• Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
Cardiff University Featured Masters Courses
Coventry University Featured Masters Courses
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
Loughborough University Featured Masters Courses
"mas"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (Mas)

  • "mas" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 53
Order by 
The Master of Arts in American Studies (MAS) at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) is a preeminent interdisciplinary program aimed at talented and ambitious graduate students from around the world. Read more

Master of Arts in American Studies

The Master of Arts in American Studies (MAS) at the Heidelberg Center for American Studies (HCA) is a preeminent interdisciplinary program aimed at talented and ambitious graduate students from around the world. The MAS is a three semester program, however, a performance-related fast track option (two semesters) is available.
The program offers exemplary and interdisciplinary teaching that provides students with in-depth cultural knowledge about the United States of America, combined with a unique outside perspective. The curriculum includes a selection of courses from economics, geography, history, law, literature, political science, religious studies, and sociology. MAS students will benefit both from excellent academic teaching by internationally renowned scholars and from an interdisciplinary approach that meets the needs of future leaders. The MAS program is taught in English.

Application deadline is March 31st.

Study at a world-class research university

Become part of a premier institute for interdisciplinary research at Germany‘s oldest university; an ideal combination of innovation and tradition. Heidelberg was recently declared one of Germany‘s elite institutions of higher learning.

Enjoy our beautiful campus

The University is spread across the 800-year-old historic city center and a newer campus area north of the Neckar River. The HCA is located in a 300-year-old baroque townhouse just steps away from the University Library and the main lecture halls. This setting offers perfect working conditions as well as a welcoming atmosphere for students, scholars, and the public.

Join an international learning community

Heidelberg is home to over 30,000 full-time students, including more than 6,000 international students. Students from almost 44 countries have participated in the MAS program over the past four years. Heidelberg University also attracts aound 250 international scholars as Visiting Professors each academic year.

Benefit from faculty expertise

First-class academics from various disciplines teach in the MAS. You will have access to distinguished scholars from the departments of English and American Literature, Geography, History, Law, Philosophy, Political Science, Theology, and Religious Studies, as well as their departmental libraries.

Enjoy a first-rate library

Along with 6.2 million books, the university library system boasts over 8,000 journals in print, more than 100,000 electronic journals, almost 400,000 E-books, more than 900,000 dissertations, and offers access more than 3,000 databases.

Access outstanding research facilities

Our students conduct research at globally renowned institutions such as the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law, a United Nations depository library, and the Schurman Library for American History.

Experience Heidelberg

There is no better place to spend your year abroad! Set in the picturesque Neckar Valley Heidelberg’s beautiful historic center offers a romantic small town atmosphere with a cosmopolitan appeal. Enjoy easy access to the nearby cultural and recreational offerings such as the Black Forest and spectacular castles. With the new express train, Paris is only three hours away. A trip to Strasbourg and the Alsace takes less than an hour. Switzerland and the Alps are a mere two hours to the south.

For further information on the MAS program and the application procedure, please check out website: http://www.hca.uni-heidelberg.de/ma/index_en.html

Read less
This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations. Read more

MAS in International and European Security

09 October 2017 - 25 May 2018

This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations.

Participants will benefit from the expertise of over 100 highly qualified academics, experienced diplomats, government officials and distinguished practitioners from around the world. It is designed to advance participants' knowledge base and through practical application demonstrates its relevance to the implementation of effective and sustainable policies, which contribute to global peace and stability.

Programme Aims:

Enhance participant understandings of peace and stability in national, ‘world-regional’ and global contexts by:
• Identifying and characterizing strategic threats to peace and stability;
• Analysing the changing nature of actors that seek to manage existing and emergent threats;
• Assessing the efficiency and effectiveness of current policy responses and debating possible future alternative policy options

The MAS provides not just space for academic reflection, but also provides participants with skills, knowledge and networksenabling participants to constructively and critically inform policy debates and discourse by:
• Engaging in and influencing decision-making,
• Enhancing their professional development and institutional capacity,
• Leveraging their strengthened skills, knowledge and networks for collaborative leadership and cooperative solutions

Full Accreditation

Participants who complete the programme successfully will be awarded a 60 ECTS Master of Advanced Studies in International and European Security by the University of Geneva and the GCSP. It has also received the highest level of accreditation awarded to degrees in Switzerland by the AAQ. As a result, the MAS degree receives automatic equivalence in most countries worldwide.

Module 1: The Foundations of International Security

This module will provide an introduction and analysis of challenges and actors that shape the security context, such as the growing environment, economy and energy nexus, international law, human security and globalisation. It will enable participants to identify the range of structural and systemic dynamics that shape our understanding of the strategic context, linking different schools of thought and levels of analysis to practice.

Module 2: Actors and Issues in International Security

This module enhances participant understanding of security policy through a focus on the evolving role of traditional and emerging international security leaders, in addition to conflict management and transnational security challenges. These will be considered both from a hard and human security perspective. It will also expose them to a wide range of readings and specialist speakers, both scholars and practitioners.

Module 3: Regional & Global Security

This module will concentrate on cooperative and competitive dynamics in emerging regions such as sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; conditions in South Asia; and developments in China and the Asia-Pacific region. It will build upon the analysis of challenges,actors and responses in the first two modules within the context of emerging regions.

Module 4: Issues and Concepts in International Security

This interdisciplinary module consists of a number of lectures and research methods seminars held throughout the entire nine-month period. Issues in international security are theoretically analysed within a multidisciplinary approach i.e. history, economics, law, political science and political philosophy. The conceptual lectures academically complement and reinforce the more practical and policy-orientated teaching and seminar work of the first three Modules. They broaden and deepen participant appreciation of the relationships between International Relations as an academic discipline and international relations as a daily practice.

Module 5: Research Paper (10-12000 words)

Under the supervision of professors from both the University and the GCSP, participants will write a research paper on a security policy-related topic. This module allows participants to develop their ability to write a research paper incorporating the lessons learned during the first four modules, and from individual and group analytical work. To provide the opportunity to demonstrate an ability to select useful sources and literature for structured research through pertinent and scientifically valid arguments, in accordance with academic standards.

Please note the themes addressed in the modules may be subject to revision.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Candidates will be selected on the basis of an application which should consist of the following:

•A letter of motivation (800 words max).
•An up-to-date Curriculum Vitae.
•A copy of relevant university degree(s).
•Two letters of recommendation.
•A writing sample of 1500 words (verified with an anti-plagiarism software) on either:
What is the purpose and relevance of reforming the United Nations Security Council? Or
Has the world’s global transformation of authoritarian regimes reached a turning point?”

DEADLINE: 01 May 2017

Please note that places are limited.

For additional information, please contact:

http://www.unige.ch/formcont/mas-security.html

Read less
Memorial’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics is one of the institution’s youngest – half our faculty have been hired since 2005 – and most recognized – 20% of us hold the university's highest rank, University Research Professor. Read more
Memorial’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics is one of the institution’s youngest – half our faculty have been hired since 2005 – and most recognized – 20% of us hold the university's highest rank, University Research Professor. Although the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has offered graduate degrees for many years, the past decade has seen an explosion of interest in these programs, adding invaluable new voices to the Department's community of researchers.

Among the research areas studied by our faculty and graduate students are the following: Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computation, Analysis, Combinatorics, Topology, Applied Statistics, Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems, Mathematical Models and Modeling / Numerical Optimization, Algebra, Mathematical Physics, Mathematical Statistics, and Fluid Mechanics.

MAS -The MAS is a highly structured program incorporating both courses and practicum (an applied statistics project). A full-time student with an honours degree in statistics normally requires two years to complete the degree requirements. This program accepts new students only in the Fall semester.

MSc – The MSc program has two options. The research-based program consists of graduate courses and a thesis. A full-time student is expected to complete the degree requirements in two years. The course-based program is an intensive three semester (one-year) program based on graduate courses and a project. This program accepts new students only in the Fall semester.

Read less
[Dual MAS/MLIS]]. The Dual Degree Program is designed to allow students to earn both an MAS and an MLIS. Students considering this option should carefully read the descriptions for both the MLIS and the MAS degrees. Read more
[Dual MAS/MLIS]]
The Dual Degree Program is designed to allow students to earn both an MAS and an MLIS. Students considering this option should carefully read the descriptions for both the MLIS and the MAS degrees.

Core Courses

Students in the Dual MAS/MLIS program will complete both the MAS Core courses and the MLIS Core courses. Students starting their program in the September term will begin with the MAS Core courses, whereas students who start in the January term must begin with the MLIS Core courses.

Electives

Candidates admitted to the Dual MAS/MLIS program will be assigned an adviser from each of the two degree programs. These advisers will be able to assist the student in selecting electives from both the MAS and MLIS programs.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies and Master of Library and Information Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies and Library Information Studies
- Subject: Information Technology
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

Read less
Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

Read less
The academic study of public relations and the media is very new and this MA puts us at the forefront of this development. Read more
The academic study of public relations and the media is very new and this MA puts us at the forefront of this development. Most of the MAs in Britain either focus on corporate public relations and are predominantly practical or are theoretical courses that sit within more traditional mass communications curriculum and focus on the important area of political communications and the news media. Our MA is innovative because it combines theory and practice, which is a distinctive feature of MAs in Screen Media. Also innovative is our combined examination of the impact of public relations on the media and the use of public relations practices within media organisations, with particular reference to their promotional cultures. This provides students with a broad and advanced understanding of the relationship between public relations and the media.

This programme will investigate the rise of public relations and its links with global media institutions from both historical perspectives and in relation to the contemporary media landscape. It will offer a critical examination of the role of PR in the mediation of power as well as the role of public relations in a range of media arenas.

You will be encouraged to reflect critically and theoretically on the function of PR in relation to: the role of the media in political communication, media policy, celebrity culture, film marketing, alternative media, media campaigning, and new media technologies. You will be offered the opportunity to plan PR campaigns and reflect on their role in the knowledge economy. This combination will provide you with the opportunity to examine the context in which PR practice takes place as well as developing the knowledge and skills to work ethically in PR at an international level.

Read less
This unique programme - the only one of its kind in the UK - is dedicated to postgraduate study and research in the tradition of modern European (or ‘continental') philosophy. Read more
This unique programme - the only one of its kind in the UK - is dedicated to postgraduate study and research in the tradition of modern European (or ‘continental') philosophy. It will enable you to study in more depth and with a more intense research focus than the one-year MAs. You will be taught by the internationally renowned members of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), with their wide range of philosophical and interdisciplinary expertise.

Key features
-This course engages in detail and in depth with fundamental texts in modern European philosophy and with 20th-century developments in modern European philosophy and critical theory.
-The course is based at the UK's leading Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, along with four MAs and a large group of research students.
-The range of option modules enables you to tailor your studies to your area of interest.
Kingston University combines an inclusive approach to education with ambitious investment in advanced-level humanities teaching and research.
-You will benefit from easy access to London's research libraries and research events, plus proximity to French, German and other European universities and libraries.

What will you study?

The programme begins with a compulsory module on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. You will then choose five modules from an extensive list that covers some of the foundational texts and thinkers of the modern European tradition (Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Heidegger) and 20th- and 21st-century philosophy and critical theory, including psychoanalysis.

You will then take a dissertation module, which includes content-based philosophical research methods seminars. Your dissertation will be assessed with a viva voce examination. In addition, you will organise and run reading groups around your own interests and on topics related to your dissertations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Kant and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-MPhilStud in Philosophy Dissertation

Optional modules
-Art Theory: Modernism, Avant-Garde, Contemporary - delivered and assessed in English
-Critique, Practice, Power
-Hegel and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-Kant and the Aesthetic Tradition - Delivered and assessed in English
-Nietzsche and Heidegger - delivered and assessed in English
-Philosophy and Psychoanalysis
-Philosophy of Art History
-Political Philosophy
-Recent French Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English
-Recent Italian Philosophy
-Topics in Modern European Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English

Read less
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. Read more
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. The MA in Teaching Languages (Arabic) is designed for teachers and language professionals as well those with no teaching experience. The course ensures that students develop new ways of thinking and talking about language, language teaching and language learning across different social and educational contexts.

More about this course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to study at doctoral level. The lecturers teaching on the course have long-term experiences in teaching in different contexts, are research active and have publications in the subject area.

There are no exams. Students are assessed via a variety of methods including coursework, essays, presentations, research and a final dissertation.

Modular structure

Modules:
-Issues in language learning: an intercultural approach
-Research methods
-Language testing and assessment
-MA dissertation
-Arabic linguistics and cultures
-Arabic world studies
-Material design for teaching Arabic

After the course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to do a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. Read more
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. The MA in Teaching Languages (English) is designed for teachers and language professionals as well as those with no teaching experience. The course ensures that students develop new ways of thinking and talking about language, language teaching and language learning across different social and educational contexts.

More about this course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to study at doctoral level. The lecturers teaching on the course have long-term experiences in teaching in different contexts, are research active and have publications in the subject area.

There are no exams. Students are assessed via a variety of methods including coursework, essays, presentations, research and a final dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Issues in Language Learning: An Intercultural Approach (core, 20 credits)
-Language Testing and Assessment (core, 20 credits)
-Linguistics and Language Teaching: the Description of Language and its Pedagogic Applications (core, 20 credits)
-Patterns in Global Sociolinguistics (core, 20 credits)
-Research Methods (core, 20 credits)
-Teaching Languages Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Understanding the Language Classroom (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to do a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. Read more
Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. The­se ques­ti­ons form the star­ting point of our in­ter­na­tio­nal, in­ter- and trans­di­sci­pli­na­ry re­se­arch-ori­en­ted, and sustaina­bi­li­ty-pro­blem-fo­cu­sed Mas­ter's Pro­gram in Global Sustainability Science.

Read less
The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a 21 month programme that prepares graduates for professional social work practice with children and families, and with adult service users. Read more
The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a 21 month programme that prepares graduates for professional social work practice with children and families, and with adult service users. It is run in partnership with local service providers in the statutory and voluntary sectors, and with service users and carers who contribute to all stages of the programme. Following successful completion of the MSW students are eligible to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration as a social worker, a protected title in the UK.

The Durham MSW offers excellent learning experiences facilitated by leading social work researchers and educators, including academics and social work practitioners as well as children, young people and adults who have experience of accessing social work services. The first year of the programme includes opportunities for joint learning with students undertaking MAs in ‘International Social Work and Community Development’ and ‘Community and Youth Work’. We have strong partnerships with a wide range of practice agencies offering high quality placements. Durham MSW graduates have excellent employment prospects.

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1

-Social Work in Practice (40 credits)
-Social Work in Context (40 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Social Work in Practice 1(50 credits)

Year 2

-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Advanced Social Work (30 credits)
-Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits)

Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There is approximately twelve weeks vacation including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice with children and adults, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment
Modules are assessed through essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, all students undergo a practical assessment of their readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by a practice educator and through critically reflective accounts of case studies of work with individuals, groups or communities. Research in Professional Practice is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements
Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.

Other admission requirements

-GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English grade C or above, or equivalent, at the time of application.
-Applicants must have sufficient recent experience (in employment, as a volunteer, as a service user or carer) in a social care, health care or related voluntary setting to be able to demonstrate an understanding of the capabilities of a social worker as indicated at the entry level of the Professional Capabilities Framework. As a guideline, this period of experience is unlikely to be less than six months.
-Applicants for whom English is not a first language will be required to demonstrate evidence of English Language Competence equivalent to IELTS 7 with no element less than 6.5.

You will also be required to:
-Attend an interview*.
-Demonstrate fitness to undergo social work training.

A. At the interview stage you are asked to declare any health conditions or disabilities that may affect your ability to undertake a practice placement safely and effectively.
B. Upon acceptance of a firm offer on the course, you are asked to complete an occupational health screening in line with national guidelines agreed with relevant professional bodies.
C. Provide evidence that you do not have a criminal record that might restrict your opportunities to work with children or vulnerable adults. Candidates will be required as a condition of admission to undertake, or provide evidence of, a current DBS check.

*Candidates who are based overseas and cannot attend an interview in person may be interviewed remotely and should contact the admissions secretary if necessary to seek advice.

The Admissions Tutor gives equal consideration to all applications received before the UCAS January deadline, in accordance with UCAS regulations and University policy. However, we start assessing applications and interviewing from November onwards, in order to meet the required timescales. It is, therefore, advisable to make an early application.

Read less
Advanced study of Greek, Roman and near Eastern history that develops skills in handling documentary evidence. Intercollegiate programme with a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

About the Ancient History MA:

Advanced study of Greek, Roman and near Eastern history that develops skills in handling documentary evidence. Intercollegiate programme with a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Compulsory module: Sources & Methods in Ancient History. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/ancient-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

The MA programme in Ancient History is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the programme offerings combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

The programme consists of a compulsory core module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last elements provide particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages, and with translated texts. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from the syllabuses for the MAs in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other MA programmes at King's. You may also take modules in Greek and Latin Languages for Research at beginners or intermediate level.


Course format and assessment

Full-time study: six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.
Part-time study: two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.
Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 12,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Career prospects

Research in the department; teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/mlc

Read less
Advanced study of the classical world in world-leading department, with focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more
Advanced study of the classical world in world-leading department, with focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Compulsory colloquium: Undertaking Research in Classics. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)


Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/classics-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the programme offerings combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

The programme consists of a three optional modules, and a dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classics, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology.

Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, modules may also be taken from the syllabuses for the MAs in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both intermediate and beginners levels.

- Course purpose -

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 6-8 hours of taught classes per week. Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 12,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Many students go on to pursue research in our department; others have developed their skills in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Welsh Writing in English offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in Welsh Writing in English

The MA allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA is openly structured. You define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

You develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Welsh Writing in English course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. There are three core modules and three optional modules. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing.

Part-time study is also available.

Welsh Writing in English Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to Welsh Writing in English.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of Welsh Writing in English.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Welsh Writing in English typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advanced Research Skills
• Dylan Thomas and the Rise of Welsh Writing in English
• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives
• Women Writing Modern Wales
• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic
• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Welsh Writing in English graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as education; publishing; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Welsh Writing in English from an English or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to early modern history.

Research Interests

The Centre for Research into the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW) is directed by Dr Kirsti Bohata, alongside Professor Daniel Williams who during the past decade has developed comparative approaches to the literatures of Wales. He took over from Professor M.Wynn Thomas OBE, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the English Association. Kirsti Bohata’s areas of specialism include Postcolonial Studies, Women’s Writing and the Production History and Culture of the Book. Professor
Dai Smith is Raymond Williams Chair of Welsh Cultural History within CREW, Dr John Goodby is a poet, leading scholar of post-war Irish poetry and specialist in Dylan Thomas, while Peter Lord, the leading historian and interpreter of Wales’s visual culture, is the Centre’s Research Fellow who recently published an edition of the Winifred Coombe Tenant Diaries. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through CREW and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

Read less
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK. -Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources. Read more
-Study at one of the largest and liveliest classical world education centres in the UK
-Work with a strong research community, supported by excellent resources
-Opportunities to begin or continue your study of Ancient Greek or Latin

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. Demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.
ii. Understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.
iii. Be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.
iv. Be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.
v. Work effectively as autonomous scholars.
vi. Be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units. If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X