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This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations. Read more

MAS in International and European Security

09 October 2017 - 25 May 2018

This Executive MAS Programme, jointly run by the Global Studies Institute (GSI) of the University of Geneva and the Geneva Centre for Security Policy (GCSP), is designed to prepare participants for leadership roles in government and international organisations.

Participants will benefit from the expertise of over 100 highly qualified academics, experienced diplomats, government officials and distinguished practitioners from around the world. It is designed to advance participants' knowledge base and through practical application demonstrates its relevance to the implementation of effective and sustainable policies, which contribute to global peace and stability.

Programme Aims:

Enhance participant understandings of peace and stability in national, ‘world-regional’ and global contexts by:
• Identifying and characterizing strategic threats to peace and stability;
• Analysing the changing nature of actors that seek to manage existing and emergent threats;
• Assessing the efficiency and effectiveness of current policy responses and debating possible future alternative policy options

The MAS provides not just space for academic reflection, but also provides participants with skills, knowledge and networksenabling participants to constructively and critically inform policy debates and discourse by:
• Engaging in and influencing decision-making,
• Enhancing their professional development and institutional capacity,
• Leveraging their strengthened skills, knowledge and networks for collaborative leadership and cooperative solutions

Full Accreditation

Participants who complete the programme successfully will be awarded a 60 ECTS Master of Advanced Studies in International and European Security by the University of Geneva and the GCSP. It has also received the highest level of accreditation awarded to degrees in Switzerland by the AAQ. As a result, the MAS degree receives automatic equivalence in most countries worldwide.

Module 1: The Foundations of International Security

This module will provide an introduction and analysis of challenges and actors that shape the security context, such as the growing environment, economy and energy nexus, international law, human security and globalisation. It will enable participants to identify the range of structural and systemic dynamics that shape our understanding of the strategic context, linking different schools of thought and levels of analysis to practice.

Module 2: Actors and Issues in International Security

This module enhances participant understanding of security policy through a focus on the evolving role of traditional and emerging international security leaders, in addition to conflict management and transnational security challenges. These will be considered both from a hard and human security perspective. It will also expose them to a wide range of readings and specialist speakers, both scholars and practitioners.

Module 3: Regional & Global Security

This module will concentrate on cooperative and competitive dynamics in emerging regions such as sub-Saharan Africa; the Middle East and North Africa; conditions in South Asia; and developments in China and the Asia-Pacific region. It will build upon the analysis of challenges,actors and responses in the first two modules within the context of emerging regions.

Module 4: Issues and Concepts in International Security

This interdisciplinary module consists of a number of lectures and research methods seminars held throughout the entire nine-month period. Issues in international security are theoretically analysed within a multidisciplinary approach i.e. history, economics, law, political science and political philosophy. The conceptual lectures academically complement and reinforce the more practical and policy-orientated teaching and seminar work of the first three Modules. They broaden and deepen participant appreciation of the relationships between International Relations as an academic discipline and international relations as a daily practice.

Module 5: Research Paper (10-12000 words)

Under the supervision of professors from both the University and the GCSP, participants will write a research paper on a security policy-related topic. This module allows participants to develop their ability to write a research paper incorporating the lessons learned during the first four modules, and from individual and group analytical work. To provide the opportunity to demonstrate an ability to select useful sources and literature for structured research through pertinent and scientifically valid arguments, in accordance with academic standards.

Please note the themes addressed in the modules may be subject to revision.

APPLICATION PROCESS:

Candidates will be selected on the basis of an application which should consist of the following:

•A letter of motivation (800 words max).
•An up-to-date Curriculum Vitae.
•A copy of relevant university degree(s).
•Two letters of recommendation.
•A writing sample of 1500 words (verified with an anti-plagiarism software) on either:
What is the purpose and relevance of reforming the United Nations Security Council? Or
Has the world’s global transformation of authoritarian regimes reached a turning point?”

DEADLINE: 01 May 2017

Please note that places are limited.

For additional information, please contact:

http://www.unige.ch/formcont/mas-security.html

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Memorial’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics is one of the institution’s youngest – half our faculty have been hired since 2005 – and most recognized – 20% of us hold the university's highest rank, University Research Professor. Read more
Memorial’s Department of Mathematics and Statistics is one of the institution’s youngest – half our faculty have been hired since 2005 – and most recognized – 20% of us hold the university's highest rank, University Research Professor. Although the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has offered graduate degrees for many years, the past decade has seen an explosion of interest in these programs, adding invaluable new voices to the Department's community of researchers.

Among the research areas studied by our faculty and graduate students are the following: Numerical Analysis and Scientific Computation, Analysis, Combinatorics, Topology, Applied Statistics, Differential Equations and Dynamical Systems, Mathematical Models and Modeling / Numerical Optimization, Algebra, Mathematical Physics, Mathematical Statistics, and Fluid Mechanics.

MAS -The MAS is a highly structured program incorporating both courses and practicum (an applied statistics project). A full-time student with an honours degree in statistics normally requires two years to complete the degree requirements. This program accepts new students only in the Fall semester.

MSc – The MSc program has two options. The research-based program consists of graduate courses and a thesis. A full-time student is expected to complete the degree requirements in two years. The course-based program is an intensive three semester (one-year) program based on graduate courses and a project. This program accepts new students only in the Fall semester.

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[Dual MAS/MLIS]]. The Dual Degree Program is designed to allow students to earn both an MAS and an MLIS. Students considering this option should carefully read the descriptions for both the MLIS and the MAS degrees. Read more
[Dual MAS/MLIS]]
The Dual Degree Program is designed to allow students to earn both an MAS and an MLIS. Students considering this option should carefully read the descriptions for both the MLIS and the MAS degrees.

Core Courses

Students in the Dual MAS/MLIS program will complete both the MAS Core courses and the MLIS Core courses. Students starting their program in the September term will begin with the MAS Core courses, whereas students who start in the January term must begin with the MLIS Core courses.

Electives

Candidates admitted to the Dual MAS/MLIS program will be assigned an adviser from each of the two degree programs. These advisers will be able to assist the student in selecting electives from both the MAS and MLIS programs.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies and Master of Library and Information Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies and Library Information Studies
- Subject: Information Technology
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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Mission Statement. The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives. Read more
Mission Statement: The MAS program prepares professionals to exercise creativity, integrity and leadership in designing, implementing and promoting programs and systems for the creation, organization, management, preservation and effective use of records and archives.

Program content focuses on:
- Nature of records and archives
- The life-cycle of records from creation to preservation
- Records systems and archival systems
- Selection of records and their acquisition in archives
- Intellectual control of records and archives and provision of access
- Records, archives and the law
- Ethical and professional responsibilities
- History of record-keeping and archives

Graduates may find work in such positions as:
Archivist; digital archivist; archives curator; archives advisor; manuscripts processing archivist; electronic records archivist; audiovisual archivist; data/digital curator; e-discovery advisor; privacy and information officer; records and information manager; records administrator/specialist; records analyst; records policy and program officer; records/preservation system designer; research officer; security specialist; and others.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Archival Studies
- Specialization: Archival Studies
- Subject: Specialty
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Options
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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The aim of the Master’s degree program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, didactic and social/communicative competence, thus ensuring that they are equipped with the best possible qualifications for the music education profession at public and private institutions (e.g. Read more

Course Aims and Mission Statement

The aim of the Master’s degree program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, didactic and social/communicative competence, thus ensuring that they are equipped with the best possible qualifications for the music education profession at public and private institutions (e.g. music schools, conservatories, higher education institutions and universities). Graduates will also have the necessary prerequisites and skills for organisational, advisory and executive/managerial activities in the cultural and media sectors (concert venues, theatres, museums, artists agencies, publishers, radio, etc.).

Building on the abilities and qualifications acquired in the bachelor studies, students of the Master's degree enter a process of intensified research and realisation of musical education concepts, especially those in the field of Jazz and Popular Music. This also extends to include their own individual artistic work and consequently these varied aspects are brought into broad and interdisciplinary discourse of institute research through team and project work (e.g. Master’s project and Laboratories for Music Research).

In this sense, the already acquired abilities of the students are further deepened and highly professionalised. At the same time, the open-ended research activities of the Master's program serve as free spaces for thought and work in which students from different backgrounds and origins encounter each other through research. They can also share and exchange their own thoughts and approaches and develop their work together, even beyond the horizon of one's own experience.

In order to make the research work visible to the outside world and to bring it into a public discussion, concert events, symposia, sound and video recordings, various internal institution publications and external partners are actively promoted. This provides the students with an important basis for continuing Career Orientation and Professionalisation, but it is also part of JAM MUSIC LAB University’s general contribution to the advocacy of ongoing conscious perception of artistic production. This also encompasses reflection on a wide variety of aspects that are linked with society and the facilitating of related dialogues.

Structure of Studies

The Master’s degree consists of four semesters and is divided into two degree programme stages of two semesters each. (Please refer to the core application, Chapters 3 and 4, and the descriptions and specifications contained therein regarding Research)

MA 1st Programme Stage (MA Expertise Level 1: Project Planning Research) Semesters 1-2:

1st Programme Stage allows the students to plan, organise and begin the initial implementation of the upcoming work as part of the Master’s project. The artistic, research-related and organisational challenges of the project are discussed in consultation with the respective supervisors of the Master's projects, or where relevant, with the major artistic subject (MAS) teachers. As part of the collaborative process, a related action plan and a project plan for implementation will be identified. A recommendation with regard to the compulsory electives that are to be covered is also provided for the best possible support for the Master’s project.

With the involvement and close coordination of MAS teachers, Master’s project teachers and the respective scientific director, the planning of the Master’s project is completed according to following standardised categories:

- Definitive formulation of the area of interest regarding research and knowledge - Indication of the methods of scientific or artistic work - Defining of the time frames of the work process up until completion - Coordinating and broadly defining adequate compulsory and free-choice electives in the context of the Master’s project

Coinciding with this as part of the Master’s degree, students continue to further deepen musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as intensified research. A presentation given by the students on the progress and development of the Master’s project and the written Master’s thesis at the end of semester 2 decides on the progression to the 2nd Programme Stage.

MA 2nd Programme Stage (MA-Expertise Level 2: independent scientific/artistic work and research) Semesters 3-4:

Students finalise their Master’s project regarding independent work and organisation. Musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as related research, are brought to a higher degree of professionalism in preparation for the upcoming Master's examination. A successfully completed Master's examination at the end of the 4th semester demonstrates outstanding qualifications in the respective main artistic subject (MAS), the ability to independently and effectively realise musical/artistic production and research, as well as a distinct expertise in project management and communication.

Examinations

Committee Examination Depending on the type of examination, the board would consist of at least two to a maximum of six examiners and one chairperson. The appointing of personnel for various boards are set up by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB and published internally within the institute.

Entrance Examination:
The basic prerequisites for enrolment in the Master’s degree program are a completed Bachelor's degree or an equivalent degree from a recognised Austrian or non-Austrian postsecondary education institution, the successful completion of the admission examination and the availability of a study place.

An application for the admission examination of the Master's degree must be applied for in writing, which should include the following: a curriculum vitae, a motivation letter and an synopsis of the planned content of the artistic and research work.

Admission into the Master’s degree course relies strongly on excellent musical proficiency in the MAS and professional suitability for the area of independent artistic production and research of educational concepts. The same criteria must be demonstrated in the course of the entrance examination through an artistic/musical presentation followed by a verbal presentation of the submitted synopsis.

Details on examination requirements and content are defined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website (Please see the details in the core application, Chapter 3.7.4, Examination and Examination Methods, Admission Examination for Bachelor and Master Studies).

MA Degree Examination:
The committee examination is carried out at the end of the 2nd semester of the Master’s degree and serves to verify the students' studies thus far and serves to verify the status quo of the Master’s project and ongoing work. The students present the progress of their work and explain the planned steps towards successful and timely completion. The content and the appropriate form of the presentation – be it an artistic presentation, verbal lecture etc. – are chosen by the students and to be submitted in writing in advance. The presentation itself is followed by a critical questioning of the candidate by the examination board. Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website. A Lesson Demonstration Examination is an integral part of both the degree and the Master's examination and contains the following specifications:

MA Lesson Demonstration Examination:
The Lesson Demonstration Examinations certify the necessary level in expertise for teaching practice. They are permitted to cover the following areas: Preliminary Lesson Demonstration MAS (single or group lessons), ensemble lessons, music theory, aural training, music history, and possibly other scientific areas as well. The performance requirements and objectives for the students in the course of the respective Lesson Demonstration examination are determined and then publicly published. The Examination Board has to advise and decide on the guidelines for defined assessment criteria (Please refer to the detailed information in the core application for further details: Chapter 3.7.4, Auditing and Examination Methods).

Master’s Examination:
The Master’s examination with exam committee consists of two practical parts (internal examination, which includes a lesson demonstration examination, and an external/public examination concert of about 45 minutes each) and an oral part in the form of a defence of the written Master's thesis. The defence consists of an approximately 30 minute verbal presentation of the submitted work, followed by a subsequent critical questioning of the candidate by the examination committee.

Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Prospective Professional Fields and Qualifications after Master’s Degree

As music educators and musicians, graduates have outstanding artistic and professional qualifications and social competence to pursue teaching and research activities at public and private institutions (e.g. music schools, conservatories, higher education institutions and universities), and to compete in the current international professional reality. In addition to their core activities as music educators in the field of music education institutions, they can also work in other active areas of professional music, art and culture mediation for all ages and target groups. As performers and creative musicians they can also work freelance as part of their own projects, as soloists and/or as ensemble members in various musical groups and orchestras focusing on Jazz, Pop, Rock, theatre, musicals, TV programs, film music etc..

In addition to their expertise in the areas of music education, artistic production, performance and research, which is tied to the practical experience gained by interacting with areas such as project management and public relations as part of the Master’s degree, graduates now have best possible prerequisites for organisational, pedagogical, advisory and executive activities in cultural enterprises and media (e.g. concert venues, orchestras, theatres, museums, artists agencies, publishers, administration of music education institutions, radio, print media, etc.).

Awarding of the degree “Masters of Arts in Music Education”

The academic degree "Master of Arts in Music Education" is awarded after completion of the Masters's examination and all prescribed lectures before the annual graduation ceremony of JAM MUSIC LAB University, which concludes the summer semester. The corresponding document can be produced in either German or English.

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The aim of the Master’s Degree Program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, social and communicative competence, thus offering the best possible qualifications in the diverse professional fields that are open to musicians. Read more

Course Aims and Mission Statement:

The aim of the Master’s Degree Program is to provide graduates with outstanding levels of artistic, scientific, social and communicative competence, thus offering the best possible qualifications in the diverse professional fields that are open to musicians. Graduates will also have the necessary prerequisites and skills for organisational, advisory and executive/managerial activities in the cultural and media sectors (concert venues, theatres, museums, artists' agencies, publishers, radio, etc.).

Building on the qualifications acquired in the bachelor's program, students of the Master's degree enter a process of intensified research and realisation of their individual artistic concepts, and bring them into broad and interdisciplinary discourse of institute research through team and project work (e.g. Master's Project, Laboratories for Music Research). This in turn contributes to a continually relevant, multifaceted and intercultural development of the arts.

In this sense, the already acquired abilities of the students are further deepened and highly professionalised. At the same time, the open-ended research activities of the Master's program serve as free spaces for thought and work in which artists from different origins and genres encounter each other through research. They can also share and exchange their own thoughts and approaches and develop their work together, even beyond the horizon of one's own experience.

In order to make the research work visible to the outside world and to bring it into public discussion, concert events, symposia, sound and video recordings, various internal institution publications and external partners are actively promoted. This provides the students with an important basis for continuing Career Orientation and Professionalisation, but it is also part of JAM MUSIC LAB University’s general contribution to the advocacy of ongoing conscious perception of artistic production. This also encompasses reflection on a wide variety of aspects that are linked with society and the facilitating of related dialogues.

Structure of Studies

The Master’s degree consists of four semesters and is divided into two degree programme stages of two semesters each. (Please refer to the core application, Chapters 3 and 4, and the descriptions and specifications contained therein regarding Research)

MA 1st Programme Stage (MA Expertise Level 1: Project Planning Research) Semesters 1-2:

1st Programme Stage allows the students to plan, organise and begin the initial implementation of the upcoming work as part of the Master’s project. The artistic, research-related and organisational challenges of the project are discussed in consultation with the respective supervisors of the Master's projects, or where relevant, with the major artistic subject (MAS) teachers. As part of the collaborative process a related action plan and a project plan for implementation will be identified. A recommendation with regard to the compulsory electives to be covered is also provided for the best possible support for the Master’s project.

In MA 1st Programme Stage, with the involvement and close coordination of MAS teachers, Master’s project teachers and the respective scientific director, the planning of the Master’s project is completed according to following standardised categories:

- Definitive formulation of the area of interest regarding research and knowledge - Indication of the methods of scientific or artistic work - Defining of the time frames of the work process up until completion - Coordinating and broadly defining adequate compulsory and free-choice electives in the context of the Master’s project

Coinciding with this as part of the Master’s degree, students continue to further deepen musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as intensified research. A presentation given by the students on the progress and development of the Master’s project and the written Master’s thesis at the end of semester 2 decides on the progression to the 2nd Programme Stage.

MA 2nd Programme Stage (MA-Expertise Level 2: independent scientific/artistic work and research) Semesters 3-4:

Students finalise their Master’s project regarding independent work and organisation. Musical and artistic expertise in theory and practice, as well as related research, are brought to a higher degree of professionalism in preparation for the upcoming Master's examination. A successfully completed Master's examination at the end of the 4th semester demonstrates outstanding qualifications in the respective main artistic subject (MAS), the ability to independently and effectively realise musical/artistic production and research, as well as a distinct expertise in project management and communication.

Examinations

Committee Examination Depending on the type of examination, the board would consist of at least two to a maximum of six examiners and one chairperson. The appointing of personnel for various boards are set up by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB and published internally within the institute.

Entrance Examination:
The basic prerequisites for enrolment in the Master’s degree program are a completed Bachelor's degree or an equivalent degree from a recognised Austrian or non-Austrian postsecondary education institution, the successful completion of the admission examination and the availability of a study place.

An application for the admission examination of the Master's degree must be applied for in writing, which should include the following: a curriculum vitae, a motivation letter and an synopsis of the planned content of the artistic and research work.

Admission into the Master’s degree course relies strongly on excellent musical proficiency in the MAS and professional suitability for the area of independent artistic production and research. The same criteria must be demonstrated in the course of the entrance examination through an artistic/musical presentation followed by a verbal presentation of the submitted synopsis.

Details on examination requirements and content are defined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website (Please see the details in the core application, Chapter 3.7.4, Examination and Examination Methods, Admission Examination for Bachelor and Master Studies).

MA Degree Examination:
The committee examination is carried out at the end of the 2nd semester of the Master’s degree and serves to verify the students' studies thus far and the status quo of the Master’s project and ongoing work. The students present the progress of their work and explain the planned steps towards successful and timely completion. The content and the appropriate form of the presentation – be it an artistic presentation, verbal lecture etc. – are chosen by the students and to be submitted in writing in advance. The presentation itself is followed by a critical questioning of the candidate by the examination board. Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Master’s Examination:
The Master’s examination with exam committee consists of two practical parts (internal examination and external/public examination concert of about 45 minutes each) and an oral part in the form of a defence of the written Master’s thesis. The defence consists of an approximately 30 minute verbal presentation of the submitted work, followed by a subsequent critical questioning of the candidate by the examination committee.

Students who register on time and have sufficient study success are admitted to the examination. Examinations are determined by the relevant bodies of JAM MUSIC LAB University and published on the Institute's website.

Prospective Professional Fields and Qualifications after Master’s Degree

As musicians and music makers, graduates have outstanding artistic and professional qualifications and the social competence to compete in the current international professional reality. As performers and creative musicians they can work freelance as part of their own projects, as soloists and/or as ensemble members in various musical groups and orchestras focusing on Jazz, Pop, Rock, theatre, musicals, TV programs, film music etc.. Graduates can also work in other active areas of professional music, art and culture mediation, especially in the context of teaching and research activities in the field of higher education

In addition to their expertise in the field of artistic production, performance and research, which is tied to the practical experience gained by interacting with areas such as music management as part of the Master’s degree, graduates now have best possible prerequisites for leading activities in the field of artistic projects, in arts and cultural management and in the work fields of the creative and media sectors.

Awarding of the degree “Master of Arts in Music”

The academic degree "Master of Arts in Music" is awarded after completion of the Masters's examination and all prescribed lectures before the annual graduation ceremony of JAM MUSIC LAB University, which concludes the summer semester. The corresponding document can be produced in either German or English.

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This unique programme - the only one of its kind in the UK - is dedicated to postgraduate study and research in the tradition of modern European (or ‘continental') philosophy. Read more
This unique programme - the only one of its kind in the UK - is dedicated to postgraduate study and research in the tradition of modern European (or ‘continental') philosophy. It will enable you to study in more depth and with a more intense research focus than the one-year MAs. You will be taught by the internationally renowned members of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), with their wide range of philosophical and interdisciplinary expertise.

Key features
-This course engages in detail and in depth with fundamental texts in modern European philosophy and with 20th-century developments in modern European philosophy and critical theory.
-The course is based at the UK's leading Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy at Kingston University, along with four MAs and a large group of research students.
-The range of option modules enables you to tailor your studies to your area of interest.
Kingston University combines an inclusive approach to education with ambitious investment in advanced-level humanities teaching and research.
-You will benefit from easy access to London's research libraries and research events, plus proximity to French, German and other European universities and libraries.

What will you study?

The programme begins with a compulsory module on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason. You will then choose five modules from an extensive list that covers some of the foundational texts and thinkers of the modern European tradition (Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Heidegger) and 20th- and 21st-century philosophy and critical theory, including psychoanalysis.

You will then take a dissertation module, which includes content-based philosophical research methods seminars. Your dissertation will be assessed with a viva voce examination. In addition, you will organise and run reading groups around your own interests and on topics related to your dissertations.

Course structure

Please note that this is an indicative list of modules and is not intended as a definitive list.

Core modules
-Kant and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-MPhilStud in Philosophy Dissertation

Optional modules
-Art Theory: Modernism, Avant-Garde, Contemporary - delivered and assessed in English
-Critique, Practice, Power
-Hegel and his Legacy - delivered and assessed in English
-Kant and the Aesthetic Tradition - Delivered and assessed in English
-Nietzsche and Heidegger - delivered and assessed in English
-Philosophy and Psychoanalysis
-Philosophy of Art History
-Political Philosophy
-Recent French Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English
-Recent Italian Philosophy
-Topics in Modern European Philosophy - delivered and assessed in English

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The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. Read more
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. The MA in Teaching Languages (Arabic) is designed for teachers and language professionals as well those with no teaching experience. The course ensures that students develop new ways of thinking and talking about language, language teaching and language learning across different social and educational contexts.

More about this course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to study at doctoral level. The lecturers teaching on the course have long-term experiences in teaching in different contexts, are research active and have publications in the subject area.

There are no exams. Students are assessed via a variety of methods including coursework, essays, presentations, research and a final dissertation.

Modular structure

Modules:
-Issues in language learning: an intercultural approach
-Research methods
-Language testing and assessment
-MA dissertation
-Arabic linguistics and cultures
-Arabic world studies
-Material design for teaching Arabic

After the course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to do a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. Read more
The course offers a global approach to the field of Teaching Languages. With our diverse and multilingual cohort, we adopt a strongly intercultural approach which provides students with a challenging and valuable learning experience. The MA in Teaching Languages (English) is designed for teachers and language professionals as well as those with no teaching experience. The course ensures that students develop new ways of thinking and talking about language, language teaching and language learning across different social and educational contexts.

More about this course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to study at doctoral level. The lecturers teaching on the course have long-term experiences in teaching in different contexts, are research active and have publications in the subject area.

There are no exams. Students are assessed via a variety of methods including coursework, essays, presentations, research and a final dissertation.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Issues in Language Learning: An Intercultural Approach (core, 20 credits)
-Language Testing and Assessment (core, 20 credits)
-Linguistics and Language Teaching: the Description of Language and its Pedagogic Applications (core, 20 credits)
-Patterns in Global Sociolinguistics (core, 20 credits)
-Research Methods (core, 20 credits)
-Teaching Languages Dissertation (core, 60 credits)
-Understanding the Language Classroom (core, 20 credits)

After the course

The MA offers opportunities for career advancement both in the UK and abroad. Most of the graduates can find employment after completion of the MAs, some returning to more senior positions in their previous employment while others can move into new areas such as school management or language advisory work. Some of our students continue with us to do a PhD.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This course is subject to validation. The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. Read more
This course is subject to validation.

The Creative Writing MAs at Canterbury Christ Church offer stimulating courses with a commercial edge, taught by experienced tutors who are successful writers themselves. We believe that all writers need a core toolkit of skills, but we also understand that our students often want to specialise in an area of writing about which they’re passionate; that’s why we offer pathways in Fantasy, Science Fiction and Horror, Commercial Fiction, Writing for Children and Creative Non-Fiction. Our courses are designed with busy lives in mind, and are taught through a combination of intensive weekends, high-quality distance learning and one-to-one tutorials, either in person or via Skype. We also offer a strong focus on developing professional practice in writers, looking at skills such as self-presentation, pitching and understanding the publishing industry.

Our Pathways

Commercial Fiction:
Students selecting this pathway will explore literary and more commercial forms of creative writing, fiction, poetry and non-fiction. This degree will appeal to students who wish to generally enrich their writing skills, or whose practice falls broadly into these areas.

Fantasy, Science-Fiction and Horror:
This pathway is aimed at students who wish to specialise in speculative fiction genres. You will develop a detailed understanding of the history and diversity of these literary forms, and work on techniques such as world-building, metaphor and narrative structure.

Creative Non-Fiction:
This pathway allows students to explore the creative aspects of non-fiction writing, including memoir, features journalism and travel/nature writing. Students will explore the creative tension between fact and fiction, and will develop practical skills in pitching and selling their work.

Writing for Children:
An ideal choice for those who want to develop a career in writing novels, picture books or children’s non-fiction, this pathway will develop the specific writing skills needed for writing for under-12s, and give students a practical understanding of issues such as the specific publishing environment for this practice, working with illustrators and interfacing with school curricula.

Steeped in literary history, Canterbury is an excellent setting for the next chapter of your Creative Writing story. Canterbury Christ Church University is a young, dynamic university, and the degree is run by a team of writers who have live experience of the publishing market. We pride ourselves in taking innovative approaches to the way our students learn, offering flexible options that help you to fit an MA into your life. We also have strong links to publishers, agents and literary festivals, and work hard to create opportunities for our students to develop their writing practice and career.

The MA Creative Writing includes core modules in The Craft of Writing, Professional Practice and Research Skills, which develop a toolkit for great writing across all genres. In all other modules, you will specialise in your chosen pathway of either Commercial Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, Writing for Children or Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Horror. You will study in guided reading groups to develop a critical understanding (and warm appreciation) of your specialised area of writing, and will work intensively to develop your practice in termly residential weekends. Finally, every student submits a 15,000 word piece of extended writing, working closely with a prominent writer from their chosen area of specialism.

Who Is The Course For?

The programme is aimed at adults who are passionate about writing, and want to hone their craft while developing an understanding of the publishing market and how to access it. Unlike traditional MAs, we ensure that our teaching falls outside of office hours, which allows students to learn at times that suit them. It may appeal to recent graduates who wish to specialise further in their chosen writing practice, or to adult learners who have been writing independently for a while, and are now ready to take the next steps towards a writing career. We are proud to work with many mature students, and aim to continue to do so in the future.

Students completing this MA could go on to a Creative Writing PhD, or could undertake a teaching qualification to take their practice into a school, FE or HE setting.

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Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. Read more
Sustainable de­ve­lop­ment is one of the ma­jor glo­bal chal­len­ges fa­c­ing the twen­ty-first cen­tu­ry. Yet, it still re­mains un­cle­ar in which di­rec­tion, wi­t­hin which so­ci­al and eco­lo­gi­cal frame­work, and by me­ans of which stra­te­gy sustainable de­ve­lop­ment can move for­ward. The­se ques­ti­ons form the star­ting point of our in­ter­na­tio­nal, in­ter- and trans­di­sci­pli­na­ry re­se­arch-ori­en­ted, and sustaina­bi­li­ty-pro­blem-fo­cu­sed Mas­ter's Pro­gram in Global Sustainability Science.

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The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a 21 month programme that prepares graduates for professional social work practice with children and families, and with adult service users. Read more
The Master of Social Work (MSW) is a 21 month programme that prepares graduates for professional social work practice with children and families, and with adult service users. It is run in partnership with local service providers in the statutory and voluntary sectors, and with service users and carers who contribute to all stages of the programme. Following successful completion of the MSW students are eligible to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) for registration as a social worker, a protected title in the UK.

The Durham MSW offers excellent learning experiences facilitated by leading social work researchers and educators, including academics and social work practitioners as well as children, young people and adults who have experience of accessing social work services. The first year of the programme includes opportunities for joint learning with students undertaking MAs in ‘International Social Work and Community Development’ and ‘Community and Youth Work’. We have strong partnerships with a wide range of practice agencies offering high quality placements. Durham MSW graduates have excellent employment prospects.

Course Structure

The MSW is structured around seven modules designed to meet the academic and practice learning requirements for a degree in social work.

Year 1

-Social Work in Practice (40 credits)
-Social Work in Context (40 credits)
-Professional and Personal Development (30 credits)
-Social Work in Practice 1(50 credits)

Year 2

-Research in Professional Practice (45 credits)
-Advanced Social Work (30 credits)
-Social Work Practice 2 (70 credits)

Learning and Teaching

The MSW is full time, starting in early October and continuing over 21 months. The programme does NOT run to university terms. There is approximately twelve weeks vacation including public holidays, during the course of the whole programme. In Year 1 the first four months are spent developing the necessary knowledge and skills to prepare you for your first practice placement of 70 days. In Year 2 you undertake a 100 day placement with a different service user group and in a contrasting setting where you will gain experience of statutory interventions in social work. Practice placements provide the opportunity to develop a range of skills set out in the Professional Capabilities Framework. You also extend your skills in linking theory, policy and practice with children and adults, and undertake a research dissertation.

Assessment
Modules are assessed through essays, observation studies, project reports, case studies, group and individual presentations. Knowledge and understanding of social work law and policy is assessed in a take away exercise. Before embarking on the first placement, all students undergo a practical assessment of their readiness for direct practice. Practice placements are assessed by a practice educator and through critically reflective accounts of case studies of work with individuals, groups or communities. Research in Professional Practice is assessed through a 10,000 word dissertation.

Practice Placements
Placements normally take place in the north east region and students are required to travel independently to these.

Other admission requirements

-GCSE Mathematics and GCSE English grade C or above, or equivalent, at the time of application.
-Applicants must have sufficient recent experience (in employment, as a volunteer, as a service user or carer) in a social care, health care or related voluntary setting to be able to demonstrate an understanding of the capabilities of a social worker as indicated at the entry level of the Professional Capabilities Framework. As a guideline, this period of experience is unlikely to be less than six months.
-Applicants for whom English is not a first language will be required to demonstrate evidence of English Language Competence equivalent to IELTS 7 with no element less than 6.5.

You will also be required to:
-Attend an interview*.
-Demonstrate fitness to undergo social work training.

A. At the interview stage you are asked to declare any health conditions or disabilities that may affect your ability to undertake a practice placement safely and effectively.
B. Upon acceptance of a firm offer on the course, you are asked to complete an occupational health screening in line with national guidelines agreed with relevant professional bodies.
C. Provide evidence that you do not have a criminal record that might restrict your opportunities to work with children or vulnerable adults. Candidates will be required as a condition of admission to undertake, or provide evidence of, a current DBS check.

*Candidates who are based overseas and cannot attend an interview in person may be interviewed remotely and should contact the admissions secretary if necessary to seek advice.

The Admissions Tutor gives equal consideration to all applications received before the UCAS January deadline, in accordance with UCAS regulations and University policy. However, we start assessing applications and interviewing from November onwards, in order to meet the required timescales. It is, therefore, advisable to make an early application.

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Advanced study of Greek, Roman and near Eastern history that develops skills in handling documentary evidence. Intercollegiate programme with a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more

About the Ancient History MA:

Advanced study of Greek, Roman and near Eastern history that develops skills in handling documentary evidence. Intercollegiate programme with a wide range of options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Compulsory module: Sources & Methods in Ancient History. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. King's was ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/ancient-history-ma.aspx

Course detail

The MA programme in Ancient History is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the programme offerings combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

The programme consists of a compulsory core module, Sources & Methods in Ancient History, two optional modules, and a dissertation. The first and last elements provide particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology. Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages, and with translated texts. Besides purely ancient historical topics, modules may also be taken from the syllabuses for the MAs in Classics, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies. You may also be able to take appropriate modules from other MA programmes at King's. You may also take modules in Greek and Latin Languages for Research at beginners or intermediate level.


Course format and assessment

Full-time study: six to eight hours of lectures and seminars each week, and we will expect you to undertake 35 hours of independent study.
Part-time study: two to six hours of lectures and seminars a week, and we will expect you to undertake 17.5 hours of independent study.
Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 12,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Greek Play

Every year (since 1953), students in the Department of Classics have produced and performed a Greek play - the only production in the UK to be performed annually in the original Greek. Read more about the Greek Play (and its history) at King's: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/classics/about/greek/index.aspx

Course purpose

This programme offers advanced study of the history of the Greek, Roman and Near Eastern worlds; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of ancient history.

Career prospects

Research in the department; teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/mlc

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Advanced study of the classical world in world-leading department, with focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Read more
Advanced study of the classical world in world-leading department, with focus on Greek and Latin language and literature. Intercollegiate programme with options taught at King's, UCL and Royal Holloway, with close links to the Institute of Classical Studies. Compulsory colloquium: Undertaking Research in Classics. Leads to further research or careers in education, journalism, finance, politics and cultural sectors.

Key benefits

- One of the world's largest and most distinguished Departments of Classics.

- Unrivalled location for the study of the ancient world thanks to London's unique range of specialist libraries, museums and galleries.

- Extraordinarily wide choice of modules, drawing on the resources of the whole of the University of London.

- King's graduates enjoy one of the best employment rates and starting salaries in the UK. Ranked 6th in the UK for graduate employment (Times and Sunday Times Good Universities Guide 2016)


Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/classics-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The MA programme in Classics is organised on an intercollegiate basis, so that the programme offerings combine the expertise of staff in all three of the participating colleges - King's, UCL and Royal Holloway. It centres on the University's Institute of Classical Studies, which not only contains a world-class research library, but also hosts the richest programme of seminars, conferences, and occasional lectures for this subject area in the UK.

The programme consists of a three optional modules, and a dissertation. The compulsory colloquium, Undertaking Research in Classics, taken as preparation for writing the dissertation, provides particularly concentrated training in research techniques and methodology.

Modules are taught both with texts in the original languages and with translated texts. Besides purely literary and linguistic topics, modules may also be taken from the syllabuses for the MAs in Ancient History, Classical Archaeology & Art, and Late Antique & Byzantine Studies, including Latin and Ancient Greek at both intermediate and beginners levels.

- Course purpose -

This programme offers advanced study of the classical world, with special reference to Greek and Latin language and literature; it is intended either as a further year's study after a first degree or as training in the technical disciplines needed to undertake doctoral research in the field of Classics.

- Course format and assessment -

Full-time study: 6-8 hours of taught classes per week. Part-time study: 2-6 hours of taught classes per week. Modules are assessed by coursework and/or examinations. The 12,000 word dissertation enables students to research a topic of their choice, working one-to-one with an academic supervisor.

Career Prospects:

Many students go on to pursue research in our department; others have developed their skills in teaching, journalism, cultural management or the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Welsh Writing in English at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MA in Welsh Writing in English offers an exciting array of modules from the traditional core of English studies in the context of contemporary approaches to the subject.

Key Features of MA in Welsh Writing in English

The MA allows you to range widely across English studies rather than confine yourself to a narrow field and draws on the individual research expertise of members of staff.

From the student’s point of view the MA is openly structured. You define your own pathway through the Department’s MA provision. This means that as well as choosing modules from the MA in English, you can select modules in any combination from the other specialist MAs offered by the Department, such as the MA in Welsh Writing in English and the MA in Gender and Culture.

You develop your dissertation project on a topic of your own choosing in consultation with a supervisor.

The College of Arts and Humanities has a Graduate Centre. The Graduate Centre fosters and supports individual and collaborative research activity of international excellence and offers a vibrant and supportive environment for students pursuing postgraduate research and taught masters study. The Centre provides postgraduate training to enhance academic and professional development and facilitates participation in seminar programmes, workshops and international conferences.

The full-time Welsh Writing in English course comprises three modules taken in each academic semester (a total of six modules) and then a dissertation over the summer. There are three core modules and three optional modules. The dissertation component draws on issues and themes developed throughout the year, or emerges from a topic of the student's proposing.

Part-time study is also available.

Welsh Writing in English Programme Aims

- To acquire advanced knowledge and understanding of a range of topics related to Welsh Writing in English.

- To develop theoretical, practical and methodological skills relevant to all aspects of the study of Welsh Writing in English.

- To lay a solid foundation of knowledge and analytical and presentational skills for further research work in the field.

Modules

Modules on the MA in Welsh Writing in English typically include:

• Practising Ideas: Advanced Research Skills
• Dylan Thomas and the Rise of Welsh Writing in English
• Locating Wales: Comparative Perspectives
• Women Writing Modern Wales
• ‘American Wales’: Writing the Transatlantic
• Welsh Identities: Literature and Nationhood

Careers

Career expectations are excellent for Welsh Writing in English graduates. MA degree holders may move on to doctoral study or enter employment in such areas as education; publishing; museums, heritage and tourism; marketing, sales and advertising; business, art, design and culture; media and PR; social and welfare professions.

Who should Apply?

Students interested in Welsh Writing in English from an English or related background. Students interested in preparation for postgraduate research, MPhil or PhD, or who wish to develop skills and knowledge related to early modern history.

Research Interests

The Centre for Research into the English Literature and Language of Wales (CREW) is directed by Dr Kirsti Bohata, alongside Professor Daniel Williams who during the past decade has developed comparative approaches to the literatures of Wales. He took over from Professor M.Wynn Thomas OBE, a Fellow of the British Academy and a Fellow of the English Association. Kirsti Bohata’s areas of specialism include Postcolonial Studies, Women’s Writing and the Production History and Culture of the Book. Professor
Dai Smith is Raymond Williams Chair of Welsh Cultural History within CREW, Dr John Goodby is a poet, leading scholar of post-war Irish poetry and specialist in Dylan Thomas, while Peter Lord, the leading historian and interpreter of Wales’s visual culture, is the Centre’s Research Fellow who recently published an edition of the Winifred Coombe Tenant Diaries. Regular research seminars and lectures are run through CREW and also through the Research Institute for Arts and Humanities (RIAH) which students are encouraged to attend.

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