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Masters Degrees (Master Of Architecture)

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Research initiatives and studio workshops led by eminent visiting professors and internationally recognised professionals offer students an opportunity to develop their architectural skills on a global scale. Read more

Research initiatives and studio workshops led by eminent visiting professors and internationally recognised professionals offer students an opportunity to develop their architectural skills on a global scale. In addition to the permanent Faculty of award-winning practicing architects and published scholars, the Abedian School of Architecture has developed partnerships with leading educators and professionals around the world who actively contribute to the architectural program. 

State of the art resources

Students have complete access to all the Architecture equipment and studios. The School is characterized by very small class sizes in a dedicated studio environment. Students have 24/7 access to the brand new architecture building, designed by Sir Peter Cook and Gavin Robotham of CRAB Studio, London. A strong studio culture is driven by student collaboration, social engagement, and consistent one-on-one interaction with academic staff. The Workshop and Digital Fabrication Lab provides opportunities in design as part of the new generation of architecture. Studio, workshop and digital based learning are core components of Architectural studies with practical hands-on projects contributing to a large part of the programs.

About the program

The Master of Architecture at the Abedian School of Architecture is designed to develop the emerging architectural professional to be fearless in their design ability, as well as possess the confidence to change the world and the habitats of the future through their creative design skills, imaginative vision, strategic thinking and technical proficiency. The Master of Architecture is delivered through a comprehensive design studio environment, current issues are debated through historical and philosophical architectural thought as well as contemporary states of urban habitation, challenges to a sustainable ecology and the ramifications of modern technology. Professional architectural concerns in law, contracts and ethics are also examined which prepare students for the commercial world of architectural practice. 

Professional accreditation

The Australian Institute of Architects and the Board of Architects of Queensland currently recognise and accredit the Master of Architecture program. The Bachelor of Architectural Studies is recognised as the normal pathway to the Master of Architecture.

Program structure

The Master of Architecture program is delivered within a comprehensive design studio environment. Each studio contains a combination of practical and professional applications, theoretical studies, technical proficiency and conceptual rigour. Each studio forms a discrete stage in the Masters sequence, culminating in a Master’s Thesis studio in the final semester of study, bringing integrated skills and knowledge together.

View the Master of Architecture - Program Structure and Sequencing

You must complete the following subjects:

PLUS one (1) Faculty elective from the Faculty of Society & Design list of postgraduate subjects.

A study tour is also available as an elective option for students.



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The Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney builds on the skills acquired in your undergraduate degree and prepares you for registration as an architect. Read more
The Master of Architecture at the University of Sydney builds on the skills acquired in your undergraduate degree and prepares you for registration as an architect. This degree produces graduates who are forward thinking, adaptable and at the forefront of the changing trends of the architecture industry. You will be challenged to expand your conceptual and creative skills while being grounded in the professional requirements essential for practice after graduation.

This degree operates around a series of studios that require students to engage at a graduate level with projects with an emphasis on research, design and vision. Student work is defined by the rigours of industry practice and surveys the social, environmental, practical and aesthetic needs of the brief while working within the larger context of architectural theory and philosophy. You will develop expertise across design, technology and theory which will form the basis of your approach and response to architectural projects and practice. There is one studio per semester as follows:

Urban Architecture;
Sustainable Architecture;
Digital Architecture; and a
Graduation Studio.

The first three studios lead to the Graduation Studio in the final semester of study which is a based around a largely self-driven project. Students also undertake subjects that explore the historical, technological and theoretical aspects of architecture and investigate the critical issues facing contemporary architectural design.

The Master of Architecture is a 2-year full-time program (part-time option available on request), consisting of 96 credit points. It is taught by some of the world leaders in architecture education and on graduation, you will join distinguished alumni who have gone on to become major figures in the architecture world both in Australia and internationally. You will have a dedicated Master of Architecture studio space which you may access 24 hours a day. Students also have access to 24 hour computer labs, the latest digital fabrication equipment, wood and metal workshops as well as a number of art studios. There is also opportunities for international exchange in the first three semesters of the program with a number of prestigious institutions worldwide.

To ask a question about this course, visit http://sydney.edu.au/internationaloffice/.

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The Master of Architecture is ideal for students who have completed undergraduate studies in architecture and want to be equipped to address the growing challenges of the evolving built environment. Read more
The Master of Architecture is ideal for students who have completed undergraduate studies in architecture and want to be equipped to address the growing challenges of the evolving built environment. Graduates will be trained as integrated urban professionals to have the vision to design progressive architecture that responds to the dynamic needs of contemporary society and speculates about the future of our built environment.

The Master of Architecture enables graduates to meet the academic requirements leading to registration as Architect in Australia.

As a student you will undertake high-level study in specialised areas of architecture, from housing and urban design to digital practices. Through project based design studios you will gain exposure to leading design practices. An integrated program of study will allow you to select from a range of design studios in conjunction with advanced architectural studies - complementary depth units that introduce students to the methods and tactics of architectural design research and engage with the multidisciplinary socio-cultural, political, economic, historical, theoretical and technical dimensions relevant to contemporary architecture and urbanism. You will also develop knowledge of architectural practice within the context of multi-disciplinary collaborations and evolving construction methods and practices. Your studies will culminate in the final year with a self-directed project.In order to register as an Architect, graduates must also complete two years of professional practice and pass the AACA Architectural Practice Examination. For more details please visit the Architectural Registration Board of Victoria website at http://www.arbv.vic.gov.au.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/architecture-f6001?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in three parts.

Part A. Advanced architecture and design studios
These studies will focus on advanced concepts and skills relevant to architecture design. Through project based studio classes you will gain exposure to leading design practices. In conjunction with studios, you will select from a range of advanced architecture studies units, which are complementary depth units. These will introduce you to the methods and tactics of architectural design research and engage with the multidisciplinary socio-cultural, political, economic, historical, theoretical and technical dimensions relevant to architecture and urbanism. Studies culminate in the final year in a self-directed project.

Part B: Applied professional practices
These studies focus on the core business and regulatory aspects of practice as an architect within the context of multi-disciplinary collaborations and evolving construction methods and practices.

Part C. Electives
These studies provide complementary depth units and enable you to tailor your studies to individual interests. You may select units from either architecture-specific advanced architecture studies depth units or other units offered by the University.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/design-and-architecture

ABOUT MADA

Welcome to Monash Art Design & Architecture (MADA)
MADA is a multi award-winning community of artists, designers and architects working together to create a better future for individuals and communities around Australia and the world.
We’re part of Monash University, the largest university in Australia, and among the most highly regarded in the world. Monash is a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities in Australia.

Located at the Caulfield campus of Monash University, our vibrant community of students, academics, researchers and staff generates creative activity at the highest level and is at the forefront of education in the creative arts, architecture, and design disciplines.
As a student with us, you’ll customise your studies from an incredible range of options – single degrees, double degrees and electives from across MADA and the rest of Monash – so you can become the creative professional you want to be.
And as a Monash graduate, you’ll have a strong sense of purpose, a global outlook, and the skills and confidence to make positive change to your own life, and to the lives of those around you.
As long as you have the drive to pursue, question and achieve, we’ll help you get there.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/architecture-f6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The Master of Architecture involves study in advanced design project work, architectural history, theory and research, along with studies in management, law and professional practice, and a major self-directed architectural project in a specialised area of interest. Read more
The Master of Architecture involves study in advanced design project work, architectural history, theory and research, along with studies in management, law and professional practice, and a major self-directed architectural project in a specialised area of interest.

When combined with Curtin's Bachelor of Applied Science (Architectural Science), or an equivalent undergraduate degree in architecture, the two qualifications provide you with the educational qualification component that forms part of the requirements for registration as an architect.

Professional recognition

The five-year combination of the Bachelor of Applied Science (Architectural Science) and the Master of Architecture is recognised by the Architects Board of Western Australia as meeting the academic requirements for registration as an architect in Western Australia. The course is also recognised by the Commonwealth Association of Architects.

On completing approved postgraduate practical experience, you will be eligible for associate membership of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects. Internationally, the course is recognised by the architectural boards in Singapore, Malaysia and Hong Kong.

Credit for previous study

Applications for credit for recognised learning (CRL) are assessed on an individual basis.

2016 Curtin International Scholarships: Merit Scholarship

Curtin University is an inspiring, vibrant, international organisation, committed to making tomorrow better. It is a beacon for innovation, driving advances in technology through high-impact research and offering more than 100 practical, industry-aligned courses connecting to workplaces of tomorrow.

Ranked in the top two per cent of universities worldwide in the Academic Ranking of World Universities 2015, the University is also ranked 25th in the world for universities under the age of 50 in the QS World University Rankings 2015 Curtin also received an overall five-star excellence rating in the QS stars rating.

Curtin University strives to give high achieving international students the opportunity to gain an internationally recognised education through offering the Merit Scholarship. The Merit Scholarship will give you up to 25 per cent of your first year tuition fees and if you enrol in an ELB program at Curtin English before studying at Curtin, you will also receive a 10 per cent discount on your Curtin English fees.

For full details and terms and conditions of this scholarship, please visit: curtin.edu/int-scholarships and click on Merit.

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This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. Read more
This two year course uniquely combines a professional course; that is, an ARB/RIBA Part 2 course with a Cambridge Master’s degree in Philosophy. It provides advanced teaching, research and practice opportunities in environmental design, including the social, political, historical, theoretical and economic aspects of architecture, cities and the global environment.

The course is a hybrid of independent research through design and a structured technical learning resource. It is designed for mature students that join the program with a distinct area of interest and provides guidelines to their scientific research, access to specialists of various fields relevant to their studies, and a matrix of deliverables that foster an informed body of work underpinned by a sophisticated set of design and presentation techniques.

The main outcome is a design thesis consisting of a detailed design proposition, supported by a written argument of up to 15,000 words. This is preceded by four essays or design exercises equivalent of 3,000 - 5,000 words. The course is closely connected with research interests within the Department’s Martin Centre for Architectural and Urban Studies. A number of the academics and researchers teach and supervise on the course.

Key benefits

- In the 2014 Research Excellent Framework, Cambridge Architecture’s research work was ranked 1st in the UK, achieving the highest proportion of combined World Leading research. 88% of the research produced by the Department was rated as World Leading or Internationally Excellent (Unit of Assessment 16: Architecture, Built Environment and Planning). This consolidates our top ranking established in the previous Research Assessment Exercise of 2008.

- Ranked 1st for Architecture by the Guardian's 2015 University Guide.

Visit the website: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/aharmpaud

Course detail

The programme propagates a twofold understanding of environmental design and mediates between its technical/architectural, and social/political aspects. Both trajectories are studied within a specific geographic area/region, its local set of conditions and global entanglements setting the parameters for each student’s research. Based on the area/region’s characteristics, students speculate on the expansion and adaptation of one of its specific traits and its environmental performance. The outcome of this first part of the course is an experimental adaptation of an indigenous typology, producing a speculative environmental prototype. This prototype is examined scientifically and tectonically, using real and virtual modelling alongside various other media and serves a particular demand and a specific set of site conditions. Complementing this tectonic first part, the design direction of the second part of the course is broader in scale and highly speculative in nature. It draws upon the technical findings of the initial research, but focuses on the socio-political conditions and cultural traditions shaping the area of focus in order to build a set of far-reaching proposals. Together, both parts of this research through design result in a heightened understanding of the performance/efficiency/specificity of a certain environmental issue and the environment it is embedded in.

Format

The course is structured by two terms focusing on design and detailed technical analysis (residence in Cambridge), an interim field work period (elsewhere), and a third term focusing on regional analysis/research (residence in Cambridge). These complementary term components, together with the practice placement, provide an opportunity to explore distinct interests within design practice in various settings, whilst offering a sound framework to pursue meaningful research.

Candidates are free to choose a geographic area/region of their interest that frames their study throughout the programme. Following an initial familiarization with their chosen specific locality and a global assessment of the given environment at hand, students are expected to identify a technical/architectural issue that is indigenous or characteristic to the area/region of interest and holds potential to develop.

The focus shall be primarily with issues of contemporary construction, not excluding the consideration of historical or traditional building methods that are still prevalent. More generally, candidates develop an understanding of the complexity of environments and their various aspects being inseparable from, and integrated with each other. More importantly, however, students will develop highly particular areas of expertise that they may draw on for the remainder of the course.

The programme positively encourages students to develop complex architectural proposals that meet RIBA/ARB criteria for Part II exemption and to acquire knowledge and develop and apply research skills in the following areas:

- role of environmental and socio-political issues in architecture and urban design
- The wider environmental, historical, socio-cultural and economic context related to architecture and cities
- The building science and socio-political theories associated with architecture and urban design
- Modelling and assessment of building and urban design
- Monitoring and surveying of buildings and urban environments
- Human behaviour, perception and comfort, and their role in building and urban characteristics
- Research methods and their application through academic and design methods.

In so doing, the candidates develop the following skills:

Intellectual Skills

- Reason critically and analytically
- Apply techniques and knowledge appropriately
- Identify and solve problems
- Demonstrate independence of mind

Research Skills

- Identify key knowledge gaps and research questions
- Retrieve, assess and identify information from a wide range of sources
- Plan, develop and apply research methods
- Apply key techniques and analytical skills to a new context
- Report clearly, accurately and eloquently on findings

Transferable Skills

- Communicate concepts effectively orally, visually and in writing
- Manage time and structure work
- Work effectively with others
- Work independently
- Retrieve information efficiently
- Assimilate, assess and represent existing knowledge and ideas

Assessment

The design thesis represents 60% of the overall mark and consists of a:

- written dissertation of not more than 15,000 words (20%). The word count includes footnotes but excludes the bibliography. Any appendices will require the formal permission of your Supervisor who may consult the Degree Committee. Students submit two hard copies and one electronic copy of their thesis for examination at the end of May.

- design project (40%) submitted for examination at the end of July in hard and electronic copy.

Candidates present their design thesis to examiners at an Exam Board held at the end of the second year. Students must remain in or be prepared to return to Cambridge to attend the examination.

- Four essays or equivalent exercises of 3,000 - 5,000 words, including footnotes/endnotes but excluding the bibliography, on topics approved by the Course Directors will be presented for examination. The first three of these essays are submitted during Year 1; one at the beginning of the Lent (Spring) Term and two at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term. The remaining essay is submitted at the beginning of the Easter (Summer) Term in Year 2.

The first essay constitutes an essay or equivalent (5%) and an oral presentation (5%), the second is a pilot study (10%) and the third is a design submission (10%). The final essay is a project realisation essay (10%).

- The course requires regular written, visual and oral presentations in the Studio. Effective communication of research findings and design concepts are an important criterion in all areas of the students' work, and assessed at all stages.

- A logbook of work and research carried out during the fieldwork period will be presented at the beginning of the Easter Term of Year 2 for assessment. The logbook is not awarded a mark.

Continuing

To continue to read for the PhD degree following the course, MPhil in Architecture & Urban Design students must achieve an overall average score of at least 70%. Continuation is also subject to Faculty approval of the proposed research proposal, and, the availability of an appropriate supervisor.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

Candidates for this course (which is not considered to be a 'research track' masters course) who are considered 'Home' for fees purposes are not eligible for most funding competitions managed by the University. Home students usually fund themselves and take out a loan from the Student Loans Company (see: http://www.slc.co.uk/).

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students. Read more
Computer Science Departmental degree requirements for the master’s degree, which are in addition to those established by the College of Engineering and the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/), are as follows for Plan I and Plan II students.

- Master of Science–Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#thesis)
- Master of Science–Non-Thesis Option (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#nonthesis)
- Timetable for the Submission of Graduate School Forms for an MS Degree (http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/#timetable)

Visit the website http://cs.ua.edu/graduate/ms-program/

MASTER OF SCIENCE–THESIS OPTION (PLAN I):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 24 semester hours of credit for coursework, plus a 6-hour thesis under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

Credit Hours
The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research: Thesis Research.

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory). These courses must be taken within the department and selected from the following:
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- 6 hours of CS 599 Master’s Thesis Research

- 24 hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, including the following courses completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will select a thesis advisor and a thesis committee. The committee must contain at least four members, including the thesis advisor. At least two members are faculty of the Computer Science department, and at least one member must be from outside the Department of Computer Science.

- The student will develop a written research proposal. This should contain an introduction to the research area, a review of relevant literature in the area, a description of problems to be investigated, an identification of basic goals and objectives of the research, a methodology and timetable for approaching the research, and an extensive bibliography.

- The student will deliver an oral presentation of the research proposal, which is followed by a question-and-answer session that is open to all faculty members and which covers topics related directly or indirectly to the research area. The student’s committee will determine whether the proposal is acceptable based upon both the written and oral presentations.

- The student will develop a written thesis that demonstrates that the student has performed original research that makes a definite contribution to current knowledge. Its format and content must be acceptable to both the student’s committee and the Graduate School.

- The student will defend the written thesis. The defense includes an oral presentation of the thesis research, followed by a question-and-answer session. The student’s committee will determine whether the defense is acceptable.

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School (http://graduate.ua.edu/) and by the College of Engineering.

MASTER OF SCIENCE–NON-THESIS OPTION (PLAN II):

30 CREDIT HOURS
Each candidate must earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of credit for coursework, which may include a 3-hour non-thesis project under the direction of a faculty member. Unlike the general College of Engineering requirements, graduate credit may not be obtained for courses at the 400-level.

Degree Requirements Effective Fall 2011

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours, as follows:

- Completion of at least one 500-level or 600-level course in each of the four core areas (applications, software, systems and theory).
Applications: CS 528, CS 535, CS 557, CS 560, CS 609, CS 615
Software: CS 503, CS 507, CS 515, CS 516, CS 534, CS 600, CS 603, CS 607, CS 614, CS 630
Systems: CS 526, CS 538, CS 567, CS 606, CS 613, CS 618
Theory: CS 500, CS 570, CS 575, CS 601, CS 602, CS 612

- No more than 12 hours from CS 511, CS 512, CS 591, CS 592, CS 691, CS 692 and non-CS courses may be counted towards the coursework requirements for the master’s degree. Courses taken outside of CS are subject to the approval of the student’s advisor.

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

Degree Requirements Prior to Fall 2011

Credit hours

The student must successfully complete 30 total credit hours of CS graduate-level course work with a grade of A or B, as follows:

- The following courses will be completed at The University of Alabama:
At least 3 hours of theory courses (CS 500 Discrete math, CS 601 Algorithms, CS 602 Formal languages, CS 612 Data structures)

At least 3 hours of software courses (CS 600 Software engineering, CS 603 Programming languages, CS 607 Human-computer interaction, CS 614 Compilers, CS630 Empirical Software Engineering)

At least 3 hours of systems courses (CS 567 Computer architecture, CS 606 Operating systems, CS 613 Networks, CS 618 Wireless networks)

At least 3 hours of applications courses (CS 535 Graphics, CS 560 or 591 Robotics, CS 591 Security, CS 609 Databases)

- The student may elect to replace 3 hours of course work with 3 hours of CS 598 Research Not Related to Thesis: Non-thesis Project. This course should be proposed in writing in advance, approved by the instructor, and a copy placed in the student’s file. The proposal should specify both the course content and the specific deliverables that will be evaluated to determine the course grade.

- Additional Requirements -

- The student will complete an oral comprehensive exam. This exam is scheduled with the Department Head prior to the semester in which the student intends to graduate.

- Other requirements may be specified by the Graduate School and by the College of Engineering.

TIMETABLE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GRADUATE SCHOOL FORMS FOR AN MS DEGREE
This document identifies a timetable for the submission of all Graduate School paperwork associated with the completion of an M.S. degree

- For students in Plan I students only (thesis option) after a successful thesis proposal defense, you should submit the Appointment/Change of a Masters Thesis Committee form

- The semester before, or no later than the first week in the semester in which you plan to graduate, you should “Apply for Graduation” online in myBama.

- In the semester in which you apply for graduation, the Graduate Program Director will contact you about the Comprehensive Exam.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The second part of our. Master of Architecture (MArch) professional. qualification is validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), enabling MA students to graduate as registered architects. Read more

The second part of our Master of Architecture (MArch) professional qualification is validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), enabling MA students to graduate as registered architects.

Our MArch course emphasises design as a research practice. It understands the architect as someone whose cross-disciplinary role enables them to draw upon knowledge from various related disciplines, to develop effective strategies and models for sustainable practice in industry space. This may be within the context of the production of buildings, the spaces between them or the urban contexts in which they occur.

Top 10 course

Our School of Architecture has been ranked in the Architecture top ten by the 2017 Guardian University Guide. This course carries full and unconditional prescription from the Architects Registration Board (ARB) as satisfying the Part 2 criteria.

Understands the architect

Our MArch course at UCA Canterbury emphasises design as a research practice. It understands the architect as someone whose cross-disciplinary role enables them to draw upon knowledge from various related disciplines, to develop effective strategies and models for sustainable practice. This may be within the context of the production of buildings, the spaces between them or the urban contexts in which they occur.

On this course you'll be able to consolidate your architectural experiences, both in education and in practice, whilst simultaneously questioning your preconceptions of the discipline.

By the end of the course, you'll be equipped to adopt a critical position within the profession and wider society. You'll also be able to initiate and deliver projects which are grounded in design-based research, and continue a process of learning through practice based experimentation and enquiry.

Virtual Media Space

Visit our Postgraduate Virtual Media Space to find out more about our courses, see what it's like to study at UCA and gain access to our campus virtual tours.



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It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent. Read more
It is expected that applicants from the field of architecture will already possess an accredited graduate diploma or postgraduate degree in architecture (UK), a professional master's in architecture (US), or the international equivalent.

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio. You will be working with students from all over the world to generate design proposals that explore the edges of architectural thought.

There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This exploration will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways, and also practical experimentation and testing in the studio environment.

This programme offers the opportunity to explore ideas in great detail, resulting in a thesis that might take the form of a video, set of drawings or physical model. The portfolio generated alongside the thesis will act as a curated record of your findings.

Why choose this course?

Oxford Brookes University is unusual in offering this design-based speculative research course in architecture that builds on its excellent reputation for architectural courses at postgraduate and undergraduate level. Brookes' School of Architecture is recognised as one of the country's leading schools and is consistently ranked by The Architects' Journal as one of the five best schools in the UK.
Students from the school figure regularly in national and international prizes and awards, and go on to work for many of the best-known practices in the country. We have an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1,000,000 in recent years. This research expertise feeds directly into the teaching programme at all levels, from undergraduate to PhD. The School of Architecture has dedicated studio space and postgraduate facilities.

This course in detail

The Advanced Architectural Design Modules (50+30 credits) represent the core of the learning experience. Project–based learning is used in a studio environment to individually and collectively explore architectural design problems. The design studio tutors will set the specific design problem and methodology employed. It is envisaged that several parallel studios may be established, numbers permitting, each led by separate studio tutors with different agendas, programmes and methodologies. However, the learning outcomes will be common. Initially, there will be only one studio which will be organised as follows:

The first semester is always a rigid organised fabric of reviews, workshops, tutorials and deadlines with students working both individually and in groups. Within this framework students engage in two strands of investigation: A. an in-depth research into the tectonic possibilities of a new material/s and B. the analysis of a real site with the aim of generating a series of questions that demand an architectural response. By the end of the semester each student is expected to present to a jury of invited critics a catalogue both conceptual and material, from which they will make a project, in a coherent manner using appropriate media. This jury provides formative feedback for students on their learning.

The first semester design studio is complimented by a series of challenging, group and individual based workshops, Urban Cultures, on drawing, model making and movie making, run by the tutors. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms, which contribute to their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

Spread over the second semester there is a further series of lectures on Architecture and the City given by external academics and practitioners. Students are expected to engage in questioning and debate with the lecturers and are required to produce a series of responses in drawn and written forms to exercises set by the visiting lecturer. The results are to be bound into a book, which contributes to and supports their design portfolio, around a theme related to the lecture series.

The second semester design studio focuses on the architectural implications of bringing the two apparently dissimilar strands of the first semester’s investigation into surprising conjunctions. Students are asked to approach the possibilities created by these apparently disconnected procedures in an entirely logical way.
At this stage the studio places emphasis on the importance of developing students’ ability to demonstrate conceptual clarity, to locate their ideas in the spectrum of current and past architecture and to maintain a strong link between concept and product.

Students are also encouraged to explore a wide range of media and technique and to develop a rationale for selecting appropriate techniques for the representation of particular kinds of architectural ideas. Students are required to present their design projects to an invited group of invited critics close to the end of the semester.

This proves formative feedback for students. The final Module mark is generated from a portfolio-based assessment held at the end of the second semester involving a panel internal staff. This system will ensure a parity of marking when the module consists of multiple design studios.

Students also undertake a Research Methods Module in the second semester that prepares them for their dissertation project. A set of generic postgraduate school-wide lectures on research paradigms, methodology and research tools is followed by Masters specific seminars in which students develop a synopsis for their dissertation’. The module is assessed by means of a review of a relevant past Masters dissertation and a synopsis proposal.

The MArch programme concludes with the Dissertation Project in which individual students work with a supervisor on projects that have developed from the work of the design studio. Students are expected to produce original, relevant and valid projects. The dissertation can take a written or design based form. In the latter case a written commentary is expected as part of the dissertation submission. Students submit their dissertation projects at the end of the summer vacation and are expected to hold an exhibition of their work in the Department or elsewhere as agreed.

Students who have qualified for the award of MA are encouraged to apply to continue to the PhD degree programme in the School if they so wish. A Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Architectural Design can be gained by students who complete 120 credits but do not complete the full master's programme.

Teaching and learning

Studio research is complemented by a series of challenging talks by visiting academics and practitioners at every stage of the process as well as a consistent programme of individual discussions and workshops with your tutors.

You will work both in groups and individually, exploring a new kind of architecture. The methods of exploration include techniques primarily associated with the movie industry, such as the making of collages, optical composites, physical models and drawings both by hand and computer. The tutors act as guides to reveal areas of interest so that you develop an individual approach to the brief, the programme and the realisation of a project.

Teaching is heavily design-studio based, with project-based learning in a studio environment. Several parallel studies may operate, offering different methodologies but with common learning outcomes. The design studio will be complemented by a series of lectures, reviews, tutorials and site visits.

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The Master of Architecture (MArch) programme is a professional/undergraduate Masters qualification available to students with an appropriate first degree in Architecture and RIBA Part I. Read more
The Master of Architecture (MArch) programme is a professional/undergraduate Masters qualification available to students with an appropriate first degree in Architecture and RIBA Part I. It leads to the RIBA Part II award.

This degree is validated by the RIBA and prescribed by ARB as a Part 2 qualification towards access to the Architectural Profession in Europe.

Year 1 focuses on design through lectures, seminars and carefully planned individual and group work. Taught modules outside studio design cover professional practice and contemporary approaches to technology.

You'll then begin the second year with a design project that's set, reviewed, and taught by a notable practitioner or design practice. In 2013-14 this was WIlkinson Eyre, the award winning London practice.

The programme builds towards the Design Thesis, where you'll produce a major piece of work in response to a brief. The dissertation subject will reflect your personal interests.

You'll be taught by our full time staff and by selected practitioners and Honorary Professors. These included Jim Eyre OBE of Wilkinson Eyre from 2010-11, and Michael Wilford of Stirling Wilford from 2014. We've a very generous offering of prizes for students performing strongly in areas of our MArch degree.

Students may take Semester 1 of Year 5 abroad at one of our approved exchange Schools of Architecture in the USA, China or Europe.

This two-year full-time post BA Hons programme includes design projects, lecture and workshop courses, a dissertation and an optional student foreign exchange programme.

You'll be examined and assessed by studio presentations and coursework submissions.

Why School of Architecture?

Highly rated research

Liverpool was the UK’s first Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) accredited University School of Architecture. Research lies at the core of our activities and we have highly rated international research in the fields of History and Theory and Environment and Process.

The activities of the research groups within these two fields provide the knowledge and expertise required by the professional discipline that the School serves, but also reach out into related areas in the visual arts, urban design, conservation and innovative technologies.

Career prospects

Students who successfully complete a Higher Degree go on to interesting and rewarding careers in architecture, the wider construction industry, management, higher education, the arts and conservation and many other specialisms to be found in the arts, architecture and the built environment.

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About the program. The combined Masters degree in Architecture and Project Management enables students interested in integrated design management to gain specialised knowledge related to the coordination of the design process and the maximisation of client satisfaction. Read more

About the program

The combined Masters degree in Architecture and Project Management enables students interested in integrated design management to gain specialised knowledge related to the coordination of the design process and the maximisation of client satisfaction. The blurring of boundaries between the built environment disciplines is occurring as a response to client demand for more complex designs involving specialist knowledge. This is an international trend, underpinned by the need to deliver projects that ultimately reflect long life, loose fit and low energy. Graduates may also be involved in design optimisation, process re-engineering and value management within the confines of economic, social and environmental criteria. The combined degree provides a unique blend of studio-based architectural design and generic project management problem-solving abilities. A distinct feature of this program takes place during the final semester where students undertake work-based learning in an integrated design environment either in Australia or overseas. Studies can be achieved within three calendar years part-time given recent or concurrent employment. Upon completion of the combined program, graduates receive two separate accredited degrees.

Unique Internship Opportunities

Bond University's partnerships with AECOM and WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff will each provide six Bond University students annually with a 12-week full-time internship in integrated design management at AECOM or WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff. AECOM employs 100,000 people across the globe and reported a US$18 billion workbook in the 12 months to September 30 last year. WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff has 34,000 employees, including engineers, technicians, scientists, architects, planners, surveyors, program and construction management professionals, and various environmental experts. The firm is based in more than 500 offices across 40 countries worldwide. These are the two largest integrated design firms in the world.

Internships are available to students in the final semester of this combined degree, with students able to nominate their preferred location, meaning they can align the experience with their ultimate career goals or even future employment destinations.

Find out more about the AECOM partnership and the Integrated Design Management subject.

Professional outcomes

The combined program will be automatically accredited by the Australian Institute of Architects, Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and Australian Institute of Project Management. Graduates of this combined degree are also internationally recognised by the Project Management Institute (PMI).

Structure and subjects

View the Master of Architecture/Master of Project Management - Program Structure and Sequencing

​You must complete all of the following subjects:



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Whether you're looking for a broad-ranging business degree or the ability to become a specialist in key business discipline, the Master of Business will develop your professional expertise and advance your business career. Read more
Whether you're looking for a broad-ranging business degree or the ability to become a specialist in key business discipline, the Master of Business will develop your professional expertise and advance your business career.

An innovative and industry-focused course, the Master of Business has a strong emphasis personal development, ethics, corporate governance and social responsibility. A key feature of the course is the personal development program which will enhance your leadership and interpersonal skills and transform the way you operate in professional contexts.

The course addresses all facets of business development, and provides a solid foundation for those without business experience. It connects research and practice to make you a stronger communicator and problem-solver, and will broaden your understanding of management and business ethics.

As part of the course you can build your knowledge and extend your expertise in one of the following specialisations:

Business, ethics and society
Commercialisation
Information technology
Law and responsible business
Managing human capital
Marketing
Project management
Quantitative business analysis
Risk management
Supply chain management
Sustainability

The flexible structure of the Master of Business enables you select units that give you a broadly applicable business qualification. Alternatively, you may prefer to choose one of the listed specialisations, effectively tailoring your studies to your particular interest or career aspirations.

The strong reputation of the Master of Business means our graduates are highly sought after, both in Australia and overseas. Graduates of the course pursue careers across the spectrum of business, including roles in human resources, management, marketing, science and commercialisation, project management, risk management or logistics.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-b6005?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Business, ethics and society

Business, ethics and society investigates and activates the role of business as ethical and social leaders. The specialisation equips students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and practical issues of internal and external ethical and societal forces that businesses face, respond to and activate. Business, ethics and society especially develops students' critical engagement and leadership capabilities to manage diversity, inclusiveness, and work and life. These capacities are developed within a strong context of ethics and corporate responsibility, and the domestic and international environments in that organisations operate. The specialisation prepares students for active managerial roles within organisations in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Commercialisation

Commercialisation is the process or cycle of introducing a new product or production method into the market. The commercialisation process or cycle can be applied in many different contexts, including: art, design, and architecture; arts and humanities; business and economics; education; engineering; information technology; law; medicine, nursing and health sciences; pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences; and science and technology. The specialisation provides a comprehensive business-focused setting to help students develop the necessary business and entrepreneurial acumen and commercialisation knowledge to succeed. Commercialisation especially develops students' new venture finance, patenting, innovation, and wealth pathways skills and knowledge. The specialisation prepares students, particularly facilitated by the commercialisation project, for commercialisation and entrepreneurial roles within organisations in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Information technology

The information technology discipline allows students to build upon the core program with six units dealing with current practices and emerging strategies for the application of information technology in business management. Students are introduced to management of the creation, storage, recall and dissemination of business records within organisation-wide frameworks and they will gain a high-level of understanding of the processes of project management. Units are taught by the Faculty of Information Technology.

Law and responsible business

The fortunes of a business can quickly turn around if it does not pay proper attention to the laws that regulate its organisation and activities. The law provides the framework for all aspects of business from the internal management of business organisations to their relationships with clients, consumers and the public. The units in this specialisation provide students with an understanding of the legal framework within which business operates and the fundamental laws that regulate business activities and transactions, with particular emphasis on how legal and social responsibility considerations should impact business decision-making.

Managing human capital

Managing human capital is the recognition of people as valuable contributors, and the systems and operations for investing in people to enhance their contributions. The specialisation equips students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and practical issues of managing and developing people within an international context. Managing human capital develops students' strategic and operational people management knowledge and skills, particularly for diverse, inclusive, and productive workplaces. This specialisation prepares students for careers in human resource management, industrial relations, consulting, public sector management, and general people management roles.

Marketing

Marketing is a fun, dynamic, complex activity (and discipline) that focuses on providing value to both organisations and consumers. Very simply, marketing is about matching what an organisation has (or can do) with someone who wants it. Marketing is about selling, it is about advertising, but it also so much more. The study and practice of the 'so much more' is what makes marketing so interesting!

In today's dynamic and global business environment, marketing permeates all areas of operations and forms an integral element of business growth and achievement. Highly qualified, innovative and international marketing practitioners, supported by well researched and pertinent marketing knowledge, are increasingly in demand.

Project management

A project is a collection of activities and resources undertaken to achieve planned objectives, which could be defined in terms of time, quality and cost or economic outcomes. Project management is the process of ensuring defined goals are achieved in relation to a project. This specialisation provides graduates with the knowledge, technology and processes employed in project management that allow them to pursue such professional roles in industry and government. This specialisation will provide graduates with an understanding and ability to apply the theories and concepts of project management, and will assist in a variety of roles in industry or government. Graduates will be able to analyse requirements for the management of given projects, identify the applicable methods and develop innovative project management strategies and processes.

Quantitative business analysis

Students will be provided with advanced quantitative skills required to carry out statistical analysis in business, economics and finance. They will also develop skills to report on the findings of their quantitative analysis.

Risk management

Risk is defined by AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009 as 'the effect of uncertainty on objectives'. The management of risk is an evolving discipline that builds on current knowledge in a diverse range of activities. The risk management specialisation focuses on operational and financial risk in today's commercial world. It provides extended skills in the strategic and process applications of risk management and prepares for the increasingly complex risk management issues faced in many areas of business and government. It prepares graduates for roles that are required to address business, insurance and financial risk. The range of units undertaken will greatly assist those seeking employment in managerial positions where risk management is an expanding field of practice.

Supply chain management

Supply chain management involves the coordination of people, organisations, technologies and processes to ensure optimal supply of products and services. This specialisation develops students' capacity to design and optimise supply chains, and to manage them to achieve strategic business outcomes. Supply chain management enhances students' skills and knowledge in innovation and improvement, business optimisation, services and operations management, and sustainable operations management. The specialisation prepares students for careers in supply chain management roles in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Sustainability

The sustainability specialisation focuses on current practices and emerging strategies for improving corporate sustainability, particularly in social, economic and environmental domains. The units within this specialisation will provide insights into sustainability from the perspectives of governance, ethics and management. This specialisation is suited to those who want to enhance their knowledge and skills in both business and sustainability issues and who seek employment in environmental governance or corporate sustainability management. It will also suit those who want to enable organisational and individual change in support of sustainability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-b6005?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Read more

About the course

Join our diverse academic community for a year of challenges and collaborations that will help you change and shape your career trajectory. Our students are driven designers, architects, visual and fine artists, performing artists, writers and others who work in the creative and cultural industries. Our faculty members are a lively mix of management specialists and creatives. All of us are passionate about doing work that has a real impact on society.

This unique programme is designed to advance your career as a solo practitioner, an entrepreneur or a member of a larger organisation within the creative economy. During the 12-month programme, you will:

- Build knowledge of business and management within the context of creative and cultural industries
- Gain new methods of learning, creating and managing to improve your career success and satisfaction – in socially responsible and meaningful ways
- Develop a diverse international network of peers, mentors and industry professionals across creative and cultural fields

The interdisciplinary MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is built around the unique learning styles and goals of creative people like you. Designed and taught by Audencia Business School and The Glasgow School of Art’s Institute of Design Innovation (InDI), each module has been created specifically for this programme and integrates a creative mix of teaching and learning methods for both business and arts/design education.

Your programme combines the design approaches and studio (project-based) teaching methods of The Glasgow School of Art (GSA) with the internationally recognised, innovative, collaborative and responsible business education of Audencia Business School. The programme includes:

- Modules designed and taught collaboratively by faculty members at Audencia and the GSA
- Study in Nantes, France, a vibrant, modern city with old-world flair
- Two-week International Winter School in the inspirational Scottish Highlands
- Real-world consulting or research project
- Optional internship in a creative industry
- Collaborative and creative live projects both online and offline, studio (project-based) work and more

Audencia and the Glasgow School of Art

Rather than putting pre-existing management and creative classes on a schedule to form a so-called “new” programme, Audencia and the GSA’s Institute of Design Innovation have jointly designed a customised programme of classes and projects that respond to emerging trends, circumstances and opportunities within the global creative economy.

Every aspect of the programme combines learning in business and management with creative processes and people. The programme is located in Nantes, France, but the GSA faculty members teach one-third of the classes – and the two-week International Winter School, which brings international design schools together in Scotland, is a highlight of the programme.

Taught by Audencia

Shaping a creative career:

Shaping a creative career is an ongoing process which requires the will and ability to keep learning and re-skilling, a good knowledge of yourself and your values and a set of practical tools that will help to enhance your career. This module will mark the start of your journey to design a creative career that is sustainable, enjoyable and fulfilling.

Mapping the creative economy:

Learn what it really means to be a part of the creative economy. Mapping the Creative Economy offers an overview of the development of the cultural and creative industries and their relationship to the creative economy. You’ll learn about important challenges the industries face, such as technological, legal and economic – and the policies adopted to meet those challenges.

Reimagining management:

This module covers the following topics:

- Critical understanding of management
- Management of creativity and innovation
- Sustainable future

From idea to action: starting up:

Building skills to act as bridge between the worlds of creativity and business, you’ll work on a real-life collaborative project where you and your peers will be faced with design, managerial and entrepreneurial challenges.

You’ll learn by doing – working together with a diverse group of students, industry professionals and academic staff.

This experiential work will serve to further develop your career project, as well as help you internalise core entrepreneurial skills and knowledge in an authentic way. Here, you can make mistakes and learn from them in a safe environment.

Creating value in the creative economy:

To have knowledge is a good thing – but to spread it is even more rewarding. During this period, you will be asked to increase societal awareness of the possibilities within the creative economy. How you communicate your knowledge about the creative economy is up to you: conference, digital project, charity work, radio programme, etc. Get creative and begin establishing yourself as a subject-matter expert.

Teaching Methods

A variety of teaching methods are used for the above modules including:

Lectures
Seminars
Workshops
Coaching sessions
Personal blog/vlog
Learning journal
Visits to creative organisations
Group presentations
Debates
Case studies, videos, articles and academic papers
Data visualising techniques

For more information about the course content taught by Audencia please visit the website below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Taught by GSA

Designing today:

Designing Today will help you develop a critical appreciation of the role of design practice and of designers as drivers of social, economic and organisational change. Your final project will be an exhibition. Topics include:

- Exploring service design and organisational design tools and methods
- Seeing social interaction as value creation
- Considering the contemporary role of designers in the area of management: industrial, experience and knowledge economies
- Understanding design not simply as the manufacture of industrial artefacts, but as an activity that creates value

Designing research:

Within Designing Research, you’ll develop an understanding of user-centred design as an ethnographic and engagement-led process of iterative development built upon collaborative working practices and creative refinement and resolution that responds to a variety of contexts. You’ll be evaluated via a project process journal and reflective writing. Components include:

- Formulating design enquiries (open-ended, empirically validated and discursive) that create the possibility of new knowledge and innovative practices or behaviours
- Methods: critical observation, ethnography, STEP analysis, future casting
- Participation in InDI’s two-week International Winter School to gain international, multi-disciplinary teaching and learning experience and develop a personal and professional network of practitioners, researchers and scholars

From idea to application:

From Idea to Application will help you internalise design practice as the material manifestation and evolution of value propositions. You’ll move from collaborative concept generation to product proposal, refinement and validation as understood across a variety of value regimes: manufacture and supply chain, branding and communication, user experience, etc.

The focus will be on the blend of industrial and digital artefacts, experience of use and the cognitive and narrative dimensions of innovative products and their collaborative production.

You’ll be evaluated through a project presentation and exhibition.

International winter school:

Led by the Institute of Design Innovation, the Winter School is an exemplar of our progressive teaching style and offers a method of research and learning that is both bespoke and distinct. The Winter School brings together international students and academics to fashion a new role for design in the exploration of a contemporary challenge during an intense two-week period.

Leading design academics and students from Köln International School of Design (KISD) and Copenhagen’s KADK (The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation) will join students and academics of the GSA, Audencia and other institutions from around the globe, forming an international network of diverse disciplines.

This component of the course offers a unique opportunity to examine current issues in a transcultural environment at the GSA’s stunning new campus in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland. Research and teaching carried out during the Winter School benefit organisations and communities as well as students.

Company experience

Research or consulting project

Your project is the culmination of your programme experience and the most ambitious expression of your individual motivation, creativity and ability to deliver. It can take the shape of a research project or a consulting project done during an optional internship. You will conduct secondary research, but great value will also be placed on your own primary research efforts.

For more information regarding the project please visit the website by clicking the link below

http://master.audencia.com/programmes-english/management-entrepreneurship-in-the-creative-economy/

Optional Internship

This component of the program is not required. However, we will encourage and support you in finding an internship that corresponds to your personal creative project and helps you shape your creative career.

Creative culture

The MSc in Management and Entrepreneurship in the Creative Economy is an alternative to an MBA or MFA programme. It offers you a uniquely creative culture with a degree from a respected and socially responsible business and management school.

Student profile

The students who will join this programme:

- Are creative people who are passionate about their area of expertise
- Want to explore fields in creative and cultural industries
- Love working with people from all over the world
- Know collaboration will be across fields and disciplines
- Understand the importance of business and management to the creative and cultural industries
- Are motivated by the ability of the creative and cultural industries to improve people's lives

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The MA in Architecture and Urban Design (MAUD) is a wide-ranging mainstream Master's programme in architecture that gives you an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective on contemporary architecture and urban design. Read more
The MA in Architecture and Urban Design (MAUD) is a wide-ranging mainstream Master's programme in architecture that gives you an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural perspective on contemporary architecture and urban design. The programme informs you about the latest knowledge of architecture and urban design in order to prepare you to become a successful professionals working on a global scale.

You are taught how to combine academic analysis with the development of creative and intellectual skills. We regard theory and practice of architecture as equally important, and believe that joint effort and excellence in both areas are necessary for communicating architecture and urban design competently and successfully. You are encouraged to develop your creative and imaginative abilities; to produce ideas and undertake work that conveys your understanding of architecture and cities in fresh and effective ways.

You learn how to approach contemporary architecture and cities and their relation to the society, culture and arts including film and theatre. Through the analysis of wider social and environmental aspects and through modeling of cities’ life and its dynamic forces, programme considers the ways in which both the heritage buildings and the new design proposals can facilitate in the sustainable development of cities in the future.

Kent School of Architecture (KSA) has developed a unique partnership with Farrells, the internationally renowned architects and urban planners. John Letherland, the Head of Master Planning, currently leads a design module for all students on this programme.

This is a versatile Master’s qualification for architects, urban designers, surveyors, historians, landscape architects, theorists, engineers and other related professionals involved with planning and design of contemporary cities, as well as graduates interested in pursuing further postgraduate studies and an academic career.

This programme is taught at our Canterbury campus. There is also a version of this programme which allows you to spend a term in Paris (https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/181/architecture-and-urban-design-paris).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/180/architecture-and-urban-design

About Kent School of Architecture

Research at Kent School of Architecture achieves excellence in both the history and theory of architecture and in sustainable urban, peri-urban and environmental design. School staff have design expertise and specialist knowledge; they are at the forefront of current architectural issues, including sustainability, technology, professional practice and research. Our staff are active at academic and professional conferences, both nationally and internationally, and appear and publish in local and national media. The School promotes innovative and interdisciplinary research, emphasising sustainable design.

Much of the project work involved in the Kent School of Architecture is located on 'live' sites in the local region, using real clients and engaging challenging issues. Students in all stages of the school have been introduced to real urban and architectural design challenges in Lille, Margate, Folkestone, Dover, Rye, Chatham and, of course, Canterbury. Much of this work involves liaising with external bodies, such as architects, planners, council and development groups.

Course structure

The MA is composed of four taught modules (two modules per term full-time, one module per term part-time) and a dissertation on the topic of your own choice. The programme leads to an MA but may be taken as a Postgraduate Diploma without the dissertation.

Graduates have worked at the cutting edge of the architectural profession on a global level and progressed to work in academia.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

AR831 - Urban Landscape (30 credits)
AR832 - Research Methods and Analysis (30 credits)
AR848 - Theory and History of Urban Design (30 credits)
AR847 - Urban Design Project (30 credits)
AR999 - Dissertation:Urban Design (60 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by coursework and the dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- ensure that you achieve excellence in your knowledge of architecture and cities through the development of your understanding, research, design and other related abilities

- promote creativity and excellence in architecture and urban design; from understanding concepts to thoughtful project development and the integration of research, strategically and in detail

- develop your knowledge of the theoretical, historical and professional contexts of architecture and urban design and ensure that you are aware of your responsibilities

- develop your understanding of architecture, cities and urban design within a broader cultural context that would include studies of arts and humanities

- promote and support independent research and high-quality skills

- accommodate a wide range of views and develop your specialised original interests

- develop understanding of how the boundaries of knowledge are advanced through research and promote originality in applying knowledge in architecture and urban design

- develop initiative, responsibility and sound critical judgement in making decisions about complex architectural and urban design issues

- enable you to develop strategies for self-improvement and commitment to research and learning

- support you in achieving your full potential in all parts of the programme.

Careers

Our Master’s programmes have been devised to enhance your prospects in a competitive world. Professionals in the architectural, planning, environmental design and conservation fields who develop higher-level skills, accredited by relevant bodies, will find themselves well-placed to progress in their field. Our students have gone on to work for major public agencies and universities, as well as leading practitioners in the private sector.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to. -Understand theories and identify concepts and empirical research methods relevant to urban studies and planning from the related fields of social sciences, humanities, ecology, engineering, architecture, design and art. Read more
Upon completing the master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning, you will be able to:
-Understand theories and identify concepts and empirical research methods relevant to urban studies and planning from the related fields of social sciences, humanities, ecology, engineering, architecture, design and art.
-Demonstrate a working understanding of the role of urban government, policy-making and planning in urban development.
-Critically and creatively pose and answer significant research questions relevant within and across multiple fields of theory and practice.
-Gather, process and develop relevant conclusions based on information from multiple sources.
-Produce, collect and analyse cases and data relevant to urban phenomena.
-Use digital and other tools to collect, analyse and share data.
-Develop responses to urban problems using relevant tools and techniques for representing, modelling, prototyping, testing and evaluating solutions.
-Understand and develop integrated approaches within and across urban research and applied planning.
-Communicate your understanding of and responses to urban phenomena visually, graphically, orally and in writing.
-Write academic, professional and popular texts on urban themes based on relevant literature.
-Apply and develop skills for co-production of knowledge and co-design.
-Work productively and cooperatively in multidisciplinary, multiprofessional and international environments.

And in terms of knowledge and skills in relation to specialisations and professions, you will be able to:
-Apply the general knowledge and skills introduced, developed and demonstrated within the courses and thesis work.
-Place urban analyses and proposals in relation to your specialisation and contextualise them in relation to others.
-Identify, differentiate and articulate relations among various theories and methods relevant to your specialisation.
-Develop and reflect on your competence in urban studies and planning in relation to your professional role.
-Carry out independent research on urban issues in your field using relevant research methods and responsible scientific practice.
-Analyse phenomena and develop solutions through the use of digital and other tools, such as GIS and CAD.
-Fulfil specific professional degrees in accordance with the relevant professional codes and directives (such as those of architects, landscape architects, and urban planners.
-Demonstrate your competence to work as a professional and/or researcher in urban studies and planning.
-Communicate professionally and constructively with different experts, practitioners and stakeholders in the field of urban studies and planning.
-Articulate your professional identity in terms of established and emerging roles relevant to urban studies and planning.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees.

Programme Contents

Urbanisation is a global phenomenon that is shaping the future of our societies. Most of the key challenges of contemporary societies are encountered and addressed in cities. Cities provide enormous economic, technical and cultural opportunities, but they are also places of social conflict and segregation as well as environmental and health problems. The magnitude of these challenges implies that no single profession or field of research can tackle them. Urban development requires an integrated approach. To this end, two prominent Finnish universities have joined forces in this unique and interdisciplinary Master’s programme.

The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies and Planning prepares you to excel as a professional capable of understanding and addressing complex urban development challenges. You will learn to address such challenges through a curriculum and pedagogical approach that includes interdisciplinary breadth as well as depth in core areas of knowledge, skills and practice. The programme balances theoretical, historical and conceptual knowledge with the acquisition of methods, skills and experience. You will thus gain a broad understanding of urban phenomena as well as practical experience in collaborative and practical situations. This is the foundation of the programme and of the elements in the curriculum.

Taking full advantage of the joint university structure, the programme unites leading expertise from the University of Helsinki and Aalto University into three major study lines. The signature elements in the programme are interdisciplinary studies that address urban challenge themes. These themes relate to urgent contemporary issues found not only in Finland but on the European and global scale, including controversies intrinsic to urbanisation. The urban challenge themes may be attached to focus areas, research projects or collaborations within our universities, municipalities and regions in order to provide a constructive and critical framework for study and practice. These themes cross the boundaries of disciplines and professions, and are united in addressing a common challenge and emphasising a forward-looking perspective.

Selection of the Major

There are three study lines in the Master’s programme in Urban Studies & Planning:

Urban Planning and Design
Urban Planning and Design (USP Plans) addresses urban development by integrating the knowledge, skills and pedagogical approaches of planning and design and by developing synergies across multiple disciplines. The constructive power of design to imagine, structure, visualise and communicate is combined with the analytical rigour and critical understanding of planning and urban governance history, methodologies and tools. USP Plans develops and deepens such skills while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based learning within concrete cases, multi-disciplinary collaboration, and learning-by-doing experimentation. USP Plans is oriented towards planners, architects, landscape architects, and spatial, service and strategic designers.

Urban Life, Economy and Cultures
Urban Life, Economy and Cultures (USP Peoples) addresses urban development by integrating analysis of socio-economic, digital and physical structures with planning. Here you will explore and apply theories and methodologies from the social and political sciences. The focus is on socio-spatial dynamics changes, including influences of policies and markets, actors and structures, decision-making processes, social mixing and demographics. USP Peoples deepens your knowledge of foundational studies while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based and collaborative learning, including situated municipal and field studies. USP Peoples is oriented towards planners, urban economists and managers and those interested in urban humanities.

Urban Ecologies and Systems
Urban Ecologies and Systems (USP Systems) addresses urban development by integrating technical and natural science knowledge. This includes methodologies for studying, assessing and planning for social and ecological resilience, technological innovation and complex adaptive systems. It applies systems approaches to identify multi-dimensional planning while retaining a holistic perspective on the complex and historical dynamics affecting multiple scales. USP Systems develops your understanding of foundational studies while advancing your professional capabilities through challenge-based and collaborative learning, including urban, digital and ecological field studies. USP Systems is oriented towards planners, engineers, architects, landscape architects, and environmental managers.

Programme Structure

The requirement for completing the Master’s programme in Urban Studies and Planning is 120 credits (ECTS), which can be done in two years. The curriculum consists of:

Core Urban Challenge Studios (20 credits)
Common urban challenge studios integrate multiple expert areas to study and address contemporary urban phenomena from different perspectives. Here you will explore urban challenge themes theoretically from different perspectives and you will address them practically within specific cases, sites or initiatives. Your teachers represent key disciplines and professions, and your studies will be conducted in cooperation with partners in research and municipalities. Examples of urban challenge themes include:
-Urban economies and the challenge of governance and welfare.
-Social integration and the challenge of urban typologies and heritage.
-Liveability and the global challenge of fast-paced cities.
-Socio-Ecological habitats and the challenge of densification.

Specialisation coursework (20 credits)
The three study lines offer courses for you to specialise within one of the three competence areas in the broad field of urban studies and planning. Both universities offer courses for each study line; these can be adapted to support your advancement, background knowledge and skills. The courses cover topics such as urban geography, urban sociology, urban ecology, urban economics, urban ethnology and history, environmental policy, urban planning, urban design, landscape architecture, real estate economics, service and strategic design, etc.

Core skills and methods coursework (20 credits)
Core skills for thesis research and professional practice are offered as basic courses. These include skills relevant to digital representation, analysis and communication, modalities and techniques of communication and argumentation, research methods and methodologies of academic research. You will learn, for example, how to use digital tools to analyse and study urban phenomena and how to illustrate your ideas and solutions visually and graphically. You will also become familiar with the theories and tools of communication and argumentation, and you will study and apply research methods.

Electives (30 credits)
You can select elective courses according to your personal study plan. You can select electives to deepen your knowledge in a specialisation or broaden your exposure to additional areas relevant to planning. For architects and landscape architects, some electives will guide your development according to the EU directive for these professions. You can also take courses at other Finnish universities, in a student exchange abroad, or in an internship in city planning and development.

Master’s Thesis (30 credits)

Career Prospects

The programme prepares you to be a professional in a field that is meaningful, growing and in demand. You will acquire the knowledge, skills and experience needed to fill both traditional and emerging planning roles (such as urban planning and design, real estate development, strategic planning, environmental planning, landscape architecture, policy and service design). To these established or emerging roles, you will bring an integrated understanding of, and training in applying, more interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches to urban development. As a graduate you will be prepared to compete for local and international positions within public, private and non-profit organisations, planning, architectural and policy advisory firms, research institutes and NGOs.

Internationalization

The Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning provides international scope in many ways, taking advantage of the unique Helsinki context and diverse urban contexts around the world. Each year, new students in the Master’s Programme in Urban Studies & Planning include both Finnish and international applicants. We look for students whose varied backgrounds, experiences, and education reflect the richness of contemporary society. The teachers of the programme have an international background and experience, and the programme builds on their strong international connections in their respective fields. Researchers and invited lecturers from abroad take part in the teaching of the programme. The Master’s Programme builds on the joint University of Helsinki and Aalto University Bachelor’s Program ‘Urban Academy’, including its teaching faculty, international network and advisory board of leading international experts. Your elective coursework can include a student exchange or internship abroad, and you are also encouraged to collaborate internationally on your Master’s thesis. You will thus have an opportunity to study in an international environment and acquaint yourself with different cultures. For international and Finnish students, Helsinki and Finland are well-known internationally for progressive approaches to planning. Helsinki is a UNESCO creative city; planning and design have strong roles within municipalities, government and the public sector. Finland is a European and international forerunner in technological research and innovation, such as open data in municipalities. Local and national policies support experimental and participatory culture and development. In the context of urban challenges, Helsinki provides a unique case for engaging with progressive approaches to welfare state paradigms, including public-private dynamics, changing demographics and cultures, and diverse approaches to market growth and sustainability.

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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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