centres, through a range of creative strategies and critical perspective on your songs’ relationship with audience and industry, you’ll develop and focus your output.

Lyric-writing, and a fluent command of imagery, metaphor and narrative is nurtured as chords and melody take shape around language’s meaning, and vice versa. You’ll investigate the power and potential of song forms, modes of address, perspectives, time-frames and characters.

Having stretched the range of creative options available to you within your own artistic palette, you’ll turn your hand to research; this is your entry to the post-graduate world. You’ll identify the industrial context relevant to your songs; your knowledge of your field will become intensified through primary research, secondary research and contact with guest speakers from industry.

Collaborating with songwriters from near and far will increase your creative and networking range; ahead of your Major Project contextual and collaborative research perform the vital tasks of shaping your song outputs.

MODULES

There are a range of modules which include:
Songwriting Skills: a twelve-week process during which you’ll develop a feel for sensory imagery, metaphor and a facility for narrative tension.

Song Identity and Culture: here you investigate and unravel your personal songwriting ‘DNA’. You’ll look at your own work and that of others, in the context of artistic identity and culture.

Professional Collaboration: you’ll negotiate collaboration with other students within a professional context. For example, songwriters might collaborate in the traditional manner of successful and acclaimed songwriting teams, or may work with choreographers, film makers, poets, composers, arrangers or remixers.

Research Methodologies and Context: a ‘pathfinder’ contextual study into an economic/cultural context for your future song outputs. From folk to hip-hop, indie, metal, etc., each industrial context possesses a uniquely different set of venues, publishers, labels, agents, producers and performers.

Major Project: bring all your research and preparation into focus. You are asked to present a showcase artefact representing the songs developed during your time on the course. Usually this is an album. For some it will be several projects for differing contexts, like a writer’s showcase for a publisher.

For detailed information on the course modules, please visit the course webpage: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-songwriting/

TEACHING METHODS

There are regular taught sessions running across each of the three trimesters. Lectures, visiting speakers, seminars, workshops, tutorials, presentations and playback sessions work on song material and research outcomes. Students play their songs to one another in a supportive yet dynamic environment facilitating networking and analysis and developing the language of creative critique. This can be in a live capacity or via playback.

For information about resources and facilities, please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-songwriting/

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessments range from simple audio sketches in the early stages to full album productions in the final stages; each of which is assessed for quality and market focus. On the research modules, formal, researched and referenced papers express your intellectual and analytical development, and presentation skills bring your work to life.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

There is a broad range of professional outcomes from this course and our graduates now work as:

• Signed artists
• Signed writers
• Lecturers
• Researchers
• Agents
• Performers
• Teachers
• Therapists
• Publishers

The course is also an excellent grounding if you’re interested in further study; a number of our alumni have progressed onto PhD study.

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Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. Read more
Textile Conservation is a multidisciplinary subject which combines academic knowledge with cultural awareness, aesthetic sensitivity and technical skill. This MPhil is both an academic programme and professional training; it will give you a framework of theoretical knowledge and a range of practical experience which will enable you to contribute to the understanding and preservation of culturally significant textile artefacts.

Why this programme

◾If you are looking to enter a career in textile conservation practice in a museum or other institution, or to pursue doctoral-level research in this field, this programme is designed for you.
◾You will take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
◾You will be based in our specialist conservation laboratories. The facilities include workrooms, a wet lab, dye lab, chemistry lab and well-equipped analytical lab.
◾You will benefit from our close links with Glasgow Museums, as well as the University’s own Hunterian Museum. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You will have the opportunity to draw on the museums’ rich and varied textile collections.

◾This is the only programme of its kind in the UK, and one of only a few specialist textile conservation programmes in the world.

Programme structure

You will take core courses over two semesters in each year, with a work placement in the summer between the first and second years. You will write up your dissertation over the second summer and submit it at the end of August.

The core courses will develop an understanding of
◾the practical skills used in textile conservation
◾related practical skills including dyeing and photography
◾the science underpinning textile deterioration and conservation treatments
◾preventive conservation techniques
◾the technological, cultural, historic and aesthetic contexts of textile artefacts
◾the place of conservation in the wider cultural sector.

Core courses

Year 1
◾Research methods in practice
◾Principles and practice: core skills and ethics
◾Understanding textiles: technology
◾Principles and practice: developing skills
◾Preventive conservation
◾Material cultures
◾Placement

Year 2
◾Principles and practice: advanced skills
◾Conservation in practice
◾Deconstructing the artefact
◾Principles and practice: conservation projects
◾Professional development
◾Research management
◾Dissertation

Career prospects

The programme is at career-entry level and graduates are qualified to go on to a post-training internship or directly into the workplace as a textile conservator in a museum or other institution around the world, as well as to undertake further study at PhD level.

The great majority of graduates of this programme and if its predecessor, the Textile Conservation Centre’s MA Textile Conservation programme, now work in museums and other institutions. Graduates of the two programmes have an outstanding record of employment on graduation and of remaining in the sector. They now work in nearly 30 countries and are in senior positions worldwide.

MPhil graduates have been awarded Mellon Fellowships at Denver Art Museum and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, in the USA, while others now work for National Museums Scotland, Historic Royal Palaces and the National Maritime Museum in the UK and Heritage Conservation Center, Singapore, among others.

However, it is worth noting that many graduates go on to short-term contract posts initially. It is easier to find a textile conservation post if you are able to be flexible in terms of location.

Further information:
◾Institute of Conservation (ICON)
◾American Institute for Conservation

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