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Masters Degrees (Masters In Computer Science)

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In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. Read more

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, Complexity Theory, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Mathematics or Computer Science

In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor's in mathematics or computer science that have a strong mathematical background and theoretical interests. We will select students based on their motivation and their background. Mathematical maturity is essential and basic knowledge of logic and discrete mathematics is expected.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based)

- IELTS score of ≥6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our approach to this field

In this Master's specialisation, mathematicians working in areas pertinent to (theoretical) computer science, like algebra and logic, and theoretical computer scientists, working in areas as formal methods and theorem proving, have joined forces to establish a specialisation in the Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science. The programme is unique in the Netherlands and will be built on the excellence of both research institutes and the successful collaborations therein.

The emphasis of the Master's is on a combination of a genuine theoretical and up-to-date foundation in the pertinent mathematical subjects combined with an equally genuine and up-to-date training in key aspects of theoretical computer science. For this reason, the mathematics courses in this curriculum concentrate on Algebra, General Topology, Logic, Number Theory, and Combinatorics. The computer science courses concentrate on Formal Methods, Type Theory, Category Theory, Coalgebra and Theorem Proving.

Our research in this field

Within both institutes, ICIS and WINST, there is a concentration of researchers working on mathematical logic and theoretical computer science with a collaboration that is unique in the Netherlands. The research topics range from work on algebra, logic and computability, to models of distributed, parallel and quantum computation, as well as mathematical abstractions to reason about programmes and programming languages.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/mathematics/foundations



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With a master’s degree in Web Science you will be able to study and solve problems on the web. Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, studies of the law, linguistics and mathematics. Read more

About the Program

With a master’s degree in Web Science you will be able to study and solve problems on the web. Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, studies of the law, linguistics and mathematics. All mandatory courses are taught in English.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or a minor in computer science. Our programme even is free of tuition. The medium of instruction is English.

More information under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws

Employment Outlook

Graduates from the institute WeST have found interesting positions at successful companies, started their own businesses or continued towards a Ph.D. Institute WeST has a limited number of places available each year for pursueing a Ph.D. If you excel earning a master's degree in Web Science you will be in pole position for continuing with doctoral studies.

Studying in Koblenz

Koblenz is one of the oldest and most attractive cities in Germany with its surroundings honoured as UNESCO World Cultural Heritage. The university of Koblenz-Landau has close contacts to leading companies, offering possibilities for internships, collaboration and project experiences.

Program Structure

Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, law, linguistics and mathematics. All mandatory courses are taught in English.

The curriculum is organized in seven module groups:

Foundations of Web Science (two modules) establishes the main idea of Web Science. It provides an interdisciplinary primary view of the web and of more abstract web structures.

The Computer Science track (three modules) teaches the essential technical aspects, namely web engineering, semantic web and web retrieval.

Web and Society (two out of four modules) considers interaction of the web and different user groups: citizens, customers, entrepreneurs, and interest groups.

The module group Elective Courses in Computer Science provides a wide range of technical topics. Modules may be choosen freely from all Master courses in computer science with relevance to the web given at the University of Koblenz-Landau (three modules or more, mininum 18 ECTS).

Elective Interdisciplinary Courses contain web-related modules offered by our university from other disciplines (such as economy, social sciences, linguistics, anthropology, communication theory etc.). Students have to freely elect at least two modules (12 ECTS).

Topics for seminars and research lab can be freely chosen from Web Science subjects. Furthermore, this module group contains a social skills and leadership training..

The topic of the master's thesis can also be freely chosen from any Web Science subjects.

More information about the curriculum can also be found under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws/curriculum

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification -

It is a legal requirement in Germany that students own a Higher education entrance qualification („Hochschulzugangsberechtigung“) respectively a Master entrance qualification („Masterzugangsberechtigung“), proven by school leaving certificates or studies completed at secondary education level.

Entrance qualification is not checked by us, but uni-assist (see application process), therefore please refrain from asking us if your diploma will be accepted. Uni-assist provides some further information on higher education entrance qualification.

Academic Background in Computer Science -

You need some academic background in computer science, such as a

bachelor's degree in computer science, business informatics, Computervisualistik (as offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau), Information management (as offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau until 2012 if 60 ECTS in computer science were acquired) or similar.

Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) can apply, too. Here we have to make a decision on a by-case-basis. To get an educated guess please contact the course guidance.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. If you are unshure if your academic background fulfils our requirements, do not hesitate to contact us: . Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not qualify you for our programme.

Sufficient Grades in Previous Studies -

The German grading system ranges from 1 ("very good") to 6 ("insufficient"). Lower numbers mean better grades. To be eligible for our programme, the grades from your previous studies must be between 1 and 2.5. Grade conversion into the German system is done by uni-assist (cf. application procedure), so we cannot tell you if your GPA fis sufficient. For a first, non-binding estimation on your eligibility you might want to check the calculator provided by the University of Paderborn.

English Language Proficiency -

The medium of instruction for all required courses is English, some additional electives can be taken in German. Thus, we require a certain level of English proficiency such that studies can be undertaken successfully. Thus, a standardised language certificate is required – proof that your previous studies were held in English are not sufficient and not negiotiable. We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

a TOEFL result of at least 79 (internet based), 550 (paper based) or 213 (computer based)

IELTS test with 6.5 points mininum

Cambridge certificate at level B2 or higher (find an exam center)

Proficiency of German language is not a requirement for application. However, additional elective courses are available in German, and we recommend to learn some basic German for daily life. Some hints on learning German can be found at Deutsche Welle.

Motivational Letter -

Applicants need to supply a motivational letter. Please do not send lenghty standard letters describing your general interest in computer science and your appreciation of the German education system. Instead, refer only to our specific programme and follow these guidelines:

Length should be between 150 and 300 words.

The letter must be written in English.

Specify what you learnt and found particularly interesting in your previous studies or practical experiences. Tell us how you want to deepen these previous experience in our master's programme. You can also describe what you expect to learn here for your future job. You should always refer to our curriculum, especially the module groups Foundations of Web Science, Major Subject Computer Science und Major Subject Web and Society. Make clear that you know our curriculum and point out why you have chosen our programme above others.

Further information under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws/requirements

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Are you fascinated by cutting-edge technology? Our one-year master’s programme aims to deepen your knowledge in an area of current interest within computer science, as well as to develop your scientific skills. Read more

Are you fascinated by cutting-edge technology? Our one-year master’s programme aims to deepen your knowledge in an area of current interest within computer science, as well as to develop your scientific skills.


Description of programme

The programme focuses on the realization of innovative IT services and systems. You will learn about the technologies and concepts essential for the development of modern information systems, which are typically complex and include cooperative components. Such technologies and concepts include software agents, service-oriented computing, middleware and ontologies. You will also learn how these technologies can be applied to business systems and other support activities that are critical to society.


Learning Outcomes

Knowledge and Understanding 

  • knowledge and understanding of Computer Science, including having an overview of the area, deepened knowledge in the area of connected systems, as well as, insight in current research and development
  • deepened knowledge of methodologies and research methodologies used in Computer Science
  • ablility to describe central concepts in the area of connected systems

Skills and Abilities 

  • ability to integrate knowledge and to analyse, evaluate and handle complex problems and situations also with limited information
  • ability to independently identify and formulate problems, as well as, plan and, by using suitable methods, carry out advanced tasks within given time frames
  • ability to orally and in writing clearly present and discuss her/his conclusions regarding matters in Computer Science, as well as the knowledge and the arguments which these are based upon in dialog with different groups
  • ability to apply the main concepts and technologies in the development of connected systems
  • skills that are required to participate in research and development work in Computer Science, or to work with other qualified tasks

Judgement and approach 

  • capability, within the area of Computer science, with special focus on connected systems, to make judgements taking into consideration relevant scientific, societal, and ethical aspects, as well as, showing consciousness of ethical aspects of research and development
  • understanding of the possibilities and limitation of science, its role in society, and the responsibility of its use
  • ability to identify her/his needs of additional knowledge and to take responsibility for her/his progress within the area


Your future career

MSc graduates in Computer Science will find many exciting opportunities await them, such as the development of complex distributed systems for e-business, e-government, e-health, e-learning, supply chain management, mobile computing and ubiquitous computing. Moreover, you will be qualified to work as a consultant and IT developer. The degree also prepares individuals for PhD studies, leading to careers in education or research.


Organisation

The program will give the student an opportunity to deepen her/his knowledge in an area of current interest within Computer Science, as well as knowledge and skills of methodologies for research and development projects within Computer Science. The core of the programme is the technologies and concepts essential for the development of connected systems including cooperative information systems.


Courses

For programme with start Autumn 2018: 

Autumn 2018 - Semester 1

Spring 2019 - Semester 2



Degree

Master's Degree (60 credits).

Master of Science (60 credits) with a major in Computer Science. 

In order to be entitled to a Master of Science (60 credits) the following requirements have to be fulfilled: 

  • 60 credits in completed courses of which at least 45 credits must be second cycle courses.
  • At least 30 credits within the same main field of study, including a degree project of at least 15 credits.
  • All qualifications at the second cycle require a previous degree of Bachelor, a professional degree or an equivalent foreign degre




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Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. Read more
Research in Computer Science at York is carried out at the frontiers of knowledge in the discipline. This course gives you the chance to study a range of advanced topics in Computer Science, taught by researchers active in that area. This means you will be learning current research results, keeping you at the forefront of these areas. You will also learn a range of theories, principles and practical methods.

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science is a full time, one year taught course, intended for students who already have a good first degree in Computer Science, and would like to develop a level of understanding and technical skill at the leading edge of Computer Science.

You can choose modules on a range of topics, including Cryptography, Functional Programming, Interactive Technologies, Natural Language Processing, Quantum Computation and Model-Driven Engineering.

Course aims
You will gain an in-depth knowledge of topics on the frontiers of Computer Science in order to engage in research or development and application of leading-edge research findings.

By undertaking an individual project, you will become a specialist in your selected area. You will be encouraged to produce research results of your own. This will prepare you to undertake a PhD in Computer Science should you wish to continue studying within the subject.

Learning outcomes
-A knowledge of several difference topics in Computer Science at an advanced level.
-An understanding of a body of research literature in Computer Science in your chosen topic, and the underlying principles and techniques of research in this area.
-An ability to engage in independent study at an advanced level, and develop skills in self-motivation and organisation.

Research Project

You will undertake your individual research project over the Summer term and Summer vacation. This will be a culmination of the taught modules you have taken during the course, which will allow you to focus on a specialist area of interest.

You will be allocated a personal supervisor, who will be an expert in your chosen area of research. You will be hosted by the research group of your supervisor, and you will benefit from the knowledge and resources of the whole group. Being attached to a research group also allows you to take part in their informal research seminars, and receive feedback and help from other members of the group.

You can choose from projects suggested by members of our academic staff. You also have the option of formulating your own project proposal, with the assistance from your personal supervisor.

All project proposals are rigorously vetted and must meet a number of requirements before these are made available to the students. The department uses an automated project allocation system for assigning projects to students that takes into account supervisor and student preferences.

The project aims to give you an introduction to independent research, as well as giving you the context of a research group working on topics that will be allied to your own. You will develop the skills and understanding in the methods and techniques of research in Computer Science.

As part of the assessment of the project, as well as your dissertation, you will give a talk about your work and submit a concise paper which we will encourage you to publish.

Information for Students

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science exposes you to several topics in Computer Science that are under active research at York. The material taught is preparatory to helping to continue that research, and perhaps continuing to a PhD. What we require from you are enthusiasm, hard work and enough background knowledge to take your chosen modules.

The modules on the MSc in Advanced Computer Science are mostly shared with our Stage 4 (Masters level) undergraduates. Your technical background will be different, and we acknowledge this.

During August we will send entrants a document describing the background knowledge needed for each module and, in many cases, references to where this knowledge is available (for example, widely available text books and web pages).

More generally, many of the modules expect a high level of mathematical sophistication. While the kind of mathematics used varies from module to module, you will find it useful to revise discrete mathematics (predicate and propositional calculi, set theory, relational and functional calculi, and some knowledge of formal logic), statistics and formal language theory. You should also be able to follow and produce proofs.

Careers

Here at York, we're really proud of the fact that more than 97% of our postgraduate students go on to employment or further study within six months of graduating from York. We think the reason for this is that our courses prepare our students for life in the workplace through our collaboration with industry to ensure that what we are teaching is useful for employers.

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Technologies based on the intelligent use of data are leading to great changes in our everyday life. Data Science and Engineering refers to the know-how and competence required to effectively manage and analyse the massive amount of data available in a wide range of domains. Read more
Technologies based on the intelligent use of data are leading to great changes in our everyday life. Data Science and Engineering refers to the know-how and competence required to effectively manage and analyse the massive amount of data available in a wide range of domains.

We offer a two-year Master of Science in Computer Science centered on this emerging field. The backbone of the program is constituted by three core units on advanced data management, machine learning, and high performance computing. Leveraging on the expertise of our faculty, the rest of the program is organised in four tracks, Business Intelligence, Health & Life Sciences, Pervasive Computing, and Visual Computing, each providing a solid grounding in data science and engineering as well as a firm grasp of the domain of interest.

By blending standard classes with recitations and lab sessions our program ensures that each student masters the theoretical foundations and acquires hands-on experience in each subject. In most units credit is obtained by working on a final project. Additional credit is also gained through short-term internship in the industry or in a research lab. The master thesis is worth 25% of the total credit.

TRACKS

• Business Intelligence. This track builds on first hand knowledge of business management and fundamentals of data warehousing, and focuses on data mining, graph analytics, information visualisation, and issues related to data protection and privacy.
• Health & Life Sciences. Starting from core knowledge of signal and image processing, bioinformatics and computational biology, this track covers methods for biomedical image reconstruction, computational neuroengineering, well-being technologies and data protection and privacy.
• Pervasive Computing. Security and ubiquitous computing set the scene for this track which deals with data semantics, large scale software engineering, graph analytics and data protection and privacy.
• Visual Computing. This track lays the basics of signal & image processing and of computer graphics & augmented reality, and covers human computer interaction, computational vision, data visualisation, and computer games.

PROSPECTIVE CAREER

Senior expert in Data Science and Engineering. You will be at the forefront of the high-tech job market since all big companies are investing on data driven approaches for decision making and planning. The Business Intelligence area is highly regarded by consulting companies and large enterprises, while the Health and Life Sciences track is mainly oriented toward biomedical industry and research institutes. Both the Pervasive and the Visual Computing tracks are close to the interests of software companies. For all tracks a job in a start-up company or a career on your own are always in order.

Senior computer scientist.. By personalizing your plan of study you can keep open all the highly qualified job options in software companies.

Further graduate studies.. In all cases, you will be fully qualified to pursue your graduate studies toward a PhD in Computer Science.

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The Pre-Masters in Biomedical Science (Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Science) provides a discipline-specific pathway (a pre-masters year) into the taught Biomedical Blood Science masters level programme. Read more

Overview

The Pre-Masters in Biomedical Science (Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Science) provides a discipline-specific pathway (a pre-masters year) into the taught Biomedical Blood Science masters level programme. It is a one-year full-time programme designed for both home and international students, with a background in life sciences, who wish to study at postgraduate level for the MSc in Biomedical Blood Science. The programme is open to science graduates who do not meet the academic criteria for a direct entry into the MSc. The MSc in Biomedical Blood Science is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). The IBMS is the professional body of Biomedical Scientists within the United Kingdom. The IBMS aims to promote and develop the role of Biomedical Science within healthcare to deliver the best possible service for patient care and safety.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/biomedicalsciencegraduatediploma/

Course Aims

The overall aim is to provide the students with the academic background necessary for the masters programme and to enable them to develop and practise the subject specific academic skills required for the intensive pace of study at masters level. The course also aims to allow international students to benefit from English language support that will help them to develop their academic English language skills.

Intended learning outcomes of the programme reflect what successful students should know, understand or to be able to do by the end of the programme. Programme specific learning outcomes are provided in the Programme Specification available by request; but, to summarise, the overarching course aims are as follows:

- To provide students with core knowledge, understanding and skills relevant to Biomedical Science

- To produce skilled and motivated graduates who are suitably prepared for the MSc in Biomedical Science and for further study.

- To cultivate interest in the biosciences, particularly at the cellular and molecular level, within a caring and intellectually stimulating environment.

- To get an accurate insight into the role of Biomedical Scientists in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

- To develop an understanding of the analytical, clinical and diagnostic aspects of Cellular Pathology, Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology, Blood Transfusion, Clinical Immunology and Haematology pathology laboratories.

- To promote the development of a range of key skills, for use in all areas where numeracy and an objective, scientific approach to problem-solving are valued.

- To provide students with a wide range of learning activities and a diverse assessment strategy in order to fully develop their employability and academic skills, ensuring both professional and academic attainment.

- To promote the development of critical thinking, autonomous learning, independent research and communication skills to help prepare the students for the MSc in Biomedical Blood Science and for a lifetime of continued professional development.

Course Content

All the modules in this one year programme are compulsory. The programme consists of a total of 90 credits made up of one 30 credit module and four 15 credit modules. An additional English module (English for Academic Purposes) will be offered for non-native English speakers if required. This module will not form part of the overall award, but successful completion is required for progression to the Masters programme.

Modules:
- Biomedical Science and Pathology (30 credits):
The module provides the student with the knowledge and understanding of the pathobiology of human disease associated with Cellular Pathology, Clinical Immunology, Haematology, Clinical Biochemistry, Medical Microbiology and Clinical Virology. It also examines the analytical and clinical functions of three more of the major departments of a modern hospital pathology laboratory, including Haematology, Clinical Pathology, Clinical Immunology, Blood Transfusion, Clinical Biochemistry and Medical Microbiology. In addition, the module will give an accurate insight into the role of Biomedical Scientists and how they assist clinicians in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of disease.

- Biochemistry Research Project (non-experimental) (15 credits):
This module aims to introduce students to some of the key non-experimental research skills that are routinely used by biochemists and biomedical scientists, such as in depth literature searching, analysis of experimental data and the use of a computer as tool for both research (bioinformatics) and dissemination of information (web page construction). The student will research the literature on a specific topic, using library and web based resources and will produce a written review. In addition, the student will either process and interpret some raw experimental data provided to them.

- Advances in Medicine (15 credits):
This module will describe and promote the understanding of advances in medicine that have impacted on diagnosis, treatment, prevention of a range of diseases. It will highlight fast emerging areas of research which are striving to improve diagnosis including nanotechnology and new biochemical tests in the fields of heart disease, cancer and fertility investigations which will potentially improve patient care.

- Clinical Pathology (15 credits):
The majority of staff that contribute to the module are employees of the University Hospital of North Staffordshire (UHNS). Students will benefit from lectures and expertise in Clinical Diagnostic Pathology, Pharmacology, Biochemistry, Genetics and Inflammatory Diseases. Students will gain an insight into how patients are managed, from their very first presentation at the UHNS, from the perspective of diagnosis and treatment. The course will cover both standardised testing options and the development of new diagnostic procedures with a particular emphasis on genetic and epigenetic aspects of disease. Students will also gain an appreciation of the cost benefit of particular routes for diagnosis and treatment and the importance of identifying false positive and false negative results. Finally, the students will have the opportunity to perform their own extensive literature review of a disease-related topic that is not covered by the lectures on the course.

- Case Studies in Biomedical Science (15 credits):
This module aims to give you an understanding of the UK health trends and the factors that affect these trends. Through clinical case studies and small group tutorials, you will explore why the UK has some of the highest incidences of certain diseases and conditions in Europe and consider what factors contribute to making them some of the most common and/or rising health problems faced by this country. This will include understanding the relevant socioeconomic factors as well as understanding the bioscience of the disease process and its diagnosis and management. You will also focus on what is being done by Government and the NHS to tackle these major health problems.

- English for Academic Purposes (EAP ):
For non-native English speakers if required

Teaching & Assessment

In addition to the lecture courses and tutorials, problem based learning (PBL) using clinical scenarios is used for at least one module. Students will also be given the opportunity to undertake an independent non-experimental research project, supervised and supported by a member of staff. Web-based learning using the University’s virtual learning environment (KLE) is also used to give students easy access to a wide range of resources and research tools, and as a platform for online discussions and quizzes. Students will be given many opportunities to become familiar with word processing, spreadsheets and graphics software as well as computer-based routes to access scientific literature.

All modules are assessed within the semester in which they are taught. Most contain elements of both ‘in-course’ assessment (in the form of laboratory reports, essays, posters) and formal examination, although some are examined by ‘in-course’ assessment alone.

Additional Costs

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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Course Content. All MSc degrees in the School of Computer Science at the University of St Andrews can be studied with English Language. Read more

Course Content

All MSc degrees in the School of Computer Science at the University of St Andrews can be studied with English Language. Students study over three taught semesters and in addition to all the modules from their chosen Computer Science degree, they study modules in English for Academic Purposes and English for Computer Science 1 and 2.

Course options

Students with a degree in Computer Science or a related discipline, such as Information Systems or Engineering:

  • Advanced Computer Science
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Computer Communication Systems
  • Software Engineering

Students who do not necessarily have a Computer Science background but are able to demonstrate proficiency in programming:

  • Human Computer Interaction

Students who do not necessarily have any prior knowledge of Computer Science, IT, programming, or management:

  • Computing and Information Technology
  • Information Technology
  • Management and Information Technology

Highlights

  • This programme offers an innovative way to start your degree with a structure that allows you to continue developing your knowledge of English.
  • You will study both Computer Science and English Language modules – for credit – right from the start. 
  • The University’s School of Computer Science is ranked second in the UK by the Guardian University Guide 2018.
  • One visa covers the full length of the programme.
  • After the first taught semester, you will continue onto a suitable Masters degree in Computer Science based on your performance on the initial Programming module. This also provides you with a high level of flexibility of study.
  • The English language requirement is a minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall, with a minimum of IELTS 5.5 on each paper.

Teaching format

The taught portion of the MSc programme includes eleven modules: three related to English Language and eight specific to Computer Science. Teaching methods include lectures, seminars, tutorials and practical classes. Most modules are assessed through practical coursework exercises and examinations. Class sizes typically range from 10 to 50 students.

All students are assigned an adviser who meets with them at the start of the year to discuss module choices and who is available to assist with any academic difficulties during the year. A designated member of staff provides close supervision for the MSc project and dissertation.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2016–2017 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2017 entry.

Closing date for applications

The closing date for applications is in November, please check our website for the most up-to-date information.



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The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business. Read more

Program overview

The computer science program is designed for students who have an undergraduate degree (or minor) in computer science, as well as those who have a strong background in a field in which computers are applied, such as engineering, science, or business.

The degree is offered on a full- or part-time basis. Courses are generally offered in the afternoons and evenings to accommodate part-time students. Full-time students take three or four courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in three semesters. Full-time students who are required to take additional bridge courses may be able to complete the course work in four semesters. Part-time students take one or two courses per semester and may be able to complete the course work in four to five semesters. The time required to complete a master's project is one semester, but can vary according to the student and the scope of the topic. Two semesters is typical.

Plan of study

The program consists of 30 credit hours of course work, which includes either a thesis or a project. Students complete one core course, three courses in a cluster, four electives, and a thesis. For those choosing to complete a project in place of a thesis, students complete one additional elective.

Clusters

Students select three cluster courses from the following areas (see website for individual area information):
-Computer graphics and visualization
-Data management
-Distributed systems
-Intelligent systems
-Languages and tools
-Security
-Theory

Electives

Electives provide breadth of experience in computer science and applications areas. Students who wish to include courses from departments outside of computer science need prior approval from the graduate program director. Refer to the course descriptions in the departments of computer science, engineering, mathematical sciences, and imaging science for possible elective courses.

Master's thesis/project

Students may choose the thesis or project option as the capstone to the program. Students who choose the project option must register for the Project course (CSCI-788). Students participate in required in-class presentations that are critiqued. A summary project report and public presentation of the student's project (in poster form) occurs at the end of the semester.

Curriculum

Thesis/project options differ in course sequence, see the website for a particular option's modules and a particular cluster's modules.

Other admission requirements

-Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
-Submit scores from the Graduate Record Exam.
-Have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B), and complete a graduate application.
-International applicants, whose native language is not English, must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language. A minimum score of 570 (paper-based) or 88 (Internet-based) is required.
-Applicants must satisfy prerequisite requirements in mathematics (differential and integral calculus, probability and statistics, discrete mathematics, and computer science theory) and computing (experience with a modern high-level language [e.g., C++, Java], data structures, software design methodology, introductory computer architecture, operating systems, and programming language concepts).

Additional information

Bridge courses:
If an applicant lacks any prerequisites, bridge courses may be recommended to provide students with the required knowledge and skills needed for the program. If any bridge courses are indicated in a student's plan of study, the student may be admitted to the program on the condition that they successfully complete the recommended bridge courses with a grade of B (3.0) or better (courses with lower grades must be repeated). Generally, formal acceptance into the program is deferred until the applicant has made significant progress in this additional course work. Bridge program courses are not counted as part of the 30 credit hours required for the master's degree. During orientation, bridge exams are conducted. These exams are the equivalent to the finals of the bridge courses. Bridge courses will be waived if the exams are passed.

Faculty:
Faculty members in the department are actively engaged in research in the areas of artificial intelligence, computer networking, pattern recognition, computer vision, graphics, visualization, data management, theory, and distributed computing systems. There are many opportunities for graduate students to participate in these activities toward thesis or project work and independent study.

Facilities:
The computer science department provides extensive facilities that represent current technology, including:
-A graduate lab with more than 15 Mac’s and a graduate library.
-Specialized labs in graphics, computer vision, pattern recognition, security, database, and robotics.
-Six general purpose computing labs with more than 100 workstations running Linux, Windows, and OS X; plus campus-wide wireless access.

Maximum time limit:
University policy requires that graduate programs be completed within seven years of the student's initial registration for courses in the program. Bridge courses are excluded.

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Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication. Read more

Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication.

You will develop the skills required to work in a range of sectors, including media, science policy, filmmaking, science outreach, public relations, museums and science centres, science festivals, and other public engagement fields.

Developed by the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the course features masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in a wide range of sectors, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

You will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?

You will consider these and other questions through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and link these to practical skills.

Special features

Real world learning

We bring practitioners into the classroom and enable you to participate in the various forms of science communication that take place in Manchester to complement your academic learning with real life experiences.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements for both individual students and groups.

You will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, professional literatures, and mass media products about science, technology and medicine.

You will also learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events.

We encourage participation and volunteering to help you further your own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Applicants may informally request examples of study materials to help you test your ability to engage effectively with the course from the Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

All units are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. You should expect both written and spoken assessments that use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

You may choose your own topic or medium for many of the assessments. Assessed work also includes a piece of original science communication research.

The final assessment is a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional (the mentored project).

Course unit details

The full-time version of the course runs for 12 months from September. There is also a part-time alternative, covering half the same classes each semester over two years. Part-time study involves a limited number of days' attendance per week and can be combined with part-time employment.

All students take three course units consisting of weekly lectures and discussion seminars:

  • Introduction to Science Communication (30 credits)
  • Communicating ideas in science, technology and medicine (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Contemporary Science and Medicine (15 credits)

All students also attend a series of intensive one-day schools on science communication practice and science policy, with sessions led by invited contributors including journalists, documentary filmmakers, museum professionals, policy analysts, outreach officers and other relevant experts. From these day schools, you will choose two of the following four areas to specialise in for assessed work (although you can sit in on all these units):

  • Science, media and journalism (15 credits)
  • Science museums, Science Centres and Public Events (15 credits)
  • Ideas and issues in science communication studies (15 credits) ¿ Science, government and policy (15 credits)

The course is completed by two more open-ended elements allowing you to specialise towards your preferred interests.

  • The science communication research project (30 credits) gives more scope for independent investigation and includes new research on a particular science communication topic.
  • The mentored project (60 credits), completed over the summer at the end of the course, involves working with support from a science communication professional on developing and analysing an activity close to professional practice.

Our course teaches the current trends in science communication, so details of our units may vary from year to year to stay up to date. This type of change is covered within the University's disclaimer , but if you are in doubt about a unit of interest, please contact us before accepting your offer of a place.

What our students say

Read about graduate Amie Peltzer's experience of the course on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog .

Facilities

You will have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of a dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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One of a range of degrees from the taught Masters Programme at the School of Computer Science our course is especially designed for graduates of numerate subjects other than computer science. Read more
One of a range of degrees from the taught Masters Programme at the School of Computer Science our course is especially designed for graduates of numerate subjects other than computer science. It is mostly taught separately from the other courses. It intensively covers a broad range of the key principles and techniques of computer science.

About the course

There is an emphasis on software development, in particular when applied to solving problems in other disciplines. Depending on the modules chosen, it can lead to a career in areas such as systems development, IT management, or the deployment of advanced applications in specific disciplines.

Why choose this course?

-This MSc is available with an optional one year industry placement. The 'with placement' programmes give you additional industrial experience by applying the skills you have learned throughout your studies
-A flexible course, part of our postgraduate master's programme in Computer Science, with two different routes
-Our course is especially designed for graduates of numerate subjects other than computer science
-Taught by a highly-regarded and long-established computer science department with strong links to business
-Half the research outputs in Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire have been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014

Careers

Our masters programme is designed to give Computer Science graduates the specialist, up-to-date skills and knowledge sought after by employers, whether in business, industry, government or research. This particular course will prepare you for a career such as a software engineer, developer or project manager.

Teaching methods

Classes consist of lectures, small group seminars, and practical work in our well-equipped laboratories. We use modern, industry-standard software wherever possible. There are specialist facilities for networking and multimedia and a project laboratory especially for masters students. In addition to scheduled classes, you will be expected a significant amount of time in self-study, taking advantage of the extensive and up-to-date facilities. These include the Learning Resource Centres, open 24x7, with 1,500 computer workstations and wifi access, Studynet our versatile online study environment usable on and off campus, and open access to our labs.

Work Placement

This MSc is available with an optional one year industry placement. The 'with placement' programmes give you additional industrial experience by applying the skills you have learned throughout your studies.

This offers you the opportunity to work for one year in a highly professional and stimulating environment. You will be a full time employee in a company earning a salary and will learn new skills that can't be taught at University. During the placement, you will be able to gain further insight into industrial practice that you can take forward into your individual project.

We will provide excellent academic and personal support during both your academic and placement periods together with comprehensive careers guidance from our very experienced dedicated Careers and Placements Service.

Although the responsibility for finding a placement is with you, our Careers and Placements Service maintains a wide variety of employers who offer placement opportunities and organise special training sessions to help you secure a placement, from job application to the interview. Optional one-to-one consultations are also available.

In order to qualify for the placement period you must maintain an overall average pass mark of not less than 60% across all modules studied in semester ‘A’.

Structure

Year 1
Core Modules
-Computer Architectures
-Computer Science Masters Project
-Operating Systems and Networks
-Preparation for Placement
-Professional Issues
-Professional Work Placement for MSc Computer Science
-Programming and Program Design
-Software Development Exercise
-Systems Modelling

Year 2
Core Modules
-Computer Science Masters Project

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Overview. Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies. Read more

Overview

Learning how to make new discoveries that will contribute to a better understanding of the historical, social political and cultural processes that shape societies.

Are people living in ethnically diverse neighbourhoods more inclined to turn inwards and to ‘hunker down’ compared to people of ethnically homogeneous settings? Are there cross-country differences in the causes of hooliganism, and in the effectiveness of methods used to combat hooligans in different European countries?

More and more comparative questions on societies are being raised. At Radboud University we believe that answers to comparative questions are more informative, lead to a better understanding of societal phenomena and processes, and therefore have more scientific and social importance than answers to questions about one society in one historical period.

This programme therefore fully focuses on teaching students how to perform high-quality comparative research. We look into the degree of inequality, cohesion and modernisation in both Western and non-Western societies. You’ll learn how to translate social problems into empirical research questions and understand the diverse theoretical approaches, research designs, data collections and analyses you need to get the answers you are looking for.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Why study Social and Cultural Science at Radboud University?

- A majority of our courses are exclusively created and offered for the research students enrolled in this programme, and therefore perfectly match the needs and desires of social and cultural researchers.

- This programme is linked to the Nijmegen Institute for Social and Cultural Research (NISCO) who offer an excellent research environment and have extensive social science databases that students are free to use.

- You’ll participate in group-oriented education and be part of a small, select group of highly motivated national and international students.

- You’ll be given your own workplace (equipped with a computer) in a room with your fellow students to enhance solidarity. Every student also receives personal guidance and supervision.

- You’ll write two scientific journal papers which will not only give you plenty of practise but will also give you a good academic research portfolio that you can use when applying for research positions.

- A large majority of our graduates gain PhD and other research positions; almost all of our graduates found work shortly after graduating.

Multidisciplinary

The programme combines the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, development studies and communication science. This programme is therefore ideal for Bachelor’s students from these disciplines with an interest in research. However, we believe that students from disciplines such as political science, economics and human geography can also profit from this Master’s.

The Research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science trains aspiring researchers and is ideal preparation for PhD positions or research positions in relevant non-academic research institutes. Or you could build a bridge between academic research and the world of practice, thereby influencing policy-making in the public and private sphere.

Career prospects

The career prospects of a graduate of Social and Cultural Science are good; almost 100% of our alumni found a job or research position immediately after graduating.

Job positions

There are plenty of options open to graduates of the research Master’s in Social and Cultural Science:

- Scientific research career (academia)

The programme provides an excellent basis for a scientific research career and attaining PhD positions.

- Societal research career

Our graduates can also go on to have careers in relevant non-academic research and policy institutes like government ministries, Statistics Netherlands (CBS), The Netherlands Institute for Social Research (SCP) and The Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement (NSCR) and foreign equivalents.

- More

Of course, this Master’s programme does not close other doors. Students with a research Master’s are also highly sought after by (commercial) businesses and organisations because of their analytical and communication skills and in-depth understanding of social and cultural behaviour. Other careers, such as policymaker, manager, journalist, etc are certainly within reach.

Find information on Scholarships here http://www.ru.nl/scholarships

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs

Our research in this field

Half of the Master’s programme in Social and Cultural Science consists of practical research training.

In the first year, you’ll do a research project in which you conduct a small-scale empirical research under guided supervision of a senior researcher. The comparative research issue is typically part of the ongoing research within a Radboud chair group. Finally, you’ll write a scientific journal paper regarding the research results. The project is done in small groups (2-3 students) and prepares you well to independently conduct a comparative empirical social science study for your Master’s thesis in the second.

- Master’s thesis topics in the field of Social and Cultural Science

For your Master’s thesis you are completely free to tackle any social issue in the disciplines of sociology, anthropology, communication science or development studies. Important is the ability to reflect on the societal significance of your research question and the societal importance of your research. Thesis topics vary widely:

- Many theses are concerned with cross-country comparisons of behaviour or attitude measures using European cross-sectional survey data on, for example, xenophobia or gender roles.

- Others theses compare classrooms and the effect ethnic composition has on interethnic bullying or the impact of the economic crisis on African migrants in Athens, Greece, or the utilisation of different sexual health services by Aboriginal adolescents.

- Thesis topics can also be found in the field of communication science, like examining the news on extreme right political parties in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands and correlating it with election results, or studying patterns in TV drama (e.g. increasing Americanisation) and comparing these media trends with societal processes such as individualisation.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/scs



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The MSc Computer Science is a Masters degree course for students who have a first degree in a subject other than computing. Designed to open the door to exciting new career opportunities in computer science and information technology, the programme is suitable for graduates from diverse subject backgrounds. Read more

The MSc Computer Science is a Masters degree course for students who have a first degree in a subject other than computing. Designed to open the door to exciting new career opportunities in computer science and information technology, the programme is suitable for graduates from diverse subject backgrounds.

The programme is different to IT programmes, in that it is a technical degree with a significant programming component. It is designed to give you a grounding in both the fundamentals of computer science and practical software development skills. Students join this programme from a wide range of first degrees, from the technical and scientific to the social sciences and humanities. Graduates of this degree are highly sought after by employers due to the special knowledge, expertise and skills acquired.

Course details

The MSc Computer Science is a full-time one-year Masters degree course for students who have a first degree in a subject other than computing. Designed to open the door to exciting new career opportunities in computer science and information technology, the programme is suitable for a variety of hard-working graduates from diverse subject backgrounds. Established in 1969, this is now the longest-running conversion programme to computing in the UK.

The programme is different to IT programmes, in that it is a technical degree with a significant programming component. It is designed to give you a grounding in both the fundamentals of computer science and practical software development skills. Students from all backgrounds are welcome to apply. Competency should be demonstrated in mathematics and scientific subjects, for example at 'advanced' high school level, which should allow understanding of the new Computer Science subjects.

The core components of this degree course are a software workshop, taught modules and a summer project. The software workshop involves two terms of intensive training in Java programming, including lectures, supervised laboratory work and small-group tutorials.

At the same time students enrol in a variety of modules, including: Introductory Computer Science; Software Engineering; Databases; and Computer Networks. In the summer term, students engage in developing a substantial software project under the supervision of a faculty member.

Students join this programme from a wide range of first degrees, from the technical and scientific to the social sciences and humanities. Graduates of this degree are highly sought after by employers due to the special knowledge, expertise and skills acquired.

Learning and teaching

Learning and teaching methods will take the form of lectures, classes, case study work, online assignments and quizzes, presentations and self-directed study.

Work will be assessed via exams, coursework, presentations and a dissertation.

Employability

As the University of the Year for Graduate Employment in The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015-16, Birmingham is the UK’s number one university for securing a graduate-level job.

A degree in Computer Science provides the skills required for a wide range of careers. It will give you a disciplined approach to analysing problems, with the ability to design creative solutions and critically evaluate the results. Employers are impressed by the combination of technical and transferable skills offered by computing graduates, and as such, you might find yourself in a variety of environments in academia, industry, research and commercial organisations.

These qualities, plus the prestige of a degree from a leading World Class University, make our graduates attractive to companies in the engineering sector worldwide as well as those in finance, consultancy and commerce.

Your Birmingham Degree

Your Birmingham degree is evidence of your ability to succeed in a demanding academic environment. Employers target Birmingham students for their drive, diversity, communication and problem-solving skills, their team-working abilities and cultural awareness, and our graduate employment statistics have continued to climb at a rate well above national trends. 



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A solid, theoretical understanding of computer technology with plenty of attention for the wide range of ICT applications. The enormous and rapidly growing power of ICT is the main driving force shaping our modern society. Read more

A solid, theoretical understanding of computer technology with plenty of attention for the wide range of ICT applications.

The enormous and rapidly growing power of ICT is the main driving force shaping our modern society. This goes beyond the technical and economical aspects. ICT is also essential in research as all sciences benefit from the raw power of software in processing huge quantities of data. But how do we manage and control the complexity of modern software? How can we make the most of the opportunities? And, not to be forgotten, how can we secure the ICT infrastructures we so heavily rely on? The Master’s programme in Computing Science covers all these aspects.

We offer specialisations in each terrain: security, software, data and the mathematics at the base of it all. These are not, however, isolated disciplines. We also look at the interesting interplay between them. For example, by taking privacy into account when dealing with big data. And by doing a thorough analysis of newly designed software to prevent security breaches later. Thanks to a large number of optional courses, you can decide where you want your focus to be.

The job opportunities in computer science are excellent: many of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all have positions within six months after graduating. Many of our graduates find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers and a few continue as researchers.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/computingscience

Specialisations

- Cyber Security

You’ll learn to assess the security of existing ICT solutions, and how to develop more secure solutions for the future. This specialisation is offered in collaboration with the Eindhoven University of Technology, meaning you get taught by many of the best cyber security experts in the country.

- Data Science

You’ll learn how to turn real-world data sets into tools and useful insights, with the help of software and algorithms. Radboud University and the iCIS research institute are leading in research on legal and privacy aspects of data science and on the societal and administrative impact of data science.

- Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science

You’ll come to understand the fundamental mathematical concepts of computation and information in order to stretch the boundaries of computer technology. We’re the only specialisation in the country – and one of the few in the world – to focus on the theoretical and abstract playing field linking mathematics and computer science.

- Software Science

You’ll learn how to design high-level software that guarantees safety while controlling its complexity. At Radboud University, we are specialised in model based development. In other words, writing and testing code before they are unleashed in the real world or built into an expensive prototype.

- Societal Master's specialisations

You can either follow one of the above-mentioned research Master's specialisations as a whole (2 years), or you can combine the first year of the research specialisation with an additional year of one of the societal Master’s specialisations, namely:

- Science in Society

- Science, Management and Innovation

Why study Computing Science at Radboud University?

- All of our specialisations are closely related to the research carried out within the Institute for Computing and Information Science (iCIS).

- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.

- There are plenty of high profile companies in the vicinity such as Philips and ASML, where you could do an internship or the research for your Master’s project.

- Exceptional students who choose the Data Science specialisation have the opportunity to do a double degree in Computing Science together with the specialisation in Web and Language Interaction (Artificial Intelligence). This will take three instead of two years.

Career prospects

There is a serious shortage of well-trained information specialists. Often students are offered a job before they have actually finished their study. About 20% of our graduates choose to go on to do a PhD but most find jobs as systems builders, ICT specialists or ICT managers in the private sector or within government.

Our research in this field

The Institute for Computing and Information Science (iCIS) is the research institute that is connected to Radboud University. Within this institute there are three research sections:

- Model Based System Development

- Digital Security

- Intelligent Systems

Within each research section there are different departments/groups that have their own research. On the websites of the research sections you will find more information about their research, publications, the departments/groups and contact information.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/computingscience



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The Department of Computer Science at Aberystwyth has a strong research focus on techniques and applications of intelligent systems, working with many major companies. Read more

About the course

The Department of Computer Science at Aberystwyth has a strong research focus on techniques and applications of intelligent systems, working with many major companies. Our taught Masters degrees draw on this focus, and link to the expertise and interests of the Department. They are designed to meet the needs of both students wanting a foundation for a career in research, and those wanting to expand on their skills to accelerate their industrial career.

Contemporary software is frequently developed to function in distributed systems. Applications are deployed across multiple computers, interacting to provide services and to solve problems in a distributed way. This Masters course is suitable for students intending to pursue a career in the software industry, and is a qualifying Masters Degree for Chartered Engineer status. It can also lead to a career in research.

The course in Software Engineering is a two year full-time programme. This degree is the same as the one year MSc in Computer Science (Software Engineering) - G493, with the addition that the student spends a year working in industry after the taught part of the course.

Year one of the course is divided into two parts over three semesters. In part one, you will establish a breadth of necessary skills in a number of core modules whilst directing your own study by choosing specialist modules, worth a total of 120 credits. In part two, you will apply your learning in the individual dissertation worth an additional 60 credits.

Previous study topics have included: Transmission of MIDI music over internet connection, Designing a network intrusion detection system, Online results and statistics using web service technology, Supply chain management system applications and Prototype railway track measurement system.

Whatever your own previous experience or future aspiration, with this course you will benefit from the marvellous integration of cutting-edge theory and practical application, within a world-class department. The most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment found that 100% of the impact research the department of Computer Science undertakes is world leading.

Course content

Year 1

Core modules:

Advanced Software Engineering
Machine Learning for Intelligent Systems
Mobile Solutions

Optional modules:

Enterprise Systems Development
Fundamentals of Intelligent Systems
Internet Technologies
Research Skills and Personal Development for Scientists
Statistical Concepts, Methods and Tools
The Object Oriented Programming Paradigm
Research Skills and Personal Development for Scientists (1520)

Year 2

Core modules:

MSC Project
Sandwich Year (PG)

Optional modules:

Statistical Concepts, Methods and Tools

Contact time

Approximately 12 hours a week in the first two semesters. During semester three you will arrange your level of contact time with your assigned supervisor.

Assessment

The taught part of the course is delivered and assessed through lectures, student seminars, practical exercises, case studies, course work and formal examinations. The subsequent successful submission of your research dissertation leads to the award of an MSc.

Industrial Year

This degree is the same as the one year MSc in Computer Science (Software Engineering), with the addition that the student spends a year working in industry after the taught part of the course.

• Students study at Aberystwyth University from September to May, and are supported in applying for suitable jobs in the software
industry.
• They work in the UK from June to the following May.
• They return to Aberystwyth to complete their dissertation from June to September

The work in industry is paid employment, not just work experience. Typical annual salaries for an industrial year are between £11,000 and £15,000.

Students wishing to do the industrial year are assisted in finding a place in industry. There is assistance with preparing an appropriate CV, training in what to expect at an interview, and practice in being interviewed by experienced industry interviewers. The Department of Computer Science sends about 70 students each year for a year's experience in industry, and has many contacts in companies enthusiastic to take good students from Aberystwyth University.

As these are paid jobs for companies, we cannot guarantee any student a job - the companies select the employees they want. Students that are unable to find a job can complete the Masters degree without an industrial year.

There is an additional but much reduced fee for the year in industry (presently £800 for the year), and members of staff stay in touch electronically and by visiting students during the year.

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Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity. Read more

Learning how to design high-level software that guarantees safety and correctness while still being in control of its complexity.

Software plays a role in almost every aspect of our daily lives and in every organisation anywhere in the world. It can often be a crucial key to their success. Well-structured software that is attuned to an organisation’s needs and future plans can be cost effective, improve efficiency, offer better services and be innovative. Many companies, in every branch out there, are therefore looking for highly skilled software specialists. Graduates of the Master’s specialisation in Software Science will have no trouble finding a job.

Producing software is not merely a technological enterprise but a deeply scientific and creative one as well. Modern cars drive on 20 million lines of code. How do we develop all this software and control its complexity? How do we ensure correctness of software on which the lives in a speeding car literally depend on? This specialisation goes far beyond basic code writing. It’s about analysing and testing code in order to improve it as well as simplify it.

Why study Software Science at Radboud University?

- Although not the only focus, our programme puts a lot of emphasis on embedded software and functional programming.

- We teach a unique range of software analysis techniques and application down to practical/commercial use in industry.

- This specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of the Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS) in areas such as model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages. We also closely collaborate with the Embedded Systems Institute.

- Our approach is pragmatic as well as theoretical. As an academic, we don’t just expect you to understand and make use of the appropriate tools, but also to program and develop your own.

- For your Master’s research we have a large number of companies like Philips, ASML and NXP offering projects. There are always more projects than students.

- Thanks to free electives students can branch out to other Computing Science domain at Radboud University such as security, machine learning or more in-depth mathematical foundations of computer science.

- The job opportunities are excellent: some of our students get offered jobs before they’ve even graduated and almost all of our graduates have positions within six months after graduating.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Computing Science or related area

In order to get admission to this Master’s you will need a completed Bachelor’s degree in Computing Sciences or a related discipline.

2. A proficiency in English

In order to take part in the programme, you need to have fluency in English, both written and spoken. Non-native speakers of English without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:

- TOEFL score of >575 (paper based) or >232 (computer based) or >90 (internet based)

- IELTS score of >6.5

- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE), with a mark of C or higher

Career prospects

Writing good software is a highly creative process, which requires the ability to approach problems in entirely novel ways through computational thinking. Besides creativity, a professional software scientist also has fine problem-solving, analytical, programming, and communication skills. By combining software programming, model-checking techniques and human intellect, software scientists can make a real difference to help and improve the devices that govern such a large part of our lives.

The job perspective for our graduates is excellent. Industry desperately needs software science specialists at an academic level, and thus our graduates have no difficulty in find an interesting and challenging job. Several of our graduates decide to go for a PhD and stay at a university, but most of our students go for a career in industry. They then typically either find a job at a larger company as consultant or programmer, or they start up their own software company.

Examples of companies where our graduates end up include the big Dutch high-tech companies such as Océ, ASML, Vanderlande and Philips, ICT service providers such as Topicus and Info Support and companies started by Radboud graduates, like AIA and GX.

Our research in this field

The Master’s programme in Computing Sciences is offered in close collaboration with the research Institute for Computing and Information Sciences (iCIS). Research at iCIS is organised in three different research sections:

- Model Based System Development

- Digital Security

- Intelligent Systems

The Software Science specialisation builds on the strong international reputation of iCIS in areas such model based and virtual product development, advanced programming, and domain specific languages.

Research project and internship

For your research project, you may choose to do your internship at:

- A company

---- SME, such as as Océ, Vanderlande, Clarity or GX

---- multinational, such as the Philips, ASML, NXP, Logica or Reed Business Media

- A governmental institute, such as the (Dutch) Tax Authorities or the European Space Agency.

- Any department at Radboud University or another university with issues regarding software, like studying new techniques for loop bound analysis, the relation between classical logic and computational systems, or e-mail extension for iTasks.

- One of the iCIS departments, specialising on different aspects of Software Science.

- Abroad, under supervision of researchers from other universities that we collaborate with. For instance, exploring a new technique for automata learning at Uppsala University in Sweden, or verifying the correctness of Erlang refactoring transformations at the Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest, Hungary.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/softwarescience



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