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Masters Degrees (Master Of Law)

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The Cambridge LLM (Master of Law) is a nine-month taught programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. Read more
The Cambridge LLM (Master of Law) is a nine-month taught programme commencing at the beginning of October each year and ending in June of the following year. The LLM, as a masters degree, is intended for those who wish to pursue further legal studies after completing their first degree in law, including those who are considering an academic career or intend to practise law. The advanced nature of the LLM is reflected in the fact that the programme is organised and taught separately from the undergraduate law degree at Cambridge. All of the LLM courses are specifically tailored for the LLM programme.

LLM students take four courses of their choice from a list of over 30 options, each most commonly assessed by means of a three-hour written examination at the end of the LLM year although students may elect to write an 18,000 word thesis in lieu of the written examination for one course only subject to prior formal approval of their dissertation topic.

Students may opt to specialise in commercial, European, international or intellectual property law by choosing at least three of their courses from those designated as being in one of these areas of specialism. Alternatively they may select from the entire range of LLM courses and obtain a non-specialised LLM degree.

See the website http://www.llm.law.cam.ac.uk/

Course detail

At the end of this postgraduate programme students can be expected to have greatly enhanced knowledge of their chosen specialist subjects areas, an increased ability to apply sophisticated and rigorous analytical techniques to primary and secondary legal materials, and a better facility in advancing robust evaluations of doctrinal and policy arguments in the fields of their studies and more generally.

Format

The LLM is a nine-month taught programme which begins in October and ends in the following June. Students must take four courses, but have a free choice as to which four they choose from a list of over 30 course offerings. In most courses student numbers do not exceed 35.

One-to-one supervisions are unlikely, except for those students who choose to write a thesis in lieu of examination for one their four courses. These students receive a number of one-to-one sessions with their thesis supervisors.

Teaching typically comprises a minimum of 16 two-hour seminars and lectures for each of their four courses, supplemented by teaching in small groups where course numbers are greater than 20.

There are no formal 'practicals', but all LLM students are expected to undertake substantial amounts of reading arising from seminars and lectures and to produce written work for some sessions.

In addition to the seminars and lectures for each course, provision is also made for discussion in smaller groups where the number taking a course exceed 20.

LLM students are encouraged to contribute to the student law review, the Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law. In addition many LLM students are involved in the Faculty's Graduate Law Society.

This style of presentation is reserved for PhD students, but LLM students are welcome to attend.

Placements

Placements are not organised through the Faculty, and are not part of the LLM programme, but many LLM students successfully organise placements for the period immediately following completion of their studies.

Assessment

LLM students have the option of writing a thesis of 18,000 words in lieu of examination for one of their four courses.

Certain LLM subjects may be assessed by an essay of 7,000 words plus a two-hour examination, rather than the more typical three-hour examination or 18,000-word thesis.

LLM students sit a three-hour written examination at the end of the LLM year for each of their four courses, unless they have already submitted a thesis in lieu of examination for one of their courses.

Formative assessment (ie assessment not contributing to final grades) is delivered by way of individual feedback on students' essays or partial thesis drafts (for those electing to write a thesis). Students may submit up to three essays for each course they are taking. Course convenors and lecturers will advise on topics, but the aim is to produce a short piece of writing which provides a concise, rigorous argument or analysis of the issues in question.

Continuing

A number of students wish to remain in Cambridge after completing their masters degree in order to pursue a further research degree. Cambridge offers research degrees of varying length: the Diploma in International Law, the Diploma in Legal Studies, the MLitt degree and the PhD degree.

Students wishing to continue their studies at Cambridge by undertaking a research degree in law should apply for their chosen course through the Graduate Admissions Office by completing a GRADSAF application form and submitting it by the relavant deadline.

The Faculty of Law website contains information about the options available at:
http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate-research

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Information about sources of funding is available from the Faculty of Law's LLM website at: http://www.llm.law.cam.ac.uk/scholarship_information.html

and from the University's Graduate Admissions Office website at:
http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This expert graduate course provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws and regulatory frameworks governing the ways in which the international community provides assistance to developing countries to improve the economic, political and social quality of life for people. Read more
This expert graduate course provides a thorough theoretical and practical grounding in the laws and regulatory frameworks governing the ways in which the international community provides assistance to developing countries to improve the economic, political and social quality of life for people. It develops advanced skills and specialist knowledge and is suitable for graduates interested in a career in international development within government, non-government or not-for-profit sectors.

You will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

As one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, we offer this course at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers choice from a broad range of law, regulation and international development areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such law, regulation, international business and economics law, human rights and justice, you will gain specialist knowledge and understanding of recent developments and the practice of law in this field.

It provides the flexibility to tailor a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study allows to you to continue to work and meet personal commitments while you study.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/law-and-international-development-l6012?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in 2 parts. Part A. Law and International Development knowledge and Part B. Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A. Law and International Development knowledge
The studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B. Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas of international development law. You will be able to focus on sources of information relevant to international development law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/law-and-international-development-l6012?domestic=true#making-the-application

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With the enormous growth in international commerce over the last few decades knowledge of international commercial law has become an essential element of legal practice in all major law firms. Read more
With the enormous growth in international commerce over the last few decades knowledge of international commercial law has become an essential element of legal practice in all major law firms. The programme is also especially relevant to those seeking opportunities in the commercial world. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research in this area spanning the full range of international commercial law from the World Trade Organisation through competition law in the domestic, European and international contexts to the issues arising out of the complexities of regulation.

A sound knowledge of international commercial law is increasingly necessary given the demands imposed by globalisation, whether
you wish to join a major law firm or be engaged in a company with european and international aspirations.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes critical analysis of different aspects of international commercial law. Leading the analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law involved in the programme have engaged in major research. This spans the full range of international commercial law from the World Trade Organisation through competition law in the domestic, European and international contexts to the issues arising out of international
commercial arbitration.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law and the Smurfit School of Business offer a wide range of modules for this Master’s programme. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme are modules such as: Corporate Governance; International Economic Law; International Commercial Arbitration; International Tax Law; International Aviation Law; and, Law of International Finance. Having completed six modules, students will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of International Commercial Law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful if you intend to practise with the large Irish and international specialist corporate law firms, or want to work as an in-house legal adviser.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Corporate Governance which examines the legal and regulatory environment and the informational and market infrastructures which apply in Ireland and the wider EU to promote an understanding its importance to companies and their stakeholders.

- Insolvency Law which examines the legal principles relating to the insolvency of corporations and individuals in Ireland and other common law jurisdictions to develop an understanding of the legal mechanisms available for the distribution of the estates of insolvent debtors.

- EU Competition Law which offers a critical examination of how EU competition law governs particular actions of private market actors, considering the rationale behind this area of law and how it fits into the EU's economic order and philosophy.

- Regulatory Governance which offers insights into competing conceptions of regulatory governance and explanations both for emergence of and variety in regulatory regimes as well as normative arguments concerning arrangements for regulatory regimes.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM in International Commercial Law is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally. It is particularly useful for students wishing to practise with the large Irish and international specialist corporate law firms or wishing to work as an in-house legal adviser.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/apply,80078,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llminternationalcommerciallaw/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Read more
The LLM General programme affords you the opportunity to choose any combination of the graduate modules offered by the Sutherland School of Law. Members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the areas of law reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers to the regulation of charities in Ireland.

Directed at well-qualified graduates in law and related disciplines, this programme promotes reflection on the different aspects of national, European and International Law, with strong opportunities for specialization in both public and private law dimensions.
Leading this analysis and discussion, the members of staff in the Sutherland School of Law have engaged in major research across the various areas of law. This is reflected in the modules offered in the programme ranging from cross-border divorce law, the socio-economic rights of asylum seekers, to the comparative regulation of charities and NGOs.

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Your studies

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Master’s programmes. Of special interest to those undertaking this programme, are modules such as: Issues in Comparative Charity Law; Key Issues in Conflict of Laws; Comparative Constitutional Law; and, Regulation of Food Safety. Having completed six modules, you will complete the LLM by undertaking a supervised dissertation.

On completion of this programme, students will be able:
- to understand and think critically about various facets of Law;
- to apply their knowledge and understanding of Law to real and hypothetical factual situations; and,
- to conduct independent research and write coherent, well-structured papers.

Studying abroad

The School affords its students the opportunity to spend a semester abroad as part of the Comparative, International and European Law (CIEL) Graduate exchange programme with our partner Universities in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain. Students participating in the programme will have their dissertations jointly supervised by staff in UCD and in the institution which
they are visiting. Successful completion of the semester abroad will lead to the award of a Certificate in Comparative, International and European Law.

Your future

The deeper understanding and knowledge of law acquired through the programme is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful varied careers, both domestically and internationally. The legal skills acquired through the programme will be particularly useful, irrespective of the career you choose.

Features

The Sutherland School of Law offers a wide range of modules for the Masters programmes. Modules of especial interest to those undertaking this programme include:

- Economic Torts which adopts a comparative common law perspective to examine specific areas of the law of torts, such as the economic aspects to the law of torts, economic aspects of damages, commercial aspects of the law of torts and causation issues.

- Key Issues in Conflicts of Law is concerned with those laws governing legal disputes with a foreign element including jurisdiction and recognition of judgments under Brussels I and IIbis, the applicable law under Rome I & II and the use of public policy/ordre public.

- International Disaster Response Law assesses the history and emergence of international disaster response laws, rules and principles and responses to disaster relief outside of the immediate disaster area, with a particular focus on the international regime for protection of individuals.

- Regulation of Food Safety addresses how the differing interests and actors involved in the production and consumption of food interact to regulate the safety and quality of food and examines the current and future challenges in the regulation of food safety and quality.

CIEL

Any student admitted to an LLM programme in the Law School also can apply on a competitive basis to spend their second semester at one of our sister Law Schools:
- University of Antwerp
- Maastricht University
- The University of Mannhein
- Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona
- Universite de Toulouse 1 – Capitole

Students must score 6.5 in IELTS or 90 in the internet TOEFL exams in the relevant language of instruction (English, French or German). Spaces are allocated on a competitive basis. Students who are accepted onto this programme graduate with an LLM and are awarded a certificate in International and Comparative Law (CIEL).

Careers

The LLM is highly regarded by employers and has been the basis for many successful careers both domestically and internationally.

We have an excellent Careers Development Centre here at UCD, designed to help you with information regarding future employment or studies. UCD hold a number of graduate events throughout the year including a dedicated law fair at which at which many of the big Law firms will be in attendance. The School of Law has a dedicated careers advisor on it’s Academic staff, Dr. Oonagh Breen, and a staff member from the careers office will be in attendance at the School of law on a number of occasions throughout the academic year. To see the full range of services offered by the careers office go to http://www.ucd.ie/careers/

Find out how to apply here http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/apply,79280,en.html

See the website http://www.ucd.ie/law/graduateprogrammes/llmgeneral/

Scholarships

The University and UCD Sutherland School of Law have a list of scholarships that are open to Irish, EU and International applicants.
For further information please see http://www.ucd.ie/scholarships
International students may wish to visit: http://www.ucd.ie/international

Why you should choose UCD

In the state-of-the-art UCD Sutherland School of Law, graduate students engage in advanced study with internationally renowned
specialists to develop the transformative potential of law.

The School is ranked by the authoritative QS World University Rankings as Ireland's number one law school and amongst the world's 100 leading law schools. Students benefit from the School’s strong links with university partners; businesses; NGOs; and, domestic, EU and international governments.
We place particular emphasis on the quality and breadth of our graduate programmes across Diploma, Masters and Doctoral levels. Our graduate degrees are available on a full-time or part-time basis, beginning in either January or September.
We also offer part-time Diploma programmes and single subject certificates with the possibility of securing CPD points and building study up to achieve diploma or masters awards.

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The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at the School of Law, University College Cork is a new programme which brings together the best legal expertise in the field in Ireland. Read more

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at the School of Law, University College Cork is a new programme which brings together the best legal expertise in the field in Ireland. It covers a range of legal topics from purely Shipping and Maritime Law to Marine Environmental Protection and International Law of the Sea. The programme gives the opportunity to students to work with the best Maritime and Marine Lawyers in the country, under the academic overview of a highly reputable and internationally acclaimed law school. The LLM integrates theoretical and practical learning of the law, and connects module contents with marine and maritime activities taking place in Cork, such as marine environmental research, marine renewables, law enforcement at sea, fisheries management, shipping and port activities. It is a programme based on flexible workload arrangements, and suitable to law graduates and marine and maritime professionals alike. 

Diploma Option

Applicants for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Marine and Maritime Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law Law). The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact  for application details. 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduating with a Masters in Law (LLM).   

The Diploma Fee is €5,300 Full-time €2,650 part-time

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) offers a wide choice of options, allowing students to either specialise in their preferred area of marine or maritime law, or to take a broad range of diverse modules.  

Credits

Students must take 60 credits of taught modules, and complete a dissertation of 15,000-20,000 words worth 30 credits. 

The programme modules include:

  • Admiralty Law
  • Climate Change and Energy Law
  • Sale, Insurance and Carriage of Goods at Sea
  • Ship Finance
  • Introduction to Law of the Sea
  • Global Maritime Security
  • Marine Environmental Law
  • Port Law
  • Natural Resources Law
  • International Environmental Law
  • Method of Environmental Law 

clinical module on Law of the Sea in Practice give students the opportunity to understand the practice of law enforcement at sea, and includes access to the Naval Service at Cork. 

The practical aspect to marine law is also available through science-based, non-law modules on GIS, Remote Sensing and Characteristics of the Marine Environment. 

Also, students will have access to certain non-programme but complementary modules, such as:

  • Planning Law
  • Heritage Law
  • International Refugee Law
  • Enforcement and Sanctions in Antitrust Law
  • EU Competition Law
  • International Criminal Law
  • International Human Rights Law
  • Cybercrime
  • e-Commerce Law

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) in the School of Law, UCC builds on the expertise and reputation of researchers and professionals in Cork and in Ireland to offer a world-class education in Marine Law and in Maritime Law. Whether students are law graduates or marine/maritime professionals, the programme provides them with an in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge and analysis of Marine and Maritime Law. 

Please visit the School of Law website here for up to date information on the programme.

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar 

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of programme modules.

Additional Teaching Mode Information

The part-time option will be taught during weekdays working hours over 2 years.

Course Practicalities

The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study, and clinical learning. Programme modules are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays in order to facilitate a flexible workload programme to students, particularly those with a professional career. Non-programme modules are available throughout the week, and where available through digital recording.

Assessment 

Generally students are examined by continuous assessment throughout the year and the dissertation must be submitted in September. Individual module assessments can be viewed in the Book of Modules 

Who teaches this course

This is what makes this course unique. Teachers on the LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) are both from within and from outside the School of Law, so that the programme benefits from nation-wide expertise in the field. The UCC School of Law collaborates closely with the Irish Maritime and Energy Resource Cluster (MarEI and the Naval Service) and Maritime Law practitioners. See the School of Law website to see the Programme Team.

Why choose this course

The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) at UCC connects in a single hub the leading marine and maritime research and practice in Ireland. Students have the unique opportunity to learn from internationally acclaimed researchers and practitioners. The programme puts the law in practice in the fields of shipping and marine environmental research. Through a clinical module, students have the opportunity to learn about law enforcement at sea, including through access to a naval ship at Cork. The programme is built on what Ireland does best in the marine and maritime world, and from there it reaches international excellence.

Skills and Careers Information

The course allows students to acquire an education in Marine Law, or in purely commercial Maritime Law. The LLM (Marine and Maritime Law) prepares them to access professions with the following bodies:

  • Legal professions
  • Governmental and regulatory agencies
  • Local government
  • Industry
  • Utilities
  • Infrastructure developers
  • Non-governmental organisations (NGOs)
  • Marine, maritime and Environmental consultancy
  • International organisations / secretariats
  • Academia


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The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights. Read more

About the course

The Master of Laws (LLM Law) course allows students to choose from a wide range of international and English law specialist subjects, including aspects of commercial and international trade law, intellectual property, and international human rights.

This enables graduates to fill the increasing demand for expertise in these areas and to produce their own 'bespoke' degree to suit their career needs.

Furthermore, because many of the modules have an international dimension, the LLM law course has proven to be of great interest to overseas candidates.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

Students receive a thorough grounding in the legal concepts and principles operating in the areas of law chosen.

They are given the opportunity to gain an understanding of areas of social and criminal justice policy where relevant and are introduced
to areas of controversy in their selected areas of law and socio-legal studies.

The Brunel Law School’s Masters of Law programme is designed to flexible enabling students to either broaden their proficiency in a range of areas or gain in-depth specialist knowledge of a particular subject of interest.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:

EU Competition Law
International Criminal Law
International Criminal Justice
Corporate Law I
Corporate Law II
International Human Rights and Islamic Law
Theory of International Financial Regulation
World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law
Privacy and Data Protection
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration
Philosophical Foundations of IP
Media Law and Regulation
Internet Law I -Substantive Legal Issues
Public International Law
European System of Human Rights Protection
Foundations of International Human Rights Law
International Humanitarian Law
Multiculturalism and Human Rights
Patent Law and Practice
Trade Marks and Allied Rights
International Trade Law
International Environmental Law
Comparative Criminal Justice
Comparative Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law
Theory and Practice of International Human Rights
Practice of International Financial Regulation
Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration
Human Rights of Women
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: Americas, Africa, Asia
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights
Managing Intellectual Property
International Intellectual Property Law
EU Intellectual Property Law

Teaching

The classes are taught to groups of approximately 30 students. Tutors use a variety of teaching methods to deliver their modules. Lectures provide a structure for the module and give an overview of the subject matter. They will introduce students to new topics relevant to their modules.

Some classes will take the form of a lecture, others will be taught seminar style. Some may use a mixture of teaching methods (eg lecture, research, case law and problem methods), in order to promote a personalised learning that considers the individual student’s interests, needs and abilities. We believe that it is part of student experience to be exposed to different teaching styles.

There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over one of the teaching terms.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by:

- participating in research centre activities and research trips
- contributing to newsletters
- making oral presentations
- attending law film screenings
- participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible Start Times and Learning Options
Programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offer smaller 15 credit modules, which provides students a range of options to both tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
Brunel Law School benefits from very active research centres, which have hosted a large number of research seminars and workshops in the last few years. Many of these events focus on a wide range of issues and they tackle the latest debates in the industry with a number of highly respected guests. Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking, and it is important to us that all our staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE).  In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-Curricular Activities
Brunel Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
Brunel Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

The Graduate School
Brunel Graduate School offers postgraduates additional features for study and the opportunity to meet fellow postgraduate students from across the University, so you will have the opportunity to meet others studying for their master of laws degrees and socialise with fellow postgraduate students.

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The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) is a new programme which takes advantage of a concentration of legal expertise in the field at the School of Law, University College Cork. Read more

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) is a new programme which takes advantage of a concentration of legal expertise in the field at the School of Law, University College Cork. Academic staff at the Law School currently hold advisory roles with a wide range of Irish and international agencies and organisations, including the European Environment Agency, the Environmental Protection Agency, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, an Bord Pleanála (Irish Planning Board), European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Aquaculture Licences Appeals Board, etc. The LLM programme offers a wide variety of legal topics ranging across traditional areas of environmental law, policy and regulation, as well as planning and land-use law, heritage protection, international environmental law, marine environmental law, natural resources law and human rights law. It aims to prepare graduates for a variety of careers in the broader environmental regulatory space, including in the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, environmental NGOs, compliance roles in industry, academia and environmental consultancy. The LLM seeks to integrate theoretical and practical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources law, and to connect module content with legal and regulatory frameworks operating locally, nationally, regionally and globally. To the greatest degree possible, the programme is based on flexible workload arrangements, to suit recent law graduates and environmental professionals alike. 

Applicants for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) Degree also have the option of registering for a Postgraduate Diploma in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.  Students take 60 credits of taught masters’ modules from those on offer for the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law). The Postgraduate Diploma can be completed over 9 months full-time or 18 months part-time. Those who wish to apply for the Diploma should contact  for application details. 

This shorter programme may be attractive to legal professionals and others who may prefer not to make an initial commitment to a full master’s programme. Graduates of the Postgraduate Diploma may further progress their studies by completing a 15,000 word research dissertation and graduating with a Masters in Law (LLM). 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) offers a wide choice of options, allowing students to take a broad range of diverse modules.  

Students must take 60 credits of taught modules, and complete a dissertation of 15,000 words worth 30 credits. 

The programme modules include:

  • Climate Change and Energy Law
  • Method in Environmental Law
  • Environmental Law in Practice
  • International Environmental Law
  • Introduction to Planning Law
  • Legal Concepts for Heritage and Environment
  • Marine Environmental Law
  • Natural Resources Law 

Exposure to technical aspects of the application of environmental and natural resources law to marine law is also available to students through optional science-based, non-law modules on GIS, Remote Sensing and Characteristics of the Marine Environment. 

In addition, students will have access to selected non-programme but complementary modules, covering such areas as Law of the Sea, International and European Human Rights Law, Corporate Insolvency Law, EU Competition Law, International Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, etc. 

The LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) builds on the expertise and reputation of a cohort of dedicated academic researchers in Cork to offer a world-class education in this field. Whether students are (recent) law graduates or other environmental professionals, the programme will provide them with a critical, in-depth theoretical and practical understanding of the key issues arising in environmental and natural resources law, policy and regulation. 

Please visit the School of Law website here for up to date information on the programme.

Programme regulations are available in the College Calendar 

Please see the Book of Modules for a more detailed description of programme modules.

Additional Teaching Mode Information

The part-time option will be taught during weekday working hours over 2 years.

Course Practicalities

The course involves a combination of lectures and directed study. Some programme modules (those offered in conjunction with the LLM Marine and Maritime Law, i.e. Marine Environmental Law, Natural Resources Law, International Environmental Law) are scheduled on Fridays and Saturdays, in order to facilitate a flexible workload programme to students, particularly those with a professional career. Others will run on various days of the week throughout the Semester, but will employ Panopto lecture-capture technology (digital recordings made available via Blackboard) in order to maximise workload flexibility and accessibility to students, particularly those with a professional career. Non-programme modules will mainly run throughout the semester and, where possible, will be available through digital recording.

Assessment

Individual module assessments can be viewed in the Book of Modules. Most programme and non-programme modules are assessed by way of continuous assessment (essays).

Who teaches this course

The teaching staff at UCC specialising in environmental and natural resources law is one of the programmes key strengths. UCC teaching staff on the LLM (Environmental and Natural Resources Law) include: Prof Owen McIntyre, Dr Áine Ryall, Dr Bénédicte Sage-Fuller, Dr Phyllis Comerford, Dr Anne-Marie O’Hagan, Prof Irene Lynch-Fannon, Dr. Bjorn-Oliver Magsig and Dr. Eva Barrett. As a national programme, modules will also have contributions from other Irish academics in the field. UCC School of Law benefits from strong links with key environmental agencies and organisations at the national and international levels, upon which we expect to rely for a full programme of guest speakers. For a full list of school members see the School of Law website here  

Why choose this course

This programme aims to equip graduates to participate and excel in any aspect of professional engagement with environmental and natural resources law, policy or regulation, and to develop a rewarding career in this field with, for example, the legal professions, governmental and regulatory agencies, industry, NGOs or academia. The programme adopts a global perspective, with a focus on international and comparative law and on the techniques of environmental regulation, which are universal in their application and relevance.    



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Are you ready to take your career in the world of commercial law to the next level?. The Master of Commercial Law is for those working in roles that require a sound grasp of commercial law issues. Read more
Are you ready to take your career in the world of commercial law to the next level?

The Master of Commercial Law is for those working in roles that require a sound grasp of commercial law issues. The course focuses on areas that include corporate and competition law, banking and finance law, and tax law and allows students to choose from an extensive range of domestic and international commercial law units. Our offering of units is designed to cater to a variety of career aspirations and interests. In this course, you will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

The Master of Commercial Law provides a formal course of training for non-lawyers working in law-related fields (e.g. accountants, company administrators, management personnel, and related business areas). It provides students with the opportunity to obtain a specialist qualification in commercial law and provides a springboard from which to launch or further your career in this complex and evolving professional area.

We are one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, and this course is offered at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers a choice from a broad range of commercial law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such as international trade law, competition law, corporate and white collar crime and corporate finance—to name a few, you will gain thorough theoretical and practical grounding in commercial law and practice. You will also develop the advanced professional skills and specialist knowledge required for work in this dynamic field.

We provide the flexibility to choose a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study options allow you to continue to work, as well as meet personal commitments.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/commercial-law-l6001?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Commercial law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Commercial law knowledge
The studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of commercial law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas commercial law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to commercial law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/commercial-law-l6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Take your passion for law to the next level with advanced study and research. Be at the centre of debate, analysis and dialogue about law and legal policy issues in New Zealand. Read more

Take your passion for law to the next level with advanced study and research. Be at the centre of debate, analysis and dialogue about law and legal policy issues in New Zealand.

Full time or part time, your study will be relevant, accessible and intellectually rewarding—research an area of law that interests you or tailor a course of study that suits your career goals.

Programmes

Master of Laws by coursework

You'll take one core course—Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 worth 10 points—and make up the rest of your 120 points from a choice of other 500-level LAWS courses. Up to 40 points can be replaced by equivalent courses from another faculty or another university.

500-level LAWS courses differ from year to year and are either taught in block format, intensive format or seminars. Look at the course timetable to see when the intensive and block courses are offered. The seminar courses are mainly led by you and the other students who will prepare papers in advance.

Internship

International students can also choose to do a 20-point one-trimester internship. You'll work with a community, government or private sector organisation under the joint supervision of a Faculty member and an outside professional. Assessment is based on the work you produce, a journal and your performance at fortnightly seminars.

Master of Laws by dissertation and coursework

You'll take LAWS 581 Advanced Legal Study (10 points), a further 20 points from the Master of Laws course-selection and LAWS 592, a 90-point dissertation of 35,000 words.

Dissertation supervision

The Faculty can provide dissertation supervision on a wide range of subjects. Explore the full list of the Faculty's research areas to help you decide on your own research topic.

Master of Laws by thesis

The Master of Laws by thesis requires you to complete a 120-point 50,000 word thesis on an area of law that interests you. You'll also do the course Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 at no extra cost.

Thesis supervision

The Faculty can provide thesis supervision on a wide range of subjects. Explore the full list of the Faculty's research areas to help you decide on your own research topic.

Master of Laws by research portfolio

This is a more flexible combination of coursework and research on an approved topic. You'll take the 10-point Advanced Legal Study LAWS 581 and the 90-point Research Portfolio LAWS 593.

The research portfolio consists of two courses that include two research papers of 12,000 words each on related topics. You'll also complete a 2,500-word linking paper to establish and justify your research, as well as a further 20 points from Master of Laws courses.

Flexible study

Designed to be flexible, the Master of Laws offers courses that are taught in different formats. Some courses meet weekly, others are taught in a more compact format.

Block courses are taught in a concentrated manner over a one-to-two week period, and intensive courses are broken into chunks of eight to twelve hours. They are often taught over two-to-three consecutive evenings or in Friday afternoon and Saturday sessions, with a break of two-to-three weeks between sessions.

Workload and duration

The Master of Laws can be completed in one year of full-time study, or in up to three years part time.

If you are studying full time, you can expect a workload of 40–45 hours a week for much of the year. Part-time students doing two courses per trimester will need to do around 20–23 hours of work a week. Make sure you take this into account if you are working.

You can estimate your workload by adding up the number of points you'll be doing. One point is roughly equal to 10–12 hours work.

Research and supervision

No matter how you choose to study for your Master of Laws there will be an element of research required. Take advantage of exciting research opportunities at New Zealand's leading centre of academic legal research

And if you're planning on doing a Master's by thesis, or a PhD, you'll have the opportunity to be supervised in wide range of subject areas by New Zealand's best legal scholars.



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Master's specialisation in Business Law. Read more

Master's specialisation in Business Law

How can a company move or expand abroad? How can a company protect itself against a hostile takeover from a firm abroad? How does EU legislation influence the national business laws of member states? With the increasing level of globalisation there is a growing demand for legal experts who understand the impact of EU legislation on business entities. At Radboud University you’ll not just gain a thorough understanding of EU legislation, but also of the legal practices of enterprises that do business in and with EU member states.

You’ll investigate aspects of European and comparative company law, such as corporate restructuring, corporate mobility, formation and financing of companies, European business forms, employee involvement, corporate governance and takeover regulations. You’ll also learn to analyse both primary and secondary EU legislation, as well as the case law of the Court of Justice of the EU and the legislation of relevant jurisdictions. By the end of the programme you’ll understand the interaction of European and national law on businesses.

See the website: http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/businesslaw

Why study Business Law at Radboud University?

- You’ll gain both a broad knowledge of the internal and external markets of the European Union and the position of Europe in the world as well as specialised knowledge in the field of Business Law.

- You’ll study at a Dutch Law School that was rated number one in the Netherlands for student satisfaction.

- The Faculty of Law in Nijmegen was the first in the Netherlands to start a European Law programme. It has built an international reputation in the field of European law, immigration law and private law and is part of a large network that includes more than fifty universities in Europe, the United States, Asia and Australia.

- You’ll work together with the prestigious Business & Law Research Centre. This centre combines academic excellence with the practical expertise of major companies and law firms. The centre has been accredited by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW).

- You’ll be taught in a stimulating, collegiate setting with small groups by internationally recognised professors of law, all specialists in their specific fields.

- The international mix of students gives the classes and project work a multicultural touch. This will give you the extra benefit of gaining multicultural communication skills as well as a multitude of cultural perspectives in this field. By the time you receive your Master's diploma, you’ll have gained excellent skills to work in the Netherlands or in any other country.

- This programme is not just geared at students from EU countries. All nations in the world trade with the EU which has rules and regulations that have to be complied with. Law students from all over the world will therefore benefit from this Master’s specialisation.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is primarily designed for students who wish to pursue an international legal career in the area of corporate law. It offers a thorough and broad education in company law that includes competition law, commercial law, labour law and insolvency law. And because it’s part of the European Law programme at Radboud University, you’ll also gain a good understanding of the internal and external markets of the European Union and the position of Europe in the world.

Job positions

Graduates of Business Law can expect a wide variety of employment prospects. The vast knowledge of EU businesses and the European decision-process makes that graduates of this specialisation are well equipped for a job in law, lobbying or consulting firms anywhere in the world. You could also work for financial institutions, multinationals and listed companies as well as for governmental institutions and NGOs. Graduates can also strive for one of the few law positions within the European Commission as this Master’s will definitely gain a sound basis needed to acquire the necessary professional competences.

Our approach to this field

Master's specialisation in Business Law

At Radboud University, we strive for clear practical relevance of academic theory.

1. All of our lecturers are also in some form law practitioners. We can therefore not only teach our students the black letter law, but also add our own professional experiences, indicating the strengths and challenges of certain laws or legal instruments.

2. Guest speakers are regularly invited to share their experiences, enlightening students with real-world scenarios and providing tips about how to deal with cases that don’t follow the norm.

3. In our research we are engaged in collaborative ventures with leading law firms, banks and multinational companies. Therefore, we are informed of the issues that practitioners deal with in their regular work. We respond to their questions by developing research that is relevant for the legal and business industry.

4. In the Master’s programme in European Law we focus on the law as it stands, meeting the professional responsibility by justifying decisions in legal terms, by referencing legal rules, principles, and precedent. However, we still continue formulating both criticism and alternatives to the law as it stands.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/europeanlaw/businesslaw



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Goals. This second year* of Master in Comparative and European Private International Law (CEPIL) provides a research master’s degree. Read more

Goals

This second year* of Master in Comparative and European Private International Law (CEPIL) provides a research master’s degree. It is entirely taught in English and has been set up in September 2011 by a cooperation agreement between the Université Toulouse 1 Capitole and the University of Dundee in Scotland. This programme is a double degree giving the chance to the students into it to be graduated of a Master 2 and a LL.M (Latin Legum Magister) in the same time. The French Master is issued after having spent the first semester in the Université Toulouse 1 Capitole and the LL.M after the second semester in the University of Dundee. The LL.M certificate is presented during a graduation ceremony taking place in the University of Dundee.

This kind of programme remains unusual in France because of the cross competences, reflexes, methodology and knowledge necessary to the Internationalisation and especially Europeanisation of private law situations and regulations.

The LL.M is a diploma globally recognised, in particularly in the English countries. The graduation implies to write a short thesis in English according to the regulation of the University of Dundee.

* In the French system, the master program is divided into two years: Master 1 (first-year of Master) and Master 2 (second-year of Master). It is possible to apply either for Master 1 or Master 2.

Publics

Prerequisites for enrolment : Bac + 4

Admission conditions

Admission conditions for the academic year 2017/2018 are currently updating.

You wish enter a master 2 in the university for 2017/2018: the procedure implies a selective access, considering there are no selections for the master 1. Considering a Master 1 (or equivalent) graduation in 2016/2017, your continuation into a master 2 is compelled by the regulation in force at the start of the academic year 2016/2017.

Are designed to enter this program the students who are graduated with a Master 1 in European Law, International Law, Business Law or in another specialty in Law or with an equivalent diploma from a foreign university.

This diploma is accessible for people with a certificate of partial validation of prior professional experience (VAE partielle) or academic experience (VES) in this academic area.

In any case, the admission is processed after review of the whole applicant’s academic and/or professional file and after reading of the motivation letter. The admission may be subject to acquirement of prerequisites.

Register

Program

Semester 1 – Université Toulouse 1 Capitole – 30 ECTS

UNIT 1 – FUNDAMENTAL COURSES : (82hrs – 15 ECTS)

Module 1: Private international law – General part

- Private international law - Fundamental rules and principles (20hrs)

- European Private international law (15hrs)

- Introduction to comparative Private international law (8hrs)

Module 2: Private international law – Specific areas

-   Private international law and business law (15hrs)

-   Private international law and contracts (15hrs)

-   Private International law and Intellectual Property Law (9hrs)

UNIT 2 – SPECIALISED COURSES: (75hrs – 15 ECTS)

-   European contract law (10hrs)

-   European business law (10hrs)

-   European criminal law (10hrs)

-   Intellectual Property Law (10hrs)

-   Conferences in European and International law and politics (mainly about the philosophical aspects of law) (10hrs)

-   Legal English (15hrs)

-   Project management

Semester 2 – University of Dundee – 30 ECTS

UNIT 3 (40hrs)

Module 1: PIL- Common Law Perspectives

Module 2 and 3 (to choose amongst the following):

-   International Dispute Resolution;

-   Corporate Governance;

-   IP Law;

-    Cross-border Tax Law;

-   Competition Law;

-    Banking and Financial Services Law;

-    Private International Law of Family Matters;

-   Oil and Gas Law.

LL.M ‘s thesis :

The student must produce a research thesis written in English. The topics will be chosen from a list made by the University of Dundee in association with the UT1.

This thesis has to be submitted by August according to the examination rules in the University of Dundee.

This work does not lead to an oral defence.

A professional internship is still possible but optional. 

Programme cost: about 4000 euros

Some bonus points may be granted to the students who practice sports or participate to national or international moot court competition.

Career Opportunities

The teachings in the both semesters pave the way to European and international careers or employment which involves knowing how to manage different situation connected with international and European law.

The encouragement to the students to develop student life and initiatives is for the purpose of bringing out skills in organisation, communication, exchanges which are essential for any legal practitioner who works in a team, with potential partners from all around the world, in practice, international organisation, firm or university.

The exchange during the second semester is a chance for developing the abilities of adaptation and communication in an international context.

Professional opportunities are:

  • Lawyer practise – National of international private litigation
  • Legal office in French or foreign private, public or public-private companies.
  • Public service entrance examinations
  • Occupation in governmental or non-governmental international organisations.
  • Assistance and expert assessment for international institutions or national institutions regarding their relation with foreign countries.
  • Academic career in France or abroad.

More Details: You may read the OFIP’s surveys about occupational integration of the graduate student.

The OFIP (Observatoire des Formations et de l’Insertion professionnelle) examines the academic and professional future of the alumni: continuation or resumption of studies, access to the labour market, after 30 months situation (work, studies, unemployment,…), occupation characteristics (sector, status, functions, professions, wages, geographical mobility,…).

Available on the UT1 website, tab “Orientation et insertion” or at the SUIO-IP.



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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Studying an LLM Master of Laws offers unrivalled academic stimulation, the opportunity to deepen your understanding of the law and specialise your knowledge in a particular area, and improved career prospects at the highest level whether that be in practice or academia. Read more

Studying an LLM Master of Laws offers unrivalled academic stimulation, the opportunity to deepen your understanding of the law and specialise your knowledge in a particular area, and improved career prospects at the highest level whether that be in practice or academia.

The Exeter LLM is a substantive, rigorous, and genuinely flexible programme of postgraduate study designed for the most ambitious and capable students. Delivered by some of the biggest names in legal research, our LLM allows you to create a bespoke programme of learning addressing your specific academic and professional needs, readying you to fulfil your career ambitions or for doctoral study.

Our faculty is able to teach and supervise an extensive range of international subjects, with particular specialities inspired by our renowned research in the areas of Commercial Law, Public Law, Human Rights Law, and Family Law.

Specialist Pathways

Students can obtain a specialised LLM. Specialisms include International Commercial Law, European Law, Maritime Law, Intellectual Property Law, Insurance Law, International Human Rights Law, and International Law, Conflict and Security.

International Commercial Law

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a wide range of options. Students may focus on banking and financial law, corporate law or general commercial law. Exeter’s strong links with the legal profession’s top global firms and employers make this LLM a particularly attractive one for students who are looking to go into private practice or to work in banks or financial institutions. This LLM is also an ideal preparation for a career in international business as it covers areas of expertise required to succeed in senior positions in international trading companies. Internships in Europe and further afield, are often advertised to participants in this course, especially those with hard-to-find linguistic or other skills. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/commercial

European Law

This specialism is designed to give students the opportunity to study the constitutional issues which arise from the concept of the European Union, including law making and the relationship between the EU and Member States.

We provide modules which examine the substantive law of the EU and the way in which that law has been implemented in English law. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/european

Maritime Law

The LLM in Maritime Law is designed specifically for students who wish to study shipping and international trade law in detail.

The modules are particularly suited to students who intend to pursue careers in chartering, trade and marine insurance (including Protection and Indemnity Clubs).

English law is widely adopted in other jurisdictions, so a study of English law is particularly important. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/maritime

Intellectual Property Law

The LLM in Intellectual Property allows students to study in depth the substantive areas of law which make up intellectual property such as competition law, copyright, trade mark law, patents and consumer protection.

Much of the law is derived from EU measures, and the modules are taught from both a domestic and EU perspective. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/property

International Human Rights Law

This specialism has been specifically developed to allow you to construct a programme appropriate to private practice or public employment in the field of international human rights law.

http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/humanrights

Insurance Law

Insurance is a key part of commercial law and practice but it is only researched and taught at a few universities. This pathway will allow you to construct a programme that will equip you with the knowledge, skills and practical tools needed to gain a thorough understanding of insurance law, practice and regulation.

The programme is designed for those with a special interest in the wide field of insurance law. While the precise modules available may vary from year to year, typical examples modules for the pathway might include general principles of insurance, consumer insurance, marine insurance, reinsurance, EU motor insurance and financial regulations. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/insurance

International Law, Conflict and Security

Designed with the needs of practitioners in mind, the programme will equip you with a comprehensive understanding of international conflict and security law, including the rules relating to the conduct of hostilities, peacetime military deployments, cyber operations and post-conflict governance. Consistent with its hands-on approach, the LLM will develop your professional and personal skills, including through a simulated command post exercise that will test your knowledge and aptitude in a practical setting. http://www.exeter.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/law/masteroflaws/internationalconflictsecurity



Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawcultsoc/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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