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Masters Degrees (Mass Communication)

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Are you interested in the creative industries? Want to learn more about management and promotional culture?. Read more
Are you interested in the creative industries? Want to learn more about management and promotional culture?

Mass Communication Management at Northumbria offers you an exciting opportunity to study the issues and trends across mass communication platforms such as TV, radio, newspaper, movies, advertising and social media.

You will learn to recognise how these modes of communication are connected and how they relate to ideas and problems in society at both the national and the global level.

You will develop an awareness of the media, communication and cultural industries in the 21st century through research-informed and practical activities as you learn how communication strategies are produced, distributed and consumed.

Applying academic theory to a range of real-world issues, this course also includes training in cultural management, enterprise and leadership, providing you with the skills and confidence to succeed in a range of media and communication industries.

This course is also taught on our London campus. This course can also be started in January - please view this web-page for details: https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/study-at-northumbria/courses/mass-communication-management-dtfmax6/

Learn From The Best

Dr Sarah Ralph is a lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies, and her expertise lies in the realm of empirical methods and approaches to the study of production cultures, media audiences and reception.

Dr Ibrahim Seaga Shaw has a background as a reporter, editor, sub editor and correspondent in Sierra Leone, France and the UK, and brings real-life issues to the classroom.

Dr Gabriel Moreno practiced journalism for 13 years, including as a general and financial news correspondent with Reuters news agency in Mexico City. He was awarded a PhD in Journalism and Mass Communication from Westminster University and is currently involved in research projects involving new media and migration, and social media and environmental communication. He became a fellow of the UK’s Higher Education Academy in December 2015.

Teaching And Assessment

You’ll learn through a mix of theory and practice, including taught sessions, field trips, lectures, seminars and group assignments.

You’ll discover the theories and issues informing real-work examples within a range of media and cultural industries and then put these to use in workshop activities which reinforce the links between theory and practice. You will be encouraged to develop your communication skills by taking an active part in seminars.

The dissertation module provides an opportunity for you to put learning into practice by designing, executing and writing up an original piece of research on a topic negotiated between you and your dissertation supervisor.

You will have the opportunity to go on at least one industry visit and hear from professionals working in a local media organisation. Previous visits have included to sites which represent successful local cultural regeneration such as BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts and Sage, Gateshead.

Module Overview
EF0126 - E.S.A.P. in FADSS Level 7 (Optional, 0 Credits)
MP7002 - Advertising and Promotional Cultures (Core, 30 Credits)
MP7003 - Working in Mass Communication Industries (Core, 30 Credits)
MP7004 - Media Dissertation (Core, 60 Credits)
MP7005 - Research Methods (Core, 30 Credits)
VA7006 - Cultural Management, Enterprise & Leadership (Core, 30 Credits)

Learning Environment

Your learning experience is enhanced by new technologies used to deliver and assess your course modules, including online reading lists and electronic submission of assignments. You are also encouraged to use social media to communicate with your peers and students regularly develop module Facebook groups for this purpose.

You will have access to an e-learning portal that provides lecture materials, assessment criteria, handbooks and additional learning materials such as videos, podcasts and news items.

You will have access to state-of-the art facilities such as the university library which has been recognised as being in the top three in the UK (tied with Cambridge University).

As part of the research methods module, you will explore using online forms for survey research, including social media and generic software tools such as Survey Monkey.

If you are an international student, you can develop your literacy and communications skills through English for Specific Academic Purposes.

Research-Rich Learning

Northumbria University is ranked in the UK top 20 for the quality of research outputs in communication, cultural and media studies (REF 2014).

70% of Northumbria’s research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies is rated as being either world leading or internationally excellent.

The Mass Communication Management course has been designed with the help of industry practitioners so you will be graduating with the latest knowledge and skills required by the creative and media industries.

You will be learning from tutors who are specialists in their disciplines and who are research active at the cutting-edge of their field. Their expertise and industry experience helps to bring theory to life in the classroom.

You will develop your own practical research skills and will be able to demonstrate your own interest in at least one aspect of the wider cultural industry through planning, executing and writing-up an empirically-focused research project.

Give Your Career An Edge

Your course is designed to give you the skills and competencies, theory and practical experience that employers in the media industries are looking for.

You will be encouraged to think like an entrepreneur and to understand the behaviours you need to exhibit in order to succeed in your future career aspirations. Graduates are global citizens who are not afraid to ask the big, challenging questions.

The diverse examples and case studies which are used across the modules provide a good grounding in a range of different media industries, enabling you to be a credible applicant for opportunities in a range of cultural industries.

Taking part in seminar discussions and group activities will encourage you to develop teamwork and a range of other transferable skills including effective communication, relationship-building and personal time management.

Your Future

This course will foster your intellectual curiosity and help you become a reflective and independent thinker, especially on issues, trends, policies, and challenges in mass communication industries in national and global contexts.

You will have the opportunity to develop skills in effectively interrogating ideas to clarify and boost your understanding. This combination of critical knowledge and skills will provide you with an excellent foundation for pursuing your future career.

On graduation, you could progress into a career in advertising, marketing, media or journalism.

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The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. Read more

The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. The course will provide you with a unique blend of theory and practice teaching, aimed at deepening your knowledge of the history of communications within the development process of emerging economies. It will critically evaluate the impact of international and regional institutions from a critical political economic perspective. Teaching by academic staff, guest lecturers and other carefully selected staff from development organisations will provide you with an overview of the policies, actions and impact of state and non-state institutions within the area of communication media and development.

A distinctive feature is its emphasis on the practical role of communication media in development. You will participate in media production workshops and take part in our internship programme, offered in partnership with media and development organisations in London. As part of the work experience module, students participate in an extensive NGOs and media seminar series featuring experts and panel discussions. The work placement programme is in line with the University of Westminster’s strategy of nurturing of the critical practitioner.

The course team is led by Dr Winston Mano and includes Professor Daya Thussu, Professor Christian Fuchs, Professor David Gauntlett, Professor Naomi Sakr, Dr Anthony McNicholas, Dr Xin Xin, Dr Anastasia Kavada, Dr Maria Michalis, Dr Roza Tsagarousianou, Dr Tarik Sabry, Paul Majendie, Geoffrey Davies and Michaela O’Brien. Visiting Lecturers include Jackie Davies, founder and Director of the Communication and Development Network (C4D) (http://www.c4d.org), a community of professionals working in communication for development. As a peer network the C4D Network is aimed at communication for development practitioners plus allied development workers, donors, academics and communication experts from the BBC, UN and major development organisations. The joining criterion is an engagement in communication for development - either professionally or through academia. Students on the Media and Development MA have the option to join the C4D network and each can do a fellowship/internship with the network during the course.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

One Semester One module from the below:

Semester 1 (option modules)

One Semester Two module from the below:

Semester 2 (option modules)

Industry links

We have strongly developed links with media and development organisations such as UNICEF, UNESCO, C4D, BBC Media Action, Internews Commonwealth Public Media Alliance.

Our large network of alumni keep our name and reputation alive in the industry.

Career path

Graduates apply for posts in development organisations based in London such as OneWorld, Oxfam, Save the Children, Red Cross, ActionAid, Panos, DfiD, Intermedia, BBC, Institute of War and Peace, Christian Aid and War on Want. Some students were able to build on knowledge, skills and their background in working for governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (in Romania, Pakistan and India) and a range of international business organisations, including the BBC. The course also prepares students for further studies and for a higher degree, e.g., a PhD. Some students apply for PhD Scholarships advertised by the Faculty of Media, Arts and Design and they were all encouraged to join the Communication for Development Network (C4D) which meets once a month in London.

We are aware that the range of skills needed is exceptionally diffuse, and that students on the course hope to develop careers in a variety of fields in many different countries. We are also aware that we are preparing you for careers in a rapidly changing job market and the structure of the course allows you take advantage of change, and not to be its victim. It, therefore, would be misleading and unhelpful to place too much emphasis on acquiring a precise set of skills drawn from one part of the media and development sector. Finally, with a view to your professional development planning, the course is designed to give you a wide-ranging and critical knowledge of the development industry that you plan to enter.



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This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication. Read more

Why take this course?

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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On this course you can. Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes. Read more
[[Why take this course?[[

This course is designed to produce highly competent communicators for the modern business and media world. Combining the theory with the practice of communication, it has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

The course can be studied through campus-based learning or through distance learning.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Study the nature and function of communication in the modern world, so you will be able to produce text (written, spoken, printed and broadcast) for different purposes
Better understand and use modern communication technologies

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course is designed for graduates from any discipline who wish to work in business, commerce and the media as highly competent communicators. The course combines the theory of communication with the practice of communication, has a distinctive vocational orientation and focuses on English as the medium of communication.

Module Details

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics balances theory and practice and features units that have a high degree of professional relevance and training.

The course is structured on the basis of core units and optional units.

Core:

Theory and Practice of Communication: This unit deals examines communication theory and practice in a range of contexts. Students will use various analytical tools to examine different areas of communication (e.g. corporate communication, mass communication and semiotics. Through engaging with this unit, students can gain a practical understanding of communication which they can apply to their professional lives.

Analysing Discourse: This unit introduces various analytical tools (e.g. appraisal, speech acts, modality, metaphors, transitivity, cohesion, theme-rheme) which are valuable in the analysis of authentic discourses and texts (e.g. courtroom discourse, social media, educational science texts, newspaper texts, political speeches, advertisements, etc.). The importance of context in any analysis is emphasised.

Dissertation: Students undertake a piece of significant research, reported and analysed in an appropriate manner in an area of professional relevance. A research proposal will be produced in the first instance and supervision from a tutor will be available throughout the process.

2 options:

Technical Communication: This unit is designed to develop students’ ability to communicate technical information effectively to specific audiences. It will examine a range of factors that can influence the effectiveness of communication and provide strategies to overcome communication problems.

Intercultural Communication: This unit deals with intercultural communication issues in a global setting. Students can benefit from an awareness of the various factors including cultural factors, which influence communication in order to improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Communication in the Workplace: This unit examines how language is used in workplace settings. Analysing and evaluating a range of spoken, written and digital texts, can help students to reflect on and improve their own knowledge and practice of communication.

Digital Communication and Media Development: This unit is designed to give students a theoretical and a practical knowledge of digital media development and implementation. Students will use a range of software applications to design or develop their own digital marketing applications.

Second Language Acquisition: This unit reviews relevant research on the topic of SLA and builds on students’ previous experience of language learning, applying this to areas such as individual differences and types of learning, as well as to more formal approaches to SLA.

Professional Portfolio: This unit offers students the opportunity to profile their degree to their own professional and/or personal interests, allowing students the chance to study areas not covered elsewhere in the curriculum. Students negotiate an area for study and then pursue this with the support of a supervisor.

Please note. All optional units are subject to staff availability and student demand.

Exit levels

The credit system creates a flexible framework in which you can graduate with one of the following awards, depending on the number of credits gained:

MA Communication and Applied Linguistics (four core units plus the research management and dissertation units) 180 credits
Postgraduate Diploma in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 120 credits
Postgraduate Certificate in Communication and Applied Linguistics: 60 credits

Programme Assessment

Full time study is one full academic year, consisting of a taught part from October to June and a research part, in which the dissertation is written, from June to September. Part time students study for a period of two years. The dissertation is written in the summer period of the second year of study.

There are no formal examinations. A variety of different assessment methods are used which include essays, projects, portfolios, presentations and your dissertation. The research management unit will prepare you for your dissertation and you will be allocated a dissertation supervisor who will oversee your work throughout the process. You will also be encouraged to start thinking about it from the start of the course and submit a series of interim documents.

Student Destinations

Graduates will be able to progress to jobs in the public and private sectors in various areas of communication including, advertising, publishing, human resources departments, in higher education in their own country or elsewhere, or continue on to undertake doctoral research. Possession of a Masters qualification is often viewed as a requirement for promotion to a more responsible position where you may already be working.

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From Al Jazeera to Hollywood, News Corporation to China Central TV, the media increasingly operate in a global context. This course offers a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to global media, and is designed for those who work in, or want to work in, the media industries. Read more

From Al Jazeera to Hollywood, News Corporation to China Central TV, the media increasingly operate in a global context. This course offers a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to global media, and is designed for those who work in, or want to work in, the media industries.

You will examine key developments in the media and communications industries associated with the logic of globalisation, and explore the complex nature of the globalisation process in the media. You will gain a relevant, well-grounded, high-quality education and skill base, enabling you to develop a clear and comprehensive understanding of communication and the mass media.

Based on continuous assessment, the course is taught in lectures and seminars by the team from Westminster's top-rated Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI ). You will be part of a bustling multicultural academic department which boasts a strong research culture, and you will be able to attend the regular talks by outside speakers (academics and practitioners) on a variety of communication and mass media issues.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules, semester one

Core module, semester two

Option modules

Internships

Students are encouraged to seek work experience in the industry and relevant opportunities are regularly shared by staff. This often leads to full-time employment once graduating from the course.

In addition, the MA course takes advantage of the vibrancy of the media environment in London and students often benefit from events taking place locally, eg at Frontline Club.

Equally, there are a number of activities run within the Department that provide students with opportunities for networking and increasing their employability. CAMRI and associated research centres run regular seminars, workshops and conferences which our students can attend for free. These workshops and conferences bring together academic researchers, industry representatives as well as regulators and policy-makers.

Graduate employment

The Global Media MA course is well established and has a strong international reputation. Our students are very successful in gaining employment, in many cases straight from graduating the course. Graduates have found jobs in middle- and upper-management in media industries, as well as the broader private (eg consulting and advertising firms) and public sector (eg government ministries, regulatory authorities), international organisations and NGOs. Some graduates also continue to do PhD research. Success in their Masters degree has allowed many who have been in media jobs before joining the course to move into more senior roles within their companies or organisations and to transfer to new sectors of the media.

Graduates from the Global Media MA have found roles in a wide variety of media and communications organisations including Al Jazeera, CCTV, and many other organisations around the world.



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The course is designed for recent graduates seeking a career in traditional and new media organisations. It provides a combination of business and media skills designed to equip you to take up an entry-level position in today’s media organisations. . Read more

The course is designed for recent graduates seeking a career in traditional and new media organisations. It provides a combination of business and media skills designed to equip you to take up an entry-level position in today’s media organisations. 

You will learn how media organisations are engaging with the challenges resulting from the emergence of digital media technologies and platforms. The course introduces you to the processes by which media organisations develop their corporate strategies, business plans, marketing and production operations as they respond to radical change in the commercial environment. 

The course is designed to enable you to find and take up work placements and internships at media organisations in London during the course of your studies. Our students have successfully completed internships at TV production companies like the BBC, technology companies like Google, as well as many other multimedia, advertising and news organisations in London. Some have successfully started their own businesses in the UK. 

Whether you are planning a career in a media organisation or seeking to create your own new business start up, the MA International Media Business aims to provide the analytical insight, operational knowledge and planning skills you will need to prosper. The course is taught alongside a suite of Masters courses in Westminster’s highly successful Centre for Creative Industries Management. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Optional modules (Semester 1)

Optional modules (Semester 2)

Career path

International Media Business students have gone on to work for many social media business including Facebook, Youtube, Google as well as traditional media firms like Sky, Disney and Bloomberg. They have also worked as creatives and digital content producers for small and large business including Land Rover, AEG and BSI Global. Others have continued their education at PhD level.



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Social Media, Culture and Society MA offers a flexible, interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. Read more

Social Media, Culture and Society MA offers a flexible, interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. It will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its societal, political, regulatory, industrial and cultural contexts.

Social Media, Culture and Society MA provides students with the opportunity to focus at postgraduate level on:

  • Studying the ways in which social media and the internet shape and are shaped by social, economic, political, technological and cultural factors, in order to equip students to become critical research-oriented social media experts.
  • Developing reflective and critical insights into how social media and the internet are used in multiple contexts in society, and into which roles social media can play in various forms of organisations that are situated in these societal contexts. The aim is that students are equipped to become reflective and critical social media practitioners.
  • Gaining in-depth knowledge and understanding of the major debates about the social and cultural roles of social media and the internet.
  • Acquiring advanced knowledge and understanding of the key categories, theories, approaches and models of social media's and the internet's roles in and impacts on society and human practices.
  • Obtaining advanced insights into practical activity and practice-based work that relate to how social media and the internet work and which implications they have for social and cultural practices.

This Master's is organised in the environment of the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) and its Centre for Social Media Research. CAMRI is a world-leading research centre that studies the role of media and communication in society. It has become known as the Westminster school of critical media and communication research. The analysis of social media, culture and society is one of its research specialisms. In the most recent UK government research audit, the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), 42.2% of CAMRI’s research was classified as world-leading and 37.5% as internationally excellent, which makes it one of Britain’s four leading media and communication research institutions. 

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. 

In semester one, students must select two elective modules from the two thematic groups below (any combination of modules is applicable): 

  • Theory and Global Political Economy of Media and Communication 
  • Media Politics, Regulation and Business Strategies. 

In semester two, students must select two elective modules from two thematic groups below (any combination of modules is applicable): 

  • Media Politics, Regulation and Business Strategies 
  • Media, Culture and Everyday Life. 

More information on modules and groups to which they belong to can be found below.

Core modules (semester one)

Option modules (Semester One)

Core modules (Semester Two)

Optional modules (Semester Two)

Career path

The Social Media, Culture and Society MA will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its social, political and cultural contexts. This degree will be of particular interest to those who plan to work in the creative industries, as well as those already working in this field. Social Media, Culture and Society MA will also be of interest to students working in non-profit sectors, including NGOs and advocacy groups. The degree will help those seeking a competitive edge in a careers market that values high-level skills in communication, research and critical thinking.

The course also provides an excellent preparation for those wishing to continue their studies to PhD level. Around 10% of graduates of the course are now undertaking PhDs. Others work in the social media start-up scene in London, or work as journalists and in a range of industries and non-profit sectors.



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The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Read more
The Department welcomes applications from well-qualified graduates to register for research degrees (M.Phil or Ph.D). Members of staff have experience of supervising research students in a very wide range of topic areas. Applications are particularly welcome from graduates who would like to study in the following areas:

- Transnational Communication and Globalization
- Political Communication
- Gender and Ethnicity
- Influence and Representation
- Production and Consumption

There are three possible routes that students can follow:

1) M.Phil or Ph.D by Research
2) Ph.D by Research under the ESRC’s 1+3 Scheme
3) ‘New Route’ or integrated Ph.D

It is strongly recommended that prospective students seek advice from the Centre’s Postgraduate Tutor at an early stage to ensure that they are aware of all the available options.

Subject specific modules available include (list is subject to variation):

Research Methods in Media and Communications (20 credits)
Contemporary issues in Media and Cultural Studies (20 credits)
Processes and Structures in Mass Communications (20 credits)
The Study of Mass Media Audiences (20 credits)
The International Context of Mass Communication (10 credits)
Political Communication (10 credits)
Option modules include: Film as Mass Communication (10 credits), Advertising and Cultural Consumption (10 credits) and News Management, Communication and Social Problems (10 credits).

Start month(s): January, April, July and October

Duration: Full time, at least 2 years for the M.Phil, at least 3 years for the Ph.D, 4 years for the ‘New Route’ or Integrated Ph.D scheme.

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The MA Globalization and Communications degree provides students with a comprehensive grounding in theories, perspectives and research related to globalization and communications. Read more
The MA Globalization and Communications degree provides students with a comprehensive grounding in theories, perspectives and research related to globalization and communications. Core focus includes major political, economic and cultural developments in the contemporary world and their impact on national and transnational media structures and mediated cultural flows. The key parts played by information and communication technologies in infrastructures and processes of globalization are also considered.

Core modules:
Transnational Relations and Communications
Theories of Globalization and New Media
Graduate Seminar: Identities and Boundaries
Research Methods and Management I
Research Methods and Management II
Dissertation

Option modules (two from the following):
The International Context of Mass Communication
News Management, Communication and Social Problems
Advertising and Cultural Consumption
Technology, Culture and Power: Global Perspectives
Film as Mass Communication
The Digital Economy
International Political Communication
Global Cinema

Assessment:
Assessment for this course is by means of essays, research methods and web-based assignments and a dissertation (between 15,000 and 18,000 words).

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Contemporary mass communications inhabit an increasingly digital landscape subject to cultural, economic and legal change. During this MA Programme you will interrogate the significance of media forms, the systems within which they operate and the challenges they face. Read more
Contemporary mass communications inhabit an increasingly digital landscape subject to cultural, economic and legal change. During this MA Programme you will interrogate the significance of media forms, the systems within which they operate and the challenges they face.

-Provides progression routes for undergraduate students on courses relating to media, journalism, cultural studies, marketing and communications and Humanities and Social Science subjects
-Designed for students from a wide range of academic or vocational backgrounds, including social media managers, public relations and journalism
-Delivered by academic staff with a proven record in research and teaching on mass communications
-Provides rigorous training in postgraduate research skills that will enable you to pursue further postgraduate study at doctoral level

Mass Communications at LJMU’s School of Humanities and Social Science considers issues of communicative power in a range of contexts to highlight their historical development and explore their continued relevance within a contemporary digital media environment.

An integral part of this MA programme is the year-long Research Methods module. This module introduces you to important methodological approaches pertinent to the study of mass communications and provides you with a grounding in key skills required for study at masters level.

In addition you will study Theories, Concepts and Debates in Mass Communications which looks at enduring issues such as the impact of mass media (within advertising, radio, print propaganda and TV broadcasting) on audiences.

The production and reception of contemporary mass communications is also explored in depth during the Digital Cultures module in which you will critically analyse research on digital media audiences, paying attention to research on web-based communication and the activities of fans. This module also features a distinctive collaborative project involving Tate Liverpool. Here you will critically review the ways that the Tate Gallery’s current exhibitions are being marketed to the general public, liaising with the gallery’s marketing team and paying particular attention to their online promotions.

You will study the quickly evolving area of new media by analysing contemporary media policies and considering the potential future direction of national and international media regulation. You will also put your knowledge of the contemporary media landscape into practice through the construction of a portfolio of digital writing, which requires you to reflect on the process of online communication in different international contexts.

Finally, your Dissertation study involves original research and enables you to incorporate reflections on your own professional practice, either through conducting a work placement or by utilising opportunities within your existing employment if you so wish.

What you will study on this degree

Please see guidance below on core modules for further information on what you will study.

Theories Concepts and Debates in Mass Communications

Discover how academics theorise the relationship between mass media and society, and current issues in the field. This module explores mediation and the treatment of different media forms/technologies

Mass Communication: Research Methods

Explore important methodological approaches to the study of mass communications on this year-long module, which introduces you to textual analysis and audience research by providing a grounding in key skills for postgraduate study

Digital Cultures

Critically examine the relationships between people and digital media technologies by exploring the notion that contemporary cultural practices and social interactions often take place online via social media and web 2.0 technologies. The module involves a critical review of Tate Liverpool's exhibition promotions and liaison with the gallery's marketing team

New Media: Policy and Practice

Explore the shifts in the ethics of media production/consumption in the light of policy and regulation developments, new technologies and changes in media ownership/communication. You will consider the future direction of media regulation by analysing contemporary media policies

Dissertation

Undertake an independent dissertation research project that will make an original contribution to the field of Mass Communications. You may choose to incorporate reflections on your own professional practice

Further guidance on modules

The information listed in the section entitled 'What you will study' is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. Read more

Communication for Development is an interdisciplinary field of study and practice, combining studies on culture, communication and development and integrating them with practical fieldwork. It explores the use of communication – both as a tool and as a way of articulating processes of social change – within the contexts of globalisation.

In this programme, where the form of study strives to be conducive to the course content, progression lies in the group dynamic process as well as in the coursework itself. The multidisciplinary nature of the subject means that the same content should provide in-depth knowledge for students with different backgrounds. One major point of this pedagogical approach is to bring together different experiences. The group diversity should allow students to deepen their knowledge of their own major as well as gain a sufficient overview based on the academic backgrounds and practical experiences of other students. This will allow them to be able to work both interdisciplinary and transcultural in their future professions.

Communication for Development as a Field of Study

Despite the fact that every year vast amounts of money are donated to developing countries, the chasm between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have-nots’ continues to widen as billions of people around the world continue to live without running water, sanitation, adequate nutrition or access to basic education.

While the poor and the marginalised have always been at the centre of development, they have been the subjects rather than the objects of communication as traditional development practices overlooked a fundamental truism: that the poor, themselves, are often the best experts on their needs. Marginalised communities, historically denied access to communication tools and channels, have traditionally been passive bystanders to their so-called development as top-down, one-sided mass communication programmes delivered information without taking into account the very important specificities of context – the cultural norms and beliefs, knowledge and folklore of target populations, and how these impact the uptake of information and the potential for social change. Due to this lack of participation by target communities, most development programmes failed to achieve their goals, and a dramatic shift in paradigm was necessary to improve the efficacy and sustainability of development cooperation methods.

Internet-based distance-learning

Malmö University was the first to pioneer the use of an Internet-based distance-learning platform to make the education available to students globally. With its mix of online collaboration and discussion, paired with webcast seminars the entire programme can be conducted over the internet. This enables students from all corners of the globe to participate, work in their own time and attain the education. The use of the Live Lecture function in seminars makes students, equipped with microphones and webcams, able to participate in lectures and discussions online, resulting in a ‘virtual classroom’. This way, students in New Zealand and South Africa can communicate and work on projects with classmates in Fiji and India, sharing ideas and working together towards the common goal of improving development practices.

Final project and field-work

The final project has always been an important element of the programme. Over the past 10 years, students of ComDev have had the opportunity to apply what they have learned theoretically to a broad range of contexts and scenarios in the process of completing their projects, and field-work has been conducted in India, South Africa, Mozambique, Kenya, Croatia and Sarajevo, to name but a few. During their project work, students have the opportunity to explore a particular research area or topic of concern at a deeper level, and the accompanying written dissertation provides a fantastic opportunity to consolidate and further the knowledge and skills gained during the education. This project work also demonstrates a solid foundation in research, which will aid those students who wish to continue into doctoral level studies. In choosing the topic for their projects, students are free to ‘think outside the box’, and employ innovativeness and creativity to their field-work endeavours, and project works have included documentaries, short films, photo essays, and a wide array of dissertations presented in interesting and original ways. Students are also encouraged to join forces and collaborate on projects, as teamwork is regarded as a vital part of effective development cooperation. For a list of all the Project Works to date, see the ComDev portal: http://wpmu.mah.se/comdev/, under ‘History’.

Courses

For programme with start Autumn 2018: 

Autumn 2018 - Semester 1

Spring 2019 - Semester 2

Autumn 2019 - Semester 3

Spring 2020 - Semester 4

Career opportunities

The global demand for media and communication skills continues to increase as organisations such as UNICEF have made it a policy to hire ComDev practitioners, not only for international development schemes, but for diversity management and other forms of transcultural cooperation. Since skills, knowledge and aptitudes gained through an education in ComDev are relevant to a variety of job functions within the development sector, you may also find alumni working in a range of allied positions, such as conflict resolution positions or as a learning and outcomes coordinator, to name but a few.

Degree

Master's Degree (60 credits).

Degree of Master (one year)



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This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity. Read more

This is an exciting and highly innovative course (developed in collaboration with the Media Diversity Institute) that seamlessly combines theory and modules providing or containing hands-on practical training in journalism or campaigning and public relations related to social and cultural diversity.

The course will give you the opportunity to study and research the main ways in which social scientists analyse the role of the mass media in the social construction, representation and understanding of difference and social diversity and get a critical understanding of the social and media structures and journalistic practices that impact upon these processes. It will also equip you with practical skills that will enable you to produce your own media product on a topic related to social and cultural diversity.

The course combines a portfolio of theory modules aimed to develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the processes of managing and making sense of cultural diversity, key issues in intercultural communication and of various aspects of the sociology of news with a number of practice-oriented modules intended to give you first hand experience in the practice of inclusive journalism.

Drawing upon this unique combination of rigorous theoretical engagement and specialist practical training, this course is designed to equip you with a comprehensive conceptual/theoretical grounding and the practical skills to engage in responsible media coverage of diversity, to practice culturally informed and inclusive journalism and to develop a career (whether practical, strategic, or research-based) involving understanding and responding to the challenges of social diversity.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced academics and journalism professionals with expertise in inclusive journalism.

Extra accreditation: In addition to your final degree, upon successful completion of certain module components or additional work you can be awarded study certificates by external accrediting bodies such as the Broadcast Journalism Training Council and Adobe.

Practical work experience: In addition to their programme of studies, we work hard to ensure that MA Diversity and the Media students are offered opportunities to gain valuable experience with media and NGOs whose work is relevant to their programme of studies and enhances their employability after graduation. We have established partnerships with the Media Diversity Institute, TAG International Development and The Prisma/The Multicultural Newspaper which offer paid or unpaid internships that give our students the opportunity to work in the UK or overseas or to contribute to the production of media content. In the past our students have also gained experience by participating in the Pearson Diversity Summer Internship Programme and other similar schemes. We place particular importance to such opportunities as these help our students to build upon their academic and practical work and further develop the skills that will enable them to embark on their chosen careers.

Hands-on media training: In addition to the accredited curriculum, the MA includes a number of training sessions in the use of cameras, sound and editing as well as in the Adobe Creative Suite.

Course structure

The course offers two study routes to suit your future plans: You can choose one of two routes for the award: the Dissertation Route or a Practice Route culminating in a final project.

The following modules are indicative of what you study on this course.

Semester 1 (core modules)

Semester 1 (optional modules)

Semester 2 (core modules)

Semester 2 (optional modules)

Career path

This course is designed to attract a mix of new graduates, often with a media-related degree or work experience, and people who have already worked in journalism, but want to enhance their understanding of social diversity and their skills in the area of inclusive journalism. It is suitable for existing media professionals that want to reflect on their practice as journalists, as well as students who want to pursue a career in the media, national and local government, IGOs and NGOs or who intend to embark on a relevant research/academic career. It will be a valuable asset for civil servants and local authority staff, NGO workers working on immigration, equality, social inclusion and cohesion and community regeneration whose duties involve communication and media work.



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This course offers a hands-on curriculum that allows you to develop core journalistic skills in broadcast and digital media. You will learn the technical skills to master tv, audio and digital reporting. Read more

This course offers a hands-on curriculum that allows you to develop core journalistic skills in broadcast and digital media. You will learn the technical skills to master tv, audio and digital reporting. The course has a very practical focus, so you will develop your own story ideas and gather your own material through research and reporting for journalistic course work. You will be given full training in using our up-to-date media resources, ensuring that you graduate from the course as a multi-skilled journalist being competent in digital and broadcast journalism. While mainly being taught at our creative Harrow Campus, modules are also delivered at our Regent Street Campus in the heart of London allowing you the opportunity to report stories of this dynamic city in walking distance of the BBC or Buzzfeed.

The MA has been accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) which means we provide industry backed journalism training for online, TV and radio. Our students regularly win BJTC awards, and the course has been awarded the BJTC award for excellence in teaching.

Our teaching staff are highly experienced journalism professionals, and our graduates go on to work with a variety of leading media organisations including BBC TV and Radio, BBC News Online, ITN, Russia Today, Al Jazeera, the Financial Times and The Guardian, Conde Nast, and many other media houses in Britain and around the world.

There is a strong emphasis on learning through 'hands-on' practice, in small class groups, using our professional studios and standard facilities. Most of your assessed course-work will be 'real' journalism assignments, a preparation for the world of contemporary journalism.

As well as regular classes taught by experienced journalists on our staff, we also invite other media professionals as guest speakers or to critique student work. We support you in applying for work placements, encourage you to go to journalism events and network with professionals, and to pursue other journalism experiences. 

You will have the chance to air your work on Smoke Radio, the University's multi-award-winning internet radio station, or post items onto the MA's own news site, Westminster World.

The course is taught over two semesters, and for the Masters students followed by the largely self-directed final project in the summer. Unlike many other journalism MAs, you can undertake an extensive practical Final Project. This could be a TV or radio documentary or a digital project. Students may undertake placements in the period from the Easter break to the end of the course to gather further work experience in a news or current affairs production company of usually three to four weeks. This MA can be taken as a part-time course (daytime) over two years studying two days a week after initial more intense orientation weeks.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.

Core modules

Optional modules

Course accreditation

This course is accredited by Broadcast Journalism Training Council, BJTC.

Career path

Though designed to prepare you for a career in journalism, this course could also lead to a career in public relations, communications, or any other professional pathway which requires effective communication skills, and the use of convergent media.

Our graduates work in journalism and content production as editors, reporters, producers and successful freelancers. They have gone to work as editors with BBC News, written cover stories of The Guardian, have become producers at CNN and overlook the content output of a fashion brand or an NGO. Both pathways are accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC).

We assist students to get work placements during the course, provide career advice, arrange network events, and keep close contact to potential employers.



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This course offers a hands-on curriculum that allows you to develop your core journalistic skills. You will learn to master a broad variety of media formats from writing and reporting to social media and video. Read more

This course offers a hands-on curriculum that allows you to develop your core journalistic skills. You will learn to master a broad variety of media formats from writing and reporting to social media and video. Besides writing, the course emphasises contemporary digital skills which will place you in high demand in an ever-changing world of content creation and distribution. Being partly taught at Regent Street Campus in the heart of London you will get the opportunity to report stories of this dynamic city in walking distance of one of the BBC or Buzzfeed. You will be given full training in using our up-to-date media resources, ensuring that you graduate from the course as a multi-skilled journalist being competent in digital media and written journalism and in video.

The course is accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) which means beside written journalism we also offer you industry backed journalism training for online video and broadcast providing voice training, camera skills and editing. Our graduates go on to work with a variety of leading media organisations including The Guardian, The Evening Standard, BBC, CNN, Al Jazeera, or Conde Nast, and many other media houses in Britain and around the world.

Many of our students have won journalism awards, and we have twice been awarded a BJTC award for excellence in teaching as our teaching staff are all experienced journalism professionals who have worked for The Guardian, The Independent or Conde Nast and other media outlets.

There's a strong emphasis on learning through 'hands-on' practice, in small class groups, using our professional standard facilities. Most of your assessed course-work will be 'real' journalism assignments, a preparation for the exciting world of contemporary journalism.

As well as regular classes taught by experienced journalists on our staff, we also invite media professionals as guest speakers or to critique student work. We support you in applying for work placements, encourage you go to journalism events and network with professionals, and to pursue other journalism experiences. 

You will have the chance to air your work on Smoke Radio, the University's multi-award-winning internet radio station, or post items onto the MA's own news site, Westminster World.

The course is taught over two semesters, and for the Master's students followed by the largely self-directed final project in the summer. Unlike many other journalism MAs, you can undertake an extensive practical Final Project. Students may undertake placements in the period from the Easter break to the end of the course to gather further work experience in a news or current affairs production company of usually three to four weeks. This MA can be taken as a part-time course (daytime) over two years studying two days a week after initial more intense orientation weeks.

Course structure

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course. Please note: Not all option modules will necessarily be offered in any one year.

Core modules

Optional modules

Course accreditation

This course is accredited by Broadcast Journalism Training Council, BJTC.

Career path

Though designed to prepare you for a career in journalism, this course could also lead to a career in public relations, communications, or any other professional pathway which requires effective communication skills, and the use of convergent media.

Our graduates work in journalism and content production as editors, reporters, producers and successful freelancers. They have gone to work as editors with BBC News, written cover stories of The Guardian, have become producers at CNN and overlook the content output of a fashion brand or an NGO. Both pathways are accredited by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC).

We assist students to get work placements during the course, provide career advice, arrange network events, and keep close contact to potential employers.



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Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication. Read more

Our MSc Science Communication course is ideal if you are interested in science, technology, medicine, mathematics or engineering and want to work in the field of science communication.

You will develop the skills required to work in a range of sectors, including media, science policy, filmmaking, science outreach, public relations, museums and science centres, science festivals, and other public engagement fields.

Developed by the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine and Manchester Institute of Innovation Research , the course features masterclasses and project support from leading professionals in a wide range of sectors, together with experienced science communicators from across the University.

You will spend time building up practical communication skills, and thinking about the broad range of challenges that science communicators face. Does science communication matter for society? Whose interests are furthered by science news? What are the ethical issues in the communication of health research? When we talk about public engagement, what kind of public do we mean?

You will consider these and other questions through insights drawn from history, innovation and policy research, media studies, and the first-hand experience of long-serving communicators, and link these to practical skills.

Special features

Real world learning

We bring practitioners into the classroom and enable you to participate in the various forms of science communication that take place in Manchester to complement your academic learning with real life experiences.

Teaching and learning

You will learn through a mixture of lectures, small-group seminars, discussions and practical exercises. Activities will be included in the taught elements for both individual students and groups.

You will engage with primary and secondary academic literatures, professional literatures, and mass media products about science, technology and medicine.

You will also learn at special sites of science communication, such as museums, media institutions, and public events.

We encourage participation and volunteering to help you further your own interests alongside the taught curriculum. All students will meet regularly with a mentor from the Centre's PhD community, with a designated personal tutor from among the staff and, from Semester 2, a dissertation supervisor.

Applicants may informally request examples of study materials to help you test your ability to engage effectively with the course from the Course Director.

Coursework and assessment

All units are assessed by academic and practical tasks set in parallel. You should expect both written and spoken assessments that use a format appropriate to the relevant professional group or medium.

You may choose your own topic or medium for many of the assessments. Assessed work also includes a piece of original science communication research.

The final assessment is a project created under the supervision of a science communication professional (the mentored project).

Course unit details

The full-time version of the course runs for 12 months from September. There is also a part-time alternative, covering half the same classes each semester over two years. Part-time study involves a limited number of days' attendance per week and can be combined with part-time employment.

All students take three course units consisting of weekly lectures and discussion seminars:

  • Introduction to Science Communication (30 credits)
  • Communicating ideas in science, technology and medicine (15 credits)
  • Introduction to Contemporary Science and Medicine (15 credits)

All students also attend a series of intensive one-day schools on science communication practice and science policy, with sessions led by invited contributors including journalists, documentary filmmakers, museum professionals, policy analysts, outreach officers and other relevant experts. From these day schools, you will choose two of the following four areas to specialise in for assessed work (although you can sit in on all these units):

  • Science, media and journalism (15 credits)
  • Science museums, Science Centres and Public Events (15 credits)
  • Ideas and issues in science communication studies (15 credits) ¿ Science, government and policy (15 credits)

The course is completed by two more open-ended elements allowing you to specialise towards your preferred interests.

  • The science communication research project (30 credits) gives more scope for independent investigation and includes new research on a particular science communication topic.
  • The mentored project (60 credits), completed over the summer at the end of the course, involves working with support from a science communication professional on developing and analysing an activity close to professional practice.

Our course teaches the current trends in science communication, so details of our units may vary from year to year to stay up to date. This type of change is covered within the University's disclaimer , but if you are in doubt about a unit of interest, please contact us before accepting your offer of a place.

What our students say

Read about graduate Amie Peltzer's experience of the course on the Biology, Medicine and Health Student Blog .

Facilities

You will have use of a shared office in the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, including networked computer terminals and storage space, and use of a dedicated subject library housed in the PhD office.

You will also be able to access a range of facilities throughout the University.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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