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Masters Degrees (Master Of Social Work)

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Social Work at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Social Work at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

This master's degree in Social Work aims to:

• prepare students for employment as professionally qualified social workers
• lay the foundation for students’ continuing professional development
• reflects the key themes of contemporary social work in Wales

Key Features of MSc in Social Work

Performance:

- The Times Higher League Tables 2014 ranked the Undergraduate Social Work degree at Swansea joint 1st in the UK, and the Guardian League Table ranked social work in Swansea 1st in the UK in 2015.
- the Social Work programme meets all the Care Council requirements and is now fully approved as a professional social work programme as defined in The Approval and Visiting of Degree Courses in Social Work (Wales) Rules 2012

Teaching and Employability:

- 95% of Social Work students from Swansea University are employed in graduate level jobs within six months of graduating (undergraduate programme). Postgraduate–level students are expected to be in similar demand
- the professional qualification is recognised in Wales, England, Scotland and Northern Ireland as well as other countries such as Australia
- the Social Work programme operates in partnership with five local authorities in the South West Wales region: Neath Port Talbot, Swansea, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, and Ceredigion
- teaching from a wide range of practitioners from social work teams and agencies plus guest speakers from Welsh Government
- a minimum of 200 days practice learning are undertaken
- successful completion allows students to register as qualified social workers with the Care Council for Wales
- applicants may be eligible for a student bursary from the Care Council for Wales which includes a contribution towards tuition fee

Social Work is about change and human growth through supporting the social care and welfare needs of individuals, groups and local communities.

Social work has been an established course at Swansea University for many years and combines a commitment to both academic excellence and practical learning. There are strong links between the Department and social services agencies in south and west Wales, and in local authority and voluntary sectors.

The master's degree in Social Work lays the foundation for students’ continuing professional development. It also reflects the key themes of contemporary social work in Wales.

Qualifying Social Work students will be:

- equipped to understand and work within the context of a profession whose nature, scope and purpose can be the subject of contested debate
- able to critically analyse, adapt to, manage and eventually lead the process of required changes in social work, delivery of social services, and social care policy and law
- prepared to promote bilingual service provision in Wales and to be able to critically reflect on the importance of the Welsh context as a cultural, social and historical landscape for social work practice

This qualification in Social Work is also recognised by Care Councils in other UK nations.

First year postgraduate Social Work students have the opportunity to participate in a 3 week global opportunity at the University of Houston, Texas.

Modules

Modules on the MSc in Social Work programme typically include:

Theories and Perspectives for Informing Social Work
Social Work Skills and Knowledge in Practice
Critical Practice in Child Care & Law
Ethics and Values in Social Work
Undertaking & Using Social Work Research for Practice
Social Work Skills and Knowledge and Service Users' Perspectives
Dissertation in Social Work Research and Evidence for Practice
Critical Practice in Adult Care & Law

Social Work Course Structure

The Social Work course is both academic and practice-based and students are required to undertake a minimum of 200 days practice learning across the two years. Half of the Social Work programme is devoted to supervised practice in social service agencies, where students learn through observation, rehearsal and performance. The social work placements take place in the local authorities of Neath Port Talbot, Swansea, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, and Ceredigion.

Social Work students will undertake academic study based on Singleton campus during Semester 1 and then placement learning in a social care agency during Semester 2.

During Semester 1, Social Work students can expect to be on campus a minimum of four days per week. Placement learning is full-time Monday to Friday, following agency hours. Students will undertake 200 days of practice learning across the 2 years.

In Year One Social Work students undertake a 20-day observational placement followed by an 80-day ‘direct practice’ placement.

In Year Two students undertake a 100-day ‘direct-practice’ placement. The social work placements take place in the local authorities of Neath Port Talbot, Swansea, Pembrokeshire, Carmarthenshire, and Ceredigion.

In Year Two students will be expected to complete a ‘desk-based’ research project and complete a dissertation with supervised support from a member of the teaching team.

Staff Expertise

All teaching staff members on the Social Work course are research active and involved in research activity at both national and international level which spans a number of interest areas including: looked-after children, sexuality and wellbeing, service user and carer involvement in education, asylum seeking children and migration, children’s rights and welfare, and social inclusion and care needs of older people.

Career Prospects

There are many possibilities for career progression in social work and for postgraduate and post qualification study. UK social work qualifications are also recognised in other countries.

Postgraduate Community

The College of Human and Health Sciences has a vibrant postgraduate community with students drawn from a variety of backgrounds and nationalities. The College is known for its friendly, welcoming and supportive environment, which combined with its extensive facilities, state-of-the-art technology and superb beachside location, helps to ensure that students benefit from an exceptional student experience.

In addition, Social Work students have access to a wide range of excellent facilities and equipment for realistic workplace experiences.

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The aim of the Master’s degree program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, didactic and social/communicative competence, thus ensuring that they are equipped with the best possible qualifications for the music education profession at public and private institutions (e.g. Read more

Course Aims and Mission Statement

The aim of the Master’s degree program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, didactic and social/communicative competence, thus ensuring that they are equipped with the best possible qualifications for the music education profession at public and private institutions (e.g. music schools, conservatories, higher education institutions and universities). Graduates will also have the necessary prerequisites and skills for organisational, advisory and executive/managerial activities in the cultural and media sectors (concert venues, theatres, museums, artists agencies, publishers, radio, etc.).

Building on the abilities and qualifications acquired in the bachelor studies, students of the Master's degree enter a process of intensified research and realisation of musical education concepts, especially those in the field of Jazz and Popular Music. This also extends to include their own individual artistic work and consequently these varied aspects are brought into broad and interdisciplinary discourse of institute research through team and project work (e.g. Master’s project and Laboratories for Music Research).

In this sense, the already acquired abilities of the students are further deepened and highly professionalised. At the same time, the open-ended research activities of the Master's program serve as free spaces for thought and work in which students from different backgrounds and origins encounter each other through research. They can also share and exchange their own thoughts and approaches and develop their work together, even beyond the horizon of one's own experience.

In order to make the research work visible to the outside world and to bring it into a public discussion, concert events, symposia, sound and video recordings, various internal institution publications and external partners are actively promoted. This provides the students with an important basis for continuing Career Orientation and Professionalisation, but it is also part of JAM MUSIC LAB University’s general contribution to the advocacy of ongoing conscious perception of artistic production. This also encompasses reflection on a wide variety of aspects that are linked with society and the facilitating of related dialogues.

Structure of Studies

The Master’s degree consists of four semesters and is divided into two degree programme stages of two semesters each. (Please refer to the core application, Chapters 3 and 4, and the descriptions and specifications contained therein regarding Research)

MA 1st Programme Stage (MA Expertise Level 1: Project Planning Research) Semesters 1-2:

1st Programme Stage allows the students to plan, organise and begin the initial implementation of the upcoming work as part of the Master’s project. The artistic, research-related and organisational challenges of the project are discussed in consultation with the respective supervisors of the Master's projects, or where relevant, with the major artistic subject (MAS) teachers. As part of the collaborative process, a related action plan and a project plan for implementation will be identified. A recommendation with regard to the compulsory electives that are to be covered is also provided for the best possible support for the Master’s project.

With the involvement and close coordination of MAS teachers, Master’s project teachers and the respective scientific director, the planning of the Master’s project is completed according to following standardised categories:

- Definitive formulation of the area of interest regarding research and knowledge - Indication of the methods of scientific or artistic work - Defining of the time frames of the work process up until completion - Coordinating and broadly defining adequate compulsory and free-choice electives in the context of the Master’s project

Coinciding with this as part of the Master’s degree, students continue to further deepen musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as intensified research. A presentation given by the students on the progress and development of the Master’s project and the written Master’s thesis at the end of semester 2 decides on the progression to the 2nd Programme Stage.

MA 2nd Programme Stage (MA-Expertise Level 2: independent scientific/artistic work and research) Semesters 3-4:

Students finalise their Master’s project regarding independent work and organisation. Musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as related research, are brought to a higher degree of professionalism in preparation for the upcoming Master's examination. A successfully completed Master's examination at the end of the 4th semester demonstrates outstanding qualifications in the respective main artistic subject (MAS), the ability to independently and effectively realise musical/artistic production and research, as well as a distinct expertise in project management and communication.

Examinations

Committee Examination Depending on the type of examination, the board would consist of at least two to a maximum of six examiners and one chairperson. The appointing of personnel for various boards are set up by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB and published internally within the institute.

Entrance Examination:
The basic prerequisites for enrolment in the Master’s degree program are a completed Bachelor's degree or an equivalent degree from a recognised Austrian or non-Austrian postsecondary education institution, the successful completion of the admission examination and the availability of a study place.

An application for the admission examination of the Master's degree must be applied for in writing, which should include the following: a curriculum vitae, a motivation letter and an synopsis of the planned content of the artistic and research work.

Admission into the Master’s degree course relies strongly on excellent musical proficiency in the MAS and professional suitability for the area of independent artistic production and research of educational concepts. The same criteria must be demonstrated in the course of the entrance examination through an artistic/musical presentation followed by a verbal presentation of the submitted synopsis.

Details on examination requirements and content are defined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website (Please see the details in the core application, Chapter 3.7.4, Examination and Examination Methods, Admission Examination for Bachelor and Master Studies).

MA Degree Examination:
The committee examination is carried out at the end of the 2nd semester of the Master’s degree and serves to verify the students' studies thus far and serves to verify the status quo of the Master’s project and ongoing work. The students present the progress of their work and explain the planned steps towards successful and timely completion. The content and the appropriate form of the presentation – be it an artistic presentation, verbal lecture etc. – are chosen by the students and to be submitted in writing in advance. The presentation itself is followed by a critical questioning of the candidate by the examination board. Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website. A Lesson Demonstration Examination is an integral part of both the degree and the Master's examination and contains the following specifications:

MA Lesson Demonstration Examination:
The Lesson Demonstration Examinations certify the necessary level in expertise for teaching practice. They are permitted to cover the following areas: Preliminary Lesson Demonstration MAS (single or group lessons), ensemble lessons, music theory, aural training, music history, and possibly other scientific areas as well. The performance requirements and objectives for the students in the course of the respective Lesson Demonstration examination are determined and then publicly published. The Examination Board has to advise and decide on the guidelines for defined assessment criteria (Please refer to the detailed information in the core application for further details: Chapter 3.7.4, Auditing and Examination Methods).

Master’s Examination:
The Master’s examination with exam committee consists of two practical parts (internal examination, which includes a lesson demonstration examination, and an external/public examination concert of about 45 minutes each) and an oral part in the form of a defence of the written Master's thesis. The defence consists of an approximately 30 minute verbal presentation of the submitted work, followed by a subsequent critical questioning of the candidate by the examination committee.

Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Prospective Professional Fields and Qualifications after Master’s Degree

As music educators and musicians, graduates have outstanding artistic and professional qualifications and social competence to pursue teaching and research activities at public and private institutions (e.g. music schools, conservatories, higher education institutions and universities), and to compete in the current international professional reality. In addition to their core activities as music educators in the field of music education institutions, they can also work in other active areas of professional music, art and culture mediation for all ages and target groups. As performers and creative musicians they can also work freelance as part of their own projects, as soloists and/or as ensemble members in various musical groups and orchestras focusing on Jazz, Pop, Rock, theatre, musicals, TV programs, film music etc..

In addition to their expertise in the areas of music education, artistic production, performance and research, which is tied to the practical experience gained by interacting with areas such as project management and public relations as part of the Master’s degree, graduates now have best possible prerequisites for organisational, pedagogical, advisory and executive activities in cultural enterprises and media (e.g. concert venues, orchestras, theatres, museums, artists agencies, publishers, administration of music education institutions, radio, print media, etc.).

Awarding of the degree “Masters of Arts in Music Education”

The academic degree "Master of Arts in Music Education" is awarded after completion of the Masters's examination and all prescribed lectures before the annual graduation ceremony of JAM MUSIC LAB University, which concludes the summer semester. The corresponding document can be produced in either German or English.

Read less
The aim of the Master’s Degree Program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, social and communicative competence, thus offering the best possible qualifications in the diverse professional fields that are open to musicians. Read more

Course Aims and Mission Statement:

The aim of the Master’s Degree Program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, social and communicative competence, thus offering the best possible qualifications in the diverse professional fields that are open to musicians. Graduates will also have the necessary prerequisites and skills for organisational, advisory and executive/managerial activities in the cultural and media sectors (concert venues, theatres, museums, artists' agencies, publishers, radio, etc.).

Building on the qualifications acquired in the bachelor's program, students of the Master's degree enter a process of intensified research and realisation of their individual artistic concepts, and bring them into broad and interdisciplinary discourse of institute research through team and project work (e.g. Master's Project, Laboratories for Music Research). This in turn contributes to a continually relevant, multifaceted and intercultural development of the arts.

In this sense, the already acquired abilities of the students are further deepened and highly professionalised. At the same time, the open-ended research activities of the Master's program serve as free spaces for thought and work in which artists from different origins and genres encounter each other through research. They can also share and exchange their own thoughts and approaches and develop their work together, even beyond the horizon of one's own experience.

In order to make the research work visible to the outside world and to bring it into public discussion, concert events, symposia, sound and video recordings, various internal institution publications and external partners are actively promoted. This provides the students with an important basis for continuing Career Orientation and Professionalisation, but it is also part of JAM MUSIC LAB University’s general contribution to the advocacy of ongoing conscious perception of artistic production. This also encompasses reflection on a wide variety of aspects that are linked with society and the facilitating of related dialogues.

Structure of Studies

The Master’s degree consists of four semesters and is divided into two degree programme stages of two semesters each. (Please refer to the core application, Chapters 3 and 4, and the descriptions and specifications contained therein regarding Research)

MA 1st Programme Stage (MA Expertise Level 1: Project Planning Research) Semesters 1-2:

1st Programme Stage allows the students to plan, organise and begin the initial implementation of the upcoming work as part of the Master’s project. The artistic, research-related and organisational challenges of the project are discussed in consultation with the respective supervisors of the Master's projects, or where relevant, with the major artistic subject (MAS) teachers. As part of the collaborative process a related action plan and a project plan for implementation will be identified. A recommendation with regard to the compulsory electives to be covered is also provided for the best possible support for the Master’s project.

In MA 1st Programme Stage, with the involvement and close coordination of MAS teachers, Master’s project teachers and the respective scientific director, the planning of the Master’s project is completed according to following standardised categories:

- Definitive formulation of the area of interest regarding research and knowledge - Indication of the methods of scientific or artistic work - Defining of the time frames of the work process up until completion - Coordinating and broadly defining adequate compulsory and free-choice electives in the context of the Master’s project

Coinciding with this as part of the Master’s degree, students continue to further deepen musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as intensified research. A presentation given by the students on the progress and development of the Master’s project and the written Master’s thesis at the end of semester 2 decides on the progression to the 2nd Programme Stage.

MA 2nd Programme Stage (MA-Expertise Level 2: independent scientific/artistic work and research) Semesters 3-4:

Students finalise their Master’s project regarding independent work and organisation. Musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as related research, are brought to a higher degree of professionalism in preparation for the upcoming Master's examination. A successfully completed Master's examination at the end of the 4th semester demonstrates outstanding qualifications in the respective main artistic subject (MAS), the ability to independently and effectively realise musical/artistic production and research, as well as a distinct expertise in project management and communication.

Examinations

Committee Examination Depending on the type of examination, the board would consist of at least two to a maximum of six examiners and one chairperson. The appointing of personnel for various boards are set up by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB and published internally within the institute.

Entrance Examination:
The basic prerequisites for enrolment in the Master’s degree program are a completed Bachelor's degree or an equivalent degree from a recognised Austrian or non-Austrian postsecondary education institution, the successful completion of the admission examination and the availability of a study place.

An application for the admission examination of the Master's degree must be applied for in writing, which should include the following: a curriculum vitae, a motivation letter and an synopsis of the planned content of the artistic and research work.

Admission into the Master’s degree course relies strongly on excellent musical proficiency in the MAS and professional suitability for the area of independent artistic production and research. The same criteria must be demonstrated in the course of the entrance examination through an artistic/musical presentation followed by a verbal presentation of the submitted synopsis.

Details on examination requirements and content are defined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website (Please see the details in the core application, Chapter 3.7.4, Examination and Examination Methods, Admission Examination for Bachelor and Master Studies).

MA Degree Examination:
The committee examination is carried out at the end of the 2nd semester of the Master’s degree and serves to verify the students' studies thus far and the status quo of the Master’s project and ongoing work. The students present the progress of their work and explain the planned steps towards successful and timely completion. The content and the appropriate form of the presentation – be it an artistic presentation, verbal lecture etc. – are chosen by the students and to be submitted in writing in advance. The presentation itself is followed by a critical questioning of the candidate by the examination board. Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Master’s Examination:
The Master’s examination with exam committee consists of two practical parts (internal examination and external/public examination concert of about 45 minutes each) and an oral part in the form of a defence of the written Master’s thesis. The defence consists of an approximately 30 minute verbal presentation of the submitted work, followed by a subsequent critical questioning of the candidate by the examination committee.

Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Prospective Professional Fields and Qualifications after Master’s Degree

As musicians and music makers, graduates have outstanding artistic and professional qualifications and the social competence to compete in the current international professional reality. As performers and creative musicians they can work freelance as part of their own projects, as soloists and/or as ensemble members in various musical groups and orchestras focusing on Jazz, Pop, Rock, theatre, musicals, TV programs, film music etc.. Graduates can also work in other active areas of professional music, art and culture mediation, especially in the context of teaching and research activities in the field of higher education

In addition to their expertise in the field of artistic production, performance and research, which is tied to the practical experience gained by interacting with areas such as music management as part of the Master’s degree, graduates now have best possible prerequisites for leading activities in the field of artistic projects, in arts and cultural management and in the work fields of the creative and media sectors.

Awarding of the degree “Master of Arts in Music”

The academic degree "Master of Arts in Music" is awarded after completion of the Masters's examination and all prescribed lectures before the annual graduation ceremony of JAM MUSIC LAB University, which concludes the summer semester. The corresponding document can be produced in either German or English.

Read less
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Read more
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams.

The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field.

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three sub-programmes (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme.

The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are:
-Their ability to apply theoretical knowledge.
-A broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues.
-Strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists.
-Their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings.
-Their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data.
-Their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography.
-Their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography.
-Their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen sub-programme, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis.

In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your sub-programme. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year.

Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into sub-programmes. The sub-programmes offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and sub-programme-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University.

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for geography are:
-Physical Geography
-Human Geography and Spatial Planning
-Geoinformatics

Physical Geography
Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change.

The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice.

Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute.

Human Geography and Spatial Planning
Human geography and spatial planning is a sub-programme, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the sub-programme is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the sub-programme. Relevant themes for the sub-programme are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods.

The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing.

Geoinformatics
Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results.

At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree:
-60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to sub-programme (including MSc thesis 30 credits).
-60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes.
-60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students.
-The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study.
-Working-life orientation and career planning.
-Personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include:
-Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation.
-Positioning and remote-sensing work.
-Regional and urban planning.
-Governmental community and regional administration.
-Governmental posts in ministries.
-Organisational posts.
-Development cooperation projects.
-Communication and publishing work.
-Teaching.

Internationalization

The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeship abroad.
-Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya).
-Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis).
-Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones).

Research Focus

In physical geography:
-Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change.
-Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems.
-Natural systems, their function and change.
-Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems.
-Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments.
-‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data.
-The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability.

In human geography and spatial planning:
-Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment.
-The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning.
-Regional policy and geopolitics.
-Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities.
-Internationalisation of cities and states.
-The spatial planning system of the European Union.
-Regional policy of data-intensive economics.
-The political ecology and management of natural resources and land use.
-Globalisation.

In geoinformatics:
-Spatial data analysis, new information sources.
-Development of remote-sensing methods for environmental study, especially hyper-spectral remote-sensing data and drone applications.
-Application of geoinformatics methods to environmental and urban research.

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The MSc in Social Work is intended to provide a programme of postgraduate study in social work leading to registration with the Scottish Social Services Council. Read more
The MSc in Social Work is intended to provide a programme of postgraduate study in social work leading to registration with the Scottish Social Services Council.

In the first two semesters students are orientated towards the programme design and philosophy; introduced to practice learning and core social work skills; given a grounding in the legal framework of social work practice; and given the opportunity to develop and test out their learning skills in preparation for the remainder of the programme. The remaining time on the programme will be structured according to individual student's needs and available learning opportunities. Students will be given full opportunity to learn in and about diverse practice settings and with a range of client groups.

Learning will build around a series of assessment tasks, which will enable students to make direct connections between the various knowledge and skills components of social work practice in real practice contexts.

Why study Social Work at Dundee?

The MSc in Social Work is delivered within the School of Education, Social Work and Community Education. This reflects the multi-disciplinary context in which social work operates as a profession.

The aims of the programme are to equip our graduates to:
Work with individuals, families, groups, organisations and communities
Function as an agent of change
Work for social justice
Act with a strong professional identity
Practise as accountable and autonomous professionals
Operate with confidence within their sphere of competence
Identify the need for and plan on-going professional development for themselves and their colleagues
Function competently in multi-disciplinary teams and settings
Practise in partnership with service users and carers
Demonstrate competence in all key roles of the Standards in Social Work Education

Carers and Users Group

The social work discipline has one of the longest standing and most innovative Carers and Users groups connected to the programme.

This will provide you with crucial perspectives and experiences of service users and carers in the delivery and development of the programme.An example of this is the award winning 'Community Care and the Caring Experience' module which offers you a unique opportunity to develop a relationship with a career in order to examine and reflect upon the experience of caring and being cared for.

What's so good about Social Work at Dundee?

Research-led teaching:
"The strength of your department and teaching really is something very special. I have studied at the University before, but I have never experienced such commitment and passion in one group of people, and I feel truly privileged to have been a part of it."
Rebecca Laing - MSc in Social Work Student 2013

Professional accreditation:
The MSc in Social Work is professionally accredited by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC).

Practice learning opportunities

The programme has links with a broad range of excellent agencies across the statutory, voluntary and private sectors. This provides students with exceptional practice learning opportunities.

Due to the geographical location of the University, you will be able to take advantage of practice learning opportunities across a range of locations including Dundee, Perth, Fife, Angus and Edinburgh. This adds a depth and richness to the opportunities available and broadens the networks that students can establish during their time on the programme.

Who should study this course?

This programme is intended for students who wish to qualify and register as a social worker with the Scottish Social Services Council and who wish to study on an innovative and engaging Master's level programme.

"There isn't a 'typical' undergraduate degree and work experience path that leads to the MSc in Social Work and so students bring a diverse range of knowledge and experience. What this means for me as a tutor is the opportunity to work with a diverse range of students and help them realise their academic and inter-personal potential."
Ann Hodson – Lecturer in Social Work, 2014

How you will be taught

The programme combines periods of campus based learning and practice learning within social work related agencies. The programme is built on adult learning principles and you will be encouraged to make links with the experience, knowledge and skills that you bring to the programme. Students are expected to be able to be self-directed in their learning whilst benefitting from the support and contributions of academic staff, professional partners and service users and carers.

The curriculum is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods including:
Taught inputs for academic staff and practitioners
Problem solving and research tasks individually and in groups
Practice learning opportunities in a diverse range of social work related workplaces.
Tutor and peer support
Skills based role-play
Service user and carer perspectives

"We are able through our partnership with the MSc in Social Work programme, not only to be involved, but importantly, to influence how you will be prepared with the knowledge, and skills, to recognise and deliver the services we all need."
John Dow (Carers and Users Group, 2014)

What you will study

The MSc programme is designed around 7 assessment-based modules:
Professional Decision Making - A (module 1a)
Community Care and the Caring Experience (module 2)
Integrated Social Work Practice – A (module 5a)
Professional Development of Self, Peers & Colleagues (module 4)
Professional Decision Making – B (module 1b)
Evaluating and Contributing to Policy Development (module 3)
Integrated Social Work Practice – B (module 5b)

How you will be assessed

The programme is assessed through essay based tasks. The emphasis is on the links between theory and practice and all assessments locate knowledge within practice contexts.

Careers

The MSc in Social Work provides graduates with the professionally required social work qualification and opens up employment opportunities across a broad range of social work roles in the statutory, voluntary and private sectors. The qualification is generic and equips graduates to work across the broad range of service user groups and practice contexts.

"Absolutely delighted that *all* of my MSc Social Work tutor group have got jobs!"
Jon Bolton, course tutor, 2012

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is a M-level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval.

The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science and the ability to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people

Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status

Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people

Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners

Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area

Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of science (Physics) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school

Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression

Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses

Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum

Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils

Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in physics

Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons

Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning

Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area

Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning

Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times

Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I
This module covers the following GPE themes:

Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.

You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II
This module covers the following GPE themes:

Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.

You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III
This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:

Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three core subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list. The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006.

We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of QTS. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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The University of Chichester provides social work awards in partnership with West Sussex Children and Adult Services and other partners from the voluntary, independent and private sector organisations. Read more
The University of Chichester provides social work awards in partnership with West Sussex Children and Adult Services and other partners from the voluntary, independent and private sector organisations. Practice is seen as central to the programme as an experiential base for learning, supported by a rigorous tutorial system, designed to help students integrate academic learning with their experience in social work and social care. As a result we have an excellent record in providing students with high quality, relevant practice placements.

The MA Social Work is nationally recognised and will be approved and endorsed by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).


Student view
Course content
The programme has three possible levels of outcome:

Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert): The Postgraduate Certificate lasts for approximately twelve months. Completion of a set number of academic credits will enable the award of Postgraduate Certificate.
Postgraduate Diploma ( PG Dip): The Postgraduate Diploma lasts for a period of between twelve and twenty four months. The award of the Postgraduate Diploma is conditional on the achievement of academic credits at Master’s level (FHEQ Level 7).
Master’s Degree (MA): Completion of the dissertation will enable students to achieve the cumulative 180 credits required for the award of the MA.

The programme is appropriate for you if you are interested in:

High professional and academic standards;
A commitment to forms of practice which proactively address discrimination and oppression;
A strong emphasis on research-mindedness;
Excellent practice learning opportunities provided in partnership with local and regional social work agencies and service users.
If you have completed relevant work experience prior to applying
If you enjoy:

Problem solving
Creative thinking
Working independently and in groups
Engaging in debate
If you want:

A qualification that will equip you for a range of careers in social work, social care, probation and criminal justice.
To work in statutory, voluntary and independent sector organisations in the UK and overseas.
About the programme

Students may study typically over 2 academic years to successfully complete and receive the MA Social Work.

The programme has three possible levels of outcome:

Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert): The Postgraduate Certificate lasts for approximately twelve months. Completion of a set number of academic credits will enable the award of Postgraduate Certificate.
Postgraduate Diploma ( PG Dip): The Postgraduate Diploma lasts for a period of between twelve and twenty four months. The award of the Postgraduate Diploma is conditional on the achievement of academic credits at Master’s level (FHEQ Level 7).
Master’s Degree (MA): Completion of the dissertation will enable students to achieve the cumulative 180 credits required for the award of the MA.
Please see our Postgraduate Tuition Fees.

Our facilities
At Chichester, we teach in small groups and pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we have created for our students. The Social Work course is delivered on our Bishop Otter Campus where the Learning Resource Centre (LRC) is the hub of your learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources with dedicated areas for silent work or group study, while on the ground floor you will find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources. There are over 130 open access PC workstations, 45 Apple IMacs and ample printing and media facilities. A state-of-the-art wireless network offers fast internet as well as access to all our online resources. Your Social Work subject librarian will be available to help you access all the library resources on the shelves and online.

Where this can take you
Social Work MA will equip you for a range of careers in social work, social care, probation and criminal justice. You will be able to work in the statutory, voluntary and independent sector organisations in the UK and overseas.

Indicative modules
Year One

Introduction to Social Work
Human Development and Psychology
Across the Lifespan
Social Work Law and Social Policy
Social Work Methods of Assessment,
Intervention, Risk and Safeguarding
Values, Dilemmas and Conflicts in
Social Work Practice
Assessed Practice 1
Professional Practice Skills
Year Two

Research Methods and Dissertation
Reflection, Analysis and Decision Making with Children and Adults
Assessed Practice 2
Teaching and Assessment
We focus on teaching quality as our first priority. Teaching staff are accessible and approachable and all of our staff have experience of working within a statutory or voluntary social work agency which means that you will be taught by professionals who have extensive, professional practice experience, as well as who publish a large number of nationally recognised books on social work. You will be supported in small tutor groups and will be allocated a dedicated personal tutor who will work with you for the duration of your course and support you in the application of professional standards in practice placements and the development of critical evaluation and reflection.
Most modules are assessed through written assignments or presentations. The practice elements of the course are assessed through portfolio presentation and assessor reports. The course includes a dissertation module.

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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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The Master of Social Work (Professional Qualifying) enables students with an existing undergraduate degree to undertake study leading to a professionally accredited social work degree, recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers. Read more
The Master of Social Work (Professional Qualifying) enables students with an existing undergraduate degree to undertake study leading to a professionally accredited social work degree, recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers.
Students will develop knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice in a range of practice fields, and the course has a very strong practical component, with students completing two field education placements.
The course offers maximum study flexibility with a range of delivery modes. Students studying in limited attendance mode are supported through print and online materials as well as annual, compulsory, on-campus residential workshops.
Students with significant social welfare and human services experience may be eligible for Recognition of Prior Learning for one field education placement.

Course learning outcomes

On successful completion of the Master of Social Work (PQ), graduates will be able to:
*Demonstrate understanding of an advanced and integrated body of knowledge, with depth in the underlying values, ethics, theories, research principles and methods, professional practice and workplace contexts in the social work discipline
*Reflect critically on the unique, complex and contemporary relationships between social work and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, and their diverse histories and cultures
*Reflect critically on the impact of complex social, political and historical issues on environmental and social sustainability in Australia and internationally, with a focus on the tropics
*Investigate, analyse critically and transform complex social systems, institutions, structures, processes, practices and inequities
*Consolidate, synthesise, research and evaluate recent developments in social policy and evidence to devise practical and knowledge solutions that reduce social barriers, inequalities and injustice
*Interpret and communicate, to specialist and non-specialist audiences, theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions in the social work discipline through advanced literacy, numeracy and technological skills
*Design, plan and execute a substantial research based project
*Manage service provision and professional practice to engage with and enable individuals, groups and communities to achieve social and environmental justice
*Apply and adapt expert and specialised professional practice knowledge and skills, autonomously and in collaboration with others, to address social barriers, inequity and injustice across diverse contexts
*Demonstrate creativity and initiative, and expert judgement and adaptability in engagement, planning, decision-making, problem-solving, provision and evaluation of specialist advice and functions, to achieve practice, organisational, policy and/or system level outcomes
*Demonstrate high-level responsibility and accountability for own learning and professional development.

Award title

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (PROFESSIONAL QUALIFYING) MSW(PQ)

Entry requirements (Additional)

English band level 3c - the minimum English Language test scores you need are:
*Academic IELTS – 7.0 (no component lower than 7.0), OR
*TOEFL – 577 (plus minimum Test of Written English score of 5.5), OR
*TOEFL (internet based) – 100 (minimum writing score of 23), OR
*Pearson (PTE Academic) - 72

If you meet the academic requirements for a course, but not the minimum English requirements, you will be given the opportunity to take an English program to improve your skills in addition to an offer to study a degree at JCU. The JCU degree offer will be conditional upon the student gaining a certain grade in their English program. This combination of courses is called a packaged offer.
JCU’s English language provider is Union Institute of Languages (UIL). UIL have teaching centres on both the Townsville and Cairns campuses.

Minimum English language proficiency requirements

Applicants of non-English speaking backgrounds must meet the English language proficiency requirements of Band 3c – Schedule II of the JCU Admissions Policy.

Why JCU?

Students will have access to The Cairns Institute – an important centre for national and international scholars. It brings together the expertise and intellectual resources of more than 20 academic disciplines, creating a uniquely robust and relevant research, consulting, training and teaching hub for Northern Australia, South and South-East Asia and the Pacific.

Application deadlines

*1st February for commencement in semester one (February)
*1st July for commencement in semester two (mid-year/July)

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Manchester Metropolitan University has a long established programme of providing social work education including both post graduate and undergraduate qualifying courses in social work, doctoral level research, post qualification professional training and post registration training. Read more
Manchester Metropolitan University has a long established programme of providing social work education including both post graduate and undergraduate qualifying courses in social work, doctoral level research, post qualification professional training and post registration training.

The overall purpose of our programmes is to produce professionally capable, analytical and critical reflective social work practitioners, capable of working in any social work service or setting. We seek to develop professionals committed to a value based approach to practice and the promotion of social justice and positive social change.

The Social Work department is home to a wealth of research activities and groups which informs our teaching and helps to inform the way in which Social Work is viewed throughout the country.

At Manchester Met we recognise the value of excellent relations with local and national employers. We are active in working in partnership with local agencies, charities and volunteer agencies in order to develop placement opportunities for our students and innovative in creating post registration and professional development curricula.

The Department of Social Care and Social Work is strongly committed to engagement with the communities where our social care and social work graduates will work. We have an active Service Users and Carers Group, who feed in and evaluate how our programmes are designed and provide essential experience and guidance to our students.

Features and benefits of the course

Our MA in Social Work is specifically designed for postgraduates who wish to become registered professional social work practitioners and successful completion of our programme confers eligibility to apply for professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

The MA programme is aligned against the Professional Capabilities Framework for Social Workers and the Knowledge and Skills Statements for social work with children and families and adults (where appropriate). It offers an exciting opportunity to undertake a professional training programme whilst studying for a Master's degree.

The programme has a strong commitment to:
-Promoting a value based approach to social work practice based on rights and social justice
-Integrating social work practice with the essential skills, knowledge, values and attributes essential to become an effective and humane social work practitioner.
-Preparing our students for the demands, challenges and opportunities to promote positive social change as professional social work practitioners.

Placement options

The programme incorporates two social work practice learning placements. The first placement is of 70 days duration and the second and final placement is of 100 days. The university has an excellent relationship with a range of statutory, non-statutory, voluntary and private agencies providing social work services and social work placements. Students are fully supported throughout their placements by a specialist placement team and network of experienced practice based social work educators.

About the Course

The MA in Social Work is delivered over two years and focuses on:
-Essential values, skills and knowledge in social work
-Critical perspectives on social work
-Law, policy and social work practice
-Research and research mindedness
-Professional development and readiness for practice in social work

All our programmes take a student-centred approach to teaching and learning. Each individual student will receive a named personal tutor throughout their studies and have access to excellent dedicated student learning support services on site. Teaching and learning opportunities include lectures, seminars, student-led projects, presentations, workshops and self-directed study. The university library for social work is located on site and is excellently stocked and has the benefit of highly skilled and supportive specialist library staff.

Please note that the MA in Social Work requires the successful completion of the postgraduate social work academic programme and placements.

This route also includes completion of a Research Methods unit and Research Study (typically a dissertation). If you are invited for interview we will go through the programme in more detail on the day.

Bursaries may be available for this programme subject to specific criteria applied by the University and the NHS Bursaries office. For the latest information visit http://www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students

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Engineers are the key to the development of society and solving the problems the world currently faces. They have the power to make the world fundamentally different. Read more
Engineers are the key to the development of society and solving the problems the world currently faces. They have the power to make the world fundamentally different.

The Master of Advanced Engineering is the key transitional stage in your career, transforming you into a global leader. Gain a depth of knowledge, mastering the crucial skills to become a leading contributor in your field.

Customise your degree - the Master of Advanced Engineering offers flexibility to complete your Master degree in just one year, or you can choose a two year option.

This course is designed to extend your knowledge in your chosen specialisation area and advance your leadership and complex problem-solving skills in a cross cultural environment.

Understand, reflect critically upon and apply methods in at least one specialist engineering area to design solutions to complex, multifaceted engineering problems.

Common core units will develop crucial skills in areas such as data analysis and entrepreneurship, translating theory into engineering practice. In discipline core units you will identify, interpret and critically appraise current developments and technologies within your specialisation.

Enhancement units are designed to provide breadth and are taken from either another engineering specialisation or in complementary areas such as information technology and business.

In addition, the two year version of the program offers a range of technical electives that will deepen your understanding of a specific topic, and two, year- long engineering project units. You will work closely with an academic on a topic of your choice and immerse yourself in a multidisciplinary design project.

The Master of Advanced Engineering could also be your stepping stone to a research degree. All of this in highly interactive, expert led classes.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/advanced-engineering-e6001?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Chemical engineering

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Chemical Engineering

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Clayton.

The Master of Advanced Chemical Engineering allows you to engage in the areas of study including advanced reaction engineering, process design and optimization, conversion of bioresources into fuel, materials and specialty chemicals, and nanostructured membranes for sustainable separations and energy production with an emphasis on the latest developments in the field. In this course, you will develop specialised knowledge and skills that are important to Chemical Engineers in industry and research. This course provides graduates with enhanced opportunities for advancement in their careers.

Civil engineering (Infrastructure systems)

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Civil Engineering (Infrastructure Systems)

The Master of Advanced Civil Engineering (Infrastructure Systems) will equip graduates to work with in the area of infrastructure engineering and management. It will provide the fundamental knowledge associated with interfacing both structural and geotechnical designs for infrastructure systems. The program is designed to equip you with advanced skills necessary for managing the challenges posed by ageing and leading designs of new complex infrastructure systems. The course is suitable for new graduates, professionals and managers who are keen to upgrade their existing design and management skills, as well as to develop theoretical and applied knowledge in the area of infrastructure engineering and management.

Civil engineering (Transport)

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Civil Engineering (Transport)

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Clayton.

The Master of Advanced Civil Engineering (Transport) program deals with the fundamental knowledge associated with transport engineering and management, traffic engineering, intelligent transport systems and transport planning. The program in is a response to the growing need for engineers with broad awareness of the characteristics and significance of transport, including its technological, economic and social impact. At the same time, the program outlines the state-of-the-art of transport engineering, as it may be applied to the solution of real problems in the planning, design, management and operation of transport facilities. The course is suitable for new graduates, professionals and managers who are keen to upgrade their existing design and management skills as well as to develop theoretical and applied knowledge in the area of transport engineering and management.

Civil engineering (Water)

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Civil Engineering (Water)

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Clayton.

The Master of Advanced Civil Engineering (Water) allows you to major in water resources engineering and management. This program deals with the fundamental knowledge associated with surface and ground water flow, stormwater management, water quality, flood forecasting and mitigation. The program is designed to equip you with advanced skills necessary for managing the challenges posed by changing climatic condition on water resource management. The course is suitable for new graduates, professionals and managers who are keen to upgrade their existing design and management skills as well as to develop theoretical and applied knowledge in the area of water resources engineering and management.

Electrical engineering

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Electrical Engineering

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Clayton.

The Master of Advanced Electrical Engineering will give you a broad introduction to advanced techniques in signal processing, communications, digital systems and electronics. The units have been chosen around the common theme of embedded systems: special purpose computing systems designed for specific applications. They are found just about everywhere including in consumer electronics, transportation systems, medical equipment and sensor networks. The course will mix theory and practice and will contain a significant amount of hands-on learning in laboratories and team-based design projects.

Energy and sustainability engineering

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Engineering (Energy and Sustainability)

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Malaysia.

The Master of Advanced Engineering (Energy and Sustainability) is designed for qualified engineers keen to deepen their knowledge in the energy and sustainability area. The course provides foundations in general engineering through engineering analysis and entrepreneurship units. Students can major in this program by examining energy and sustainability area from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Students can also choose elective units such as environment and air pollution control and smart grids to further enhance their knowledge in this area or undertake a minor research work to pursue a topic of interest related to this area.

Materials engineering

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Materials Engineering

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Clayton.

The Master of Advanced Materials Engineering encompasses practical aspects of the key classes of materials such as metals, polymers, biomaterials, nanomaterials and energy-related materials. This program particularly focuses on the most up-to-date aspects of the field, along with the utilisation of materials and their electronic, chemical and mechanical properties as underpinned by the microstructures that are revealed by modern characterisation techniques. This program is designed to prepare students to appreciate and exploit the central role of materials in addressing the present technical, economic and environmental problems involved in the design and construction of engineering structures, processes and devices. This course is ideally suited for new graduates as well as professional engineers who are eager to advance their applied knowledge in the area of Materials Engineering.

Mechanical engineering

Your qualification will be a Master of Advanced Mechanical Engineering

Please note that this specialisation is available only in Clayton.

Most modern engineering projects are multidisciplinary in nature and require a broad range of skills, proficiencies and perspectives to accomplish the task. The Master of Advanced Mechanical Engineering takes a systems approach to the design, monitoring and performance of complex mechanical engineering systems in the fields of renewable energy, aerospace, buildings, transportation, and biomedical devices. The systems approach also permeates the design of the course: four discipline-based core units are vertically integrated so that common problems are examined from different perspectives, culminating in a sustainable systems unit.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/engineering

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/advanced-engineering-e6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Overview. The Masters programme in Work-Based Learning (WBL) at Newman University provides flexible lifelong learning opportunities for professionals currently in employment (either paid or voluntary). Read more

Overview

The Masters programme in Work-Based Learning (WBL) at Newman University provides flexible lifelong learning opportunities for professionals currently in employment (either paid or voluntary). The programme is designed to engage students in maximising their knowledge, skills, employability attributes and professional development opportunities needed in the workplace, by developing and implementing systematic professional enquiry and research. As a result, students can become more informed and more effective at work.

Throughout the programme, students are encouraged to explore their own personal and professional interests, whilst utilizing (and building upon) their existing expertise. By focusing on a WBL approach to study, numerous benefits can be available to students such as: bespoke, relevant, student-focused, flexible programmes of study offering formal recognition of their occupational role; an acknowledgement of skills and knowledge gained at work; opportunities for workplace continual professional development (CPD) and career advancement; networking openings; alongside routes into various higher education awards. Indeed, if students wish to progress their studies even further then the WBL programme provides an appropriate academic platform for progression to doctoral study at level 8 such as PhD, EdD, DProf.

WBL has been defined as the learning arising from real-life activity within the workplace, with students taking work activities as a starting point for their studies. It is a structured and learner-managed approach to maximising learning and professional development opportunities. The focus is upon ‘capturing learning in the workplace’, by exploiting the different kinds of knowledge which can be used at work, via an application to working practices. This is achieved by centring upon the critical evaluation and synthesis of an individuals’ professional practice by specifically analysing their professional and personal development. Put simply, work-based learning is learning for work, at work and through work.

Awards available:

There are four core awards available to students, focusing on enhancing professional practice:

  • Postgraduate Certificate (PG Cert) in Work-Based Learning (Enhancing Professional Practice)
  • Postgraduate Diploma (PG Dip) in Work-Based Learning (Enhancing Professional Practice)
  • Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Enhancing Professional Practice)
  • Master of Science (MSc) in Work-Based Learning (Enhancing Professional Practice)

There are 12 subject-specific ’named awards’ available to students:

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Business Management)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Drama)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (English, Literature, and Society)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Health Mentor)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Heritage and Public History)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Social Care: Policy and Practice)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Working with Children, Young People & Families)

Master of Arts (MA) in Work-Based Learning (Youth and Community Work)

Master of Science (MSc) in Work-Based Learning (Applied Social Science)

Master of Science (MSc) in Work-Based Learning (Business Management)

Master of Science (MSc) in Work-Based Learning (Enhancing Healthcare Practice)

Master of Science (MSc) in Work-Based Learning (Health Mentor)

Who is it for?

The Master’s level WBL programmes at Newman University are designed to cater for learners already in employment (paid or unpaid), normally in professional settings, who are looking for:

  • Career enhancement.
  • Additional qualifications.
  • A subject-specific ‘named’ award e.g. MA in WBL (Enhancing Professional Practice).
  • Opportunities to engage in continual professional development (CPD).
  • Academic credit for their prior experiential and certificated learning.
  • Opportunities to use their work-based expertise and experiences as a focus for their studies.
  • Learning that is tailored to their personal needs, interests and aspirations.
  • Opportunities to develop their subject knowledge and expertise related to their professional role.

Progression opportunities for current Newman University postgraduate students:

There is an opportunity of progression for Newman University postgraduate students wishing to progress to a full Master’s degree from programmes such as:

PG Cert in Higher Education Practice

PG Cert in Heritage and Public History

PG Cert in Chaplaincy with Young People

PG Cert in Safeguarding

Attendance

The WBL courses will be delivered using a ‘blended’ approach, which consists of a mixture of distance learning (supported by materials available online), and some campus-based taught sessions. Campus-based taught sessions will only be used when necessary, and will usually be delivered at the Genners Lane Campus, at the weekend. 

In respect of student workload, it should be noted that 30 credit modules require 300 hours of study and a 60 credit module requires 600 hours of study.

Part-time students have a maximum period of study of 5 years to complete a full Master’s degree. However, students will normally complete a full Master’s degree on a part-time basis, over 2-3 years.

For students submitting an RPL/RPEL claim up to the maximum of 90 credits, a full Master’s degree could be completed in 12 months.

Assessment

Students will experience a range of work-based assessment formats including: written reports and essays, digital resource creation, project report and case study, e-portfolio, presentations, work-based research. Through the completion of such assessment activities, the course will develop independent study skills that are transferable to a range of both learning-based and work-based situations.



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