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Masters Degrees (Maps)

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MAPS is promoted by the University of Torino and held at Collegio Carlo Alberto. It is an Advanced Master's programme, open to students with a second cycle degree or one-long cycle degreein social sciences (including economics and business administration), statistics, law, humanities and the like. Read more
MAPS is promoted by the University of Torino and held at Collegio Carlo Alberto. It is an Advanced Master's programme, open to students with a second cycle degree or one-long cycle degreein social sciences (including economics and business administration), statistics, law, humanities and the like. MAPS trains highly motivated students in the processes of social change in European societies and the public policies to meet these challenges at the national, European and global level.

MAPS graduates receive an Advanced Master's Degree from the University of Torino. All courses are taught in English.

APPLICATION DEADLINES: May 16, 2017 for students who apply for tuition waivers or scholarships Afterwards, a rolling application will be kept open.

ELIGIBILITY: a second cycle degree or one-long cycle degree programme (http://en.unito.it/studying-unito/courses/masters)

AIMS & OBJECTIVES

MAPS aims to provide an in-depth understanding of:
-globalization and its consequences for public policy at national and European level;
-the ongoing tensions between economic and social policies;
-the interplay between European/international regulatory regimes and national welfare states;
-current social change trends.

MAPS graduates are able to:
-identify and analyze in a sophisticated way economic, social and demographic change and its consequences for European societies, the interdependencies between different policy areas and the interactions between different levels of governance;
-assess the outcomes of existing national and European public policies and envisage the regulatory instruments needed to meet ongoing challenges through innovative and evidence-based public policy.

Why MAPS

-it offers deep understanding of the processes of economic and social change in European societies (including demographic and migration trends) in the context of globalization;
-it sharpens your capacity to analyze global and EU governance in its interchange with national systems of governance;
-it makes you focus on comparative and international political economy, looking at the interplay between economic, social and political processes;
-it provides you with thorough expertise in the institutions, actors, processes and content of policymaking in the European Union;
-it trains you to strong interdisciplinarity and an empirical approach;
-it involves you in a highly profiled international research community at the Collegio, comprising a dynamic and cosmopolitan research and teaching environment;
-it provides you with personalized tutoring throughout the whole year spent at the Collegio.

COURSE PROGRAM

http://www.carloalberto.org/maps/course-program-2017-18/

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The MA in Asia Pacific Studies/Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Read more
The MA in Asia Pacific Studies/Master of Business Administration program is designed to provide a humanities-based, interdisciplinary degree that applies business expertise to the development of Asia and its impact on global economic systems. Awarded by the USF College of Arts and Sciences and the USF School of Management, the MAPS/MBA program provides a cost and time savings of up to 16 units.

• Separate admission to each school is required.
• Students may begin either program first or begin the programs concurrently.
• Indicate in your "Statement of Purpose" that you are applying to both of these programs for the dual degree.

Curriculum

• Asia Pacific Studies Core and Elective Courses — 20 credits
8 degree units are waived

• MBA Core courses — 34 credits

• MBA Elective courses — 14 credits
8 units of MBA electives are waived

MBA and MAPS courses are offered during the evening on a year-round basis. MBA courses are also offered during the day and in the summer. This schedule allows you the flexibility to pursue the concurrent degree while working or studying full-time.

Format

MAPS/ MBA students complete the MBA program in either a Full-Time MBA cohort or Part-Time MBA cohort. Eight MAPS units are applied to the MBA elective curriculum.

Duration

The MAPS/ MBA can be completed on a full-time or part-time basis. Students opting for the full time format can complete the program in as little as three years. If students opt to take the program on a part-time basis, then the duration will be extended.

Career and Networking Forum

Understanding the vital role of professional development, our program holds an annual Career and Networking Forum for students, alumni, and others in the USF community to engage with various organizations seeking interns and employees. At the most recent event, over 35 organizations — including businesses, non-profits, and recruiters with a connection to the Asia Pacific — attended and approximately 200 people participated. Representatives from The Asia Foundation, Center for Asian American Media (CAAM), Give2Asia, Pasona, and many others have enjoyed dynamic, productive interactions with students at the Forum.

Mentorship Program

The Mentor Program is a voluntary, non-credit option offered to students at any time during their two years of study. It presents students with a broad spectrum of possibilities as to how they might apply their degree to their chosen career field and connects students with professionals in their field of interest. The Mentor Program is coordinated by members of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies Executive Advisory Board.

Professional Development Program

The Professional Development Program (PDP) offers students opportunities to broaden their familiarity with potential career paths and to meet with successful professionals.
The PDP relies heavily on the expertise and voluntary services of working professionals. The majority of these professionals are members of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies Executive Advisory Board. The Board's Professional Development Committee advises the Center for Asia Pacific Studies on the administration and direction of the PDP.

Executive Networking Event

Periodically students in the program are invited to the Executive Networking Evening held on campus in collaboration with the Center for Asia Pacific Studies. Students have the opportunity to meet many of the Center for Asia Pacific Studies' Board members and other professionals in a range of fields.

Job Search Training

MAPS students may request training and advice on pursuing a job in an international field, including resume design, mock interviews, and other job training skills.

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Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions. Read more

Students in the MA in Asia Pacific Studies (MAPS) program develop valuable cultural competency of the Asia Pacific region. Reflecting the diversity and innovative spirit of San Francisco, the program offers a wide range of courses in the history, literature, politics, business, and culture of Asian regions.

The interdisciplinary curriculum is designed to give students the flexibility and independence to pursue their passions. Separate concentrations — humanities/social sciences and business — allow students to take courses that align with their professional or academic goals after graduation.

San Francisco Advantage

San Francisco is a nucleus for opportunities that connect the city with the Asia Pacific region. MAPS students take full advantage of San Francisco’s location and resources to gain career and research experience, immersing themselves in the city’s vibrant and diverse Asian Pacific communities through internship and networking opportunities.



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Join us at our. Masters Open Day. to find out more about our courses. The only applied structural geology Masters in the UK. Read more

Join us at our Masters Open Day to find out more about our courses.

The only applied structural geology Masters in the UK. Providing you with advanced training in the practical application of structural geology, preparing you either for employment in the hydrocarbon or mining industries or for postgraduate study (PhD).

You’ll gain a skillset combining advanced structural techniques and interpreting seismic data, an understanding of structural systems in time and space, and an appreciation of both the geological and geophysical constraints of seismic interpretation and model building.

This will enable you to use a combination of structural and geophysical techniques to solve geological problems. As a capable seismic interpreter you’ll be able to contribute in an industry role from day one.

Our teaching is research led, with direct links to active applied research. You’ll be taught by a range of research and industry experts, as well as through industry-led workshops. Strong industry links are a feature of this course.

Course highlights:

  • The only applied structural geology Masters in the UK, offering you a route to both industry or a PhD.
  • Unlike other petroleum/ ore geoscience courses in the UK, which only provide you with broad training in all aspects of petroleum and ore geology. At Leeds, apply your skills, tools, and knowledge in structural geology and tectonics to exploration settings, datasets, and problems.
  • A key focus of this Masters is on understanding structural evolution in various settings and the use of 3D and 4D thinking in geological contexts. Skills that are essential for your employment in industry.
  • Gain an international standard of Masters qualification in 12 months rather than 24. We deliver focused, advanced teaching linked to a research project (in contrast to the more research-oriented US Masters).
  • Undertake free fieldwork in the UK and EU that is directly linked to your classroom learning.
  • Choose from hydrocarbon and mining module options, depending on your interests.
  • Access high-spec computing facilities and industry-standard software.
  • Produce an industry or research focused dissertation in your final year.

Fieldwork

The following fieldwork to the UK and overseas is free, and forms an integral part of the course. It is directly linked to learning outcomes in the classroom.

  • An introductory field day to Ingleton, North Yorkshire.
  • A 6-day trip to the South West of England. Consider both extensional and compressional tectonics, basin-scale to fault to reservoir scale deformation, fault seal analysis, kinematic and geometric fault evolution, restorations, and 3D fault analysis.
  • A 12-day trip to the Central Spanish Pyrenees. This trip serves as a summary trip where you will pull together elements from the entire course. Consider regional scale orogenic deformation through to basin scale to fracture scale. And the influence of sediment-structure interaction in basin evolution, and tie outcrop scale observations with seismic examples.

Course content

Develop personal skills and a professionalism that will make you employable, as well as increasing your knowledge and technical ability.

You will take 9 months of taught classes, followed by approximately 3 months of independent research and dissertation writing in association with industry or research collaborators.

Carry-out free fieldwork, which forms an integral part of the course, and is directly linked to learning outcomes in the classroom. Besides local visits, there is a 6-day trip to South West England and a 12-day visit to the Spanish Pyrenees.

Some of the modules you will study are spread over 2 semesters, while most are short and intensive. They are devised to develop your advanced understanding of key topics (including large scale tectonics, basin evolution and reservoir scale deformation) and your technical ability through the use of industry-leading software.

Begin, by reviewing the fundamentals of structural geology, maps, and mathematics before moving onto the more advanced modules.

You’ll receive advanced training in structural geology and tectonics, in geological model construction, and the practical application of structural geology. And gain training in interpreting seismic data and the principals underlying data acquisition and processing.

You’ll also undertake professional and research level training in structural geology and basin evolution from regional, to basin, to reservoir/deposit scale.

In semester 2, you can choose from hydrocarbon or mining modules.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • Structural Geology Independent Project 60 credits
  • Applied Geophysical Methods 15 credits
  • Integrated Sub Surface Analysis 30 credits
  • Applied Structural Models 20 credits
  • Geomechanics 10 credits
  • Applied Geodynamics and Basin Evolution 15 credits
  • 3D Structure: Techniques and Visualisation 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Structural Geology with Geophysics MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching is varied, with some of your modules being very practical based e.g. fieldwork, presentations, learning new software. While other methods are tutorial or lecture based. You will also have the opportunity to work individually or as a group. Regardless of method, you will be supported by substantial online learning material.

Facilities

The School of Earth and Environment’s £23m building gives you access to world-class research, teaching and laboratory facilities. As a Masters student, you will have access to a 3D visualisation suite, and to your own dedicated computer facilities, which runs industry standard software.

Industry standard software:

  • 2D and 3D seismic interpretation is done via Kingdom Suite software.
  • Geocellular modelling is delivered on the Petrel platform.
  • Structural modelling and restoration is learnt using Midland Valley's 2DMove software.
  • PCs run a range of structural modelling, GIS and 3D visualisation programmes.
  • If you choose the optional Ore Deposits module, train in Leapfrog 3D deposit modeller.

Assessment

Given the variety of learning outcomes and teaching methods, you will be assessed differently between modules but generally assessed on a combination of presentations, practicals and/or formal examinations.

Industry links

We have very strong links with industry, which you’ll benefit from throughout the year. This includes the provision of scholarships, data for dissertation projects, teaching of short courses and free licenses for industry standard software.



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Part 1 (120 credits). runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. Read more
Part 1 (120 credits): runs from September to May and consists of four taught modules, a Field Visit, and a Research Methods module component. They must be completed successfully before proceeding to Part 2.

Part 2 (60 credits): is the dissertation phase and runs from end of May to September. This is a supervised project phase which gives students further opportunity for specialisation in their chosen field. Dissertation topics are related to the interests and needs of the individual and must show evidence of wide reading and understanding as well as critical analysis or appropriate use of advanced techniques. The quality of the dissertation is taken into account in the award of the Masters degree. Bangor University regulations prescribe a maximum word limit of 20,000 words for Masters Dissertations. A length of 12,000 to 15,000 words is suggested for Masters programmes in our School.

Summary of modules taken in Part 1:

All students undertake 6 modules of 20 credits each which are described below.

Conservation Science considers questions such as ‘in a post-wild world what should be the focus of conservation attention?’ ‘What are the relative roles of ecology, economics and social science in conservation?’ ‘What are the advantage and disadvantages of the introduction of market-like mechanisms into conservation policy?’ We look closely at the current and emerging drivers of biodiversity loss world-wide, while carefully analysing the range of responses.

Insect Pollinators and Plants is at the interface between agriculture and conservation, this module introduces students to plant ecology and insect pollinators. Students will gain unique understanding of the ecological interactions between plants and insect pollinators including honey-bees to implement more sensitive conservation management. The module explores the current conservation status of insect pollinators and their corresponding plant groups; how populations are monitored, and how interventions in the broader landscape can contribute to improving their conservation status. Module components relate specifically to ecosystem pollination services, apiculture and habitat restoration and/or maintenance. The module has a strong practical skills focus, which includes beekeeping and contemporary challenges to apiculture; plant and insect sampling and habitat surveying. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on “learning by doing.

Agriculture and the Environment reviews the impact of agricultural systems and practices on the environment and the scientific principles involved. It includes examples from a range of geographical areas. It is now recognised that many of the farming practices adopted in the 1980’s and early 1990’s, aimed at maximising production and profit, have had adverse effects on the environment. These include water and air pollution, soil degradation, loss of certain habitats and decreased biodiversity. In the UK and Europe this has led to the introduction of regulatory instruments and codes of practice aimed at minimising these problems and the promotion of new approaches to managing farmland. However, as world population continues to rise, there are increased concerns about food security, particularly in stressful environments such as arid zones where farmers have to cope with natural problems of low rainfall and poor soils. Although new technologies including the use of GM crops have potential to resolve some of these issues, concerns have been expressed about the impact of the release of these new genetically-engineered crops into the environment.

Management Planning for Conservation provides students with an understanding of the Conservation Management System approach to management planning. This involves describing a major habitat feature at a high level of definition; the preparation of a conservation objective (with performance indicators) for the habitat; identification and consideration of the implications of all factors and thus the main management activities; preparation of a conceptual model of the planning process for a case study site and creating maps using spatial data within a desktop GIS.

Research Methods Module: this prepares students for the dissertation stage of their MSc course. The module provides students with an introduction to principles of hypothesis generation, sampling, study design, spatial methods, social research methods, quantitative & qualitative analysis and presentation of research findings. Practicals and field visits illustrate examples of these principles. Course assessment is aligned to the research process from the proposal stage, through study write up to presentation of results. The module is in two phases. The taught content phase is until the period following Christmas. This is followed by a project planning phase for dissertation title choice and plan preparation.

Field Visit Module: this is an annual programme of scientific visits related to Conservation and Land Management. The main purpose of the trip will be to appreciate the range of activities different conservation organisations are undertaking, to understand their different management objectives and constraints. Previous field trips have visited farms, forests and reserves run by Scottish Wildlife Trust, National Trust, RSPB, local authorities, community groups and private individuals.

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Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?. Read more
Has your undergraduate degree inspired you to learn more about the way people work?

Our MSc Psychology is an advanced fast-track conversion course for students with an undergraduate degree in a subject other than psychology, or for those whose undergraduate Psychology degree was not accredited by the British Psychological Society.

This course combines the award of a Masters with eligibility for the Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society. The GBC is the minimum academic qualification required to work as a professional psychologist, so passing our course demonstrates that you have studied and acquired an advanced understanding in Masters-level study in psychology. With this qualification you will also be eligible to apply for professional training in any branch of professional psychology.

Our staff have a wide range of research interests, so you gain a critical and detailed understanding of the core areas of psychology, plus some specialisation, and learn research methods to an extent which will enable you to devise, carry out and analyse an empirical research project. Topics studied include:
-Visual and auditory perception and cognition
-Language, concepts, memory and attention
-The relation between brain and behaviour
-Developmental psychology
-Social psychology

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

We are a warm and friendly Department, and we wish to welcome both graduates who have recently completed their studies, and mature students who may wish to upgrade their qualifications, refresh their CV, or return to academic study after a period of time away from education.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Recent graduates of MSc Psychology have found employment as a research assistant at the Anna Freud Centre, a clinical psychologist for the NHS, a child psychologist for Children First and a lecturer at the University of Surrey. Other graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Brain and Behaviour
-Personality and Individual Differences
-Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology I
-Advanced Cognitive Psychology II
-Advanced Social Psychology
-Advanced Developmental Psychology
-Research Project (MSc)
-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Special Topics in Social Psychology (optional)

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How can we make the most successful predictions about how humans will behave? How do we measure concepts such as “personality”? In what ways can statistics inform us about the human condition?. Read more
How can we make the most successful predictions about how humans will behave? How do we measure concepts such as “personality”? In what ways can statistics inform us about the human condition?

Our MSc Research Methods in Psychology develops your awareness of psychological science in relation to its philosophical and biological contexts, and in relation to research in the natural and social sciences. In addition to this research-focussed training, you also study advanced topics in psychology that will extend your theoretical knowledge.

You explore topics including:
-Methods in cognitive neuroscience
-Advanced statistical techniques
-Research management
-Interview analysis

If you intend to pursue a career as a research psychologist, or wish to take a research degree, then our MSc Research Methods in Psychology will give you the advanced research training which provides you with an excellent preparation for a PhD, and enhances your chances of obtaining funding.

Our University is one of just 21 ESRC Doctoral Training Centres, enabling us to offer studentships to psychology students intending to pursue a research degree.

Our research is challenging and ground-breaking, with 90% rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014), placing us in the top 15 in the UK. We are supported by some of the most prestigious funding bodies, including the European Commission and the Leverhulme Trust.

Our expert staff

Our academic staff include award-winning teachers and prize-winning researchers who are international experts in their own research areas.

The Cognitive and Developmental Psychology Group are researching attention, language, decision-making, and memory. Recent projects have investigated the psychology of energy reduction, the enhancement of human memory through technology, and improvements in the usability and design of transport maps.

The Social and Health Psychology Group work on motivations, needs, intercultural contact, and sexual attraction. Recent projects include the impacts of living and studying abroad, and how personal relative deprivation is linked to problem gambling.

The Cognitive and Sensory Neuroscience Group research brain function and human behaviour. Recently they have been working on projects on the neural processes underlying language production, how motivations are communicated through tone of voice, and how the brain performs 3D vision. They previously developed the BioAid mobile phone app that turns an iPhone into a biologically inspired hearing aid.

Our department is expanding, and has recently appointed a number of excellent researchers whose expertise increases the diversity and depth of our skills base.

Specialist facilities

We are committed to giving you the best access to state-of-the-art facilities in higher education, housed entirely within our purpose-built psychology building on our Colchester Campus:
-Dedicated laboratories including a virtual reality suite and an observation suite
-Specialist areas for experimental psychology, visual and auditory perception, developmental psychology and social psychology
-Study the development of perceptual and cognitive abilities in infants in our Babylab
-Our multimillion pound Centre for Brain Science (CBS) contains specialist laboratories, office space for research students, and research rooms and social spaces which foster opportunities for innovation, training, and collaboration

Your future

With the skills and knowledge you acquire from studying within our Department of Psychology, you will find yourself in demand from a wide range of employers.

Our graduates have been employed in clinical psychology, educational psychology, criminal and forensic psychology.

We also have excellent links with the research community; we are recognised by the ESRC as providing excellent postgraduate training and are an accredited Doctoral Training Centre, offering several studentships.

Our recent PhD students have taken up post-doctoral positions in other top UK universities and international universities (in the US, Italy and Australia), as well as being appointed to lectureships.

Example structure

-Fundamentals of Neuroscience and Neuropsychology
-Quantitative Data Analysis
-Research Management
-Research Project (MSc)
-Interviewing and Qualitative Data Analysis
-Cognitive Neuropsychology of Language (optional)
-Critical Literature Review (optional)
-Methods in Cognitive Neuroscience (optional)
-Special Topics in Social Psychology (optional)
-Psychology at Work and in the Real World (optional)
-Special Topics in Individual Differences and Developmental Psychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Neuroscience and Neuropsychology (optional)
-Special Topics in Perception and Cognition (optional)
-Visual Attention: From lab to life (Advanced) (optional)

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Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. Read more
Our department offers a distinctively comparative approach to the study of literature; at Essex you don’t just study English literature, you study world literature in English. You explore literature across time, geography, and genre, combining scholarly research with innovative, practical ways of engaging with texts.

You grapple with the challenges of conducting research into Shakespeare and other early modern literature, acquiring specialist skills in archival research, palaeography, and the study of rare and antiquated books. You study materials on 18th century drama and literature, visiting the UK’s only surviving Regency Theatre to investigate how architecture affected the content of drama, and how drama reflected Georgian society. You have the opportunity to explore the history of genres such as the novel and lyric poetry, and study a truly extensive range of work; your reading takes you from African American literature, through Caribbean literatures, to the literature and performance of New York, Paris, Berlin, Vienna, Moscow and London.

Our department is ranked Top 20 in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2015), and three-quarters of our research is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’ (REF 2014).

This course is also available on a part-time basis.

Our expert staff

At Essex, we have an impressive literary legacy. Our history comprises staff (and students) who have been Nobel Prize winners, Booker Prize winners, and Pulitzer Prize winners.

Our Department is a vibrant conservatoire of scholars and practitioners who are committed to unlocking creative personal responses to literature. This distinctive environment is possible because we are a community of award-winning novelists, poets and playwrights, as well as leading literature specialists.

Our academic staff specialise in a range of areas including modernism, comparative and world literature, Shakespeare, the Renaissance, modernism, travel writing, nature writing, translated literature, cultural geography, Irish and Scottish writing, U.S. and Caribbean literatures, and the history of reading.

Specialist facilities

-Meet fellow readers at the student-run Literature Society or at our department’s Myth Reading Group
-Write for our student magazine Albert or host a Red Radio show
-View classic films at weekly film screenings in our dedicated 120-seat film theatre
-Learn from leading writers and literature specialists at weekly research seminars
-Our on-campus Lakeside Theatre has been established as a major venue for good drama, staging both productions by professional touring companies and a wealth of new work written, produced and directed by our own staff and students
-Improve your playwriting and performance skills at our Lakeside Theatre Workshops
-Our Research Laboratory allows you to collaborate with professionals, improvising and experimenting with new work which is being tried and tested

Your future

A good literature degree opens many doors.

We offer supervision for PhD, MPhil and MA by Dissertation in different literatures and various approaches to literature, covering most aspects of early modern and modern writing in English, plus a number of other languages.

Our University is one of only 11 AHRC-accredited Doctoral Training Centres in the UK. This means that we offer funded PhD studentships which also provide a range of research and training opportunities.

A number of our Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies graduates have gone on to undertake successful careers as writers, and others are now established as scholars, university lecturers, teachers, publishers, publishers’ editors, journalists, arts administrators, theatre artistic directors, drama advisers, and translators.

We work with our Employability and Careers Centre to help you find out about further work experience, internships, placements, and voluntary opportunities.

Example structure

-Dissertation
-Research Methods in Literary and Cultural Analysis
-Georgian and Romantic Literature and Drama
-Early Modern to Eighteenth Century Literature
-The New Nature Writing (optional)
-Writing the Novel (optional)
-Memory Maps: Practices in Psychogeography (optional)
-Dramatic Structure (optional)
-Literature and Performance in the Modern City (optional)
-Adaptation
-Documentary and the Avant-garde: Film, Video, Digital
-Film and Video Production Workshop
-Advanced Film and Industry: Production and Industry
-US Nationalism and Regionalism (optional)
-African American Literature (optional)
-Sea of Lentils: Modernity, Literature, and Film in the Caribbean (optional)
-Writing Magic (optional)
-"There is a Continent Outside My Window" : United States and Caribbean Literatures in Dialogue (optional)
-Literature and the Environmental Imagination: 19th to 21st Century Poetry and Prose (optional)

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This programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and sanitation services in low- and middle-income countries. Read more
This programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and sanitation services in low- and middle-income countries. You will develop knowledge, expertise and skills in many aspects of inclusive and sustainable public health infrastructure and services.

The programme is based in the School of Civil and Building Engineering’s Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC), one of the world’s leading education and research institutes of its kind.

Modules are taught by experts in a broad range of disciplines who have considerable experience of working in low- and middle- income countries. Classes include a mix of nationalities and past experiences, providing both a stimulating learning experience and a valuable future network.

Externally accredited, WEDC programmes are well-established, and held in high regard by practitioners and employers from both the emergency and development sectors.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked in the UK top 10 in the Guardian Good University Guide

- Excellent graduate prospects. Many of our graduates are employed by relief and development agencies.

- Professionally accredited. The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) have accredited this programme. Students registered for this programme are eligible for free student membership of CIWEM. The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) has also accredited all WEDC MSc degrees as meeting requirements for Further Learning.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-waste/

Programme modules

Core modules:
- Water and Waste Engineering Principles
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the range of suitable technologies for water supply and engineering management of liquid and solid wastes in low- and middle-income countries.

- Management of Water and Sanitation
The aim of this module is to introduce the principles, concepts and key issues of managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services for low-income consumers in developing countries.

- Water Utilities Management
The aim of this module is to better enable participants to plan for and manage urban water and sanitation services in developing countries.

- Data Collection, Analysis and Research
The aims of this module are to introduce the principles and approaches for doing research and studies on infrastructure and services in low- and middle-income countries and to prepare students to undertake the research dissertation module.

- Group Project
The aims of this module are for the student to work within a group to understand the necessary inter-relationships between different components of their programme of study; to consolidate and integrate material contained in earlier taught modules; and to learn how to work as part of a team.

- Research Dissertation
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.

Optional Modules (choose 3):
- Water Source Development
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the occurrence, location, exploration, exploitation and pollution of groundwater and surface water sources.

- Wastewater Treatment
The aims of this module are for the student to understand the various stages, and unit operation and process options, for treatment of wastewaters, particularly in low- and middle-income countries; and to understand the principles for planning and design of wastewater treatment facilities, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

- Integrated Water Resources Management
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the concepts used in integrated planning and management of water resources in low and middle-income countries.

- Solid Waste Management
The aim of this module is to introduce participants with available and possible options in solid waste management for low and middle income countries. To make participants familiar with the key issues for low income countries.

- Water Distribution and Drainage Systems
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the most important aspects of how to design, construct and maintain piped water distribution, drainage and sewerage systems.

- Short Project
The aim of this module is for participants to be able to undertake extended study of a subject of their own choosing which is related to their Postgraduate Programme to enable them to conduct an independent review and analysis to understand state of art issues or a topic.

Facilities

All masters students have access to our excellent laboratory facilities which include equipment for field sampling and analysis of water and wastewater, and some of the largest hydraulics equipment in the UK. There are three dedicated water laboratory staff available to help you use our equipment who are specialists in pollutant analysis, hydraulics and running continuous trials.

Practical training includes:
- Hand-pump maintenance using the largest single site collection of hand-pumps;
- latrine slab construction;
- flow measurements; and
- water quality sampling and analysis.

Field visits are made to relevant UK facilities.

WEDC has a unique sector Resource Centre with a dedicated and skilled information officer. Over 19,000 items can be searched on a customized database allowing ready access to this collection of books, series, country files, student projects, videos, journals, maps, and manufacturers' catalogues.

The Resource Centre also provides a dedicated quiet study space for WEDC students. Many items including all WEDC publications and over 2500 papers presented at 37 WEDC International Conferences are available in the open access sector knowledge base.

How you will learn

The programme comprises both compulsory core modules and optional modules which may be selected. A group case study module draws together material from across the programme and develops team working skills. The individual research project and dissertation (frequently linked to specific needs of an agency) of between 75 and 150 pages in length concludes the programme. To support your learning you will have access to our comprehensive facilities including laboratories, hand-pumps, and a dedicated Resource Centre.

- Assessment
For most modules, students are assessed by one item of coursework (two items for foundation modules) and an in-class test. The Group Project module is assessed on the basis of written documents and spoken presentations, including an individual component for the module mark. The individual Research Dissertation is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation, and this module includes an oral when a student discusses their submitted dissertation with their supervisor and a second member of academic staff.

Careers and further study

Many WEDC students and alumni work for international NGOs (MSF, Oxfam, SCF, GOAL, WaterAid, etc.) and agencies (such as UNICEF), or National Governments. Graduate job titles include Sanitation Technical Manager, Water and Sanitation Consultant, Project Manager, Environmental Engineering Consultant and Civil Engineering Specialist.

Scholarships / Bursaries

Bursaries are available for self-funding international students.
The University also offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account. You can apply for one of these scholarships once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-waste/

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This programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and environmental services in low-and middle-income countries. Read more
This programme is ideal for engineers and scientists who want to improve the delivery of water and environmental services in low-and middle-income countries. You will develop knowledge, expertise and skills in many aspects of water, sanitation and environmental management. The programme focuses on the conditions and aspirations of communities in low- and middle-income countries.

The programme is based in the School of Civil and Building Engineering’s Water, Engineering and Development Centre (WEDC), one of the world’s leading education and research institutes of its kind.

Modules are taught by experts in a broad range of disciplines who have considerable experience of working in low- and middle- income countries. Classes include a mix of nationalities and past experiences, providing both a stimulating learning experience and a valuable future network.

Externally accredited, WEDC programmes are well-established, and held in high regard by practitioners and employers from both the emergency and development sectors.

Key Facts

- Research-led teaching from international experts. 75% of the School’s research was rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the latest Government Research Excellence Framework.

- An outstanding place to study. The School of Civil and Building Engineering is ranked in the UK top 10 in the Guardian Good University Guide

- Excellent graduate prospects. Many of our graduates are employed by relief and development agencies.

- Professionally accredited. The Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) have accredited this programme. Students registered for this programme are eligible for free student membership of CIWEM. The Joint Board of Moderators (JBM) has also accredited all WEDC MSc degrees as meeting requirements for Further Learning.

See the website http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-environmental-management/

Programme modules

Core modules:
- Management of Water and Sanitation
The aim of this module is to introduce the principles, concepts and key issues of managing sustainable water and environmental sanitation services for low-income consumers in developing countries.

- Water and Environmental Sanitation
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the range of suitable technologies for water supply and engineering management of liquid and solid wastes in low- and middle-income countries.

- Integrated Water Resources Management
The aim of this module is for participants to understand the concepts used in integrated planning and management of water resources in low and middle-income countries.

- Water Utilities Management
The aim of this module is to better enable participants to plan for and manage urban water and sanitation services in developing countries.

- Data Collection, Analysis and Research
The aims of this module are to introduce the principles and approaches for doing research and studies on infrastructure and services in low- and middle-income countries and to prepare students to undertake the research dissertation module.

- Group Project
The aims of this module are for the student to work within a group to understand the necessary inter-relationships between different components of their programme of study; to consolidate and integrate material contained in earlier taught modules; and to learn how to work as part of a team.

- Research Dissertation
The aim of this module is to provide the student with experience of the process and methodology of research by defining and studying (on an individual basis) a complex problem in a specialised area relating to their degree.

Optional Modules (choose 2):
- Water Source Development
The aim of this module is for the student to understand the occurrence, location, exploration, exploitation and pollution of groundwater and surface water sources.

- Environmental Assessment
The aim of this module is for participants to develop a broad understanding of both the needs for and the mechanisms of environmental assessment and management, with emphasis on aquatic environments, in low and middle-income countries.

- Small-scale Water Supply and Sanitation
The aim of this module is for the student to understand important aspects of the design, construction, operation and maintenance of small-scale water supplies and on-site sanitation options for low-income rural and urban communities.

- Solid Waste Management
The aim of this module is to introduce participants with available and possible options in solid waste management for low and middle income countries. To make participants familiar with the key issues for low income countries.

Facilities

All masters students have access to our excellent laboratory facilities which include equipment for field sampling and analysis of water and wastewater, and some of the largest hydraulics equipment in the UK. There are three dedicated water laboratory staff available to help you use our equipment who are specialists in pollutant analysis, hydraulics and running continuous trials.

Practical training includes:
- Hand-pump maintenance using the largest single site collection of hand-pumps;
- latrine slab construction;
- flow measurements; and
- water quality sampling and analysis.

Field visits are made to relevant UK facilities.

WEDC has a unique sector Resource Centre with a dedicated and skilled information officer. Over 19,000 items can be searched on a customized database allowing ready access to this collection of books, series, country files, student projects, videos, journals, maps, and manufacturers' catalogues.

The Resource Centre also provides a dedicated quiet study space for WEDC students. Many items including all WEDC publications and over 2500 papers presented at 37 WEDC International Conferences are available in the open access sector knowledge base.

How you will learn

The programme comprises both compulsory core modules and optional modules which may be selected. A group case study module draws together material from across the programme and develops team working skills. The individual research project and dissertation (frequently linked to specific needs of an agency) of between 75 and 150 pages in length concludes the programme. To support your learning you will have access to our comprehensive facilities including laboratories, hand-pumps, and a dedicated Resource Centre.

- Assessment
For most modules, students are assessed by one item of coursework (two items for foundation modules) and an in-class test. The Group Project module is assessed on the basis of written documents and spoken presentations, including an individual component for the module mark. The individual Research Dissertation is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation, and this module includes an oral when a student discusses their submitted dissertation with their supervisor and a second member of academic staff.

Careers and further study

Many WEDC students and alumni work for international NGOs (MSF, Oxfam, SCF, GOAL, WaterAid, etc.) and agencies (such as UNICEF), or National Governments. Graduate job titles include Sanitation Technical
Manager, Water and Sanitation Consultant, Project Manager, Technical Adviser, Environmental Engineering Consultant and Civil Engineering Specialist.

Scholarships and bursaries

Bursaries are available for self-funding international students.
The University also offers over 100 scholarships each year to new self-financing full-time international students who are permanently resident in a county outside the European Union. These Scholarships are to the value of 25% of the programme tuition fee and that value will be credited to the student’s tuition fee account.
You can apply for one of these scholarships once you have received an offer for a place on this programme.

Why choose civil engineering at Loughborough?

As one of four Royal Academy of Engineering designated Centres of Excellence in Sustainable Building Design, the School of Civil and Building Engineering is one of the largest of its type in the UK and holds together a thriving community of over 60 academic staff, 40 technical and clerical support staff and over 240 active researchers that include Fellows, Associates, Assistants, Engineers and Doctoral Students.

Our world-class teaching and research are integrated to support the technical and commercial needs of both industry and society. A key part of our ethos is our extensive links with industry resulting in our graduates being extremely sought after by industry and commerce world-wide,

- Postgraduate programmes
The School offers a focussed suite of post graduate programmes aligned to meet the needs of industry and fully accredited by the relevant professional institutions. Consequently, our record of graduate employment is second to none. Our programmes also have a long track record of delivering high quality, research-led education. Indeed, some of our programmes have been responding to the needs of industry and producing high quality graduates for over 40 years.

Currently, our suite of Masters programmes seeks to draw upon our cutting edge research and broad base knowledge of within the areas of contemporary construction management, project management, infrastructure management, building engineering, building modelling, building energy demand and waste and water engineering. The programmes are designed to respond to contemporary issues in the field such as sustainable construction, low carbon building, low energy services, project complexity, socio-technical systems and socio-economic concerns.

- Research
Drawing from our excellent record in attracting research funds (currently standing at over £19M), the focal point of the School is innovative, industry-relevant research. This continues to nurture and refresh our long history of working closely with industrial partners on novel collaborative research and informs our ongoing innovative teaching and extensive enterprise activities. This is further complemented by our outstanding record of doctoral supervision which has provided, on average, a PhD graduate from the School every two weeks.

- Career Prospects
Independent surveys continue to show that industry has the highest regard for our graduates. Over 90% were in employment and/or further study six months after graduating. Recent independent surveys of major employers have also consistently rated the School at the top nationally for civil engineering and construction graduates.

Find out how to apply here http://www.lboro.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/programmes/departments/civil/water-environmental-management/

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. The Early Modern Studies pathway gives you the opportunity to explore the vibrant culture that existed in Europe between 1300 and 1700. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

The Early Modern Studies pathway gives you the opportunity to explore the vibrant culture that existed in Europe between 1300 and 1700. A unique feature of this pathway is that it provides the chance for you to explore the Medieval and Early Modern periods, thanks to our unparalleled research expertise in both fields. Our approach to this material is genuinely interrogative, asking what we mean when we talk of the ‘Medieval’ or the ‘Early Modern’. Our approach is also interdisciplinary: you will examine the history, religion, literature, and visual culture of the period, and be taught by experts working in the Departments of English, History, and Modern Languages.

The specially designed modules enable you to study some of the most influential writers working in the period 1300-1700, including Chaucer, Erasmus, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Donne and Milton, and to address the central issues informing current discussions about what constitutes the Medieval and Early Modern periods.

Central to the pathway is our distinctive approach to the period that focuses on editing, news networks and maps. Our teaching staff are widely regarded as international experts in the editing of authors such as Donne and Milton; we are at the cutting edge of research into networks of literary creativity and patronage in subjects as various as prison writing, psalms and the circulation of news pamphlets; we have cross-disciplinary strengths in the history of mapping from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries; and we are acknowledged as leading the field in exploring the boundaries between Medieval and Early Modern drama and the concept of authorship.

One of the other distinctive features of this pathway is the focus on archival training and study, as we concentrate on the impact of developments in manuscript culture and the new technologies in printing and publishing. In all cases, our aim is to generate a historical understanding of the key movements, debates, and ideas which shaped the period 1300-1700.

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Your programme of study. Geographic information systems have become really interesting to all of us with the increased innovation in smart phones and IOT, whether we are searching for a venue to eat and drink or looking for something specific in a difficult to reach location. Read more

Your programme of study

Geographic information systems have become really interesting to all of us with the increased innovation in smart phones and IOT, whether we are searching for a venue to eat and drink or looking for something specific in a difficult to reach location. At one time GIS was heavily used in planning and map creation, now we all have access to those maps on our mobiles and tablets and we now expect sensors in our phones to connect automatically to satellite systems to tell us our every move, whether we are walking or in the car. This has made the discipline incredibly interesting and opened up a lot more opportunities in terms of work. On top of the more obvious GIS enabled systems many businesses rely on this technology to inform them about weather, shipping, coastal locations, risks and hazards, agriculture and energy and minerals exploration.

Geospatial technologies are increasingly important across all industries and this programme gives you skills in developing remote sensing, working with wide ranging expertise from coastal, marine, ecology, energy, geology, spatial planning, and archaeology. You learn some very useful skills in programming, simulation and modelling, spatial databases and global positioning systems, plus cartography, remote sensing, digital image processing, geographic information systems, field data capture for a variety of devices. 

It is worth visiting the Scottish Innovation Centres to find out more about innovations using GIS and the technologies it uses:

http://www.innovationcentres.scot/

Courses listed for the programme

Semester 1

The History Origins and Evolution of GIS

GIS Tools and Technologies

People Management and GIS

Optional

Data Systems and Big Data

Aspects of Digital Mapping and Visualisation

Semester 2

Fundamentals of GIS and Spatial Analysis

Planning, Managing and Presenting a GIS Project

UAV Remote Sensing, Monitoring and Mapping

Semester 3

Dissertation

Find out more detail by visiting the programme web page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/degree-programmes/99/geographical-information-systems/

Why study at Aberdeen?

  • Aberdeen is in a great location to test out your skills in a range of sea and energy, remote, rural and wild locations
  • You are encouraged to go on field trips and out into these varied locations
  • You are taught by experts from marine science, ecology, energy and environmental industry and academic experts
  • Apart from learning your profession inside out career opportunities are rapidly developing in GIS across the world

Where you study

  • University of Aberdeen
  • Full time and Part Time
  • 12 Months Full Time or 24 Months Part Time
  • September or January start

International Student Fees 2017/2018

Find out about fees:

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/tuition-fees-and-living-costs-287.php

*Please be advised that some programmes have different tuition fees from those listed above and that some programmes also have additional costs.

Scholarships

View all funding options on our funding database via the programme page

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/postgraduate-taught/finance-funding-1599.php

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/funding/

Living in Aberdeen

Find out more about:

  • Your Accommodation
  • Campus Facilities
  • Aberdeen City
  • Student Support
  • Clubs and Societies

Find out more about living in Aberdeen:

https://abdn.ac.uk/study/student-life

Living costs

https://www.abdn.ac.uk/study/international/finance.php



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The course is intended for students who have a substantial background in geography or a related discipline with a good first degree. Read more
The course is intended for students who have a substantial background in geography or a related discipline with a good first degree. It aims to provide: (i) broad-based training in geographical research, its philosophical backgrounds and debates, and interpretation of geographical literature, (ii) comprehensive training in research methods in human geography and the social sciences as a whole, and (iii) the opportunity to develop large scale research management skills by completing a research thesis under academic supervision and guidance. Students choose two geography modules, which are combined with two modules in research design and methods, and a thesis. The course aims to develop general transferable skills for research employment in a wide range of walks of life, or as the first stage of a PhD thesis.

The course is intended to give students a broad-based advanced training and critical awareness of geographical research and its methods, including awareness of the research methods of related disciplines. The course is offered to all students hoping to undertake a PhD in Human Geography. Hence the thesis often forms a ‘pilot’ for a larger scale PhD proposal and will include a review of the relevant literature, research questions, an outline and evaluation of appropriate research methods, and an assessment of the initial findings and their significance.

See the website http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/courses/directory/eaggmpmgr

Course detail

The course aims to develop further the students’ understanding of the relationship between society, nature and space, emphasising both global and local processes and connections. They develop further their skills of assessing the merits of contrasting theories, explanations and policies; collecting and critically judging, evaluating and interpreting varied forms of evidence; preparing maps and diagrams; employing various methods of collecting and analysing spatial and environmental information; combining and interpreting different types of evidence to tackle specific problems; recognising the ethical and moral dimensions of study.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the 11 months, students taking the MPhil in Geographic Research will be expected to have:

- Acquired a broad knowledge of qualitative research methods and general statistics
- Acquired the skills to use library and internet resources independently
- Acquired specialist knowledge of the relevant literature related to their thesis
- Acquired skills to independently structure their research design
- Given a presentation on their thesis to their peers and academic staff
- Written three essays and one thesis

Format

Each student is allocated a thesis supervisor before the course begins. Generally up to 10 meetings of up to one hour of one-to-one supervision as well as briefer meetings when needed.

The Department runs a series of seminars during term which students on this course should attend. This introduces them to the breadth of the discipline and a new level of academic debate. Students may attend other lectures, seminars, classes and reading groups after consultation with their supervisors. Students attend Research Methods classes and lectures in the first and second term. Students are also expected to take part in their research group’s activities.

Skills and research training programme = 8 x 1 hour lectures in first term and optional lectures in the 2nd term. hours per term

Social Science Research Methods Centre (SSRMC) courses: workshops and practicals. Approx. 15 hours per term hours per term

Dissertation presentation in 3rd term.

Written feedback on each submitted essay and the dissertation.

Assessment

- 20,000 word dissertation; oral examination at discretion of examiners
- 3 essays or other exercises of up to 4,000 words

Continuing

70% overall in MPhil

How to apply: http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/applying

Funding Opportunities

ESRC (1+3) for applicants who plan to continue to PhD. (1+3 = one year MPhil and 3 years PhD)
AHRC Masters via CHESS Scheme for AHRC topics approved for the AHRC DTP at University of Cambridge.

General Funding Opportunities http://www.graduate.study.cam.ac.uk/finance/funding

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This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture. from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond. Read more

This course in Digital Humanities brings digital theory and practice to the study of human culture: from history, English and music to museums, digital publishing and beyond.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

Key benefits

  • This world-leading course is highly multidisciplinary and draws on a wide range of expertise in web technologies, digital publishing, open software and content creation, digital cultural heritage, coding in humanities/cultural contexts and maps, apps and the Geoweb.
  • The course provides opportunities to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus.
  • Through the optional internship module students can have direct access to some of the world’s most important culture and media institutions.
  • The MA can lead to further research or to careers in cultural heritage institutions (such as museums, libraries, and archives), in multimedia and new media companies, in internet companies, in publishing houses, and in web based businesses in London and overseas.

Description

In an age where so much of what we do is mobile, networked and mediated by digital culture and technology, digital humanities play an important role in exploring how we create and share knowledge. On this course, we will develop and enhance your awareness and understanding of a range of subjects that are relevant to the digitally mediated study of human culture, including:

  • How we model human culture using computers and how we can create memory and knowledge environments which facilitate new insights or new ways of working with the human record.
  • How the ethos of openness that the internet encourages – open access, open data – influences the knowledge economy.
  • The role of digital culture in changing concepts of authorship, editing and publication.
  • The potential application and limitations of big data techniques to further the study of human culture in an era of information overload.
  • The place of coding in our digital interactions with culture and cultural heritage.

We will give you a broad understanding of the most important applications of digital methods and technologies to humanities research questions and what they do and don’t allow us to do. You will be able to scope, build and critique practical experiments in digital research with an arts, humanities and cultural sector focus, and you will learn to provide critical commentary on the relationship between creativity, digital technology and the study of human culture.

Course purpose

The MA in Digital Humanities is designed to develop your understanding of digital theory and practice in studying human culture, from the perspectives of academic scholarship, cultural heritage and the commercial world.

Digital technology provides many new opportunities and challenges to those working with textual, visual or multimedia content and this course studies the history and current state of the digital humanities, exploring their role in modelling, curating, analysing and interpreting digital representations of human culture in all its forms.

The MA course is aimed at a diverse range of participants and aims to equip students with a variety of strategic, technical and analytical skills to provide direction and leadership in these areas.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide 120 to 180 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars, and we will expect you to undertake 1674 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide 90 hours of teaching through lectures and seminars in your first year, and 50 hours in your second. We will expect you to undertake 720 hours of independent study in your first year and 954 hours in your second.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, which will mostly take the form of essays, with some project work.



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The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Read more
The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts.

This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff please visit the Warburg website:
http://www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff

Structure

Core courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Iconology: Mythological painting, allegorical figures, historical subjects, altarpiece - Dr Paul Taylor
Religion and Society - Dr Alessandro Scafi
Optional Courses (courses may vary from year to year)

Artistic Intentions 1400 - 1700 - Dr Paul Taylor
Islamic Authorities and Arabic Elements in the Renaissance – Professor Charles Burnett
Music in the Later Middle Ages and the Renaissance - Professor Charles Burnett
New Worlds, Ancient Texts: Renaissance Intellectual History and the Discovery of the Americas - Dr Philipp Nothaft
Renaissance Philosophy – Dr Guido Giglioni
Renaissance Art Literature – Dr François Quiviger
Renaissance Material Culture – Dr Rembrandt Duits and Dr François Quiviger
Sin and Sanctity in the Reformation – Professor Alastair Hamilton
All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and the optional subjects in the second term and the options available vary from year to year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship. Subjects dealt with include: description of manuscripts; palaeography; printing in the 15th and 16th centuries; editing a text; preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library.
Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided and are offered to all students. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff.

Assessment

The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000 – 20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers.

Mode of study

12 months full-time only.

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