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Masters Degrees (Master Of Research)

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Pathways available. Master of Research (Biomedical Science) – MRes / PGCert. Master of Research (Psychology) – MRes / PGCert. ​​Master of Research (Health) - MRes/PGCert. Read more

Pathways available:

  • Master of Research (Biomedical Science) – MRes / PGCert
  • Master of Research (Psychology) – MRes / PGCert
  • ​​Master of Research (Health) - MRes/PGCert

​The Master of Research (MRes) programme provides high quality and professionally relevant training in research methods and analysis for health, psychology and biomedical science graduates.

Through the taught modules students will develop their research skills, including critically appraising literature, developing research proposals, laboratory techniques, project management, presenting findings (through oral, written and digital media) and applying for funding. Students will be introduced to a wide range of methodologies and practical techniques relevant to their discipline. Training will be provided in research governance and ethical procedures to ensure students are prepared for work as professional researchers.

Students will conduct two substantial research studies in a topic of their choice, supervised by experienced members of academic staff. These studies will be written up in the form of journal articles and will form a substantial component of the credits for the MRes award.

This award prepares you for a future in research and progression on to PhD studies. 

Course Content

Students will complete the following modules over the course of one full year (full-time) or two years (part-time); modules can be viewed HERE.

There are subject specific and three shared modules which prepare you for your area of research and develop your skills as a researcher.

Dissertation

Students will complete a dissertation proposal (10 credits) and associated ethics application. This is followed by the dissertation which counts for 100 credits. The dissertation is written as two research papers which address two discrete areas of the research project. The dissertation will involve all the elements of the research process from the design of the study, data collection, analysis of findings and write up in the format of a journal article. Students will be supervised by two members of staff to complete their dissertation. Students will be matched with appropriate staff members who have expertise in the chosen topic and/or methodology. 

Learning & Teaching

The MRes programme comprises 180 credits of which 110 are gained from completing a dissertation proposal and dissertation on the students chosen topic. Therefore the programme is largely independent research, with the support of academic supervisors. The 70 credits of specialised research taught modules ensure you will be equipped with the knowledge, practical and professional skills to engage in your chosen research area and also to provide you with a broader knowledge base of research methodologies. The taught based modules will involve a variety of different learning and teaching methods including: lectures, seminars, small group work, workshops, online learning, tutorials and self-directed learning. 

Each student will be allocated two members of staff to supervise their dissertation and a separate personal tutor. Your personal tutor will support you with pastoral care and advice for career planning, e.g. supporting you to complete a personal development plan. 

Assessment

Each module has its own form of assessment. The majority of modules are assessed via coursework, including research reviews, reports, essays and presentations. The dissertation will be written up in the format of two journal articles.

Employability & Careers

MRes graduates will be well placed for PhD level study or a career that involves carrying out, critically appraising or applying research findings. Evidence based practice means that a knowledge and understanding of research is essential in all health related domains so that health care providers are able to interpret previous research findings, as well as contributing to the process of designing and carrying out research projects. Graduates will also be well equipped in roles which involve scientific writing, analysis of research, designing or administering research projects and development of research portfolios. 



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Pathways available. Master of Research (Biomedical Science) – MRes / PGCert. Master of Research (Psychology) – MRes / PGCert. ​​Master of Research (Health) - MRes/PGCert. Read more

Pathways available:

Master of Research (Biomedical Science) – MRes / PGCert

Master of Research (Psychology) – MRes / PGCert

​​Master of Research (Health) - MRes/PGCert

​The Master of Research (MRes) programme provides high quality and professionally relevant training in research methods and analysis for health, psychology and biomedical science graduates.

Through the taught modules students will develop their research skills, including critically appraising literature, developing research proposals, laboratory techniques, project management, presenting findings (through oral, written and digital media) and applying for funding. Students will be introduced to a wide range of methodologies and practical techniques relevant to their discipline. Training will be provided in research governance and ethical procedures to ensure students are prepared for work as professional researchers.

Students will conduct two substantial research studies in a topic of their choice, supervised by experienced members of academic staff. These studies will be written up in the form of journal articles and will form a substantial component of the credits for the MRes award.

This award prepares you for a future in research and progression on to PhD studies. 

Course Content

Students will complete the following modules over the course of one full year (full-time) or two years (part-time); modules can be viewed HERE.

There are subject specific and three shared modules which prepare you for your area of research and develop your skills as a researcher.

Dissertation

Students will complete a dissertation proposal (10 credits) and associated ethics application. This is followed by the dissertation which counts for 100 credits. The dissertation is written as two research papers which address two discrete areas of the research project. The dissertation will involve all the elements of the research process from the design of the study, data collection, analysis of findings and write up in the format of a journal article. Students will be supervised by two members of staff to complete their dissertation. Students will be matched with appropriate staff members who have expertise in the chosen topic and/or methodology. 

Learning & Teaching

The MRes programme comprises 180 credits of which 110 are gained from completing a dissertation proposal and dissertation on the students chosen topic. Therefore the programme is largely independent research, with the support of academic supervisors. The 70 credits of specialised research taught modules ensure you will be equipped with the knowledge, practical and professional skills to engage in your chosen research area and also to provide you with a broader knowledge base of research methodologies. The taught based modules will involve a variety of different learning and teaching methods including: lectures, seminars, small group work, workshops, online learning, tutorials and self-directed learning. 

Each student will be allocated two members of staff to supervise their dissertation and a separate personal tutor. Your personal tutor will support you with pastoral care and advice for career planning, e.g. supporting you to complete a personal development plan. 

Assessment

Each module has its own form of assessment. The majority of modules are assessed via coursework, including research reviews, reports, essays and presentations. The dissertation will be written up in the format of two journal articles.

Employability & Careers

MRes graduates will be well placed for PhD level study or a career that involves carrying out, critically appraising or applying research findings. Evidence based practice means that a knowledge and understanding of research is essential in all health related domains so that health care providers are able to interpret previous research findings, as well as contributing to the process of designing and carrying out research projects. Graduates will also be well equipped in roles which involve scientific writing, analysis of research, designing or administering research projects and development of research portfolios. 



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Pathways available. Master of Research (Biomedical Science) – MRes / PGCert. Master of Research (Psychology) – MRes / PGCert. ​​Master of Research (Health) - MRes/PGCert. Read more

Pathways available:

Master of Research (Biomedical Science) – MRes / PGCert

Master of Research (Psychology) – MRes / PGCert

​​Master of Research (Health) - MRes/PGCert

​The Master of Research (MRes) programme provides high quality and professionally relevant training in research methods and analysis for health, psychology and biomedical science graduates.

Through the taught modules students will develop their research skills, including critically appraising literature, developing research proposals, laboratory techniques, project management, presenting findings (through oral, written and digital media) and applying for funding. Students will be introduced to a wide range of methodologies and practical techniques relevant to their discipline. Training will be provided in research governance and ethical procedures to ensure students are prepared for work as professional researchers.

Students will conduct two substantial research studies in a topic of their choice, supervised by experienced members of academic staff. These studies will be written up in the form of journal articles and will form a substantial component of the credits for the MRes award.

This award prepares you for a future in research and progression on to PhD studies. 

Course Content

Students will complete the following modules over the course of one full year (full-time) or two years (part-time); modules can be viewed HERE.

There are subject specific and three shared modules which prepare you for your area of research and develop your skills as a researcher.

Dissertation

Students will complete a dissertation proposal (10 credits) and associated ethics application. This is followed by the dissertation which counts for 100 credits. The dissertation is written as two research papers which address two discrete areas of the research project. The dissertation will involve all the elements of the research process from the design of the study, data collection, analysis of findings and write up in the format of a journal article. Students will be supervised by two members of staff to complete their dissertation. Students will be matched with appropriate staff members who have expertise in the chosen topic and/or methodology. 

Learning & Teaching

The MRes programme comprises 180 credits of which 110 are gained from completing a dissertation proposal and dissertation on the students chosen topic. Therefore the programme is largely independent research, with the support of academic supervisors. The 70 credits of specialised research taught modules ensure you will be equipped with the knowledge, practical and professional skills to engage in your chosen research area and also to provide you with a broader knowledge base of research methodologies. The taught based modules will involve a variety of different learning and teaching methods including: lectures, seminars, small group work, workshops, online learning, tutorials and self-directed learning. 

Each student will be allocated two members of staff to supervise their dissertation and a separate personal tutor. Your personal tutor will support you with pastoral care and advice for career planning, e.g. supporting you to complete a personal development plan. 

Assessment

Each module has its own form of assessment. The majority of modules are assessed via coursework, including research reviews, reports, essays and presentations. The dissertation will be written up in the format of two journal articles.

Employability & Careers

MRes graduates will be well placed for PhD level study or a career that involves carrying out, critically appraising or applying research findings. Evidence based practice means that a knowledge and understanding of research is essential in all health related domains so that health care providers are able to interpret previous research findings, as well as contributing to the process of designing and carrying out research projects. Graduates will also be well equipped in roles which involve scientific writing, analysis of research, designing or administering research projects and development of research portfolios.



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The Royal Veterinary College produces outstanding graduates who go on to work in some of the world’s leading scientific research institutes, as well as within industry and government. Read more

The Royal Veterinary College produces outstanding graduates who go on to work in some of the world’s leading scientific research institutes, as well as within industry and government. It is also one of the world's leading centres for postgraduate veterinary science study.

An RVC Master of Research (MRes) may be for you if you do not wish to commit to undertaking a PhD but want to try a sizeable research project and gain the generic skills applicable to research. You can do this over one-year full time, or over two years part-time while you are continuing your career.

The MRes is designed to equip you to acquire the experience and the skills needed to enter a PhD programme or to move on to careers where advanced research experience will help you. It is an excellent training opportunity for both biological and veterinary graduates and addresses both basic and clinical problems in the biosciences, with applications in veterinary and human medicine. Research areas span cell and molecular science, whole animal physiology and population medicine.

An RVC MRes will develop you as a scientist who is capable of working across interdisciplinary teams and who can tackle problems of practical relevance to veterinary and medical science. You will:

  • Learn from experts who produce cutting-edge research in a range of subjects and are published in the top academic journals
  • Join an international team of staff and students 
  • Benefit from close proximity to other international centres of excellence in biomedical and biological sciences.

The course

With more than 100 research-active staff at the RVC, the range of research topics is vast, extending from molecules to whole animals and animal populations. We focus on two main research themes:

  • Comparative Physiology & Medicine - Our understanding of animal disease, together with the superb facilities at the RVC, means that we are all well paced to contribute to the way in which human diseases are diagnosed and treated. The programme is led by Professor Dominic Wells
  • Livestock Production and Health - There is international recognition of the need for new approaches to meet the growing challenges of livestock production, to control infectious diseases that threaten humans and animals. The programme is led by Professor Dirk Werling

You will join the RVC to undertake a specific piece of work under the direction of two supervisors, working within one or more of the RVC’s research groups. We offer a range of specific MRes projects which you can apply for, or you may have your own area of research in mind. Most of our MRes students are self-funded, but funded MRes projects are occasionally advertised.

Your MRes will culminate in a research dissertation of 10,000-15,000 words and an oral presentation.

To underpin the research you are undertaking you will participate in training skills workshops, courses and seminars alongside other post-graduate researchers. You can find out more about our skills development programme here. You will be supported throughout your time with us by your supervisors and the Graduate School.

We have one MRes intake annually, at the beginning of October each year, and students undertake the course over one year fulltime or two years part-time(this option is only available for some projects).

The next intake will be October 2018. MRes projects will be advertised on these web pages early in 2018.

Your career

A postgraduate degree from the RVC is highly regarded and recognised internationally.

Our graduates have a track record of successful careers in government, research and other organisations. Many students use the MRes as a way to gain valuable research experience and skills before going on to do a PhD.



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The MRes in Animal and Plant Science is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Read more
The MRes in Animal and Plant Science is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Applications will be accepted for a start date in October or January. The programme consists of (a) a major research thesis and (b) taught modules on generic and transferable skills, with an emphasis on scientific writing, oral presentations, and general research skills. Part-time study for this programme is not available.

Prospective students must talk to their proposed supervisor about possible project areas (see below) and have a project approved by interview with the supervisor and Head of Discipline prior to application via http://www.pac.ie (PAC code: CKS81).

Visit the website: https://www.ucc.ie/en/bees/courses/postgrad/

Course detail

Students undertake a total workload equivalent to 90 credits over the 12 month programme, the principal element of which is the completion of a major research thesis of approximately 25,000 words. In parallel, students must take and pass taught modules to the value of 20 credits.

Modules

Students take 20 credits from the following available modules:

BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL6012 Marine Megafauna (10 credits)
BL6016 Marine Ecology and Conservation (10 credits)
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)
BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL4004 Frontiers in Biology (5 credits)
BL4005 Research Skills in Biology (5 credits)
BL4006 Food Production (5 credits)
PS6001 Plant Genetic Engineering (5 credits)
PS4024 Crop Physiology and Climate Change (5 credits)
PS4021 Environmentally Protective Management of Plant Pests and Pathogens (5 credits)
ZY4021 Evolutionary Ecology (5 credits)

Students may elect to take other, relevant modules (subject to availability) that are offered by the University that are not listed above to fulfil the elective requirement with approval from the MRes coordinator, research supervisor and Head of School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science.

Students will also undertake independent research towards completion of a research thesis to a student workload equivalent of 70 credits on a selected topic in Animal or Plant Science.

Current projects:

- The effect of lactation housing on the behaviour and welfare of pigs
- Understanding viral pathways in marine environments
- Distribution and diet of otters in a rural/urban streamscape
- Novel approaches in the use of freshwater macroinvertebrates for biomonitoring
- The ecology of Sika/Red/Fallow deer in Ireland
- Catching prey; the role of Ultraviolet radiation in attracting insects by carnivorous plants
- Birds as dispersers of plant propagules
- Does the phytotoxicity of nanoparticles depend on environmental parameters?
- The role of biochar as a sustainable soil amendment
- Effects of Eutrophication in shallow subtidal marine systems
- Use of Brachypodium sylvaticum as a model for growth regulation in perennial forage grasses
- Effect of temperature on spring growth of perennial ryegrass cultivars

Programme Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

- Carry out an independent and original research project to address an emerging question in Animal or Plant Science.
- Prepare and write a dissertation of their research project in a critical, logical and systematic manner, in keeping with the standards of postgraduate research.
- Display advanced theoretical knowledge and practical understanding within a research area of Animal or Plant Science.
- Understand the basis and application of field and laboratory methods used in Animal and Plant Science and a knowledge of their limitations
- Avail of relevant workshops or modules to increase scientific technical skills (e. g. biostatistics).
- Source, review, critically assess and evaluate relevant primary literature and summarize material for presentation to peers and for inclusion within the research dissertation.
- Design, write and defend a scientific research proposal based on their current research topic or a proposed topic.
- Evaluate their skill set and identify skills that should be acquired.
- Develop professional practice skills including team-work, negotiation, time-management, scientific writing and oral communication

How to apply

Students should consult the MRes Animal and Plant Science Brochure: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinAnimalandPlantScience.pdf

Prospective students should also consult the following guide to procedures realting to applying for the MRes Animal and Plant Science: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinANimalandplantscience-Studentguidetoproceduresbeforeandafterentrytotheprogramme24March2016.pdf

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Why choose this course?. Develop your potential and profile as a successful researcher on this innovative masters course. It enables you to undertake original research and push the boundaries of knowledge in your specialist area of choice. Read more

Why choose this course?

Develop your potential and profile as a successful researcher on this innovative masters course. It enables you to undertake original research and push the boundaries of knowledge in your specialist area of choice.

  • Focus on a subject pathway which matches your interests and ambitions: you can graduate with an MRes in Social Research, Criminal Psychology, Humanities or Journalism
  • Learn in an inter-disciplinary and research-active environment
  • Build advanced research skills through a series of inspirational masterclasses
  • Conduct your own substantial piece of independent research, with support and supervision from influential academic researchers
  • Join our dynamic and supportive postgraduate community and work with influential researchers on collaborative projects
  • Focus on ‘real-world’ research: if you are already in employment, you can relate your studies directly to your professional role
  • Learn how to attract funding for research projects and how to share your findings for maximum impact
  • Benefit from a truly interdisciplinary approach to learning, drawing on best research practice from across the social sciences and humanities
  • Boost your future prospects by building an impressive portfolio of transferable skills in data collection, analysis and critical reflection – using evidence to evaluate and solve problems
  • Prepare for a fulfilling career as a researcher or research manager in academia or public, private and voluntary organisation
  • Gain an excellent platform if you want to progress to a PhD
  • Enjoy flexibility in your studies – with the chance to take shorter versions of the course leading to a Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma.

The Master of Research (MRes) offers a flexible, challenging and inspirational way to develop wide-ranging research and analytical skills and to complete a substantial research project under the supervision of academic experts. You can gain named MRes awards in Social Research, Criminal Psychology, Humanities or Journalism, depending on the subject pathway you choose to take.

A broad appeal

The MRes is ideal for high-performing students who want to progress directly from undergraduate studies and to continue developing their experience of real-world and collaborative research. 

With a part-time route available, it is also suited to professionals already working in roles which involve the collection and analysis of data to address complex challenges and underpin decision-making.

It will appeal in particular to ambitious individuals who want to advance their careers in settings such as the criminal justice sector, local authorities, police and probation services, the heritage sector and the media. They could be in roles which are specifically focussed on research or where they need to use data and evidence effectively.

In-depth knowledge, enhanced employability

The MRes delivers:

  • A critical awareness of current debates, problems and developments at the forefront of your academic or professional subject specialism
  • A comprehensive understanding of research methods, techniques and originality in research practice
  • Excellent critical thinking, evaluation and analysis skills so that you can test theories and engage in academic debate
  • Enhanced employability so that you are well prepared for higher level professional employment

A truly interdisciplinary approach

One of the strengths of our MRes programme is its emphasis on inter-disciplinary learning. The course is uniquely structured so that you are trained in research methods and practice which are relevant across the social sciences and humanities, equipping you with a solid foundation of skills. 

You will draw on best practice from different sectors, learning how they take distinctive approaches to research and knowledge production. Because the course is expected to attract individuals from different settings – from police officers to social workers, journalists to heritage sector professionals, to name but a few – you will benefit from sharing ideas and fresh perspectives.




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The MRes in Geological Sciences is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Read more
The MRes in Geological Sciences is a full-time programme running over 12 months from the date of first registration for the programme. Applications will be accepted for a start date in October or January. The programme consists of (a) a major research thesis and (b) taught modules on generic and transferable skills, with an emphasis on scientific writing, oral presentations, and general research skills. Part-time study for this programme is not available.

Prospective students are advised to contact the Programme Coordinator (Prof. Andy Wheeler in advance of application via http://www.pac.ie (PAC code CKS82) to discuss possible project areas.

Visit the website: https://www.ucc.ie/en/bees/courses/postgrad/

Course detail

Students undertake a total workload equivalent to 90 credits over the 12 month programme, the principal element of which is the completion of a major research thesis of approximately 25,000 words. In parallel, students must take and pass taught modules to the value of 20 credits.

Modules

Students take 20 credits from the following available modules:

GL6002 Igneous and Metamorphic Terrain Mapping (10 credits)
GL6003 Coal Exploration (5 credits)
GL6005 Basin Analysis and Sedimentary Fancies Analysis (10 credits)
GL6006 Geotechnical Investigations of Soils and Rocks (5 credits)
GL6007 Practical Offshore Geological Exploration (5 credits)
GL6008 Geological Application of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)
GL6010 Field Exploration Methods and Professional Development (5 credits)
GL6011 Structural Geology for Hydrocarbon Exploration (5 credits)
GL6012 Structural Geology for Mineral Exploration (5 credits)
GL6013 Geology of Ore Deposits (5 credits)
GL4002 Petroleum Geology and Basin Analysis (5 credits)
GL4003 Applied Geophysics (5 credits)
GL4004 Advanced Igneous Processes (5 credits)
GL4011 Economic Geology (5 credits)
GL4024 Exceptional Glimpses of Ancient Life (5 credits)
GL4027 Geochemistry (5 credits)

Students may elect to take other, relevant modules (subject to availability) that are offered by the University that are not listed above to fulfil the elective requirement with approval from the MRes coordinator, research supervisor and Head of School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Science.

Students will also undertake independent research towards completion of a research thesis to a student workload equivalent of 70 credits on a selected topic in Geological Science.

Current projects

- Palynology and palynofacies of the Booley Bay Formation of Co.Wexford
- Palaeoenvironments recorded in the Lias of Northern Ireland
- Taphonomy of insects in the Daohuguo Konservat-Lagerstätte (Jurassic, Inner Mongolia)
- Characterising deformation in unconsolidated sediments
- Early tectonic fabric development in sedimentary rocks
- Petrological and structural mapping of the Fanad Lineament, Co. Donegal
- Quantifying the climate-controlled Pleistocene erosion of the Irish landmass (over the last 2.5 ma)

Programme Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of this programme, students should be able to:

- Carry out an independent and original research project to address an emerging question in Geological Sciences.
- Prepare and write a dissertation of their research project in a critical, logical and systematic manner, in keeping with the standards of postgraduate research.
- Display advanced theoretical knowledge and practical understanding within a research area of Geological Science.
- Understand the basis and application of field and laboratory methods used in Geological Science and a knowledge of their limitations
- Avail of relevant workshops or modules to increase scientific technical skills
- Source, review, critically assess and evaluate relevant primary literature and summarize material for presentation to peers and for inclusion within the research dissertation.
- Design, write and defend a scientific research proposal based on their current research topic or a proposed topic.
- Evaluate their skill set and identify skills that should be acquired.
- Develop professional practice skills including team-work, negotiation, time-management, scientific writing and oral communication.

How to apply

MRes Animal and Plant Science Brochure: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinAnimalandPlantScience.pdf

Prospective students should also consult the following guide to procedures realting to applying for the MRes Animal and Plant Science: https://www.ucc.ie/en/media/academic/schoolofbees/documents/MResinANimalandplantscience-Studentguidetoproceduresbeforeandafterentrytotheprogramme24March2016.pdf

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Combining broadly-based and subject specific training in research methodologies and transferable employment related skills, our MRes is ideal for research students and professional wanting to enhance their career or progress to doctoral study. Read more

Combining broadly-based and subject specific training in research methodologies and transferable employment related skills, our MRes is ideal for research students and professional wanting to enhance their career or progress to doctoral study.

A truly flexible programme - you can complete the course in one year through full-time study or over two years of part-time study. Teaching blocks are 9-weeks per trimester with classes offered on Tuesday and Thursday between 2 and 6pm.

What you will study

The Master of Research (MRes) programme consists of 8 modules and a research project. Students can exit with a Postgraduate Diploma in Research if they do not wish to undertake the project.

Our MRes can be studied independently or as part of a 1 3 structure leading to the award of PhD. Students wishing to undertake a combined 1 3 PhD should apply to the PhD programme.

Modules

  • Nature of Research Enquiry
  • Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
  • Applied Skills in Qualitative Research Methods
  • Critical Review of Research
  • Research Design and Project Management
  • Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
  • Quantitative Data Analysis
  • Independent and Negotiated Study
  • Masters Research Project

Why choose this programme?

  • Innovative teaching that focuses on learning for the real world and the employability of our graduates
  • Flexible study: full-time and part-time entry available. 
  • Comprehensive programme of research training balancing theoretical engagement and practical application.
  • Offers opportunity for those wishing to move onto postgraduate research and those interested in professional research work outside the higher education sector.
  • Classes taught between 2-6pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 9 weeks of teaching per trimester


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The MRes is an award that may be the first step towards an academic research career. It would also be relevant for students keen to pursue research in other organisations with client-focused settings. Read more

The MRes is an award that may be the first step towards an academic research career. It would also be relevant for students keen to pursue research in other organisations with client-focused settings. The degree programme provides opportunities to develop advanced research skills, and assessments are focused on real world relevant outputs (such as a research protocol for a funding application and a potentially publishable paper for submission to the peer-review process). Individual modules may be available to applicants wishing to acquire particular research skills.

Teaching, learning and assessment

There are two taught modules (Research Methods and Applied Research) designed to develop skills in, and awareness of, the modern research environment. These are delivered via seminars, workshops, online learning and independent study. A major component of this course is the Research Project, which offers students the opportunity to carry out an extensive piece of research, or to produce a client report, with the expectation of an output suitable for submission to the peer-review the process for potential publication.

Applying to this programme

Due to the heavy focus on the Research Project, students will need to produce an outline protocol (2-3 sides of A4) of their intended research project, including a named supervisor who has the expertise to supervise the project, as part of the application process. This should normally be prepared in conjunction with the named academic member of staff. Applicants should therefore identify the subject area within which they would like to conduct their research and either make contact with a member of staff directly, or ask to be put in touch with subject area  research advisors via the programme leader Dr Stephen Darling (see opposite). Browsing webpages of the relevant subject areas within the School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management on the QMU website will allow potential applicants to determine the current research interests of the academic staff.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out self-directed, independent work. Your attendance requirements at QMU will depend on which module you are studying and whether you are studying full or part-time.

Careers

The MRes may be the first stage in an academic career and the skills gained on this degree course are a sound basis on which to pursue doctoral studies for a PhD award. The skills gained through the MRes will also give students a thorough base from which to pursue a career in undertaking research activities in other organisations, relevant to service users, industry or society.

Quick Facts

  • Students who complete this  course will have acquired and demonstrated the fundamental skills required to successfully conduct sound research and disseminate research findings.
  • Graduates will be well-equipped to embark on a research career within academia.
  • Graduates will also be well-equipped to carry out research related activities in other settings, working for organisations beyond academia.




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The MRes in Management Studies is offered by Cambridge Judge Business School as a full-time period of study and research, during which students with experience at master's level will receive training in research methods and the foundations of their chosen discipline. Read more

The MRes in Management Studies is offered by Cambridge Judge Business School as a full-time period of study and research, during which students with experience at master's level will receive training in research methods and the foundations of their chosen discipline. The goal of the MRes programme is to lay the foundations that will enable students to contribute to the academic debate in their discipline through publications in leading journals, which they will develop during their PhD.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the programme, students will have:

  • gained in-depth knowledge of research methods used in management research;
  • developed strong awareness of the current academic debates in their chosen discipline, and in-depth knowledge of the underlying theories of management;
  • gained practical knowledge of management research through close supervision of their dissertation project;
  • developed strong methodological expertise across a spectrum of research methods and applied these methodologies as part of the dissertation research project;
  • developed a strong awareness of the imperative of social impact with management research, through a dissertation; and
  • received training in transferable skills, eg communication skills, presentation skills, writing skills, research project management skills, literature review skills.

Continuing

In order to continue to the PhD, MRes students are required to achieve an average mark of 60 per cent in each module separately and 70 per cent in the dissertation alone. Note that, as for all Cambridge PhDs, the first year of the PhD (the year after the MRes) is still probationary and students will be required to pass a first-year assessment. 

Visit the PhD in Management Studies page for information on that element of this programme.



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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. Read more
The aim of the MA in Higher Education is to equip students with research skills and substantive knowledge for the study of higher education. You will enhance your ability to facilitate and lead the development of expert knowledge within your specific area of higher education including academic practice.

In an increasingly global world the study of higher education is no longer limited to local, regional or national contexts. Universities influence and are influenced by factors such as globalisation, technological change and ongoing sophistication of higher education national and international characteristics. The study pathway therefore aims to enhance practice, research and policy of higher education within these fluid contexts. The course contributes to the personal development of those concerned with the study of higher education both formally and informally in a wide range of institutional settings and locations. Coursework encourages you to bring together your personal understanding of issues relating to specific aspects of higher education with the established and current body of professional and academic research literature relevant to your professional or personal aims. Underpinned by the development of advanced, specialist research skills, the course allows you to progressively broaden the knowledge and understanding of your chosen aspects of higher education. It emphasises the synthesis of theory and practice, including academic practice, and the importance of both structure and agency when understanding interactions within higher education institutions.

Careers

The MA graduates from a wide range of backgrounds, including tutors, lecturers and academics from different disciplines and educational contexts will benefit from the provision of specialist knowledge and research methods training. The course actively seeks to support the professional development, employability and career progression of managers, administrators and academic-related, professional staff (e.g. learning technologists, academic developers). The offering of a range of specialised research skills is tailored to enhance the expertise of these professionals as well as those aspiring to progress to higher levels of management in the areas of higher education policy, widening participation and access in higher education institutions. Invited lecturers from external higher education and policy institutions will highlight possible pathways for future employment within specialist organisations or universities in a number of countries. The design of authentic course assessment tasks underlines the importance of developing specialised research and professional skills applicable in the workplace. Equally, the research skills element of the course will equip participants with necessary skills for progression to doctoral or independent research.

Module list

• National and International Perspectives on Higher Education Policy

This module examines policy and policy-making as distinct processes of implementation and change. Students will consider the approaches of different countries to important debates in the field including the purpose and nature of universities, funding, internationalisation, access and widening participation, management, quality, and regulation processes. Utilising policy analysis methods as well as key concepts and theoretical frameworks students will critically examine comparative evidence to enhance their knowledge and understanding of higher education principles, processes and practices drawing on individual national case studies. The module covers the following broad areas of higher education policy, policy-making and change:

• Access, recruitment and widening participation
• Quality assurance and regimes of (de)regulation in higher education
• Management and change at institutional, national and international level
• Tiers of higher education provision, rankings and their implications for governments and universities.
• Higher education financing and shifting patterns of funding.
• Internationalisation, global competition and cross-border flow of students and researchers.

• Universities as Contemporary Learning and Teaching Environments

This module examines the historical development of research in teaching-learning with a view to identify key contributions that influenced how we conceptualise teaching-learning in the university sector. Several theoretical traditions are presented (e.g. communities of practice, student approaches to learning, actor network theory) and emphasis is placed on the role of assessment and feedback as well as the wide-scale implementation of technological media in higher education and their impact on new modalities of learning. Students will be offered the means to enhance their critical understanding and use of relevant theory by supporting critical and systematic reflection on the changing nature of teaching-learning in higher education, on the changing management landscape, and on the relationships between them in national and international contexts.

• Special Research Methods in Higher Education

This module provides an overview of the methods and methodologies applied to research in higher education. In doing so, it provides links between higher education and educational and social research in general without losing its particular focus and applicability on higher education settings. The meanings and associations between methods are discussed and their position in wider epistemological paradigms is considered. Students will be given an overview of the development of these methods and methodologies in higher education and will develop applied research skills on methods relevant to their practice or interests. Conclusions will be drawn on the methodological opportunities and challenges of the presented research methods and their supplementary to wider educational and social research will be critically examined.

• Educational and Social Research Methods

This module provides you with the opportunity to consider the aims and intentions of educational research, critique published journal articles, and examine the role of evidence from research as a basis for improving education and social care. You will gain grounding in educational research issues, methods and strategies together with knowledge of how to match intended outcomes with specific educational questions and methods of investigation.

• Postgraduate Major Study

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of their Master's Major project and involves a dissertation of 14,000 words or the equivalent. The Major Project enables students to demonstrate the ability to raise significant and meaningful questions in relation to their specialism which may involve working at the current limits of theoretical and / or research understanding. It will involve the ability to develop solutions to ethical dilemmas likely to arise in their research or professional practice. The project enables students to expand or redefine existing knowledge, to develop new approaches to changing workplace situations and / or to contribute to the development of best practice. It asks the student to communicate these processes in a clear and elegant fashion and to evaluate their work from the perspective of an autonomous reflective learner. Students' research topics must be negotiated with their appointed supervisor. An application for ethical approval and ethics discussion paper must then be submitted. The project may take the form of a written dissertation, a formal presentation and full research paper, an exhibition, a performance, an artefact or the development of software, or other written, aural or visual material. The project may be formed from a combination of these modes but will normally include a written component.

Assessment

You will be assessed in a number of ways, from systematic literature reviews to reflective accounts on your professional practice, to ensure you're learning effectively. Other forms of assessment may include presentations, critical analyses of existing research, producing a dissemination poster and a research project. Each module comprises of one summative assessment and one core formative assessment. The assessment of the modules places emphasis on authenticity of the assessment tasks. Assessment are designed to strengthen your ability to conduct research in higher education settings.

Your Faculty

The Faculty of Health, Social Care & Education is the largest provider of health, social care and education courses in the East of England, with over 6,000 students from more than 20 countries.

With 95% of our students finding full-time employment within six months of graduating, you can be sure that our courses have been designed with your career in mind. We’ve been educating nurses, midwives and social workers for over 25 years.

At the cutting edge of research, we offer a range of internationally recognised undergraduate and postgraduate degree courses taught by friendly, supportive and experienced staff. With over 150 research students across our three doctoral programmes (PhD; DProf and EdD), we provide the multi-disciplinary perspective and potential for academic debate that reflects our position as a leader in practitioner-focused and practice-led research studies.

Designed to enhance your learning experience, our facilities include state-of-the-art simulated skills laboratories that mirror real-life clinical situations and UK hospital wards. Our students also benefit from our Early Childhood Research and Resource Centre; a space in which they can experiment with equipment and play activities.

You’ll study in an exciting, modern faculty which has strong links with regional, national and international organisations, including healthcare trusts, social services, local and regional authorities, schools and academic institutions.

Your enthusiasm. Our passion. Your best foot forward.

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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The Master of Research programme is ideal for postgraduate students requiring training and experience of research methods prior to embarking upon a PhD. Read more
The Master of Research programme is ideal for postgraduate students requiring training and experience of research methods prior to embarking upon a PhD.

Applications are invited for MRes projects in Environmental Sciences. The MRes course is taken in one year (12 months) full-time, or two years part-time. Students take 60 credits of advanced study in the discipline, 60 credits of advanced research training, and complete the selected research project (60 credit points).

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Take your passion for law to the next level with advanced study and research. Be at the centre of debate, analysis and dialogue about law and legal policy issues in New Zealand. Read more

Take your passion for law to the next level with advanced study and research. Be at the centre of debate, analysis and dialogue about law and legal policy issues in New Zealand.

Full time or part time, your study will be relevant, accessible and intellectually rewarding—research an area of law that interests you or tailor a course of study that suits your career goals.

Programmes

Master of Laws by coursework

You'll take one core course—Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 worth 10 points—and make up the rest of your 120 points from a choice of other 500-level LAWS courses. Up to 40 points can be replaced by equivalent courses from another faculty or another university.

500-level LAWS courses differ from year to year and are either taught in block format, intensive format or seminars. Look at the course timetable to see when the intensive and block courses are offered. The seminar courses are mainly led by you and the other students who will prepare papers in advance.

Internship

International students can also choose to do a 20-point one-trimester internship. You'll work with a community, government or private sector organisation under the joint supervision of a Faculty member and an outside professional. Assessment is based on the work you produce, a journal and your performance at fortnightly seminars.

Master of Laws by dissertation and coursework

You'll take LAWS 581 Advanced Legal Study (10 points), a further 20 points from the Master of Laws course-selection and LAWS 592, a 90-point dissertation of 35,000 words.

Dissertation supervision

The Faculty can provide dissertation supervision on a wide range of subjects. Explore the full list of the Faculty's research areas to help you decide on your own research topic.

Master of Laws by thesis

The Master of Laws by thesis requires you to complete a 120-point 50,000 word thesis on an area of law that interests you. You'll also do the course Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 at no extra cost.

Thesis supervision

The Faculty can provide thesis supervision on a wide range of subjects. Explore the full list of the Faculty's research areas to help you decide on your own research topic.

Master of Laws by research portfolio

This is a more flexible combination of coursework and research on an approved topic. You'll take the 10-point Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 and the 90-point Research Portfolio LAWS 593.

The research portfolio consists of two courses that include two research papers of 12,000 words each on related topics. You'll also complete a 2,500-word linking paper to establish and justify your research, as well as a further 20 points from Master of Laws courses.

Flexible study

Designed to be flexible, the Master of Laws offers courses that are taught in different formats. Some courses meet weekly, others are taught in a more compact format.

Block courses are taught in a concentrated manner over a one-to-two week period, and intensive courses are broken into chunks of eight to twelve hours. They are often taught over two-to-three consecutive evenings or in Friday afternoon and Saturday sessions, with a break of two-to-three weeks between sessions.

Workload and duration

The Master of Laws can be completed in one year of full-time study, or in up to three years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Research and supervision

No matter how you choose to study for your Master of Laws there will be an element of research required. Take advantage of exciting research opportunities at New Zealand's leading centre of academic legal research

And if you're planning on doing a Master's by thesis, or a PhD, you'll have the opportunity to be supervised in wide range of subject areas by New Zealand's best legal scholars.



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