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Masters Degrees (Market Research)

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This course-based, one year Graduate Diploma in Market Research is designed for students who want to extend their knowledge of market research and advanced analytical tools beyond the level they obtained during their undergraduate degree. Read more
This course-based, one year Graduate Diploma in Market Research is designed for students who want to extend their knowledge of market research and advanced analytical tools beyond the level they obtained during their undergraduate degree. Students are trained by leaders in the field who have developed progressive research and analytical methods.

Program Features

-Course-based
-Minimum two full-time semesters of study
-Allows students an entry into a thesisbased MSc degree
-Develops students’ advanced analytical tools to provide solutions for strategic and policy issues
-Students regurarly attend the Department’s weekly seminar class

Faculty Expertise

-Marketing Theory
-Consumption Behaviour Theory
-Qualitative Research Methodologies
-Quantitative Research Methodologies
-Marketing Analytics
-Big Data Analytics

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Summary. Read more
Summary
This course integrates a core of social research with marketing and market research; modules are shared with the Master of Science social research; this provides students with an opportunity to develop their knowledge and understanding of the research processes; this programme extends that knowledge to the specific area of marketing research; it allows students to specialise and provides important industry-relevant skills; the award is intended for those who wish to deepen their knowledge of social research theory and practice, and to apply this knowledge to specific market, marketing research and societal marketing contexts; it can be studied either before taking up employment, whilst in employment as part of a career development programme, or as a forerunner to doctoral research.

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The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. Read more
The focus of this programme is on contemporary substantive issues in criminology and criminal justice and on criminological research methods. It is particularly appropriate for those engaged in criminal justice policy analysis and development or similar work in allied fields.

The programme develops a theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues within criminology, criminal justice and research methods. More specifically, it aims to develop an advanced understanding of the complex nature of crime, harm and victimisation together with an appreciation of the role of the state/criminal justice system in the regulation of human behaviour, deviance and crime. The programme will equip you to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics, analyse and present the material such research generates.

Through combining criminology and research methods, the programme enables you to think logically and in an informed manner about criminological issues. The programme fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilize your research knowledge of research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of criminology and broader social science research professions.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/criminology-social-research-methods-msc

Modules

You'll undertake modules from a broad base of subject areas including:

- Criminological theory
This module charts the development of criminological thinking from the onset of modernity through to the present day. It will place discrete theories in their proper sociological, historical, political and cultural contexts. It will seek to establish the implications and relationships of various theories to criminal justice policy. A number of contemporary issues (terrorism, urban disturbances, and gang culture) will be explored with a view to critically evaluating the value of competing theoretical frameworks.

- Crime, harm and victimisation
The module aims to deconstruct the fundamental elements of criminology: the crime, the criminal and the victim. It begins by examining historical and contemporary patterns of crime and criminality, as officially measured, within the UK and beyond. It then engages with more critical academic debates about defining and measuring crime, considering definitions of crime as: a breach of criminal law; a violation of collective conscience; a product of conduct norms; a social construct; ideological censure; a gendered reality; a violation of human rights, and; social or environmental harm. The module engages with critical deconstructions of the 'offender' and the 'victim', considering how these are socially constructed and how our understanding of these, like of 'crime', has changed and continues to change in late-/post-modern society.

- Responding to crime: justice, social control and punishment
This module explores some of the key issues and controversies in the delivery of justice, social control and punishment. It begins with a critical consideration of the concept of justice and emphasises the significance of this in relation to how the state responds to various forms of crime. It encourages you to think critically about the role of the state in the regulation of behaviour and provides an overview of key changes that have occurred in the field of crime control and criminal justice. One of the key features of contemporary crime control discourse is the rise of risk management and the pursuit of security. This module outlines the ways in which such a discourse has transformed criminal justice thinking and practices of both policing and penal policy, and also of crime (and harm) prevention.

- Criminological research in practice
This module uses examples from recent and current research conducted by members of the Crime and Justice Research Group at LSBU and external guest speakers to develop both the research training and subject understanding elements of the MSc, demonstrating how research becomes knowledge – generating theoretical advances, policy initiatives, new research questions and university curricula. Lectures/seminars will take the form of a research commentary, talking you through a research project from idea inception through research design, fieldwork, analysis and dissemination and, where appropriate, on to the influences research has had (or could have) on subsequent academic works and policy developments. Particular emphasis will be placed on challenges peculiar to criminological research.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module introduces you to core concepts in social research and shows how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll be introduced to central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices. You are then introduced to different ways research can be designed and the ways design affects permissible inferences. You are then introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
You are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. Students will gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to their own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The dissertation is a major part of your work on the MSc, reflected in its value of 60 credits. The aim of the dissertation is to enable students to expand and deepen their knowledge of a substantive area in criminology, whilst simultaneously developing their methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation. You'll be allocated a dissertation supervisor from the departmental team and will meet regularly for personal supervision meetings.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in criminal justice related work in statutory, commercial or community voluntary sectors and operating at central, regional and local government levels, for example, the Home Office; police forces; local government; crime and disorder reduction partnerships and their equivalencies throughout the world.

The acquisition of specific criminological and research methods knowledge will also enhance the career opportunities if you are currently working in the field. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

The Crime and Criminal Justice Research Group, (CCJRG), at LSBU has developed a strong national and international reputation for delivering high quality and real life impact research. It has worked closely with a range of government agencies, including the Office for Criminal Justice Reform (Ministry of Justice); Government Office for London; the Scottish Executive, Northern Ireland Office and the Equalities and Human Rights Commission. It has also undertaken extensive research in collaboration with various London local authorities together with a range of voluntary and charity-based agencies.

Placements

Our criminology programme also has a strong voluntary work scheme.You're encouraged to undertake voluntary work in a variety of criminal justice related agencies. Recent positions have been within the police service, the prison service, legal advice, victim support, domestic violence and child abuse agencies and youth offending and youth mentoring schemes.

Teaching and learning

Study hours:
Year 1 class contact time is typically 6 hours per week part time and 12 hours per week full time plus individual tutorial and independent study.

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In the current knowledge economy and information age, the demand for social, market and marketing research has increased substantially as organizations have recognized the growing need for research on which key policy and strategic decisions are based. Read more
In the current knowledge economy and information age, the demand for social, market and marketing research has increased substantially as organizations have recognized the growing need for research on which key policy and strategic decisions are based. The Research Analyst graduate certificate program focuses on the theoretical, practical and ethical underpinnings of research, while also equipping you with the statistical, technical and professional skills necessary to do applied research in a variety of different settings throughout the public and private sectors.

In this program, you will focus on all of the major aspects of the research process including research design, information retrieval and evaluation, data collection, analysis and interpretation, and the preparation and presentation of the research findings.

Special features of the program include an emphasis on professional, ethical and legal implications when designing research studies; new research technologies for data collection; analysis; presentation; proposal writing; research entrepreneurship; project management; and program evaluation.

Professional Accreditations

This program is recognized by the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association (MRIA) as being an official post-graduate program designate. This enables graduates of the program to take advantage of Pathway 1 to the Certified Marketing Research Professional (CMRP) designation.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Retrieve, process, and present market research information and findings using current online and stand-alone information technology tools.
• Conduct social and market research with a high degree of accuracy and reliability, which can inform major organizational and business decisions.
• Write documentation to collect, and support the collection, of data for social and market research projects.
• Interpret qualitative and quantitative research through the analysis and presentation of empirical data to meet the needs and objectives of the client.
• Ensure that all analysis of numerical and text data is consistent with the appropriate principles of descriptive statistics and techniques of statistical inference.
• Design and implement research projects for international and domestic populations with varied cultural and linguistic demographic profiles.
• Formulate plans for social and market research that will meet the needs of the client and follow all theoretical, practical, ethical, and legal guidelines related to the collection of data and the privacy of personal information.
• Design and implement research projects that address the unique characteristics of public, private or not-for-profit organizations.
• Prepare applications for the research ethical review board in an effective manner.
• Complete all work in accordance with ethical, legislative, and professional requirements and standards.

[Modules]]

Semester 1
• RAPP 5001: Surveying Society
• RAPP 5002: Qualitative Research Methods 1
• RAPP 5003: Spreadsheet and Table Management
• RAPP 5004: Quantitative Research Methods 1
• RAPP 5005: Research Communication and Proposal Writing Skills
• RAPP 5006: Research Ethics and Standards

Semester 2
• RAPP 5011: Research Seminar
• RAPP 5012: Qualitative Research Methods 2
• RAPP 5013: Research Management
• RAPP 5014: Quantitative Research Methods 2
• RAPP 5015: Database Management
• RAPP 5016: New Research Technologies
• RAPP 5021: Research Analyst Placement

Work Placement

Students complete a twelve-week placement beginning in May, which allows them to gain invaluable practical and professional experience.

Your Career

Graduates of this program may find employment as analysts, community and social development officers, consumer advisers, economic policy researchers, education policy researchers, health and social policy development officers, health policy researchers, housing policy analysts, market and marketing researchers, program officers, research consultants, and social survey researchers.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded 3* for our environment - 'conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability' - Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014. Read more
75% of our research into Social Work and Social Policy was awarded 3* for our environment - 'conducive to producing research of internationally excellent quality, in terms of its vitality and sustainability' - Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014.

This Masters in Social Policy and Social Research Methods is particularly significant if you are currently working in local authorities or the voluntary sector. The skills you learn will progress your career in social welfare policy development, delivery or research. Or it is also relevant if you are thinking of starting a career related to social policy in the public, voluntary or private sectors.

The focus of this course is on contemporary substantive issues in social policy development and delivery, and social policy research methods. You'll develop your theoretical, policy and technical understanding of key issues related to policy-making, social welfare delivery, equality and social justice, and research methods.

You'll gain an advanced understanding of national and international factors influencing policy development and implementation. The changing relationship between the State, voluntary sector and private sector in terms of social welfare delivery. You'll also explore how ideas of equality, diversity, justice and human rights shape institutions and the programmes they offer.

You'll engage with recent research linked to changing family forms and how family policy impacts on children and families. You'll be equipped to design and implement social scientific research using a broad range of methodologies, consider research ethics then analyse and present the material such research generates.

The course fosters a critical awareness of the relationship between theory, policy and practice and enables you to utilise your research knowledge and research skills and translate these into research practice in the field of social policy and broader social science research professions.

Flexible modes of study:
You can choose between three modes lasting one, two or three years allowing you to study whilst maintaining other life commitments.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/social-policy-and-social-research-methods

Modules

- Social policy analysis
This module will help you understand the policy making process and the factors that influence the formation and implementation of social policy, for example, demographic changes or policy transfer. You'll discuss current debates about policy making and delivery, including user involvement, localism and sustainability.

- The voluntary sector and the state: protagonist or partner
You'll explore the contemporary role of the voluntary sector in the delivery of social welfare, and the challenges they face in terms of management, capacity building and funding. You'll examine the role of the voluntary sector as partner or protagonist to the state, as well as its relationships with the private sector.

- Methods for social research and evaluation: philosophy, design and data collection
This module is an introduction to core concepts in social research and how they can be used to address social scientific questions and practical issues in policy evaluation. You'll engage with central topics in the philosophy of social sciences and the effect they have on research choices and explore the different ways research can be designed, and the way design affects permissible inferences. You'll also be introduced to the theory of measurement and sampling. The final third of the module focuses on acquiring data ranging from survey methods through qualitative data collection methods to secondary data.

- Approaches to social change: equality, social justice and human rights
In this module you'll explore a number of different goals, and the theoretical underpinnings which aim to achieve social change. These goals include: equality, diversity, social justice, social inclusion, multiculturalism, social cohesion and human rights. You'll examine a range of different initiatives to promote these goals in both employment and social welfare delivery. Finally, the module will explore strategies: to identify inequality, injustice and forms of discrimination; to monitor policy development and implementation; and to evaluate outcomes and 'success'.

- Family policy
This module is taught by internationally recognised researchers from the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research. You'll be introduced to demographic changes in families and changes in State-family relationships and developments in 'family policy'. You'll explore early intervention into families, child welfare including adoption, fostering and child maintenance, child poverty, and childcare. Finally, cross cultural perspectives in family formation will be discussed.

- Data analytic techniques for social scientists
In this module you are introduced to a range of analytic techniques commonly used by social scientists. It begins by introducing you to statistical analysis, it then moves to techniques used to analyse qualitative data. It concludes by looking at relational methods and data reduction techniques. You'll also be introduced to computer software (SPSS, NVivo and Ucinet) that implements the techniques. You'll gain both a conceptual understanding of the techniques and the means to apply them to your own research projects. An emphasis will be placed on how these techniques can be used in social evaluation.

- Dissertation
The aim of the dissertation is to enable you to expand and deepen your knowledge on a substantive area in social policy, whilst simultaneously developing your methodological skills. You'll choose an area of investigation and apply the research skills of design and process, modes of data generation and data analysis techniques to undertake a 15,000 word dissertation.

Employability

This MSc will enable you to pursue a range of professional careers in areas linked to social policy and social welfare. You'll be able to access work in the statutory, commercial or voluntary sectors and operating at central, and local government levels, for example, local government; MORI, NSPCC and DEMOS. The acquisition of specific social policy and research methods knowledge will also enhance your career opportunities if you are currently working in the field in social policy development and delivery or in undertaking social policy related research. The specialist focus on research methods also offers an excellent foundation for those interested in undertaking subsequent doctoral research in the field.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Placements

If you are not already working in an environment which is linked to social welfare you'll be encouraged to undertake voluntary work which will give you useful experience alongside the degree. In addition it may become used as a location where you can undertake primary research for your master's dissertation. The Employability team at LSBU can help students find voluntary placements.

Teaching and learning

Modules are assessed by coursework. There are different kinds of writing required which include: a critical reading log, a self-reflective essay, a methodological critique of a research article, a research proposal, extended essays, an evaluation of social change and a dissertation.

Modules are supported by Moodle, the LSBU virtual learning environment where most course reading will be made available. The classroom is envisaged as a core learning environment where you can discuss new ideas but also to think how they can be applied to previous or current work or voluntary experiences. Attendance is crucial for building your knowledge and skills. You'll be making use of computer laboratories in order to develop your use of a range of programmes that can be used to analyse quantitative and qualitative methods.

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This programme is based at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, which is world renowned for the translation of biomedical research into new therapeutic advances in eye disease. Read more
This programme is based at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, which is world renowned for the translation of biomedical research into new therapeutic advances in eye disease. Students will be embedded in the research environment, have the opportunity to conduct an independent research project, and to work alongside world-leading experts.

Degree information

Students will develop key transferable personal and professional skills to independently conduct an extended empirical research project supervised by world-leading experts in the field of vision research. Students will also learn about the fundamental biology of the eye in health and disease, providing key knowledge to support their research project.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), three optional modules (45 credits) and a dissertation (105 credits).

Core modules
-Bioscience Research Skills
-Research in Practice

Optional modules - students choose three of the following:
-Genetics and Epidemiology of Ocular Disease
-Ocular Cell Biology
-Ocular Development in Health and Disease
-Ocular Immunology

Dissertation/research project
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 18,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, journal clubs and workshops. Assessment is through essays, oral presentations, problem-based tasks and a research dissertation.

Careers

The Vision Research MRes will develop the necessary competitive skills to pursue a research degree at PhD level in the field of biomedical sciences. Graduates will offer prospective employers skills in research development and practice, suitable for further research careers in academia, industry or business.

Employability
A unique feature of the Vision Research MRes is the delivery of key elements that are essential for the development of an internationally-competitive career in biomedical research. The research expertise at the institute will be fully harnessed to prepare students for a new era in research in the global employment market. Students will develop critical understanding of a range of research-related knowledge and skills, including quantitative and qualitative tools for the implementation, management and dissemination of research. The programme will give students both the fundamental knowledge and skills base to address complex issues of global significance in health and wellbeing.

Why study this degree at UCL?

The UCL Institute of Ophthalmology is recognised globally for its outstanding record in basic biomedical research, much of which has been translated into important advances in novel and innovative therapies.

The Vision Research MRes is a unique programme that will combine existing high-quality research-informed teaching at the institute with a substantial empirical research project.

The opportunity to participate fully in academic life as part of a research team will provide networking opportunities across the spectrum of biomedical research taking place at the institute, UCL and elsewhere, thereby increasing exposure to further opportunities in research.

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The School of Civil and Building Engineering at Loughborough has an outstanding research reputation, 75% or its research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework. Read more
The School of Civil and Building Engineering at Loughborough has an outstanding research reputation, 75% or its research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

This programme is aimed at students training for a research career in energy and related areas, in either academia or industry. It focuses on energy demand reduction in the built environment, examining technical solutions within the wider social and economic context.

The course is closely linked with the London-Loughborough Centre for Doctoral Research in Energy Demand (the ‘LoLo CDT’) and is led by internationally-leading research staff at Loughborough University and the Energy Institute at University College, London.

The programme capitalises on the world-class building energy modelling and monitoring expertise in the Building Energy Research Group and the Royal Academy of Engineering Centre of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design. Students make use of our extensive laboratory and full-scale testing facilities, enriched by site visits, conferences, workshops and seminars by external experts. The programme begins with an intensive residential week studying Energy Demand in Context. Students attend lectures from energy experts in different fields, while working to produce a pathway satisfying the goal of a national 80% emissions reduction by 2050.

This is an intensive but rewarding course for future leaders in energy demand research; we accept approximately ten high calibre students each year.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. This unique programme is taught by acknowledged world experts in the field.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked 2nd in the UK for Building in the Times Good University Guide 2015.

- The MRes is an integral part of the London-Loughborough Centre for Doctoral Research in Energy Demand, which has just been funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for a further eight years.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/energy-demand-studies/

Programme modules

- Energy Demand in Context
The aim of this module is to provide an introduction into the many issues of energy demand in the built environment, setting them in the wider context of climate change policy and the history of energy use. Why is energy demand deduction complex? How did we get to where we are? What are the options for the future, and what is your possible role?

- Building Energy Systems and Models
This module will provide students with a thorough understanding of how systems and models of systems work at various levels, from heat transfer in materials and energy systems to the national building stock. They will understand approaches to modelling buildings, systems of energy demands and the influence of people. Students will be taught how to use building energy models and to interpret the results.

- Energy Theory, Measurement and Interpretation
The aims of this module are: to develop students understanding of the principles of measurement in the context of energy demand and associated factors; to explain how to interpret and represent the results accounting for uncertainties and limitations; and to apply this knowledge at different scales from individual components, to building, urban and national scale.

- Research Development and Dissemination
The module aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to devise, plan and disseminate research projects. The module will provide skills in defining research questions and hypotheses; critically reviewing literature; planning a programme of research; communicating to different stakeholders including academia, industry and the public; preparing conference presentations and academic papers; engaging with the public; and producing an MRes Research Dissertation proposal. The module also includes project administration skills including, research ethics and confidentiality.

- Energy Demand: Society Economics and Policy
This module is delivered in the second semester in a series of weekly sessions at UCL. Its aim is to provide a broad understanding of the social, economic, and policy determinants of energy demand, taking into account areas such as pricing and demand, market structure, cost-benefit analysis, social environment and lifestyle, individual attitudes and behaviour, public-private goods, externalities and the policy cycle.

- Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methods
This module will provide students with the grounding in quantitative and qualitative research methods that they need to become effective researchers. The module will provide: skills in statistical analysis and use of the SPSS software; an ability to make informed choices about ways of handling data and to assess the appropriateness of particular analytical procedures; an understanding of questionnaire, interview and focus group design, delivery and analysis; and an ability to critically assess and evaluate the research of others. Whilst case-study applications will be relevant to building energy demand, the skills and knowledge acquired will be generic.

- Energy Demand Studies Research Dissertation
The aims of this module are to train students in the planning, execution and evaluation of a substantive research project; to train them in the art of persuading others of the importance of the research and outcomes and to project their work through academic writing. The dissertation enables students to explore a topic of interest in great depth.

Facilities

MRes students make use of the extensive laboratory facilities and test houses operated by the School of Civil and Building Engineering. The MRes combines measurements in buildings with modelling studies, allowing students to experience at first hand the ‘performance gap’ – the difference between modelling and real world behaviour.

Lectures at University College London provide access to world-class experts in energy economics and the societal context. Our staff pride themselves on their enthusiasm and availability to students, who often comment on this aspect of the course in their feedback.

How you will learn

The programme has a strong student-centred and research focus. Four taught modules set the context and provide subject-specific knowledge, whilst two further modules provide training in relevant research methods. A research dissertation forms half of the total credits and can lead to publishable work.

The MRes in Energy Demand Studies can be studied as a 1-year standalone programme and also forms the first year of the 4-year course for students accepted into the LoLo CDT, who then go on to study for a PhD. The opportunity exists for strong MRes students to join the LoLo Centre at the end of their MRes year.

- Assessment
The MRes is assessed entirely by coursework. A group presentation forms part of the assessment in the initial residential module; with the remainder assessed by an individual essay. Other modules include assessment by presentations and written work, including essays, reports and press releases.

The research project is assessed by a dissertation, an academic paper and a viva at which students present the work to an expert panel.

Careers and further study

Both the School of Civil and Building Engineering and the LoLo CDT have strong links with industry (e.g. Willmott Dixon, B&Q), policy makers (e.g. DECC), and the wider stake-holder community.
Dissertation projects are often linked to our industry sponsors’ interests, which provides a natural pathway to future employment and our visiting Royal Academy Professors and industry partners provide practice-based lectures and workshops.

Scholarships

This is a sought-after course, with a small intake, which ensures students’ access to highly qualified tuition. No scholarships are available for the standalone MRes.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/energy-demand-studies/

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Learn how psychological knowledge is created while receiving practical training in a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods. Read more
Learn how psychological knowledge is created while receiving practical training in a range of quantitative and qualitative research methods.

Who is it for?

This course is suited to students with an undergraduate-level knowledge of psychological research methods who wish to broaden and deepen their research skills. This will probably be with a view towards managing their own research projects. This could be in academia, or in a variety of other work settings where the ability to survey opinions, interpret data meaningfully, and construct and test hypotheses, is valued.

Objectives

This programme provides training in psychological research methods, including research design, statistical methods, and relevant software, but also offers a range of supplementary options from several other psychology masters programmes.

It covers an array of methodological content which will provide you with the skills necessary to engage in research in public or private-sector organisations, or alternatively continue on to a PhD in preparation for an academic research career.

By offering modules from several masters programmes, this course will allow you to gain broad-ranging research skills that leave your future options open, whilst allowing you to engage with a range of students on more specialised programmes, thus providing specific practical examples to help ground abstract research concepts.

Academic facilities

The programme leans heavily on our up-to-date computer labs, and also our research facilities (e.g. TMS, EEG and eye-tracking labs).

Teaching and learning

The general approach to teaching and learning in this programme is through a combination of lectures, interactive sessions, practical workshops and small group classes, including individual and group presentations. You are expected to give presentations, to engage in discussions designed to encourage you to reflect on issues raised in the lectures, to expand further specific topics, and to develop your communication skills.

You are encouraged to undertake extensive reading in order to understand the topics covered in lectures and classes and to broaden and deepen your knowledge of the subject. The teaching and learning process is supported by resources available on City’s virtual learning environment, Moodle, and by a personal tutorial system, as well as the welfare services provided by the Institution.

Assessment of the Programme is through coursework (i.e. assessed essays and assignments, for example stats tests, research proposal presentations, and programming exercises), examinations, and a summer dissertation.

Modules

You will take five core taught modules, two in the Autumn term and three in the Spring term. You also get to customise your programme through the choice of three elective modules, typically two in the Autumn term and one in the Spring term. Finally, you will complete a research dissertation in the Summer term.

Taught modules generally involve two to three hours of contact time (i.e. lectures, lab classes etc.) per week, for ten weeks, but you will need to supplement these classes with individual study and skill development. You should anticipate spending around 150 hours on each taught module, which implies a full-time (~40 hours per week) workload.

You will take five core modules (PEM104, PEM107, SAM005, PSM207 and PSM208) totalling 75 credits. You will also take three elective modules worth a total of 45 credits. The research dissertation is worth 60 credits.

This is a composite programme, which provides you with the opportunity to study modules from several of our other MSc courses. Your research methods training is thus situated within several sub-disciplines of social science. Click on the links below to read the descriptions provided within the context of the programme from which the module originates. Elective modules are illustrative and can change from year to year.

Core modules
-Behavioural Research Methods: Design & Analysis
-Applied Econometrics and Psychological Research Methods
-Research Methods & Programming
-Statistical Models
-Applied Qualitative Data Analysis

Elective modules
-Qualitative Research Methods
-Fundamentals of Cognitive Science
-Psychological Processes: Individual and Social
-Principles of Neuroscience: Brain anatomy, techniques and paradigms
-Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
-Mental Health, Wellbeing and Neuroscience
-Work Design, Organisational Change and Development
-Research, Design & Analysis
-Research in organisations
-Epidemiology

Dissertation - to be eligible for the MSc, you must complete a 60 credit dissertation.

Career prospects

Possible career paths for graduates of this course include academic research (usually following a PhD) or work involving central and local government agencies, public health, the voluntary sector, market/media research, or management consultancy. This programme of study is suitable for progression onto a PhD programme.

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Fashion and Textiles aims to develop the creative process for designers in conjunction with valuable marketing and business skills. Read more
Fashion and Textiles aims to develop the creative process for designers in conjunction with valuable marketing and business skills. The course is aimed at ambitious designers, designer-makers or textile artists who wish to develop opportunities within the profession and who may wish to set up on their own or with others in small teams.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is offered in both full and part-time modes. It is normally one year (3 trimesters) in duration in full-time mode or 6 trimesters in part-time mode. The first two trimesters comprise taught sessions and assessed projects, while the Master’s Project in the final part of the course is by negotiated project only. Completion of the first 2 modules on the course lead to the award of the Postgraduate Certificate, and completion of the first 4 modules leads to the award of the Postgraduate Diploma. Subsequent completion of the MA double module leads to the award of MA Design: Fashion and Textiles.

You will be introduced to research skills and methods, product development, design management and methods, with marketing and business skills. The emphasis of the course is learning how best to present ideas, and where and how to place them in the market.

The course is developed through seminars, lectures, tutorials, visiting speakers, group critiques, market research and personal research. You are encouraged to trial a product in the market. This may be through first hand experience, or through working with studios and agents for designers, shops and craft markets (for designer makers), or with galleries or public spaces (for textile artists). Students propose a route of study through the course to explore and research a chosen area of textiles in knit, print, weave, or embroidery for fashion or interiors, or in fashion design.

MODULES

Research Methodologies - Part One introduces generic methodologies with Part Two considering subject specific data retrieval analysis and evaluation techniques.

The Development of Product, Market Research and Product Ideas - Developing ideas technically and aesthetically, in-depth investigation into techniques and researching to market.

Marketing Skills - Marketing and Business skills – developing an understanding of marketing requirements for textile designers and artists.

Product Sampling and Development and Research - Initial product sampling techniques and investigation. Developing and progressing ideas to enable the creation of new products. Range planning.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The first trimester (PGCert) consists of two modules. Research Methodologies consists of a taught programme of lectures, seminars, group critiques, and assignments. You will also negotiate a programme of study for the Product, Market Research and Product Ideas module. The emphasis at this level is on ideas. During the second trimester (PGDip) you will take two further modules: Marketing Skills comprises of lectures, seminars and research; the Development of Product and Product Ideas is negotiated by each student. The final trimester, leading to the MA, involves a negotiated study which you will propose. The study will be research based resulting in a body of work for assessment.

Specialist facilities include computer studios with over 70 Macs, as well as flatbed and transparency scanners. There is a recently re-equipped digital media studio. Fashion and Textiles students benefit from specialist studio spaces for both digital and screen printing, knitting, weaving, embroidery, laser cutting and pattern cutting, using the latest digital technology for CAD/CAM. All students have access to workshops in photography, sound and video, etching and litho, as well as the specialist Art and Design library.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

The main aim of the course is for students to identify their own employment opportunities. Other possibilities may include textile design, product or fashion design, retail or sales and marketing opportunities, teaching, trend prediction and promotion, or further research in industry or education, and exhibiting in galleries as a textile artist.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The PGCert is assessed by studio exhibition and/or portfolio presentation with a marketing report. The PGDip involves a written report including market analysis of your chosen product field. Practical work is presented by studio work and/or portfolio. For the MA you will present a cohesive body of creative work, supported by written work.

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Keen to measure the impact of an intervention? Interested in finding out about attitudes and values? Want insight into individual motivations and realities… Read more
Keen to measure the impact of an intervention? Interested in finding out about attitudes and values? Want insight into individual motivations and realities of lived experiences? Whatever your approach to understanding the social world and the individuals within it, we offer an industry-recognised qualification that explores a variety of research methods, before letting you specialise in your own areas of interest. Whatever your background, we’ll give you the skills for successful research.

Part-time option

Analysing census data. Monitoring how we use social media. Investigating newspaper language. Social research is wide-ranging. Working as a junior researcher in the private, public or third sector? Moving onto further study? Wanting to pursue a social research career? Whatever your background, our part-time route will give you the skills to succeed.

Key features

Distinguish yourself with a qualification that’s recognised to a professional industry standard and accredited by the Market Research Society (MRS). Excel on a programme that examiners and reviewers praise for its balance of practical and theoretical study and benefit from the opportunity to put theory into practice in a safe environment, with guidance and support every step of the way.

Deepen your understanding of a range of research methodologies and theories, as well as practical skills. Test these out in work placements available as part of the programme, with researchers active across Plymouth University and beyond. Previous students have conducted projects researching Street Pastors, National Student Survey (NSS) scores and the Plymouth Food Network, amongst others.

Learn from staff who are internationally recognised experts in their field, covering a range of areas from health services research, drug use, gender, health and well-being, media, global development, work, education and employment to rural service provision. Staff from across the University may also be available to supervise your dissertations depending on your chosen specialism.

Study a wide range of applied, transferable research methods. Then work towards a distinct MSc exit qualification in a specialist area of your choice, including quantitative, qualitative, social science, education and evaluation research. Past dissertation topics have included: web media influences on voting, Perspectives on hate crime amongst police; Packaging colours and purchase intent; Experiences of older motherhood; Mental health issues in the workplace; Cyber-bullying and Higher Education and The modern wedding – romance or consumerism?

Connect with other researchers from across Plymouth University and beyond with links to the expertise at the Institute of Health and Community (IHC), as well as other research centres.

Tailor your time at university to meet your needs by balancing your study around your work and personal commitments. Opt for a full-time programme taught two days a week (usually Monday and Friday) over a year, or choose part-time study over two to five years.

Choose to take modules individually as stand-alone professional development courses if you require training in a specific area but don’t want to work towards an MSc/ PgDip or PgCert qualification.

Replace your traditional masters dissertation with a practical, professional research apprenticeship. Research work placements have taken place in students’ existing workplaces, including Barnardo’s, the NHS and Plymouth Council. Other students have found research work abroad with organisations such as Ipsos GmbH, and more locally with SERIO, PEDRIO, and The Dartington Hall Trust. And worked with academics within the University on funded projects.

Expand your qualifications with the opportunity to take the exam for the MRS Advanced Certificate in Social and Market Research. This is a market research industry and government recognised qualification.

Course details

The programme has an emphasis on professional development of applied, transferable research skills, attracting individuals from across the private, public and third sector. Supported by the substantive and methodological expertise of academic staff, it provides opportunities to develop a comprehensive and in-depth understanding relating to both conceptual knowledge and practical skills. Gain a distinctive qualification whose title specifically reflects the areas you engage with for your dissertation. For example, if your dissertation focuses on an evaluation of programme or intervention you’ll be awarded an MSc Social Research Methods (Evaluation).

Alternatively, if your dissertation focuses on a subject specialism, for example, media you’ll be awarded MSc Social Research Methods (Media). Other examples of specialisms include: work, employment, education, visual methods, health services, global development, tourism, work. Opt for one of two possible exit awards prior to completing the MSc. A PgCert in Social Research Methods is awarded on the successful completion of 60 credits of taught modules and the PgDip in Social Research Methods is awarded on completion of 120 credits of taught modules.

Typically, part-time study takes two years, and attendance is one day a week. However, you may take the programme over a maximum period of five years.

Applying

The University aims to make the application procedure as simple and efficient as possible. Our Postgraduate Admissions and Enquiries team are on hand to offer help and can put you in touch with the appropriate faculty if you wish to discuss any programme in detail. If you have a disability and would like further information about the support provided by Plymouth University, please visit our Disability Assist Services website. Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email .

Scholarships are available for postgraduate taught programmes.

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The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies provides rigorous advanced training in the multi-disciplinary study of gender. Read more
The MPhil in Multi-disciplinary Gender Studies provides rigorous advanced training in the multi-disciplinary study of gender. The course is designed for those students who wish to prepare for PhD or further research and also, for those who want to enhance their understanding of 'gender' by undertaking a one-year MPhil only.

The primary objective of the course is to introduce students from a wide variety of academic, business and policy backgrounds to the traditions, methods and front-line research that shape an advanced gender analysis of human society. Over twenty different departments within the University of Cambridge come together on this course to address a range of topics such as Conflict; Globalization; Labour Market Inequality; Public Policy; Culture; Bio-medical advances, Experimental Psychology, Human Rights and Justice, Literature and the Arts, Culture and Antiquity. Graduates from this MPhil will emerge as highly desirable candidates for NGO, governmental, policy, business, and academic careers.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/hsgsmpmgs

Course detail

The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to:

1. use a range of methods for gathering, analyzing and interpreting research material.
2. apply normative theories to substantive research topics.
3. frame research questions, to construct appropriate research designs, and develop a thorough grasp of a wide range of methodological approaches.
4. interpret complex research publications effectively.
5. independently manage primary research, including data management and the writing up of research as well as understanding codes of research practice and research ethics.
6. research and also to make use of constructive criticism.

Learning Outcomes

The MPhil programme is designed to enable students to conduct independent research in the field of gender studies. The outcomes of the programme are achieved both through focused study of a wide range of selected specialised aspects of gender analysis, and through development of more general research skills and methods that enable the student to produce original, independent work. The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to:

1. use a range of methods for gathering, analysing and interpreting research material.
2. apply normative theories to substantive research topics.
3. frame research questions, to construct appropriate research designs, and develop a thorough grasp of a wide range of methodological approaches.
4. interpret complex research publications effectively.
5. independently manage primary research, including data management and the writing up of research as well as understanding codes of research practice and research ethics.
6. present research and also to make use of constructive criticism.

Format

Students will take the following:

1. Theory and Controversy (MGS 1)
2. Research Methodologies (MGS 2)
3. Multi-disciplinary Text Seminar (MGS 3)
4. Multi-disciplinary Gender Research Seminar
5. Multi-disciplinary Speaker Programme
6. Dissertation.

Courses and seminars will run for the first two terms (Michaelmas and Lent). Dissertations are expected to be completed throughout the third term (Easter) and the vacation under guidance from a supervisor.

Students are introduced to a wide range of disciplinary methods and research topics and are encouraged to debate ideas and concepts throughout the course. In addition, students will have the opportunity to interact with world-leading experts in gender theory hosted by the Centre throughout the year through the Diane Middlebrook and Carl Djerassi Visiting Professorship. Group discussion, led by experts, forms the core of the MGS 1 and MGS 3 courses. In addition to the research dissertation, students are required to produce two unsupervised essays of not more than 5000 words. These essays are assessed to examine how well the student has understood the complex debates and theoretical ideas taught in MGS1, MGS2 and MGS3.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation submitted in mid July.
- 2 essays of 5,000 words each submitted at the end of the second term and the beginning of the third term.

Feedback on each submitted essay and the dissertation will be provided.

Continuing

70% overall score in MPhil.

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

There are no specific funding opportunities advertised for this course. For information on more general funding opportunities, please follow the link below.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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The MA in Historical Research Methods is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the research training guidelines favoured by UK Research Councils. Read more
The MA in Historical Research Methods is designed to train students in research skills to the level prescribed by the research training guidelines favoured by UK Research Councils. It is intended for students with a good first degree in history, or who possess a taught Masters degree in history. Most students would be expected to progress to a research degree in history at the end of the degree, but it is also possible to take it as a stand-alone programme.
Students must complete a programme in research training and submit a dissertation on an approved topic which is connected to the core course of this programme (Sources and Research Design in Historical Research). As part of this course candidates must also submit a number of research related assignments which, taken together with the dissertation, are equivalent to approximately 30,000 words.

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/mahistresmeth/

Structure

Core Course:
- Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1.0 unit)
This course provides one-to-one training in research design and in the use of sources for a specific region under the guidance of the MA dissertation supervisor. It is assessed by 2 essays (10,000 words in total). The first is normally on source-based problems and the second on research design which is linked to the dissertation topic.

Structure of the Programme:
This degree programme consists of four elements, including a 10,000-word dissertation:

1. Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (Core course, 1.0 unit)
2. Research Methods in History with reference to Asia and Africa (1.0 unit)
3. Dissertation (1.0 unit)
4. a minor course or courses (equivalent to 1.0 unit) chosen from the Minor Course Options list and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures.

Please note that not all the courses listed here will be available every year, and some new courses are likely to be added.

For any queries, please contact the convener of the History MA Programme, who will also be pleased to provide more detailed information on individual courses.

MA Historical Research Methods Programme Specification (pdf; 109kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/mahistresmeth/file76287.pdf

Teaching & Learning

- Lectures and Seminars

Teaching is generally by informal lectures and seminar discussions. At Masters level there is particular emphasis on seminar work where students may be expected to make full-scale presentations for units they take.

In addition to their studies on the MA programme, students at SOAS are able to participate in a wide range of research seminars, lectures and conferences that regularly take place in the School and in the University of London.

- Dissertation

The 10,000 word Dissertation on an approved topic linked with one of the taught courses.

- Learning Resources

SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Historical Research Methods from SOAS provides its students with an understanding of the world, giving them specialised historical knowledge and understanding of cultural sensibilities of a region. Postgraduate students are equipped with the expertise to continue in research as well as the skills needed to enable them to find professional careers in the private and public sectors.

Postgraduate students leave SOAS with a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek, including familiarity with methods of research; the competence to manage large quantities of information; the ability to select and organise information and analytical skills. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The degree has been developed to meet the needs of both development practitioners and researchers on international development, including those wishing to pursue an MPhil/PhD in International Development. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The degree has been developed to meet the needs of both development practitioners and researchers on international development, including those wishing to pursue an MPhil/PhD in International Development. The programme will suit students with a variety of backgrounds in social sciences, including politics, sociology, economics, and so on. It would also meet the needs of people working, or hoping to work in international agencies, humanitarian organisations, and NGOs. Students with a strong interest in research and research methods will thrive on the MSc distinctive focus on training in research methods.

The MSc Research for International Development is a newly established interdisciplinary Taught Masters programme at SOAS, offered jointly by the departments of Economics and Development Studies. This cutting-edge degree is funded and supported by the UK’s ESRC (The Economic and Social Research Council) as part of the Bloomsbury Doctoral Training Centre.

The programme’s unique twenty-week core module Battlefield of Methods: Approaches to International Development equips students with the theoretical background and analytical skills to inquire into the relationship between theory and method in the domain of international development. The module provides students with knowledge about the plurality of methodological approaches in key areas of international development research, and the policy choices and strategies associated with these. The module offers students the opportunity to engage with a selection of methods used in international development research.

Further training in a variety of research methods is the focus of the other two core modules: Research Methods in Political Economy I and II. RMI covers the necessary statistical methods for social sciences including survey design and regression analysis. It aims to a) introduce students to statistical inference; b) encourage the clear and coherent expression of statistical results; and c) promote the critical reading of statistics within the development literature. RMII addresses sources and methods for the social sciences in the context of the political economy of development.

This programme gives students advanced interdisciplinary training in research methods and topics in Research for International Development. While the programme structure emphasises research methods, students will also have the opportunity to choose from a large number of substantive optional modules. The interdisciplinary nature of the programme is by virtue of both the core modules and options available for study being drawn from two departments within SOAS: Economics and Development Studies. Students will therefore benefit from studying with experts in a variety of fields of international development, and from the wide regional expertise in developing countries and development issues.

SOAS Development Studies student Matthew Juden wins first DSA/ICEA Masters dissertation prize 2015: https://www.soas.ac.uk/news/newsitem109127.html

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/economics/programmes/msc-research-for-international-development/

Programme Specification

Programme Specification 2015/16 (pdf; 72kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/development/programmes/msc-research-for-international-development/file101805.pdf

Materials

- SOAS Library
SOAS Library is one of the world's most important academic libraries for the study of Africa, Asia and the Middle East, attracting scholars from all over the world. The Library houses over 1.2 million volumes, together with significant archival holdings, special collections and a growing network of electronic resources.

Teaching & Learning

Modules are taught in lectures and tutorial groups. Degrees are awarded on the basis of assessed coursework, examinations and the dissertation. Modules are generally assessed on the basis of a final examination (70%) and essay or project based coursework (30%). MSc degrees are taught over a period of twelve months of full-time study within a structured programme. In the case of part-time study, the degrees will be taught over two or three years.

- Lectures

Most modules involve a 1 or 2 hour lecture as a key component with linked tutorial classes.

- Tutorials

At Masters level there is particular emphasis on tutorial work. Students make full-scale presentations and are expected to write papers that often require significant independent work.

- Dissertation

Students are required to complete a 13,000-word dissertation in ‘Research Methods for International Development’.

- Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course

Our MSc programmes attract students with a wide range of backgrounds including many who have worked for a few years before coming to SOAS. Our popular quantitative modules are designed to be accessible to all of our students including those with a relatively small quantitative component in their first degree. Our well-received quantitative modules focus on applying basic methods used in empirical research. They equip students to carry out their own high quality empirical work and critically evaluate research, with relatively little emphasis on advanced econometric theory and mathematical proofs. Our quantitative methods teaching begins with a three-week preliminary module in mathematics, statistics and computing. Each student must attend this module, and sit its exam. The preliminary module runs in September prior to the start of teaching in term one. The objective of the module is to review the basic quantitative skills assumed once formal teaching commences. This module is compulsory. Further details on the Preliminary Mathematics and Statistics Course (http://www.soas.ac.uk/courseunits/15PECC050.html).

Employment

A postgraduate degree in Research for International Development from SOAS provides graduates with a portfolio of widely transferable skills sought by employers, including analytical skills, the ability to think laterally and employ critical reasoning, and knowing how to present materials and ideas effectively both orally and in writing. Equally graduates are able to continue in the field of research, continuing their studies either at SOAS or other institutions.

An MSc in Research for International Development is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. Read more
Our Psychology Department is one of the top 10 psychology departments in the UK (REF 2014). You will be taught by a dynamic group of world-class psychologists whose areas of expertise span a broad range, including researchers and practitioners. We provide high quality supervision and teaching, and you will benefit from the friendly and supportive atmosphere in the Department, as evidenced by student feedback available on our website.

This MSc course will equip you with knowledge of cutting-edge developments and issues in applied social psychology, as well as an array of analytical, methodological and communication skills, important for those progressing to a PhD as well as for those looking for jobs in applied settings in commercial and governmental organizations.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/psychology/coursefinder/mscappliedsocialpsychology.aspx

Why choose this course?

- Our Department ranks among the best in the UK for research (rating in the top ten in the UK in the 2014 REF) and teaching (highest rating ‘excellent’ for teaching quality).

- You will develop an enhanced understanding of the subject area through an exciting mix of seminars, lectures and research conveyed by our friendly and accessible staff, who are all involved in cutting edge research.

- You will benefit from high quality lectures that combine theory, research, and application, providing you with insight into topical issues and the latest research in applied social psychology.

- Some of the lectures are delivered by applied psychologists in the field, providing you with insights into the real jobs that await our graduates.

- You will have the opportunity to complete an innovative research project under the supervision of a leading academic in the relevant field.

Department research and industry highlights

Example research projects of our academic staff:
- Wrath of God: Religious primes and punishment.
- Can values reduce prejudice against Muslims even when national identification is high?
- Monetary donations following humanitarian disasters.
- Recalling and recognizing faces of other-races: A behavioural and eye movement study.

Example relations with the industry:
- Laureus Sport for Good Foundation; developing an assessment tool on well-being of youth.
- Relations with care homes helping patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
- Hospitals for a clinical trial test and intervention to help people with back pain.

Course content and structure

You will study seven core units, including the Social Research Project:

Core course units:
Psychology in Applied Settings
In this unit you will:
- develop an enhanced understanding of the link between research and practice

- be equipped with research skills relevant to research in applied settings and implementation of research findings in the practice of psychologists

- participate in specialist seminars on applied psychology topics such as forensic and educational psychology

- take part in interactive discussions of all relevant issues guided by the tutor taking any given session.

- Multicultural Existence
This unit will introduce you to the social psychology of multicultural existence and familiarise you with existing theories and current research on this topic. You will be trained to apply your knowledge to the analysis of real-life examples of multicultural existence.

- Adjustment and Well-Being
This course will introduce you to theory, empirical findings, and applications regarding adjustment and well-being (happiness and self-fulfillment).

- Advanced Techniques in Social and Behavioural Research
You will explore many of the key research techniques that are used in social, health, and developmental research. You will develop an advanced understanding of current techniques within these areas and how to employ these techniques, and be able to evaluate and critique them.

- Social Research Project
You will be provided with the possibility to carry out an original piece of research on a topic of your interest within the broad area of applied and social psychology. You will be given the necessary support during the conception, conduct and writing up of your research

- Topics in Psychological Science
The aim of the unit is to stimulate an interest in topical research findings from a wide range of research areas relevant to psychology. You will develop the skills of presentation, evaluation, interpretation and discussion of original research findings.

- Statistics for Research
You will be provided with an overview and basic understanding of advanced statistical methods used in psychology and neuroscience research, including hands-on experience applying these methods to specific problems. The unit will provide a methodological foundation if you wish to pursue research in disciplines allied to the MSc course.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of social psychology and its application
- strong research skills in social and applied psychology
- experience in transferable skills that are highly sought after in the job market, such as oral presentations, oral and written communication, and project planning.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, different types of presentations, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different psychology-related areas, including careers in human relations and organizational psychology. Our graduates are currently working for organizations such as community associations, NGO’s, organizational psychology firms, and consultancy firms. This course also equips you with a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Read more
Students who graduate from the Master’s programme in geography have strong theoretical and practical skills. The education in geography offers a broad understanding in current social and environmental issues. Our students can work as experts in their field, both independently and as members of multi-professional teams.

The teaching within the programme is connected with the work of the geography research groups. It is often possible to write the final thesis as part of work in a research group or a research institute in a related field.

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into three sub-programmes (described in section 4). Our students have been very successful in the job market after completing our programme.

The strengths of students who have completed our Master’s programme when it comes to research and expertise are:
-Their ability to apply theoretical knowledge.
-A broad understanding of multi-layered regional issues.
-Strong interaction skills within multi-disciplinary groups of specialists.
-Their ability to communicate in writing, orally, and graphically about geographical phenomena and research findings.
-Their ability to utilise and interpret various kinds of research data.
-Their versatile knowledge of methodology in geography.
-Their ability to apply the newest methods in geoinformatics and cartography.
-Their embracing of responsible and ethical scientifc practices.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

The first year of the advanced module of the Master’s programme contains the method courses of your chosen sub-programme, elective courses, and advanced literature. During this year you will start planning your Master’s thesis.

In the autumn of the second year, you will join a Master’s seminar and take exams on literature related to the MSc thesis. In the spring, you should be ready to present your finished MSc thesis (Pro gradu). In addition, you can take optional courses in both years that support your sub-programme. If you are studying to be a teacher, you will take courses in pedagogy during your second year.

Studying takes many forms. A large part of the instruction is contact teaching. Method and specialisation courses are usually implemented in groups of 10-20 students, where it is easy to discuss professional issues and gain deeper insights. Independent study is supported through workshops supervised by older students, and reading circles. The Master’s programme also includes extensive exams on literature in the field.

Selection of the Major

The Master’s programme in geography is divided into sub-programmes. The sub-programmes offer students the opportunity to specialise in different areas of geography. The Master’s programme contains both general and sub-programme-specific courses. The teaching within the Master’s programme in geography is seamlessly connected with the Master’s programme in urban studies and planning, which is jointly implemented with Aalto University.

The sub-programmes in the Master’s programme for geography are:
-Physical Geography
-Human Geography and Spatial Planning
-Geoinformatics

Physical Geography
Physical geography is an area of geography that studies natural systems and the regional interaction between nature and humans. The main parts of physical geography are geomorphology, climatology, hydrogeography, biogeography, and research into global change.

The Master’s courses in physical geography work towards deeper regional syntheses, explain the physical surroundings and their changes as a part of the function of regional systems, and analyse and model the relationships between different sectors. Focus areas in the Master’s programme in physical geography are the effect of global change on natural systems, watershed research, and the regional modelling of geomorphological processes and local climates. A considerable part of the Master’s programme in physical geography consists of work in small groups or in the field, where you will learn to implement theories in practice.

Having completed the Master’s programme in physical geography, you will be able to analyse and model regional systems of nature, as well as the interaction between nature and humans. In addition, the programme teaches you to analyse sustainable use of natural resources, and evaluate environmental impact. You will learn to implement theoretical knowledge and regional methods in planning a scientific thesis, implementing it in practice, and presenting your results orally and in writing. Further, the courses will train you to take specimens independently, analyse them, and interpret them. The teaching at the Master’s stage is closely connected with research on physical geography: theses are done in collaboration with a research group or research institute.

Human Geography and Spatial Planning
Human geography and spatial planning is a sub-programme, where regional structures and related planning is studied. Urban structures, regional social structures, statewide regional structures, the regional development in the European Union, and globalisation are studied. At the core of the sub-programme is the spatial transformation of society. The Master’s programme studies such phenomena as the divergence of regional and urban structures, urban culture, as well as the political-geographical dynamics of regions. In addition, sustainability, multiculturalism, segregation, housing, and migration are at the core of the sub-programme. Relevant themes for the sub-programme are also regional and urban planning, the political ecology of use of natural resources and land, and gobal development issues. These geographical phenomena and themes are studied through both theoretical and empirical questions, which can be analysed with different qualitative and quantitative methods.

The programme goes into how theories on cities and regional systems can be transformed into empirical research questions. After completing their Master’s theses, students can independently gather empirical data on the main dimensions of regional and urban structures and regional development, they can analyse these data with both qualitative and quantitative methods, and they can evaluate the planning practices connected with regional and social structures. After graduating from the Master’s programme, students will be able to communicate about phenomena and research findings in regional and urban structures, both orally and in writing.

Geoinformatics
Geoinformatics is an effective approach to the study and understanding of complex regional issues. Geoinformatics studies and develops computational methods for gaining, processing, analysing, and presenting positioning data. As a part of geography, geoinformatics is a research method on the one hand, to be used in the study of complex regional issues from urban environments to natural ones, from studying local environments to issues of sustainability in developing countries. On the other hand, the methods are the object of research. In urban environments, the methods of geoinformatics can be used to study accessibility and mobility, for example, or to plan a good park network. In the context of developing countries, the research into climate change, land use, or interaction between humans and environment with the help of quantitative, qualitative, and involving methods rises into the front. Students in geography reach a basic understanding of geoinformatics methods in the study of geographical issues, the sources and use of different sets of data (remote sensing, global and national databases, geographical Big Data), analysis methods, and effective visualisation of results.

At the Master’s level, as a student specialising in geoinformatics you will advance your skills both theoretically and technically, developing your methodological expertise from data acquisition to data refinement and visualisation with the help of geoinformatics methods. The instruction is directly connected with the work of research groups and theses are often written as a part of research work. After graduating, you will be able to utilise versatile approaches in geoinformatics in research into geographical questions. You will be able to follow the rapid development of the subject independently, and participate on your own.

Programme Structure

The Master’s programme in geography comprises 120 credits (ECTS) and you should graduate as a Master of Science in two academic years. The following courses are included in the degree:
-60 credits of shared advanced courses or according to sub-programme (including MSc thesis 30 credits).
-60 credits of other courses from your own or other programmes.
-60 credits of courses in pedagogy for teaching students.
-The other studies may include working-life or periods of international work or study.
-Working-life orientation and career planning.
-Personal study plan.

Career Prospects

The Master’s programme in geography provides you with excellent abilities to work in research or as specialists. Our graduates have found good employment in the public and private sectors, in Finland and abroad. Their postings include:
-Evaluation of environmental effects and environment consultation.
-Positioning and remote-sensing work.
-Regional and urban planning.
-Governmental community and regional administration.
-Governmental posts in ministries.
-Organisational posts.
-Development cooperation projects.
-Communication and publishing work.
-Teaching.

Internationalization

The Master’s programme in geography offers many opportunities for international work:
-Student exchange in one of the exchange locations of the faculty or university.
-Traineeship abroad.
-Participation in international projects and expeditions (e.g. to the Taita research station in Kenya).
-Participation in international research groups (writing your thesis).
-Participation in language courses at the University of Helsinki (a wide range of languages, including rare ones).

Research Focus

In physical geography:
-Research into global change, especially the environmental effects of climate change.
-Watershed research, the physical-chemical quality and ecological status of water systems.
-Natural systems, their function and change.
-Regional analytics and modelling in research into natural systems.
-Positioning and remote-sensing methods and their application when studying the status and changes in natural environments.
-‘Big data,’ analysis of regional and temporal data.
-The Arctic areas: status, change and vulnerability.

In human geography and spatial planning:
-Transformation and segregation in the social and physical urban environment.
-The changing rationalities and concepts of regional and urban planning.
-Regional policy and geopolitics.
-Urbanisation and changing relationships between state and cities.
-Internationalisation of cities and states.
-The spatial planning system of the European Union.
-Regional policy of data-intensive economics.
-The political ecology and management of natural resources and land use.
-Globalisation.

In geoinformatics:
-Spatial data analysis, new information sources.
-Development of remote-sensing methods for environmental study, especially hyper-spectral remote-sensing data and drone applications.
-Application of geoinformatics methods to environmental and urban research.

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