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Masters Degrees (Marine Policy)

We have 118 Masters Degrees (Marine Policy)

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This MSc is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS in the far north of Scotland. A unique opportunity to study a live marine environment. Marine planning, including spatial planning, is a fast developing discipline of global interest with excellent employment prospects. Read more
This MSc is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS in the far north of Scotland. A unique opportunity to study a live marine environment.

Marine planning, including spatial planning, is a fast developing discipline of global interest with excellent employment prospects. Ambition to create jobs and growth in the ‘Blue Economy’ is made real by new technologies giving access to the wealth of resources in the oceans and seas. New approaches are needed to govern the interactions among marine industries while maintaining the aspiration for healthy seas and the conservation of ecosystems. Adaptation to the effects of climate change adds to the importance of marine planning as an essential tool in marine management.

The MSc in Marine Planning for Sustainable Development is based at the Orkney Campus but is available also at the Edinburgh Campus. Orkney is a global centre for marine energy research and development. A unique concentration of marine expertise and activity provides students with unparalleled access to key participants in the sustainable development and planning of marine industries.

The MSc involves studying eight taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead. The MSc programme is completed with a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses.

SEMESTER 1

A11MP Introduction to Marine Planning
Introduces students to the emerging policy and practice of marine planning (global and regional). It examines political, jurisdictional and rights issues in the introduction of economic activities into the marine commons (the ‘Blue Growth Agenda’). The framework of marine legislation is explained and methods of conflict resolution are explored. A series of international case studies will identify the various tools and techniques being used around the world to manage human activity and balance conservation interests with demands for economic growth.

A11OC Oceanography & Marine Ecology
Designed to give an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources and to develop other maritime industries. Marine ecosystems are also studied and how these may be impacted by human activities and about the challenges and impacts associated with carrying out engineering operations in the marine environment.

A11ER Economics of Renewable Energy
Orkney is a world leading centre for the research and testing of marine renewables. The economics of the energy sector are studied in the context of the whole renewable energy sector, both marine and terrestrial, with particular focus on wave and tidal projects underway in the vicinity of the University.

A11DM Marine Resource Development
Examines the exploitation and use of marine resources (including oil and gas, fisheries, shipping, marine renewables, aquaculture and tourism), issues associated with development in the marine environment (including pollution and waste) and how these activities are regulated. You will learn about marine technologies in the Blue Economy and the challenges of developing and deploying technologies to exploit resources in the marine environment.


SEMESTER 2

A11PK Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context of marine governance. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of marine developments. A practical EIA exercise is undertaken.


A11GI GIS for Marine and Environmental Scientists
Geographic Information System mapping is a tool which is now widely used by both developers and regulators in the management and development of marine resources. Within the context of Marine Spatial Planning the use of GIS has rapidly become the standard means of collating and analysing spatial information regarding resource use. This course will explain the principles and provide hands-on experience of applying state of the art mapping software in project based case studies.

A11DA Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital asses, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

A11VY Practical Marine Survey
A practical field study course into the methods and techniques of marine survey. The opportunity for dive study if suitably qualified.

Additional information
This MSc is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS. By studying in Orkney you will benefit from a number of activities including field trips, guest lectures and practical activities, which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and others involved in the renewable energy industry.


Assistance with funding is available, please visit our website for further details and information on how to apply.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:

- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

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This programme is unique in Europe and beyond. It embraces a holistic, interdisciplinary approach to understanding the roles of humans and their connection to marine ecosystems for survival and prosperity. Read more

This programme is unique in Europe and beyond. It embraces a holistic, interdisciplinary approach to understanding the roles of humans and their connection to marine ecosystems for survival and prosperity.

This MSc approaches marine systems as an integrated socio-ecological system through focusing on three spheres of marine systems:

  • Marine natural systems – exploring diverse scales and functions of key marine biomes, habitats and species, spanning islands, coasts, estuaries, continental shelves, polar seas and global oceans.
  • Marine policy systems – examining different approaches to marine spatial planning and governance of marine ecosystems and services, through formal policies, laws and informal customs and practices.
  • Marine built systems – exploring ‘blue growth’ opportunities e.g. the ingenuity and impact of human built environments in marine settings, from reshaping coastlines for cities, travel and trade, to the urbanisation of ocean environments through innovations in energy infrastructure.

Programme structure

(Revised 18 October 2017 to provide more comprehensive information). This programme involves two semesters of classes followed by an individual research project. The curriculum consists of compulsory and optional taught courses followed by a period of individual dissertation project work. There will also be local and international field trips.

Compulsory courses typically include:

  • Marine Systems and Policies
  • Marine Infrastructure and Environmental Change
  • Corals in a Changing Ocean
  • Marine Field Methods in Research and Practice
  • Research Project in Marine Systems and Policies

Option courses:

Through consultation with your Programme Director you will choose three option courses from areas such as:

Policy/society:

  • International Law of the Sea
  • International Law of the Marine Environment
  • Human Dimensions of Environmental Change and Sustainability
  • Foundations in Ecological Economics
  • Applications in Ecological Economics
  • Global Environmental Politics
  • Energy Policy and Politics
  • Energy and Society

Environment:

  • The Ecology of Ecosystem Services
  • Ecosystem Service Values
  • Water Resource Management
  • Values and the Environment

Analytical:

  • Environmental Impact Assessment
  • Principles of GIS
  • Fundamentals for Remote Sensing

Courses are offered subject to timetabling and availability and are subject to change.

Field trips

Our field trips provide site-based learning of both natural and social science practices, a key dynamic of this MSc. The core field trip has historically taken place in tropical locations such as Jamaica and the Maldives.

Career opportunities

This MSc provides a foundation for work up to international level, for government bodies, think-tanks, consulting firms and NGOs where an integrated understanding of marine ecosystems, policies and practice is required.



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This MSc Programme is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS in the far north of Scotland - a unique opportunity to study a live marine environment. Read more

MSc Marine Resource Management

This MSc Programme is based at our ORKNEY CAMPUS in the far north of Scotland - a unique opportunity to study a live marine environment.

As man increases his demands upon the oceans, their sustainable development will depend on a rational management strategy for the total resource.

The professional working in the marine environment is constantly required to be multidisciplinary, and able to appreciate the conflicts that arise between conservation and development.

The MRM programme (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-resource-management-mrm-/ ) considers the sustainable development, use, conservation and management of marine resources.

Core themes include:
- Marine environmental systems.
- Resource management and conservation.
- Valuation and project management.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead. The MSc programme is completed with a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses.

Programme content

- Conservation, Sustainable Development & Resource Management
This course takes a broad look at the principles of sustainability and sustainable resource use, including environmental ethics. You will explore the challenges faced by policy makers and marine managers when incorporating these broad principles into policy and practice. You will learn about how sensitive habitats and the species they support are managed and protected, and how impacts from development are mitigated. The course gives an introduction to biodiversity conservation and the biodiversity action planning process, as well as examining issues around the relationship between conservation and science.

- Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Oceanography & Marine Biology
This course is designed to give you an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources. You will also learn about marine ecosystems and how these may be impacted by energy extraction and about the challenges and impacts associated with carrying out engineering operations in the marine environment.

- Resource Development
This course examines the exploitation and use of marine resources (including oil and gas, fisheries, transport, renewables, aquaculture and tourism), issues associated with development in the marine environment (including pollution and waste) and how these activities are regulated. You will learn about marine technologies and the challenges of developing and deploying technologies to exploit resources in the marine environment.

- Introduction to Marine Spatial Planning
This course introduces students to the emerging policy and practice of marine planning (global and regional). It examines political, jurisdictional and rights issues in the introduction of economic activities into the marine commons (the ‘Blue Growth Agenda’). The framework of marine legislation is explained and methods of conflict resolution are explored. A series of international case studies will identify the various tools and techniques being used around the world to manage human activity and balance conservation interests with demands for economic growth.

- GIS
Geographic Information System mapping is a tool which is now widely used by both developers and regulators in the management and development of marine resources. Within the context of Marine Spatial Planning the use of GIS has rapidly become the standard means of collating and analysing spatial information regarding resource use. This course will explain the principles and provide hands-on experience of applying state of the art mapping software in project based case studies.

- Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital asses, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project
This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Additional information
If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including field trips, guest lectures and practicals, which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and others involved in the renewable energy industry.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-resource-management-mrm-/

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The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global. Read more

Why take this course?

The world’s aquatic ecosystems and environment are increasingly under threat. Pollution, overfishing, global climate change and many other impacts have highlighted the importance for us to understand their function at all levels, from the molecular to the global.

This is what our course sets out to do and thanks to our close proximity to many types of temperate marine habitats and internationally protected conservation areas, we offer the perfect location for investigation.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Research at our internationally-renowned Institute of Marine Sciences or carry out microbiological work at the University’s Field Centre for Environmental Technology at Petersfield Sewage Works
Rear coldwater species for restocking programmes or trial fish food at Sparsholt College’s National Aquatics Training Centre
Study abroad through Erasmus or various other conservation and research schemes

What opportunities might it lead to?

You’ll be taught by leading international researchers and the course has been designed with strong input from outside agencies including environmental consultancies, a range of government bodies and industry. This ensures your training links directly to UK and international employment opportunities.

Here are some routes our graduates have pursued:

Consultancy work
Government-based research
Conservation
Teaching
Further study

Module Details

You will cover a variety of topics in advanced laboratory and field skills, and choose from units that cover marine ecology, aquaculture, ecotoxicology and pollution, and scientific journalism. A large amount of your time will also be spent on the research project that will enable you to apply the skills and knowledge you have gained.

Core units are:

• Research Toolkit: This covers a range of key professional skills for research methods (communication skills, ethics and report writing), advanced field skills (boat sampling, taxonomy, and marine and freshwater sampling methods), advanced laboratory skills (genomics, monitoring and pollution monitoring methods) and remote sensing technology (such as GIS).

• Research Project: Your final project allows you to select from a range of marine and freshwater projects provided by staff within the School, government research laboratories, NGOs and private research companies. During the project you will write literature reviews and develop skills in data analysis and presentation.

Then choose any three optional units from:

• Ecotoxicology and Pollution: This provides an introduction to environmental toxicology using model and non-model organisms.

• Aquaculture: This unit focuses on the principles of aquaculture production, global production and diversity of aquaculture species. It is taught by academic staff and staff from the National Aquatics Training Centre at Sparsholt College. Areas covered include larval culture, diseases and pathology, feeding and growth, reproductive manipulation, and business and management.

• Marine Policy, Planning and Conservation: Planning and Conservation: This unit explores contemporary debates on coastal and marine management with a specific focus on marine policy, planning and conservation.

• Science and the Media: Science communication is increasingly becoming an important part of science. This unit firstly addresses the skills required by scientists to effectively communicate with the media and general public and secondly, provides an understanding of the skills needed for a career in science journalism.

• Subtidal Marine Ecology: Selected topics of current interest in marine ecology, incorporating both theory and applied aspects, culminating in a week-long practical field course in the Mediterranean Sea. The unit carries an additional cost for the field trip, and requires a minimum level of training and experience in SCUBA diving to participate.

Programme Assessment

Hands-on laboratory-based work teamed with field trips means that practical learning underpins the theory learned in lectures, seminars, tutorials and workshops. You’ll also find that some aspects of your course may be taught online using our virtual learning environment.

You will be assessed using a range of methods from exams to coursework and presentations, with great opportunities to present your final-year projects to industry and researchers from other departments and organisations.

Student Destinations

Once you have completed this course, you will be particularly well placed to enter a wide range of interesting and rewarding careers in the UK and abroad. We will ensure you have all the relevant knowledge and skills that employers require, giving you the opportunity to either pursue a scientific career, enter the teaching profession, or further study should you want to continue your research.

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This MSc programme is delivered by the International Centre for Island Technology (ICIT) at our Orkney Campus. It has been designed to promote an integrated, participatory approach to nurture and strengthen quantitative skills in science and environmental graduates using locally relevant issues. Read more

Integrative Marine Data Skills

This MSc programme is delivered by the International Centre for Island Technology (ICIT) at our Orkney Campus. It has been designed to promote an integrated, participatory approach to nurture and strengthen quantitative skills in science and environmental graduates using locally relevant issues. It will build a broad understanding of marine ecosystems, ecosystem services and associated management issues. Teaching is strongly reinforced with laboratory, fieldwork and project work, with emphasis placed on simulating real work situations. Strong links with industry partners, policy-makers and regulators ensure relevance within this sector. It will produce students who are quantitatively competent and literate, capable of interpreting and communicating findings, with work-ready skills (field and industry) to facilitate employment in a competitive marketplace where demand for data-savvy students is high.

Course content

Semester 1:

Advanced Research Skills 1 – Data Collecting and Handling (core)
Data is increasingly important in today’s society with huge quantities generated by the maritime sector to address a range of environmental and economically important issues. However, a specific set of skills are required to handle, extract, manipulate, analyse and communicate these data sets. Students will collect data across three platforms: shoreline, oceanic and remote, providing work-ready technical, laboratory and field skills. This course will build quantitative confidence and competency, providing graduates with the skills essential to understanding, responding to, and mitigating today’s environmental challenges.

Advanced Research Skills 2 – Statistical and Numerical Techniques (core)
The ability to problem-solve, think critically and apply mathematics has been severely eroded across education sectors, with this deficit being transferred to the working environment. Skills in numeracy, data mining, data management and modelling have been highlighted as being in demand. This course will utilise environmentally relevant, local long-term data sets collected in Advanced Research Skills 1 to strengthen skills in data analysis using a range of methods. This course is not targeting students with a strong numerical or modelling background, instead it aims to build confidence with analytical techniques and provide a broad, yet solid depth of knowledge.

Oceanography and Marine Ecology (core)
This course will give an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources and to develop other maritime industries. The challenges and impacts associated with engineering operations in the marine environment are examined. Marine ecosystems and ecosystems services are also studied and how these are impacted by human activities.

Introduction to Marine Planning (core)
Introduces students to the emerging policy and practice of marine planning (global and regional). It examines political, jurisdictional and rights issues in the introduction of economic activities into the marine commons (the ‘Blue Growth Agenda’). The framework of marine legislation is explained and methods of conflict resolution are explored. A series of international case studies will identify the various tools and techniques being used around the world to manage human activity and balance conservation interests with demands for economic growth.

Semester 2:

Case Study and Project Design (core)
This course will facilitate the interpretation and communication of data and promote teamwork skills and engagement with a broad range of end-users, fostering responsive management skills. It is an essential follow-on core component from Advanced Research Skills 1 and 2 in Semester 1 to further consolidate the quantitative learning experience and promote synergies with local industry, stake-holders and communities. The course will capitalise on the strong networks already in place at ICIT with staff, local industry and community groups.

GIS for Marine and Environmental Scientists (optional)
Geographic Information System mapping is a tool which is now widely used by both developers and regulators in the management and development of marine resources. Within the context of Marine Spatial Planning the use of GIS has rapidly become the standard means of collating and analysing spatial information regarding resource use. This course will explain the principles and provide hands-on experience of applying state of the art mapping software in project based case studies.

Environmental Policy and Risk (optional)
This course explores the legal and policy context of marine governance. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course examines regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of marine developments. A practical EIA exercise is undertaken.

Practical Skills in Marine Surveying (optional)
Students entering employment in marine conservation or marine resource management are often required to plan or manage surveys of the marine environment in the role of either client or contractor. Diving is often the most effective method for conducting surveys to monitor or map marine biota. This course will provide students with the requisite knowledge for designing and managing such projects utilising scientific diving techniques.

Marine Environmental Monitoring (optional)
This course will provide an understanding of: the scientific background of natural processes in estuarine and coastal environments as a necessary prerequisite for understanding monitoring and management; the fundamentals of the design and applications of environmental monitoring programmes; the role of impact assessment in resource management, conservation and pollution control and legal framework supporting this process; and the importance of the scientific dimension underpinning estuarine and coastal management.

Tropical Coral Reefs: Monitoring and Management Field Course (Malaysia) (optional)
(Additional fee for flights and subsistence)
Students will experience different techniques used for surveying and monitoring coral reefs, to provide an understanding of the sampling and other issues which influence choice of method. It will provide students with an impression of the environmental pressures affecting reef habitats as a result of climate change, tourism related development, and of the range of management measures which may be introduced to promote sustainable use of reef resources. It will familiarise students with the main forms of fish, coral and invertebrates which characterise reefs. In addition, the course gives the chance to examine other marine habitats that are often closely inter-related with reefs: e.g. sea-grass beds.

More information:

https://www.hw.ac.uk/uk/orkney.htm
https://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/energy-geoscience-infrastructure-society/research/icit/orkney.htm
https://www.hw.ac.uk/study/why/our-rankings.htm

Fees and Scholarships

https://www.hw.ac.uk/study/fees/scholarships-bursaries.htm

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Renewable energy is a cornerstone of the green economy and marine wind, wave and tidal energy are key elements of the UK, European and global renewable energy roadmaps. Read more
Renewable energy is a cornerstone of the green economy and marine wind, wave and tidal energy are key elements of the UK, European and global renewable energy roadmaps. Begin your voyage to being a part of this vital transformation by studying on the UK’s first MSc Marine Renewable Energy programme. Building on our international reputation for marine research and teaching along with regional and national initiatives, this distinctive degree focuses on the growing marine renewable energy sector.

Key features

-Be at the forefront of the emerging field of marine renewable energy at a time when such expertise is increasingly sought after.
-Develop knowledge and confidence in the critical areas which will help you to be an integral part of the effort to develop and promote marine renewable energy.
-Benefit from our research team’s expertise – our staff achieved ratings of ‘world leading’ and ‘internationally excellent’ in the UK Government’s most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014).
-Take advantage of Plymouth University’s active role in the Southwest Marine Energy Park and the Offshore Renewables Development Programme to stay abreast of the latest developments and make contacts with key players in the field.
-Gain experience in the use of world leading facilities such as the COAST Lab test tanks and the Falcon Spirit research vessel as part of your taught programme and your research.
-Learn in an environment which benefits from PRIMaRE investment in new staff expertise and facilities.
-Benefit from a programme fully-integrated with the £42 million wave hub project, the world's largest wave energy test site, off north Cornwall.
-Live and study in ‘Britain’s Ocean City’, with easy access to businesses and the natural environment involved in your area of study this is an ideal location to study marine renewables.
-Take the opportunity to study abroad in the research project phase and be supported by one Plymouth University supervisor and one supervisor overseas.

Course details

The taught modules in the first period are compulsory and are designed to provide you with a broad background on marine renewable as well as a solid basis for the option modules in period two. You’ll undertake three modules in period one that provide a background in marine renewable energy: introduction to marine renewable energy, economics, law and policy for marine renewable energy, research skills and research methods. In period two you can choose three options from a choice of five: assessment of coastal resources and impacts, marine planning, economics of the marine environment, mechanics of marine renewable energy structures, and wave and current modelling for marine renewable energy. During period three you’ll undertake a research project and dissertation. Due to the extensive staff research expertise there is a wide range of potential projects spanning marine science, engineering and socio-economics. You may also carry out projects with external organisations that have interests in marine renewable energy.

Core modules
-MAR513 Research Skills and Methods
-MAR526 Introduction to Marine Renewable Energy
-MAR527 Economics, Law and Policy for Marine Renewable Energy
-MAR524 MSc Dissertation

Optional modules
-MAR529 Marine Planning
-MATH523 Modelling Coastal Processes
-MAR528 Mechanics of MRE Structures
-MAR507 Economics of the Marine Environment
-MAR512 Assessment of Coastal Resources and Impacts

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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On this course you will investigate solutions for conserving our coastal zones, seas and oceans through the development of a coordinated strategy to distribute environmental, socio-cultural and institutional resources. Read more

Why take this course?

On this course you will investigate solutions for conserving our coastal zones, seas and oceans through the development of a coordinated strategy to distribute environmental, socio-cultural and institutional resources. It is a dynamic process and you will possess a genuine desire to ensure the long-term sustainability of the world’s coast lines.

What will I experience?

On this course you can:

Benefit from a wealth of coastal and marine environments on your doorstep – internationally important wildlife, urban development, maritime heritage and the busiest waterway in Britain
Complement your studies with case study analysis, lectures from guest speakers and fieldtrip opportunities
Learn alongside students from diverse international backgrounds and politico-economic cultures

What opportunities might it lead to?

This course is accredited by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS). On graduating from this course, you can expect to find roles within government agencies, environmental consultancies and observational or research institutions that oversee the investigation and application of resource management issues.

Module Details

You can opt to take this course in full-time or part-time mode.

You will be introduced to technical and analytical frameworks and concepts, which will enable you to study these three major themes:

The physical environment
The institutional frameworks that have been developed for coastal and ocean areas
The value of coastal and marine resources

The course is divided into three parts. The first two comprise the taught units of the course covering the key conceptual, institutional and applied bases of the subject. The third focuses on your dissertation.

Here are the units you will study:

Coastal and Marine Resource Management: You will examine the theory, concepts and frameworks of coastal and marine management, and use topical issues as examples of practical application.

Coastal Physical Processes and Shoreline Management: You will study the biophysical behaviour of contemporary coastal systems. You will then investigate how and why coastal risk management is practiced and examine the effects of management upon ‘natural’ systems.

Law of the Sea and Marine Spatial Planning: You will examine the nature of coastal and marine policy and the forces instrumental in creating such a policy. You will also learn about the law affecting the utilisation of marine space and resources and consider the stages, key stakeholders and approaches to marine planning in the UK, Europe and internationally.

Fieldwork and Research Methods: Firstly, you will examine the role and importance of fieldwork in coastal and marine resource management studies and practice. The concepts, issues and practices covered will mean you can undertake a field-based project on the compulsory residential trip. Secondly, you will have an introduction to research design and methods so you can conduct field research in two contexts: 1) the residential field trip and 2) for your dissertation/independent study.

Dissertation: This provides you with an opportunity to independently study a topic of your choice related to coastal and marine resource management.

Programme Assessment

The course provides a balanced structure of lectures, tutorials and laboratory work. You will generally be taught in small classes, providing an informal, friendly and supportive atmosphere for your studies.

Assessment is varied, aimed at developing skills relevant to a range of working environments. Here’s how we assess your work:

Preparation of web pages
Poster and oral presentations
Project reports
Literature reviews
Book chapters
Essays

Student Destinations

If you work or hope to work in an organisation involved in marine resource policy or in the use or development of maritime resources, or would like to contribute to the conservation of natural resources of coasts and oceans, this could be the course for you.

It will prepare you to work in industry, for central or local government, with community groups, for landowners or in a consultancy role. Alternatively, you might wish to pursue a career in research or education.

We aim to provide you with as much support as possible in finding employment through close industrial contacts, careers events, recruitment fairs and individual advice.

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Galway’s identity is intertwined with the coast. The Discipline of Geography, with strong links with The Ryan Institute which identifies marine and coastal processes as a Priority Research Area, is delighted to offer a brand new structured postgraduate programme in NUIG. Read more

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Galway’s identity is intertwined with the coast. The Discipline of Geography, with strong links with The Ryan Institute which identifies marine and coastal processes as a Priority Research Area, is delighted to offer a brand new structured postgraduate programme in NUIG. This programme is designed to train skilled personnel, who can advise on, organise and regulate an informed development of coastal and marine resources and activities in Ireland, the European Union and worldwide. Ireland’s coastal and marine environments are a vital natural resource. This value is reflected in a broad range of current EU directives and strategies aimed at taking full advantage of these resources while also enhancing our natural environments. The Irish Government has recently launched an integrated plan (Our Ocean Wealth), seeking to put into operation these EU policies for our coastal and marine resources. While rapid growth is expected as these new plans come into action, they are not without risks. A recent report by the Marine Institute outlined some challenges: a need to develop our environmental understanding; the challenge posed by climate change; protecting biodiversity; enhancing monitoring capability; greater integration of science, management and advice. The key to achieving the true sustainable development of our coastal and marine resources may be through new educational programmes. On the one hand, facilitating existing managers and planners through targeted learning in this expanding field, while on the other hand, training our current students to be the future decision-makers in these coastal and marine environments.

This is a highly opportune time for an MSc in Coastal and Marine Environments: physical processes, policy and practice. This MSc programme, theoretically informed and with a strong field-based and applied focus, is offered in direct response to newly emerging discourses on the long term health of coastal and marine environments. It seeks to challenge and facilitate students to engage with but go beyond established scientific conceptual and theoretical perspectives, engage new ways of understanding the complexities of our evolving physical coastal and marine environments, and develop critical insights that can support policy and practice in sustaining these increasingly vulnerable environments.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The MSc in Coastal and Marine Environments is a full-time postgraduate course delivered over 3 semesters (12 months). The programme was devised by a team of academics from the Discipline of Geography who have been involved in priority EU-funded and US National Science Foundation (NSF) research on contemporary and future challenges facing coastal and marine areas, including the ANCORIM (Atlantic Network for Coastal Risk Management) (INTERREG) and MARNET (Marine Atlantic Regions Network) (FP7) projects, as well as local and national-level projects on the same. The team is engaged in a broad range of scientific investigation of the physical environment, with an excellent international publication record. Students will become active members of ongoing research programmes and will learn the research and publication process.

There is a strong focus on the formulation of coastal and marine policies and strategies; the identity and role of stakeholders; the nature and impact of local, national and European governance; and the historic and contemporary approaches used to understand the physical processes that control the characteristics of our coast. Development of skills is supported by a significant focus on practical and field-based learning, including short field courses in Ireland and work placements.

It is directed at graduates from Geography, Natural Sciences and other related disciplines in the social and natural sciences, and at professionals in the field who are interested in furthering their knowledge of coastal and marine environments. Students will be required to conduct socially relevant research that addresses the roles of agencies and policy structures in coastal and marine environments.

CAREER OPPORTUNTIES

With coastal and marine resources increasingly promoted as being central to revitalising the Irish economy, the coming years will require well-informed and educated leaders who understand the complexities of the interaction between the economy and health of these environments. This, added to the broader national and European focus on the coastal zone and the urgent need for more Higher Education courses which recognise the renewed importance of sustainability of coastal and marine activities and the multifunctional facets of these areas, should present graduates of this course with opportunities across various fields ( coastal and marine science, environmental consultancy, local/regional/state management agencies, government and policy institute research, politics and governance of the environment, sustainable energy, research laboratories and programmes, teaching, heritage, tourism, etc.). The work placement programme will aid in professional development and offer links with potential employers, giving our students realistic and desirable career opportunities, and built-in work experience upon graduation.

PhD Entry: the MSc Programme can be used as a platform for potential doctoral PhD candidates for research programmes in Geography and our partners in NUIG, especially the Ryan Institute, and abroad. This will encourage the growth and visibility, at home and abroad, of the coastal and marine priority theme research clusters in NUIG.

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Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Environmental Biology. Read more

Visit our website for more information on fees, scholarships, postgraduate loans and other funding options to study Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management at Swansea University - 'Welsh University of the Year 2017' (Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2017).

The MSc Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management course focuses on the relationships between living organisms and the terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments, coupled with the interactions that result from natural and anthropogenic processes.

On the Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management course you will benefit from advanced training in the interpretation of local and global environmental issues, field and theoretical aspects of biology and ecology, and in analytical techniques. You will also develop the skills necessary to work confidently in vocational areas such as conservation, environmental impact assessment, environmental management, monitoring and education, and foster an objective, scientific and realistic approach to environmental biological issues that you may have to face in a professional capacity.

Graduates from the Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management course go on to work for government agencies such as CCW, Environment Agency, English Nature, Scottish Heritage, Fisheries Research Services, CEFAS. Other organisations include zoos, wildlife parks and reserves, national parks, environmental departments, research and development of SMEs as well as large companies. Graduates also go on to do postgraduate research.

Modules

Modules on the Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management MSc include:

Core Science Skills and Research Methods

Conservation of Aquatic Resources

Term papers in Environmental Biology

Environmental Assessment and Management

Ecosystems

Remote sensing of the changing environment

Geographical Information Systems

Research Project

Please visit our website for a full description of modules for the Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management programme.

Facilities

As a student on the MSc Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management programme, you will benefit from a range of facilities such as:

Our excellent facilities include a unique built Animal Movement Visualisation Suite (£1.35m), incorporating an electronic wall linked to a computer-tesla cluster for high-speed processing and visualisation of complex accelerometry and magnetometry data derived from animals. Coupled with this facility is the Electronics Lab with capacity for research, development and realisation of animal tags with new capacities (sensors, energy-harvesting systems, miniaturization, 3-D printing of housings etc.); a custom-designed 18m on coastal research vessel; a recent investment of £4.2m on a new suite of state-of-the art Science laboratories; and the £2m unique Centre for Sustainable Aquatic Research (CSAR) with a 750 m2 controlled environment building, with programmable recirculating aquatic systems, unique within the UK’s higher-education sector. These are tailored for research on a diverse range of organisms, ranging from temperate to tropical and marine to freshwater. Coupled with this are nutrient and biochemical analytical capabilities.

Student profiles

“I’ve spent four years as a student at Swansea University, three years as an undergraduate studying Marine Biology and a year as a postgraduate undertaking the MSc in Environmental Biology: Conservation and Resource Management. Whether studying or partying I can honestly say I had a fantastic time the whole way through! It was through my undergraduate study that I realised how amazingly diverse the marine ecosystem is, but also how vulnerable it can be and the level of exploitation it endures. This prompted me to undertake the MSc, which furthered my knowledge in many aspects of conservation and environmental issues around the world on sea and land. With my experience and expertise gained from studying at Swansea I have secured a job working with WWF Cymru in Cardiff as Marine Policy Officer where I am helping work towards a sustainable future for the Welsh marine environment.”

David Parker

BSc Marine Biology

MSc Environmental Biology: Conservation & Resource Management

Marine Policy Officer, WWF Cymru, Cardiff

Research

We are 7th in the UK and top in Wales for research excellence (REF 2014)

93.8% of our research outputs were regarded as world-leading or internationally excellent and Swansea Biosciences had the highest percentage of publications judged ‘world-leading’ in the sector. This is a great achievement for the Department, for the College of Science and indeed for Swansea University.

All academic staff in Biosciences are active researchers and the department has a thriving research culture.



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The emergence of the Law of the Sea Convention and establishment of Exclusive Economic Zones has given coastal states extensive and comprehensive rights and obligations over marine resources in vast areas of ocean. Read more
The emergence of the Law of the Sea Convention and establishment of Exclusive Economic Zones has given coastal states extensive and comprehensive rights and obligations over marine resources in vast areas of ocean. Wise management of ocean resources is essential if the full economic potential of these new entitlements is to be realised. To ensure the continuing biological productivity of these areas, the level and type of development of activities such as waste dumping, mineral extraction, recreation, industrial and urban growth, fisheries and aquaculture, need to be controlled, and interactions of these often conflicting activities resolved by management.

This MSc is a full-time one-year course, consisting of 9 months taught course and 3 months research project, and examined by continuous assessment. The course provides theoretical and practical training in measuring and quantifying marine resources and the effects of conflicting usage upon them. It provides a sound scientific basis on which to develop policy and make decisions on marine resource exploitation and protection around the world.

Course Aims
To broaden the student's awareness of the economic potential of the ocean, to generate an understanding of the major marine biological resources and the physical processes controlling these resources, to provide theoretical and practical training in measuring and quantifying these resources and the effects of conflicting usage upon them, to enhance those skills necessary to manage effectively the sea area of national jurisdiction, and to produce graduates with appropriate experience for developing policy and making decisions on marine resources and other marine uses for their individual countries or regions. To date, most graduates have taken up employment in the field of marine environmental protection in the UK and abroad.

You will receive training in the following major modules:

Marine Ecology Skills
Marine Fisheries
Coastal Habitat Ecology and Survey
Marine Environmental Impacts and their Assessment
Marine Conservation and Coastal Zone Management
Research Project design and Planning
Research Project and Dissertation
Modules combine different learning approaches, including taught lectures, seminars and working groups, practicals in the laboratory, on the shore or at sea, as well as personal study and practical research.

Skills Trained
The broad areas covered in each module are outlined below. For more detail on what our current students are studying you can take a look at our online module information.

Marine Ecology Skills
Experimental and survey design
Statistical techniques
Ship work
Taxonomic Workshop
Marine benthos survey
Statistical analysis
Report writing
Marine Fisheries
Fisheries biology
Fisheries resources
Fisheries survey at sea
Population dynamics of fin fish
Coastal Habitat Ecology and Survey
Coastal habitat ecology
Survey techniques
Planning biological surveys
Risk assessment
Team field survey
Marine Environmental Impacts and their Assessment
Physical and chemical processes causing impacts
Development of the coastal zone
Environmental Impact Assessment
Preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement
Consultant / Developer interviews
EIA public meeting
Marine Conservation and Coastal Zone Management
Environmental remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems
Coastal Zone Law
Socioeconomics
Biodiversity
Conservation
Sustainability
Integrated Coastal Zone Management
Coastal Zone Management Conference
Research Project Design and Planning
Literature review
Project proposal development
Scientific peer review
Research Project and Dissertation
Health and Safety
Practical research at home or overseas
20,000 word dissertation

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Take the opportunity to study on the UK’s first MSc Marine Renewable Energy programme. Read more
Take the opportunity to study on the UK’s first MSc Marine Renewable Energy programme. Building on our international reputation for marine research and teaching, the Peninsula Research Institute in Marine Renewable Energy (PRIMaRE) initiative and the South West Marine Energy Park, this distinctive degree focuses on the rapidly growing marine renewable energy sector. Gain expert knowledge in marine science, engineering, economics, law and policy, and undertake an independent research project.

Key features

-Be at the forefront of the emerging field of marine renewable energy at a time when such expertise is increasingly sought after.
-Learn in an environment which benefits from PRIMaRE investment in new staff expertise and facilities.
-Benefit from a programme fully-integrated with the £42 million wave hub project, the world's largest wave energy test site, off north Cornwall.
-Live and study in ‘Britain’s Ocean City’, with easy access to businesses and the natural environment involved in your area of study this is an ideal location to study marine renewables.
-Take the opportunity to study abroad in the research project phase and be supported by one Plymouth University supervisor and one supervisor overseas.
-Benefit from our research team’s expertise – our staff achieved ratings of ‘worldleading’ and ‘internationally excellent’ in the UK government’s most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2008).

Course details

The taught modules in the first period are compulsory and are designed to provide you with a broad background on marine renewable as well as a solid basis for the option modules in period two. You’ll undertake four modules in period one that provide a background in marine renewable energy: introduction to marine renewable energy, economics, law and policy for marine renewable energy, research skills and research methods. In periods two and three you’ll demonstrate your ability to implement a research project and produce an independent dissertation or paper of your own research. Many projects are carried out in association with active PRIMaRE research projects that staff are engaged in, including: resource characterisation, marine renewable energy systems, environmental and biodiversity impacts, coastal impacts, safe operations and navigational risk, underwater and surface electrical systems, socio-economic factors. Projects always have two supervisors.

Core modules
-MAR513 Research Skills and Methods
-MAR526 Introduction to Marine Renewable Energy
-MAR527 Economics, Law and Policy for Marine Renewable Energy
-MAR525 MRes Dissertation

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview ) taught at our Orkney Campus. Read more

Overview

This is a 12 month full-time MSc degree course (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview ) taught at our Orkney Campus. It involves studying 8 taught courses. If you can demonstrate that you have already mastered the subject, you may apply for an exemption from one of the taught courses and undertake a Design Project instead. The MSc programme is completed with a research dissertation equivalent to 4 taught courses.

For more information visit http://www.hw.ac.uk/schools/life-sciences/research/icit.htm

Distance Learning

The Marine Renewable Energy MSc/Diploma is also available for independent distance learning. For distance learners, the main difference is that you will undertake the Development Project alone rather than as part of a group. You can still obtain the full MSc in Marine Renewable Energy, or you can opt to study fewer courses, depending on your needs.

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Marine Renewable Energy. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

Programme content

The Diploma and MSc degree course involves studying the 8 taught courses outlined below. If a student can demonstrate that they have already mastered the subject, they may undertake a Development Project instead of one of these courses.

- Energy in the 21st Century
This course is designed to give you a broad understanding of the environmental, political and socio-economic context for current developments in renewable energy. The course examines the extent of current energy resources and how energy markets function. It covers some energy basics you will need for the rest of the programme (e.g. thermodynamics, efficiency conversions) as well as environmental issues associated with energy use, climate change and the political and policy challenges involved in managing energy supply and achieving energy security.

- Economics of renewable energy
This course gives an understanding of the economic principles and mechanisms which affect energy markets today. It covers price mechanisms, the economics of extracting energy and the cost-efficiency of renewable energy technologies. You will learn about economic instruments used by policy-makers to address environment and energy issues, economic incentives to stimulate renewable energy development and about environmental valuation.

- Environmental Policy & Risk
This course explores the legal and policy context in which renewable energy is being exploited. You will gain an understanding of international law, particularly the Law of the Sea, property rights and how these relate to different energy resources. The course also looks at regulatory issues at the international, European and UK level, which affect how energy developments are taken forward, as well as risk assessment and management in the context of renewable energy developments.

- Oceanography & Marine Biology
This course is designed to give you an understanding of the science of waves and tides, and how this affects efforts to exploit energy from these resources. You will also learn about marine ecosystems and how these may be impacted by energy extraction and about the challenges and impacts associated with carrying out engineering operations in the marine environment.

- Marine Renewable Technologies
You will gain an understanding of renewable energy technologies which exploit wind, wave and tidal resources. The focus is on technical design issues which developers face operating in the marine environment, as well as the logistics of installation, operations and maintenance of marine energy converters.

- Renewable Technology: Integration
This course explores the technical aspects of generating renewable energy and integrating it into distribution networks. You will learn about the electricity grid and how electrical power and distribution systems work. You will find out about different renewable fuel sources and end uses, and the challenges of energy storage.

- Development Appraisal
Looking at what happens when renewable energy technologies are deployed, this course examines development constraints and opportunities: policy and regulatory issues (including strategic environmental assessment, environmental impact assessment, landscape assessment, capacity issues and the planning system). It also looks at the financial aspects (valuation of capital asses, financing projects and the costs of generating electricity) and at project management.

- Development Project
This is a team project, where students have the opportunity to apply what they have learned through the other courses in relation to a hypothetical project. You have to look at a range of issues including resource assessment, site selection, development layout, consents, planning and economic appraisal, applying the knowledge and tools you have studied.

- Dissertation
This research project (equivalent in assessment to 4 taught courses) allows you to focus on a specific area of interest, with opportunities to collaborate with businesses and other stakeholders. You choose your dissertation subject, in discussion with your supervisor.

- Additional information
If you study at our Orkney Campus, you will also benefit from a number of activities including guest lectures and practical sessions which help to develop your skills and knowledge in your field of study, and offer opportunities to meet developers and other involved in the renewable energy industry.

English language requirements

If your first language is not English, or your first degree was not taught in English, we’ll need to see evidence of your English language ability. The minimum requirement for English language is IELTS 6.5 or equivalent. We offer a range of English language courses (http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Distance learning students

Please note that independent distance learning students who access their studies online will be expected to have access to a PC/laptop and internet.

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-marine-renewable-energy/#overview

Visit the Marine Renewable Energy MSc/Diploma page on the Heriot-Watt University web site for more details!

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The MSc Marine Biology aims to train graduates in multiple areas of marine biology and equip them with professional certificates in Sea Survival, Powerboat Handling, Marine Radio and First Aid as well as necessary field skills. Read more
The MSc Marine Biology aims to train graduates in multiple areas of marine biology and equip them with professional certificates in Sea Survival, Powerboat Handling, Marine Radio and First Aid as well as necessary field skills.

The areas of marine biology covered in this master’s course include fisheries and aquaculture, genetics, marine ecology and conservation, marine mammals and ecological aspects of Geographic Information System (GIS). In addition, the course has a significant field work component including ship work as well as survey and sampling techniques training. This course, run entirely by the School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences at University College Cork, will provide an understanding of these various disciplines and skills needed in order to meet the growing demand for trained marine biologists at home and abroad.

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr38/

Course Details

On successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

- demonstrate a clear understanding and integration of knowledge of marine flora and fauna, the marine environment and its biological and physical properties and processes
- assess the sustainability of exploitation (fisheries and aquaculture) and assess the impact of other anthropogenic factors on the marine environment
- define the roles of management and conservation across the marine environment
- demonstrate a wide range of research skills (field and laboratory) including safety-related and professional qualifications
- apply the knowledge and skills acquired in this course in the working environment enabling the development of policy.

Format

This full-time 12-month course is split into Part I taught modules running from September to April and Part II, a four-month research project for students passing Part I. The course includes ship time experience aboard the Irish State research vessel, Celtic Voyager and field work day trips to various locations in County Cork as well as a week-long residential field course in the West of Scotland in March. In addition, students undertake professional certificate courses in January and February at the National Maritime College of Ireland in Ringaskiddy, Cork

Part I of the course consists of eight taught modules to the value of 60 credits involving lectures, practicals, seminars and fieldwork. Part II is a substantial research project (BL6017) to the value of 30 credits for those passing Part I. Each of the prescribed taught modules will be examined by a written paper and/or continuous assessment. Each student progressing to Part II of the course must submit the research project in an area of marine biology by a date as prescribed by the School of BEES.

Part I

BL6010 Characteristics of the Marine Environment (5 credits)
BL6012Marine Megafauna (10 credits)
BL6013Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture (10 credits)
BL6014Marine Fieldwork and Survey Techniques (10 credits)
BL6015Practical Marine Workplace Skills (5 credits)
BL6016Marine Ecology and Conservation (10 credits)
BL6019 Ecological Applications of Geographical Information Systems (5 credits)
BL6020 Genetics and the Marine Environment (5 credits)

Part II - Four-Month Research Project

BL6017Marine Biology Research Project (30 credits)

Assessment

The taught modules in the course are assessed by a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment elements (including essays, practical reports, critiques, seminars, dossiers and analytical elements). The four-month research project is assessed by a dissertation, project seminar and an assessment of your practical ability throughout the duration of the project.

Careers

As well as a number of professionally certified courses that will be provided throughout the course, students will also gain a variety of technical skills associated with research and computer skills (GIS in particular). Many transferable skills are also fostered through different learning approaches, including critical thinking, problem solving, report writing, oral presentations, statistical analysis, independent research and time management.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The oceans do not exist in isolation but are in constant interaction with the atmosphere and underlying geology receiving energy from the sun and to a lesser extent from geothermal sources. Read more
The oceans do not exist in isolation but are in constant interaction with the atmosphere and underlying geology receiving energy from the sun and to a lesser extent from geothermal sources. The highly interdisciplinary field of Marine science, the study of the oceans from the deep sea to shallow coastal seas, aims to understand the biology, chemistry, geology and physics of this dynamic system so central to all our lives.

This programme offers students with a background in marine biology, geology or geography the opportunity to integrate their expertise in the wider marine science context.

The programme has one core course and offers a wide variety of options with maximum flexibility allowing students to pursue their studies either at our Orkney Campus or in Edinburgh.

Core course

- Oceanography and Marine Ecology
- Research Project (MSc only)

Optional courses

- Marine Resources and Sustainability
- Diversity of Marine Organisms1
- Applied Research Design & Analysis1
- Climate Change: Causes and Impacts
- Marine Ecotoxicology
- Practical Marine Ecotoxicology1
- Marine Ecology & Fisheries
- Introduction to Marine Planning
- Economics of Renewable Energy
- Environmental Processes
- Energy in the 21st Century
- Marine Biotechnology
- Practical Skills in Marine Biotechnology (Edinburgh Campus only owing to labs and practicals)
- Marine Environmental Monitoring
- Climate Change: Mitigation and Adaptation Measures
- GIS for Marine and Environmental Scientists
- Tropical Coral Reef Field Course
- Practical Skills in Marine Surveying (Orkney Campus only - field work)
- Environmental Policy & Risk
- Development Appraisal
- Development Project

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The programme encompasses the following key ideas. ·        . Understanding complex marine systems from a range of standpoints. Read more

The programme encompasses the following key ideas:

·        Understanding complex marine systems from a range of standpoints. Establishing a core body of knowledge about the marine environment and the physical, chemical, ecological and anthropogenic processes operating on a range of spatial and temporal scales.

·        Multidisciplinary approaches. Creating a multidisciplinary approach to understanding and managing the marine environment through integrated field, laboratory and theory-based learning and examine this in the context of the relevant legislative framework and global policy changes.

·        Understanding the impacts of both natural and anthropogenic factors on the marine environment alongside environmental change. Using a multidisciplinary approach to the development of applied solutions to managing marine resources and biodiversity in an ever changing situation.

·        Use of big marine data. The collection of rigorous scientific data; formulating and testing hypotheses through carrying out scientific investigations and communicating information in a variety of formats to a range of audiences.

·        Professional practice and application to real world situations. Understanding the links between scientific ideas and their application to solving marine environmental problems by working with professionals from a range of scientific disciplines. In addition, using industry-standard approaches, equipment and analysis to collect, analyse and report on ecological and environmental data from field and laboratory investigations in the relevant format to inform the public, practitioners in the field, policy makers and scientists.

Themes

The programme allows the progression of students along two main pathways with different core modules to allow for specific career and skill development. Those wishing to pursue a career in fisheries science can follow the MSc Marine Environmental Management (Fisheries) pathway where those students who wish to follow the more ecological route can follow the MSc Marine Environmental Management (Ecology)  route.

Example modules:

  • Applied Fisheries Science and Management. Fisheries ecology, economics and social science; understanding of fundamental fisheries management tools and concepts, comparing/contrasting freshwater and marine systems. Students are trained in the use of Ecopath with Ecosim and traditional numeric fisheries management tools.
  • Applied Benthic Ecology.  The use of industry-standard approaches, equipment and analysis to collect, analyse and report on marine ecological and environmental data from field and laboratory investigations.  During a 1 week field trip students are trained in survey design using sublittoral sampling equipment and then tasked as a group designing a question and supervising the operation of a survey boat for a day. Samples will be worked up (quantified, taxonomic work and mapping) and analysed on return the university.
  • Operational Oceanography.  Desktop oceanography using the myriad of open source “big data” sources available, students will learn to use a range of recognised resources to model and analyse contemporary and future oceanographic situations and issues.
  • Research Design.  Identifying aspects of environmental problems amenable to qualitative and quantitative study, questionnaire design, programmes of monitoring and experimental study. The scientific method: formulating and testing hypotheses through carrying out scientific investigations using primary and secondary data from field, laboratory, computer and desk-based study.  To support thier analytical abilities students take part in a 3-day intensive R programming course.
  • Dissertation in fisheries ecology or management using extensive links with industry.  These can be data based or field based in nature.

Optional modules

  • Principles of GIS.  Practical use of the most widely available GIS system ArcGIS on real-world environmental problems; development of a wide range of special analysis and problem-solving skills.
  • Environmental Impact Assessment.  Introduction to EIA/EcIA; scoping and valuation; key ecological receptors; characterising impacts of urbanisation or industrial development; determining significance; presenting an EcIA to consultees.
  • Ecotoxicology.  Knowledge of the impacts of persistent and ephemeral pollution on marine and estuarine systems)
  • Scientific Diving.  Training to or towards this HSE recognised professional qualification and an understanding of the regulatory and legal framework in which such activities sit). Student divers will carry out a research project to give them an opportunity to more fully understand the opportunities and limitations of this research approach.


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