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Masters Degrees (Mas)

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This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations. Read more

MAS in International and European Security

09 October 2017 - 25 May 2018

This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations.

Participants will benefit from the expertise of over 100 highly qualified academics, experienced diplomats, government officials and distinguished practitioners from around the world. It is designed to advance participants' knowledge base and through practical application demonstrates its relevance to the implementation of effective and sustainable policies, which contribute to global peace and stability.

Programme Aims:

Enhance participant understandings of peace and stability in national, ‘world-regional’ and global contexts by:
• Identifying and characterizing strategic threats to peace and stability;
• Analysing the changing nature of actors that seek to manage existing and emergent threats;
• Assessing the efficiency and effectiveness of current policy responses and debating possible future alternative policy options

The MAS provides not just space for academic reflection, but also provides participants with skills, knowledge and networksenabling participants to constructively and critically inform policy debates and discourse by:
• Engaging in and influencing decision-making,
• Enhancing their professional development and institutional capacity,
• Leveraging their strengthened skills, knowledge and networks for collaborative leadership and cooperative solutions

Full Accreditation

Participants who complete the programme successfully will be awarded a 60 ECTS Master of Advanced Studies in International and European Security by the University of Geneva and the GCSP. It has also received the highest level of accreditation awarded to degrees in Switzerland by the AAQ. As a result, the MAS degree receives automatic equivalence in most countries worldwide.

Module 1: The Foundations of International Security

This module will provide an introduction and analysis of challenges and actors that shape the security context, such as the growing environment, economy and energy nexus, international law, human security and globalisation. It will enable participants to identify the range of structural and systemic dynamics that shape our understanding of the strategic context, linking different schools of thought and levels of analysis to practice.

Module 2: Actors and Issues in International Security

This module enhances participant understanding of security policy through a focus on the evolving role of traditional and emerging international security leaders, in addition to conflict management and transnational security challenges. These will be considered both from a hard and human security perspective. It will also expose them to a wide range of readings and specialist speakers, both scholars and practitioners.

Module 3: Regional & Global Security

This module will concentrate on cooperative and competitive dynamics in emerging regions such as sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; conditions in South Asia; and developments in China and the Asia-Pacific region. It will build upon the analysis of challenges,actors and responses in the first two modules within the context of emerging regions.

Module 4: Issues and Concepts in International Security

This interdisciplinary module consists of a number of lectures and research methods seminars held throughout the entire nine-month period. Issues in international security are theoretically analysed within a multidisciplinary approach i.e. history, economics, law, political science and political philosophy. The conceptual lectures academically complement and reinforce the more practical and policy-orientated teaching and seminar work of the first three Modules. They broaden and deepen participant appreciation of the relationships between International Relations as an academic discipline and international relations as a daily practice.

Module 5: Research Paper (10-12000 words)

Under the supervision of professors from both the University and the GCSP, participants will write a research paper on a security policy-related topic. This module allows participants to develop their ability to write a research paper incorporating the lessons learned during the first four modules, and from individual and group analytical work. To provide the opportunity to demonstrate an ability to select useful sources and literature for structured research through pertinent and scientifically valid arguments, in accordance with academic standards.

Please note the themes addressed in the modules may be subject to revision.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Candidates will be selected on the basis of an application which should consist of the following:

•A letter of motivation (800 words max).
•An up-to-date Curriculum Vitae.
•A copy of relevant university degree(s).
•Two letters of recommendation.
•A writing sample of 1500 words (verified with an anti-plagiarism software) on either:
What is the purpose and relevance of reforming the United Nations Security Council? Or
Has the world’s global transformation of authoritarian regimes reached a turning point?”

DEADLINE: 01 May 2017

Please note that places are limited.

For additional information, please contact:

http://www.unige.ch/formcont/mas-security.html

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About the Programme. The (Master of Advanced Studies). MAS ETH in Science, Technology and Policy. provides natural science and engineering graduates with complementary skills in public policy analysis and policy management. Read more

About the Programme

The (Master of Advanced Studies) MAS ETH in Science, Technology and Policy provides natural science and engineering graduates with complementary skills in public policy analysis and policy management. The programme's focus is building students' ability to situate scientific and engineering knowledge within a broader social, economic, and political context, and analyse policy-making institutions, processes and policy options as well as policy management and evaluation procedures.

While emphasis is on a wide range of skills in policy analysis and management, the programme offers ample opportunities to apply those skills to specific policy areas of interest.The MAS ETH STP will support the creation of a next generation of decision makers and policy leaders truly literate in science and technology as well as policy.

The MAS Programme includes lectures, seminars, case studies, and independent research work, including an extensive policy analysis project. The first half of the programme is designed for full time study, and the second half of the programme can be completed through full- or part-time study in combination with an internship or professional employment.

Objectives

The programme's goal is to complement students' scientific or engineering skills with additional education in public policy analysis and policy management to support successful careers in government, public administration, corporate regulatory and strategy divisions, international organisations, and civil society.

Professional perspectives

The MAS ETH STP programme is for students seeking to combine their science or engineering knowledge with skills in policy analysis and policy management. Potential future employers include: 

  • government departments focusing, for instance, on environmental, telecom, or pharmaceuticals regulation, R&D funding, or export controls on dual-use goods;
  • regulatory, public affairs, and strategy units in technology firms;
  • international organisations, or sections therein focused on technology, innovation, and regulation;
  • civil society organisations focused on science and technology-related issues.


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[Dual MAS/MLIS]]. The Dual Degree Program is designed to allow students to earn both an MAS and an MLIS. Students considering this option should carefully read the descriptions for both the MLIS and the MAS degrees. Read more
[Dual MAS/MLIS]]
The Dual Degree Program is designed to allow students to earn both an MAS and an MLIS. Students considering this option should carefully read the descriptions for both the MLIS and the MAS degrees.

Core Courses

Students in the Dual MAS/MLIS program will complete both the MAS Core courses and the MLIS Core courses. Students starting their program in the September term will begin with the MAS Core courses, whereas students who start in the January term must begin with the MLIS Core courses.

Electives

Candidates admitted to the Dual MAS/MLIS program will be assigned an adviser from each of the two degree programs. These advisers will be able to assist the student in selecting electives from both the MAS and MLIS programs.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies and Master of Library and Information Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies and Library Information Studies
- Subject: Information Technology
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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This unique programme - the only one of its kind in the UK - is dedicated to postgraduate study and research in the tradition of modern European (or ‘continental') philosophy. Read more
This unique programme - the only one of its kind in the UK - is dedicated to postgraduate study and research in the tradition of modern European (or ‘continental') philosophy. It will enable you to study in more depth and with a more intense research focus than the one-year MAs. You will be taught by the internationally renowned members of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), with their wide range of philosophical and interdisciplinary expertise.

Key features
-This course engages in detail and in depth with fundamental texts in modern European philosophy and with 20th-century developments in modern European philosophy and critical theory.
-The course is based at the UK's leading Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, along with four MAs and a large group of research students.
-The range of option modules enables you to tailor your studies to your area of interest.
Kingston University combines an inclusive approach to education with ambitious investment in advanced-level humanities teaching and research.
-You will benefit from easy access to London's research libraries and research events, plus proximity to French, German and other European universities and libraries.

What will you study?

The programme begins with a compulsory module on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. You will then choose five modules from an extensive list that covers some of the foundational texts and thinkers of the modern European tradition (Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Heidegger) and 20th- and 21st-century philosophy and critical theory, including psychoanalysis.

You will then take a dissertation module, which includes content-based philosophical research methods seminars. Your dissertation will be assessed with a viva voce examination. In addition, you will organise and run reading groups around your own interests and on topics related to your dissertations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Kant and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-MPhilStud in Philosophy Dissertation

Optional modules
-Art Theory: Modernism, Avant-Garde, Contemporary - delivered and assessed in English
-Critique, Practice, Power
-Hegel and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-Kant and the Aesthetic Tradition - Delivered and assessed in English
-Nietzsche and Heidegger - delivered and assessed in English
-Philosophy and Psychoanalysis
-Philosophy of Art History
-Political Philosophy
-Recent French Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English
-Recent Italian Philosophy
-Topics in Modern European Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English

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The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. Read more
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. The MA in Teaching Languages (Arabic) is designed for teachers and language professionals as well those with no teaching experience. The course ensures that students develop new ways of thinking and talking about language, language teaching and language learning across different social and educational contexts.

More about this course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to study at doctoral level. The lecturers teaching on the course have long-term experiences in teaching in different contexts, are research active and have publications in the subject area.

There are no exams. Students are assessed via a variety of methods including coursework, essays, presentations, research and a final dissertation.

Modular structure

Modules:
-Issues in language learning: an intercultural approach
-Research methods
-Language testing and assessment
-MA dissertation
-Arabic linguistics and cultures
-Arabic world studies
-Material design for teaching Arabic

After the course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to do a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. Read more
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. The MA in Teaching Languages (English) is designed for teachers and language professionals as well as those with no teaching experience. The course ensures that students develop new ways of thinking and talking about language, language teaching and language learning across different social and educational contexts.

More about this course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to study at doctoral level. The lecturers teaching on the course have long-term experiences in teaching in different contexts, are research active and have publications in the subject area.

There are no exams. Students are assessed via a variety of methods including coursework, essays, presentations, research and a final dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Issues in Language Learning: An Intercultural Approach (core, 20 credits)
-Language Testing and Assessment (core, 20 credits)
-Linguistics and Language Teaching: the Description of Language and its Pedagogic Applications (core, 20 credits)
-Patterns in Global Sociolinguistics (core, 20 credits)
-Research Methods (core, 20 credits)
-Teaching Languages Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Understanding the Language Classroom (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to do a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course is subject to validation. The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. Read more
This course is subject to validation.

The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. We believe that all writers need a core toolkit of skills, but we also understand that our students often want to specialise in an area of writing about which they’re passionate; that’s why we offer pathways in Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror, Commercial Fiction, Writing for Children and Creative Non-Fiction. Our courses are designed with busy lives in mind, and are taught through a combination of intensive weekends, high-quality distance learning and one-to-one tutorials, either in person or via Skype. We also offer a strong focus on developing professional practice in writers, looking at skills such as self-presentation, pitching and understanding the publishing industry.

Our Pathways

Commercial Fiction:
Students selecting this pathway will explore literary and more commercial forms of creative writing, fiction, poetry and non-fiction. This degree will appeal to students who wish to generally enrich their writing skills, or whose practice falls broadly into these areas.

Fantasy, Science-Fiction and Horror:
This pathway is aimed at students who wish to specialise in speculative fiction genres. You will develop a detailed understanding of the history and diversity of these literary forms, and work on techniques such as world-building, metaphor and narrative structure.

Creative Non-Fiction:
This pathway allows students to explore the creative aspects of non-fiction writing, including memoir, features journalism and travel/nature writing. Students will explore the creative tension between fact and fiction, and will develop practical skills in pitching and selling their work.

Writing for Children:
An ideal choice for those who want to develop a career in writing novels, picture books or children’s non-fiction, this pathway will develop the specific writing skills needed for writing for under-12s, and give students a practical understanding of issues such as the specific publishing environment for this practice, working with illustrators and interfacing with school curricula.

Steeped in literary history, Canterbury is an excellent setting for the next chapter of your Creative Writing story. Canterbury Christ Church University is a young, dynamic university, and the degree is run by a team of writers who have live experience of the publishing market. We pride ourselves in taking innovative approaches to the way our students learn, offering flexible options that help you to fit an MA into your life. We also have strong links to publishers, agents and literary festivals, and work hard to create opportunities for our students to develop their writing practice and career.

The MA Creative Writing includes core modules in The Craft of Writing, Professional Practice and Research Skills, which develop a toolkit for great writing across all genres. In all other modules, you will specialise in your chosen pathway of either Commercial Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Writing for Children or Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Horror. You will study in guided reading groups to develop a critical understanding (and warm appreciation) of your specialised area of writing, and will work intensively to develop your practice in termly residential weekends. Finally, every student submits a 15,000 word piece of extended writing, working closely with a prominent writer from their chosen area of specialism.

Who Is The Course For?

The programme is aimed at adults who are passionate about writing, and want to hone their craft while developing an understanding of the publishing market and how to access it. Unlike traditional MAs, we ensure that our teaching falls outside of office hours, which allows students to learn at times that suit them. It may appeal to recent graduates who wish to specialise further in their chosen writing practice, or to adult learners who have been writing independently for a while, and are now ready to take the next steps towards a writing career. We are proud to work with many mature students, and aim to continue to do so in the future.

Students completing this MA could go on to a Creative Writing PhD, or could undertake a teaching qualification to take their practice into a school, FE or HE setting.

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Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies. Read more

Curating Science will enable you to develop an independent academic and curatorial practice at the intersection of histories, philosophies and social studies of science, science communication and museum studies.

You will engage with current debates in science communication and interpretive practice in museums, including cutting-edge art-science practices that are reimagining ways of knowing and being in the 21st Century. Alongside this, you will be encouraged to develop innovative practices of dialogic and participative engagement, developing their own ways of convening public spaces for debate.

You will undertake a range of active learning activities from developing displays, programmes and events to developing digital content and designing their own research projects. You will be supported throughout by an interdisciplinary academic staff team drawn from museum and curatorial studies and the histories and philosophies of science, as well as professionals from our partner institutions.

Students can specialise in their own areas of interest, through choosing from an array of optional modules that explore contemporary curatorial strategies, technologies and media, cultural memory, histories of medicine, audiences, participation and engagement. You will have the option of undertaking a negotiated placement with a museum or heritage organisation.

Course content

All students on the MA in Curating Science will take three core modules.

The History and Theory of Modern Science Communication allows students to explore how science, technology and medicine have been communicated to a wider public in the past. Students will identify how the processes and purposes of science communication has changed over the last two centuries and debate the consequences for science communication of the introduction of new media, ranging from the radio to the internet. The module addresses these questions by surveying the development of science communication since 1750, and by examining the changing theoretical perspectives that have underpinned these developments. Students will learn to re-examine the processes of contemporary science communication in the light of a deeper understanding of this history.

Interpreting Cultures is underpinned by action learning and puts contemporary curation in an international context. From the outset, students work on an interpretation intervention with one of the archives and collections on campus (such as The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery; Special Collections; Treasures of the Brotherton; Marks and Spencer Company Archive; ULITA ― an Archive of International Textiles; Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine). This intensive experience of project planning, management, collaboration and team working prepares students for the option of undertaking a negotiated work placement in the second semester or optional modules exploring audiences, participation or engagement.

Through our Advanced Research Skills modules, students are equipped to undertake assessments and ultimately develop their own research project. The modules build to a symposium in Semester 2 where students present initial research findings towards a dissertation on a research topic of interest.

In addition, students choose from a range of optional modules offered by the School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies and the School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science. These include the opportunity to complete a placement or consultancy project role in either curational approaches or engagement.

Course structure


Compulsory modules

  • Curating Science Individual project (dissertation / practice-led) 50 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 15 credits
  • Advanced Research Skills 25 credits
  • Interpreting Cultures 30 credits
  • History & Theory of Modern Science Communication 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making Sense of Sound 30 credits
  • Encountering Things: Art and Entanglement in Anglo-Saxon England 30 credits
  • Anthropology, Art and Representation 30 credits
  • Humanity, Animality and Globality 30 credits
  • Technology, Media and Critical Culture 30 credits
  • Placements in Context: Policy, Organizations and Practice 30 credits
  • Historical Skills and Practices 30 credits
  • The Origin of Modern Medicine (Birth of the Clinic) 30 credits
  • Audience Engagement and Impact 30 credits

Learning and teaching

You will be taught by leading researchers and experienced practitioners in their fields, and you’ll benefit from a range of teaching and learning methods. They include lectures and seminars, gallery and museum visits, as well as hands-on experience of specific collections in library sessions.

Assessment

We use a range of assessment methods including essays, presentations, assignments and literature reviews among others, depending on the modules you choose.

Career opportunities

Through a combination of theory and practice, the programme produces graduates who are able to develop professional careers in the museums and heritage sector whilst retaining a critical and reflexive eye on their own practice and that of the institutions in which they work. It will equip you with a good understanding of the issues and approaches to science communication and curation, interpretation and engagement, as well as practical work experience ― a combination which is very valuable to employers.

To get a flavour of the kinds of career trajectories our graduates of allied MAs have taken see the ‘news’ section of the Centre for Critical Studies in Museums, Galleries and Heritage and the alumni pages of the School website.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.

Placement opportunities

In Semester 2 you will have the option to undertake a negotiated work placement to gain first-hand experience of curating science.

We have close links with many of the major cultural institutions and organisations in the region, meaning there are plenty of opportunities for you to explore. If you have a particular ambition in mind for your placement, we usually try to find a role that suits you.

Students on allied MAs have completed placements in organisations such as Leeds City Museum, Leeds Art Gallery, Harewood House, the Henry Moore Institute, National Science and Media Museum, York City Art Gallery, National Railway Museum, Impressions Gallery, The Tetley, Yorkshire Sculpture Park, Lotherton Hall, Abbey House Museum and the Royal Armouries.



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Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. Read more
Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. The­se ques­ti­ons form the star­ting point of our in­ter­na­tio­nal, in­ter- and trans­di­sci­pli­na­ry re­se­arch-ori­en­ted, and sustaina­bi­li­ty-pro­blem-fo­cu­sed Mas­ter's Pro­gram in Global Sustainability Science.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017). Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MA in Welsh Writing in English offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in Welsh Writing in English

The MA allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA is openly structured. You define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

You develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Welsh Writing in English course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. There are three core modules and three optional modules. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing.

Part-time study is also available.

Welsh Writing in English Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to Welsh Writing in English.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of Welsh Writing in English.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Welsh Writing in English typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advanced Research Skills

• Dylan Thomas and the Rise of Welsh Writing in English

• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives

• Women Writing Modern Wales

• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic

• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Welsh Writing in English graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as education; publishing; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Welsh Writing in English from an English or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to early modern history.

Research Interests

The Centre for Research into the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW) is directed by Dr Kirsti Bohata, alongside Professor Daniel Williams who during the past decade has developed comparative approaches to the literatures of Wales. He took over from Professor M.Wynn Thomas OBE, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the English Association. Kirsti Bohata’s areas of specialism include Postcolonial Studies, Women’s Writing and the Production History and Culture of the Book. Professor

Dai Smith is Raymond Williams Chair of Welsh Cultural History within CREW, Dr John Goodby is a poet, leading scholar of post-war Irish poetry and specialist in Dylan Thomas, while Peter Lord, the leading historian and interpreter of Wales’s visual culture, is the Centre’s Research Fellow who recently published an edition of the Winifred Coombe Tenant Diaries. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through CREW and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.



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The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. Read more

The MA in Classics and Ancient History is extremely flexible and wide-ranging. In this it reflects the broad, multidisciplinary nature of the subject, which includes Latin and Greek language, the history of Greek and Roman antiquity from archaic times to the beginning of the Middle Ages, and Greek and Roman literature, philosophy, and culture. The MA is designed to introduce students to advanced study in their chosen field and to equip them with the skills required for doctoral research. The programme and most modules within it allow students to tailor their advanced study and research-preparation to their interests, needs and existing knowledge. Apart from the thesis, the only compulsory unit is that devoted to research training. We also expect all students to study Latin and/or Greek as part of their MA. (No existing knowledge of Latin or Greek is required, and we are very well-equipped to support students beginning their study of either language; it is also possible to study one or both languages at more Advanced levels). Apart from these requirements, students are able to choose freely in constructing an MA course which best suits their interests and skills.

In addition, we offer one specialist route through the MA programme: namely the 'City of Rome' route. This route involves taking a course unit at the British School at Rome, for which students prepare by studying a course on Roman social and urban history.

Aims

On successful completion of the MA in Classics and Ancient History, students will:

i. demonstrate the enhancement of previously acquired skills at a more critical, reflective, and sophisticated level, especially skills involving synthesising information from a variety of sources, historical and/or literary interpretation, exercising independent and critical judgement.

ii. understand and respect the `otherness' of the past by developing specialist knowledge about one or more aspect of Graeco-Roman civilisation.

iii. be able to describe, analyse, and assess ancient sources, including (as appropriate) literary, non-literary, visual, and material evidence.

iv. be able to design and complete a substantial piece of independent research.

v. work effectively as autonomous scholars.

vi. be able to understand complex problems and communicate them clearly in oral and written form, with the help, where appropriate, of visual or graphic aids.

Coursework and assessment

The MA in Classics & Ancient History is made up of a taught element (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). Taught units are usually assessed by extended essay, but assessment might also include oral presentations, conference posters, commentary exercises and (particularly for language units) formal examinations.

In more detail, the structure of the course is as follows:

Research training . Our core course, 'Studying the Ancient World: Techniques and Approaches', introduces you to the key research questions and methods involved in advanced study of the discipline and, in the second semester, gives you experience in developing and presenting your own research project.

Language units.  If you are a beginner, you will take one of our specially-designed `intensive' courses in Latin or Greek, which will put you in a position to start reading ancient texts in the original language before the end of your MA. If you have already studied Greek or Latin, you will continue your study of one or both languages at an appropriate level. If you are already at a very advanced stage in both languages you will take a specially-designed course unit which allows you further to develop your language skills in an area related to your research interests (for example: palaeography; papyrology; textual criticism; epigraphy).

Taught course-units . The remainder of your taught credits are selected from a range of taught units, chosen from a menu covering a range of topics in Greek and Roman history, literature, and culture. Most taught units are worth 15 credits, and usually involve 11 `classroom' hours, consisting of both student-led and tutor-led discussion, supported by additional guidance and planning sessions.

It is possible for one of these units to be an approved unit from another subject area (for example, History or Archaeology), or a Directed Reading course, in which you are free to pursue whatever avenue is of interest to you, by negotiation with a tutor and with the Postgraduate Programme Director. The usual pattern for a Directed Reading course is 6 to 8 hours of contact time, which may be individual or in a small group, or a mixture of the two.

A dissertation of between 12,000 and 15,000 words: 60 credits.

Course unit details

Course units vary from year to year, depending on staff availability and student enrolment, but you will find below details of the units which we are currently planning to offer in 2017/18. (If you are planning to take the MA part-time, over two years, please note that we cannot guarantee that all of these courses will definitely run in 2018/19: if you are particularly keen to take a specific course, you are advised to discuss your plans with the Programme Director: Dr. Jenny Bryan ( ).

Please note that we are also planning to offer a new 15-credit course in 2017/18: 'Approaching Women in Greek Tragedy': further details will be available here soon.

Career opportunities

This non-vocational Masters degree teaches and develops a wealth of transferable skills, and thus enables students to keep open a very wide range of career options. Recent graduates have gone on to vocational MAs (e.g. in Gallery & Museum Studies), to PhDs in Classics or Ancient History, to teaching, to contract researching, or to work in local or central government, commerce or industry.



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Our MA programme is designed both for specialists to deepen their knowledge and skills and for graduates of other Humanities disciplines to switch into postgraduate level understanding of our subjects. Read more
Our MA programme is designed both for specialists to deepen their knowledge and skills and for graduates of other Humanities disciplines to switch into postgraduate level understanding of our subjects. The key to us being able to do this is the centering of the courses around high-level, small-group seminar discussion, mainly assessed by essays that form mini-research projects in areas of your interest. These courses are followed by one-to one supervision for a research dissertation. This structure means that if you have studied an undergraduate degree in Religious Studies, Theology, Philosophy, Ethics or related subjects, the MA provides an extended opportunity to work in depth in what fascinated you in your BA, while also offering the chance for exploring other areas that you might have missed. On the other hand, if your degree is in another area of Humanities, the small-group and one-to-one focus gives us the chance to provide tailored help to get up to speed in any area of Religions and Theology. You are also able to join in undergraduate classes, whether that is to have an extended exposure to the basics of a topic or to learn a language. In fact, even students who already have a BA in the field quite often find that they want to pick up a subject that they previously missed. One of Manchester's key distinctive features is that you are very free to do this.

This programme enables specialisation, while stressing a broad, interdisciplinary and comparative approach. Courses can be taken from across the offerings within the discipline and beyond. Courses cover a wide range of topics, including Biblical studies, Jewish studies, Christian studies, South Asian studies, philosophy, ethics, gender studies and politics.

Aims

-To provide multi-disciplinary curricula informed by the research and scholarly activities of the teaching staff.
-To develop in students a critical understanding of religion and theology through a range of learning and teaching methods.
-To equip students with the skills necessary to interpret primary and secondary sources and to make available appropriate language instruction, where feasible.
-To help students from diverse backgrounds progress though their programme by providing effective academic and pastoral support.
-To equip students for a variety of careers through subject specific knowledge, active engagement in their own learning and the development of analytical and other transferable skills.
-To provide a stimulating research environment through seminars, tutorials and programmes of guest lectures that will foster postgraduate study
-To develop skills in research and analysis that will foster postgraduate study.

Coursework and assessment

MA students take two core courses and up to six options, then write a dissertation. The programme takes 12 months full-time or up to 27 months part-time. Assessment is usually by essay on a topic agreed between the student and lecturer. Language course units may also involve an examination. The dissertation is 12-15000 words and you will receive one-to-one supervisory support.

Career opportunities

The primary focus of all our postgraduate degrees is to give people research skills, whether for academic work or for another career. Many professions today require investigative skills. Some in the media spend time researching angles of events that relate to religions. Some in the health service investigate the experiences of various cultural groups in accessing services. Many in museums, libraries and other archives require the textual and historical research skills that our courses teach. Postgraduate study in Religions and Theology gives you a high level qualification for a wide range of investigative tasks.

Our masters degrees qualify you for research study at Manchester or at virtually any other high-level academic institution in the world. Many of our MA students are preparing for PhD study. Other students take Manchester MAs to enhance their understanding of a particular religious tradition, either their own or that of others. The programmes in Biblical Studies and Theology, Culture and Society offer particular opportunities for continuing professional development for church ministers. All of our courses offer valuable further professional development for teachers of Religious Education. In applying for a job in any field, a Manchester postgraduate degree will mark you out as someone with high-level skills and a track-record of successful engagement with serious and complex issues.

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MA Journalism (NCTJ-accredited) offers you one of the best ways to launch your journalism career – whatever the medium you hope to work in. Read more

About the course

MA Journalism (NCTJ-accredited) offers you one of the best ways to launch your journalism career – whatever the medium you hope to work in.

Our programme is accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists, ensuring you get a qualification that really counts when you apply for your first position. Unlike other single-medium Journalism MAs, you will be taught journalism from the basic building blocks of online reporting and writing through to substantial news and feature projects in video, audio and print and multi-platform.

You will be studying not only for your prestigious Brunel Master's degree but also the NCTJ Diploma, which examines you in Reporting, Public Affairs, Law, Video, Teeline shorthand and a Portfolio. We work in close consultation with senior journalists, ensuring our syllabus provides a rigorous foundation to a career in this dynamic, challenging and often controversial industry.

This programme is distinctive in allowing you to develop your own cutting-edge journalistic practice, whether it's exploring 3G news, or on-screen page make-up. At the same time you learn about the impact of technological change, cultural developments and political issues surrounding different forms of journalism.

Particular attention will be paid to factors such as ethics, professionalism, media ownership, the regulation of the media, and the role of journalism in the political process.

The Journalism Diversity Fund is aimed at people from diverse backgrounds who need help funding their journalism training. Candidates must be from a socially or ethnically diverse background, be able to demonstrate genuine commitment to becoming a successful journalist and have secured a place on an NCTJ-accredited course. For more information, please visit http://www.journalismdiversityfund.com/

Aims

You will gain a systematic understanding of the field of contemporary journalism and a critical understanding of the current problems in the field.

You will acquire an understanding of the main theoretical approaches and techniques of journalism. You will be encouraged to use these critically, both in their studies of journalism and their own critical practice.

You will be provided with a critical understanding of the journalistic field that will enable you to use most effectively the skills which they acquire on the programme.

Course Content

MA Journalism consists of a common core of study in journalism, with an offer of specialist study in print or broadcast journalism in the second term, which will facilitate your entry into different aspects of the industry. This is particularly relevant in the context of a converging media industry requiring multi-skilling and the ability to adapt to new media environments.

The programme will consist of five modules - two that provide cutting-edge journalism skills essential for the new entrant to the industry, coupled with two that offer in-depth analysis of the recent history and political economy of the industry, critical evaluation of the cultural, political, ethical and legal frameworks within which journalism operates, and academic interrogation of current and emerging journalistic issues.

The fifth module, a major project, requires a synthesis of practice and theory. Through undertaking these modules, you will be enabled to identify and apply the most useful practical, theoretical and contextual approaches to help you to produce “good” journalism. In this way, you can enter journalism confident of your abilities, with highly-developed research skills, ethical judgement, the necessary contextual knowledge and an ability to navigate successfully an increasingly market-led industry.

The MA consists of compulsory modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach:

Journalistic Practice 1
Journalistic Practice 2
Issues in Journalism
Major Research Project

Contact Hours

Full-time: Minimum four days attendance per week

Part-time: Three days in year 1 and 1-2 days in year two provided the 100wpm Teeline exam has been passed in year 1.

These are the attendance hours for terms 1 and 2. Terms 3/4 are more varied and flexible as this is when you will have assignments, exams and supervision.

Assessment

Assessments will take the form of practical projects and tasks, essays, exams, case studies, presentations, reflexive reports and dissertations.

Assessing students’ knowledge and understanding of theoretical debates, hermeneutic skills and understanding of the historical and institutional context of different international journalism practices will be undertaken via written essays.

The assessments covering these cognitive skills are practical exercises, written work and productions which test the acquisition of practical skills and strategies; essays which test theoretical and historical knowledge; and the final journalism project (and accompanying written analysis) which requires a summation of the critical, creative and practical skills learned during the programme.

The Major Project will test students’ theoretical knowledge and practical skills (with supporting reflexive practice) to a level commensurate with a Master's qualification. Dissertations are usually agreed in advance with the supervising tutor.

Special Features

We are industry accredited
This means you will study for the NCTJ Diploma as well as your Masters degree – two qualifications in one. The NCTJ Diploma doesn’t just prepare you for local media – BBC, Sky and The Guardian are on the Board.
You will become a multi-platform journalist by learning how to work in online, print, audio and video journalism in our fantastic, 24-hour, state-of-the-art digital newsroom and studios. You will develop the mindset to find lots of ways to report and present a story or feature to deadline using the very latest techniques.

You will be highly employable
Editors come to us when recruiting journalists. Brunel Journalists are now working as staff in top newsrooms across the globe, including the BBC, The Guardian, The Independent, news agencies, glossy consumer magazines, business-to-business journals, websites, local and regional press and broadcasting. Several are award winning journalists. Find out more about where our graduates are now working.

You will receive individual attention
All full-time lecturers are available at least four hours per week for personal consultation on academic issues. A structure of senior tutor and year tutors provides students with an easily accessible system for addressing queries about the programme. Each student has access to top journalists for career guidance.

We have top weekly guest speakers
We have an impressive range of high-profile industry guest speakers, giving you the chance to network with some of the leading journalists in the country. This year we have speakers from Cosmopolitan, the Guardian, BBC, Sky, Daily Express, C4 News and more.

Great work placements
Brunel journalists land all the best placements, gain enviable referees and see their bylines in leading publications. We have one of the best university Professional Development Centres in the UK who coach our students not only in CV and application writing but also help them develop the necessary skills to exceed at job interviews.

You are taught by top industry names
Our staff team and visiting lecturers comprise some of the biggest names in the business, such as leading investigative journalist Paul Lashmar (World in Action, The Observer, The Independent), Jacquie Hughes (Granada, BBC) and many more. You get the very best expertise preparing you for your career.

London-based campus environment
Brunel’s campus is a lively and attractive environment that buzzes with creativity and diversity. There is always something going on and a wide variety of amenities ranging from the bars and cafés to the computing clusters and the library. Our students also benefit from the fantastic links to London and its local, national and global media, not only through expert speakers but also via excellent work placements.

There’s great student media on site
Whether you fancy going on air, online or in print, you can do it here at Brunel. There’s student radio, a student newspaper and a host of online opportunities at your fingertips to enhance your CV and boost your employability. You will also have the opportunity to compete in national student media awards.

But it’s not all hard work..
There are days out, screenings, quizzes, networking events to build your contacts, confidence and just to have fun.

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If you want to be a filmmaker this is the place to learn, gain experience and make films you will be proud to have on your show reel. Read more

If you want to be a filmmaker this is the place to learn, gain experience and make films you will be proud to have on your show reel.

As a student on one of the six pathways you'll develop your specialist skill. In addition, you'll also have a range of short optional modules in other production areas of your choosing to give you the kind of flexibility that the industry now expects. The options include script and project development, web drama, online content, and social activist filmmaking, alongside more traditional media such as camera and editing skills. 

Our filmmaking facilities and scheduling are geared around fiction production, as this is a major opportunity that the learning on the programme provides. The ethos of the course is “form follows function.” Your study and practice throughout the year will equip you with the most appropriate means of telling your story in order to connect with an audience. 

Filmmaking is a team activity. Every student is required to work closely with others as part of a creative team to produce their final project. All the programmes also have good contacts and connections with students in the other specialist areas your productions might require, such as music composition, hair and makeup, set design, scriptwriting and of course acting talent.

Filmmaking is very demanding; it requires a lot of commitment, imagination and teamwork. You will be fully stretched on these programmes.

Pathways

This MA has six pathways you can follow: 

The programmes also retain close links with MA Scriptwriting.

The filmmaking programmes are located within a large and very lively Media and Communications Department that is also home for a range of practice MA programmes in radio, journalism and scriptwriting for example.

There is also a range of theory MAs and strong research tradition, with the Department coming top in the entire country on research intensity. This makes for a very stimulating and creative environment. 

The questions we ask

Where is cinema going? Where is TV heading? How and where are people going to watch moving images? What do new audiences want these to look and sound like? What new platforms are on the horizon? How are the traditional craft skills relevant to the digital age?

These are the kinds of questions we’re interested in. And we don’t explore them alone. Our annual Olive Till Memorial debate features world-renowned industry speakers including directors Danny Boyle, Gurinder Chadha and Paul Greengrass, and producers Tessa Ross and Tim Bevan, so you get the best kind of insight while you’re here.

The processes we use

We offer advanced skills training to film school standards. You will work within a building with studio and rehearsal spaces, screening rooms and up-to-date camera, lighting and sound equipment, plus sound and edit suites. And we now have the Curzon Goldsmiths as our on-site cinema so you can showcase your work to the public.

The approach we take

We encourage you to meet filmmakers, work with others, and exchange ideas. The programme includes regular Master classes where students from all the programmes and others come together to learn about current industry trends, new opportunities and ideas with leading figures of the UK film and television industries. But filmmaking is not only about these industries, it also offers a wealth of transferable skills for students interested in all media platforms, including web drama, video games, art gallery installations of all types, interactive mixed media and live performance and music videos.

Modules & structure

All programmes include: 

  • Masterclasses
  • Pitches 
  • Exercises aimed at using your skills specialism in a variety of live shoot situations 

You will also have a variety of research projects to undertake, as well as other module options. The third term will be taken up with your final substantive project, and in writing up a process paper on your work and research over the year. 

There is also a choice of short modules, such as: 

  • Screen Adaptation
  • Principles of Editing
  • Media Law and Ethics
  • The Short Script
  • Politics of the Audio Visual
  • Social Activist Film Making
  • Contemporary Screen Narratives
  • Representing Reality
  • Visual Story Telling
  • The Current Landscape of the UK Media Industries 

In addition students are encouraged to “audit,” (that is, attend but not be assessed on) any other lecture course in the Department – in so far as their timetable allows.

For full module information, refer to the individual pathways.

Skills & careers

From Steve McQueen to Sam Taylor-Wood, Goldsmiths graduates go on to shift the public perception of what makes film matter. And our MA filmmaking graduates are creating award-winning work including Best Cinematography at the NAHEMI Encounters International Film Festival and Best Documentary at the Exposures Film Festival.

The best advice we can give you is to make the most of your time with us. For a whole year you have access to the best in the field: highly qualified, industry-active and award-winning staff and guest speakers.

Find out more about employability at Goldsmiths



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