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Masters Degrees (Manuscript)

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This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more

This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Working with tutors and other writers on the course, you’ll develop your writing and build up a substantial body of work. Weekly workshops are taught by a strong team of published writers, and there are regular visits by literary agents, publishers, magazine editors and broadcasters, as well as other writers.

Due to the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers every year.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

You’ll learn:

• To plan a manuscript (a novel, collection of short stories, collection of poems or book of literary non-fiction) and complete it, or a substantial part of it, brought to publishable quality or as near as possible.

• To understand literary form, style and genre, as relevant to your chosen form of writing

• To acquire a variety of relevant writing techniques, and research techniques to support writing, and adapt them to your particular creative project.

• To understand and respond creatively to questions arising from the subject-matter, themes, genres, traditions and other literary contexts with which your chosen manuscript is engaged.

• To receive and give precise and sensitive critical feedback in workshop groups and one-to-one tutorials.

• To respond creatively to feedback provided by tutors and other students, adapting that feedback to your particular vision of your book.

• To understand choices and opportunities relevant to your chosen manuscript, including questions of how to place your work, and the role of agents, publishers and editors.

MODULES

Each student will take two workshop modules, two context modules and a double module entitled 'The Manuscript':

In the first trimester ‘Professional Skills’ provides intensive group discussion and some plenary lectures. You’ll bring short pieces of writing to workshop groups consisting of a tutor and not more than seven other students. There are separate groups for prose and poetry. You’ll submit a manuscript proposal halfway through the module.

In trimester two, you’ll take a second workshop module in either prose or poetry.

Each context module explores connections between your creative writing and the wider world as represented by a theme or genre. Seminars are divided between considering set texts and workshopping your creative writing. You’ll take a context module in trimester one and another in trimester two.

In trimester three, ‘The Manuscript’ will be taught by means of one-to-one tutorials. This is the culmination of the course – the book, or substantial part of a book.

For more information on course structure and modules please go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-creative-writing/

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll be taught in group workshops and seminars, one-to-one tutorials, plenary lectures and a residential weekend.

TUTORS

The teaching team in 2015-16 included the novelists Ian Breckon, Nathan Filer, Maggie Gee, Tessa Hadley, Samantha Harvey, Philip Hensher, Beatrice Hitchman,Tricia Wastvedt, Fay Weldon and Gerard Woodward, the poets Tim Liardet, Lucy English, Neil Rollinson and Sean Borodale, the historical novelists Celia Brayfield and Kylie Fitzpatrick, the nature writer and memoirist Richard Kerridge, the nature writer Stephen Moss, the travel writer Joe Roberts and the literary memoirist Gavin Cologne-Brookes.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

You’ll be assessed entirely by coursework: mainly creative writing, plus two short essays, a manuscript proposal and a short commentary on the manuscript in progress.

For more information on assessment please see the course handbook: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/media/bathspaacuk/course-handbooks/course-handbooks/PG-Creative-Writing-Handbook-2016-17.pdf

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; been long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, Orange Prize, Costa Prize and the Guardian First Book Award; received the Betty Trask Prize, Manchester Book Award and a W.H. Smith New Talent Award, and reached the best-seller lists.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.



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This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. Read more
This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. This is in both terms of a distinctive philosophy of writing (to answer the question, ‘What kind of writer am I?’), and in terms of the practicalities of making creative work public.

You should have some experience of writing fiction, poetry or prose (although there is not a requirement for this work to have been published), or scriptwriting, and wish to further your skills within the academic context of creative writing as an academic discipline. You will work with a core team of professional writers and other professionals to develop your creative work and nurture an understanding about the nature of your continuing creativity, aiming towards producing a final manuscript for possible publication.

What will I study?

You will begin straight away to experience the benefits of the regular workshops that form an integral part of the programme. You will discuss the work of others on the MA as well as learning from their discussion of your work. You will also receive tutor feedback.

You will study a variety of contemporary literature which will feed into your writing where needed, along with a study of the poetics of contemporary writers (that is, the things writers have written about their own writing philosophies and practices). The aim is to influence your practical development, allowing you to develop your own poetics and philosophy of composition.

In the first weeks of the course you will research markets and outlets for your work and complete submissions of your writing. You will also compile a professional development audit of your activities so far (which may not be extensive, of course). You will be asked to keep a log throughout the programme to enable you to track your development.

How will I study?

The writing workshops are always taught in small groups, but the discussion groups involve seminars with a lecture component.

During the manuscript module (a dissertation) you will work one-to-one with your manuscript supervisor, bringing your months of study to a final creative fruition. All the modules you will take have been designed specifically for writers.

This is not the kind of ‘Creative Writing’ course that requires you to pick from already existing English Literature modules. The modules have been custom-designed for you.

How will I be assessed?

You will present your creative writing with a short example of poetics relating to the piece. You will write about works of contemporary literature and about the poetics of these writers, though you will approach these tasks from the perspective of a fellow-writer. All this work will help you develop towards the final piece of work, The Manuscript. The professional development audit and logs will be marked on a pass / fail basis.

Who will be teaching me?

A team of seven, with extensive experience in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, short stories and scriptwriting teach on the programme. The team will be complemented by visiting speakers and visiting writers.

What are my career prospects?

The thinking behind the professional development strand is that writers seldom exclusively work as writers, but need to learn to combine their principal involvement and passion for literary composition with other activities (whether they are of a literary nature or not).

Of course, as a Masters in a humanities subject you will find this qualification useful in a variety of professional contexts, such as in school teaching, which encourages staff to work at Masters level. It provides a sound basis for further study (e.g. PhD work in Creative Writing).

Previous graduates have gone on to publish with major publishers, win prizes, edit magazines and books, and are active in the pedagogy of Creative Writing as a robust academic discipline.

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This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA is designed for writers for children, teenagers and young adults who aim to complete a novel, series of picture books or shorter stories for young children. It is a practical course, taught by experienced lecturers who are all published children's writers and/or industry professionals.

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to young adult (YA). Prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, but students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and narrative non-fiction for young people.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course supports you to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field. Most of our students aim to complete a novel by the end of the MA.

The writing workshop is at the heart of the course. What you’ll do with tutors and your fellow writers in a workshop situation is learn to see your work through objective eyes and to think clearly about the different strategies you might adopt. You learn from each other’s mistakes and successes as well as your own. You will be urged to try things out, take risks and experiment, and reflect on and discuss the writing process. The context modules help you to see your own writing in the wider context of published children’s writing. The course encourages you to read widely and analytically.

MODULES

In the first trimester’s writing workshop you’ll explore a variety of forms of writing, gaining a sense of different age ranges and styles of writing and experimenting with your own writing. The context module is Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages and it is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, and will help you understand some of the issues raised by writing for young people.

In the second trimester, you'll be asked to choose your area of writing and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. You will bring short excerpts from your work-in-progress for discussion and feedback in the group. You may continue to experiment with different ideas for other stories.The second trimester's Context Module is Contemporary Children's Publishing, which aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field.

In the third trimester, you'll continue to write your work-in-progress, developing a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. The manuscript may be a novel, picture book texts, or a collection of stories or poems.

For more information on module and course structure please go to our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

TEACHING METHODS

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, with one three-hour session each week for the eleven weeks of each taught trimester, at the Corsham Court campus. We aim to keep the writing workshops small – usually no more than eight students – so that there is sufficient time, support and attention for each person’s work.

ASSESSMENT

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing plus a short reflective commentary. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Lucy Chrisopher: prize winning author of Stolen and The Killing Woods for YA readers, and Flyaway for younger teens ( Chicken House).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker's Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fight Back and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).

For the full list of our fantastic staff and tutors please visit our website: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-writing-for-young-people/

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Graduates have achieved publication deals with a range of different mainstream and smaller publishers, and many more students have secured literary agents. Other students have subsequently taught Creative Writing at university level. Some have combined their writing with subsequent careers in journalism, teaching, publishing, television etc.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

More than 30 graduates of this MA have achieved publication deals since the course began in 2004, with more novels due to be published in 2016-2017. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children’s Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award in 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize. Elen Caldecott, Clare Furniss, Gill Lewis and Jim Carrington have been long-listed for the Carnegie award. Sally Nicholls was short-listed for the Guardian children’s book prize and won the Independent Booksellers’ award in 2015 for her novel An Island of Our Own. David Hofmeyr was short-listed for the Branford Boase award 2016 for his novel Stone Rider.

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This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more

This degree in Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts.

The required module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

  • A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's.
  • Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations.
  • Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies.
  • Located in the heart of literary London.

Description

Our Early Modern English Literature MA is an innovative and exciting partnership between the Department of English at King’s and the British Library. 

The course focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts, meaning both the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print as well as the way they were received. The specific process through which a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is central to its interpretation. 

You will learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts, and to edit them for the modern reader. In focusing on transmission, the course explores the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re) production on the way it is interpreted.

The Material Legacy of Early Modern Literary Texts module, which is taught at the British Library, is specifically designed to teach you how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide, and how to identify the factors and people involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

Course purpose

Early Modern English Literature is taught with the British Library and provides a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in the light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with four to six hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 26 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 13 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We assess all of our modules through coursework, normally with a 4,000-word essay. For your dissertation module, you will write a 4,000-word critical survey and a 15,000-word dissertation.

Regulating body

King’s College London is regulated by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.



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Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. Read more

Book History is a dynamic and rapidly growing area of interdisciplinary study that examines the book as an artefact in material culture. This programme brings together theory and practice in new and innovative ways. We study the production, circulation and reception of books from manuscript to e-books, paying attention to the histories of reading and authorship.

The programme integrates traditional bibliography, advanced theoretical approaches, training in special collections, and hands-on experience. You will be taught by leading experts at the University’s renowned Centre for the History of the Book. Field trips and work placements will allow you to take advantage of the exceptional collections in Edinburgh.

The programme attracts outstanding students from a variety of academic and professional backgrounds. The degree is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Programme structure

You will complete two core and two option courses, along with training in research methods. You will then complete a supervised, independently-researched dissertation on a topic of your choice.

Compulsory courses:

  • Cultures of the Book
  • Working with Collections

Option courses may include:

  • Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
  • Shakespeare's Sister: Archival Research and the Politics of the Canon
  • Sex and God in Victorian Poetry
  • Exploring the Novel
  • Censorship

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

  • the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
  • the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
  • advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with the detailed knowledge and research skills you need to progress to a research degree and continue a career in academia; or you may pursue a career in publishing, libraries, and the cultural heritage sector. You will graduate with a number of highly transferable skills in communication, project management and analysis that will give you an advantage, whatever your chosen career.



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During the nineteenth century, many of the features of modern cultural, social, and political life were established. This programme allows you to study literature in English with a focus on the Victorian period, placing texts in the context of massive upheaval. Read more

During the nineteenth century, many of the features of modern cultural, social, and political life were established. This programme allows you to study literature in English with a focus on the Victorian period, placing texts in the context of massive upheaval.

You’ll develop your understanding of research methods, improving your skills in preparation for writing the dissertation as well as for a range of careers. You’ll also choose from optional modules within the Victorian pathway – and you can take a broader approach with modules from across the School of English. Taught by leading researchers in their fields, you’ll be able to focus on your interests and explore new texts and contexts.

You’ll benefit from studying in a major nineteenth-century cultural and industrial centre, with all of the archives, museums, galleries and architecture the region has to offer. The family home of the Brontës is a short trip away in Haworth, and the city’s galleries and libraries contain substantial material to support your research.

Our extensive library resources help to make the University of Leeds a stimulating environment for critical thinking. The world-class Brotherton Library contains a wealth of archival, manuscript, and printed material in its Special Collections, including the original manuscript of Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel Sylvia’s Lovers (1864) and her only surviving manuscript diary. You’ll also find works, including much correspondence, by the Brontë family as well as extensive collections of letters to and from figures including Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, and Bram Stoker among others.

Course content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module which builds your knowledge of research methods in literary studies. You’ll also take the first of your three optional modules – at least one optional module must focus on the Victorian period, but you can choose up to two modules from across the range offered by the School of English if you want to expand your knowledge in different directions. You’ll take your two remaining optional modules in the following semester.

Throughout the programme you’ll gain specialist knowledge in areas that suit your interests as well as improving your skills in research and analysis. You’ll demonstrate these qualities when you submit your dissertation by the end of the programme in September – an independent research project on a Victorian literary topic of your choice.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Studying English: Research Methods 30 credits
  • Research Project 60 credits

Optional modules

  • The Brontes 30 credits
  • Victorian New Media 30 credits
  • Apprentices to Life: The Nineteenth-Century Bildungsroman 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature (Victorian pathway) MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read English Literature (Victorian pathway) MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

You’ll generally have two-hour weekly seminars in each module where you discuss the themes and issues arising from your reading, and you’ll be able to enhance your learning by attending the wide range of research seminars and talks by visiting speakers that we arrange throughout the year. You’ll also benefit from supervisions throughout semester 2 with your dissertation supervisor.

However, independent study is a vital part of the degree as it allows you to build your skills and explore your own ideas.

Assessment

We use different assessment methods, but most of your modules will be assessed by a single 4,000 word essay, which you submit at the end of the semester. Your research project or dissertation is usually between 12,000 and 15,000 words. During the year you may also be expected to give presentations on your reading during seminars, or submit unassessed essays to get feedback on your work.

Career opportunities

This programme will equip you with a wide range of advanced transferable skills which are valuable in a wide range of careers.

You’ll be a confident researcher who can work independently as well as within a team. You’ll be a strong communicator, both verbally and in writing, and be able to think critically and analytically. In addition, you’ll have a strong level of cultural and critical awareness, and you’ll be able to look at a situation from different points of view.

All of these qualities are attractive to employers across sectors, and you’ll be well equipped to pursue a career in a wide range of fields depending on your interests. These could include teaching, journalism, publishing, advertising, broadcasting and law. Many of our graduates also progress to PhD-level study and you’ll be in a good position to develop a career in academia.

Careers support

Leeds for Life is our unique approach to helping you make the most of University by supporting your academic and personal development. Find out more at the Leeds for Life website.

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you’ll explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies. Read more

The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you’ll explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies.

Core modules will improve your research skills and introduce you to key concepts and issues in social and cultural history. You’ll also choose from a wide range of optional modules, allowing you to focus on societies and periods that interest you.

You could study apartheid in South Africa, communities and castes in India, birth and death in medieval Europe or social movements in the USA. You’ll be able to focus on gender, race and religion as well as other issues that have shaped the lives of individuals and communities.

Taught by expert researchers within the School of History and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute, this programme uses the latest approaches and thinking in social and cultural history to give you an insight into the lives of others.

We have a wealth of resources allowing you to explore topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library and its Special Collections contain a huge number of early printed, archive and manuscript materials including the Liddle Collection on the First and Second World Wars, Leeds Library of Vernacular Culture, manuscript and commonplace books, travel journals and one of the best collections of cookery books and household manuals in the country.

Extensive collections of national, regional and local newspapers from over the years are available on microfilm, as well as cartoons and satirical prints from the British Museum and extensive collections of letters and correspondence. There’s even the Yorkshire Fashion Archive and M&S Archive on campus, allowing you to gain a real insight into popular culture over time.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months.

Course content

From the beginning of the programme you’ll study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you’ll also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You’ll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the ‘Making History: Archive Collaborations’ optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You’ll be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You’ll submit this by the end of the programme in September.

If you choose to study part-time, you’ll study over a longer period and take fewer modules in each year.

Course structure

These are typical modules/components studied and may change from time to time. Read more in our Terms and conditions.

Compulsory modules

  • Research Methodology in History 30 credits
  • Dissertation (Social and Cultural) 60 credits
  • Concepts and Debates in Social and Cultural History 30 credits

Optional modules

  • Making History: Archive Collaborations 30 credits
  • Gender, Sex, and Love: Byzantium and the West, 900-1200 30 credits
  • Reformation(s): Belief and Culture in Early Modern Europe 30 credits
  • Medicine and Warfare in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 30 credits
  • Defending the Nation: Britain during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, 1793 to 1815 30 credits
  • India since 1947: Community, Caste and Political Violence 30 credits
  • Sexuality and Disease in African History 30 credits
  • Contesting Patriarchy: Debating Gender Justice in Colonial and Post-Colonial India.30 credits
  • Latin America and the Caribbean from Rebellion to Revolution, 1765-1845 30 credits
  • Insurgency and Counterinsurgency 30 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Cultural History MA Full Time in the course catalogue

For more information on typical modules, read Social and Cultural History MA Part Time in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

We use a range of teaching and learning methods. The majority of your modules will be taught through weekly seminars, where you’ll discuss issues and themes in your chosen modules with a small group of students and your tutors. Independent study is also crucial to this degree, giving you the space to shape your own studies and develop your skills.

Assessment

We use different types of assessment to help you develop a wide range of skills, including presentations, research proposals, case studies and essays, depending on the subjects you choose.

Career opportunities

This programme will heighten your cultural and social awareness as well as allowing you to build your historical knowledge. You’ll also gain high-level research, analysis and communication skills that will prove valuable in a wide range of careers.

Graduates have found success in a wide range of careers in education, research and the private sector. Many others have continued with their studies at PhD level.



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This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. Read more

This programme draws together teaching from a wide range of disciplines, investigating the application of computational technologies to the arts, humanities and cultural heritage. We study the impact of these techniques on cultural heritage, museums, libraries, archives and digital culture while developing skills that employers and students tell us are needed.

About this degree

Our students develop an advanced understanding of digital resources, techniques and computational methods relevant to research and practice in the humanities and cultural heritage sectors; these include programming, XML, databases, internet technologies, image capture and digitisation. They receive both practical and theoretical training to develop a unique and critical skill set suitable for many types of employment or advanced study.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), a research dissertation (60 credits) and a work placement.

A Postgraduate Diploma, five core modules (75 credits), three optional modules (45 credits), full-time nine months or flexible study up to 5 years, is offered.

A Postgraduate Certificate, four from any of the available modules (60 credits), full-time fifteen weeks or flexible study up to two years, is offered.

Core modules

  • Digital Resources in the Humanities
  • Internet Technologies
  • Introduction to Programming and Scripting
  • Server Programming and Structured Data
  • XML

Optional modules

Students choose three optional modules from a list which may include the following: 

  • Affective Interaction
  • Computer Music
  • Cultural Heritage and Development
  • Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
  • Electronic Publishing
  • Fundamentals of Information Science
  • Geographical Information Systems
  • Historical Bibliography
  • Interaction Design
  • Systems Management
  • Introduction to Digital Curation
  • Introduction to Digitisation
  • Knowledge Representation and Semantic Technologies
  • Legal and Social Aspects of Electronic Publishing
  • Manuscript Studies
  • Research Software Engineering with Python
  • Research Skills for Spatial Analysis
  • Systems Management
  • The Anthropology of Social Media
  • User-centred Evaluation Methods

Optional modules are offered subject to availability, and students may be required to fulfil specific prerequisites.

Dissertation/report

All MA/MSc students undertake an independent research project in the form of a 12,000-word dissertation.

Teaching and learning

The programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, demonstrations, seminars and practical sessions, and will include a work placement in a relevant organisation. Assessment is through a mixture of essays, practical projects, programming exercises, written technical examinations, and group work projects, depending on the options chosen.

Placement

Students undertake a 4-6 week work placement as part of their programme of study. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: Digital Humanities MA/MSc

Careers

The cultural heritage sector is increasingly aware of the need to provide and manage digital material and projects with institutions and museums investing heavily in online content. Our graduates develop a unique skill set and are well placed for project management, further research, or a career in e-commerce and the fast growing digital field. Our alumni have found employment in the British Museum, Oxford University, UNESCO, International Red Cross, Knowledge 4 All Foundation, and the British Medical Journal, in roles as diverse as web editor, chief operating officer, and senior digital marketing executive. Several have also progressed to fully-funded research degrees; others have further developed their technical skills and have been recruited as programmers and developers for both academic and commercial projects.

Employability

The MA/MSc in Digital Humanities is a unique and groundbreaking programme that gives students the skills that they and employers tell us are needed. In this truly interdisciplinary programme, with optional modules offered across UCL, our students receive an exceptional blend of practical and theoretical skills that are in great demand. The work placement gives our students the opportunity to put theory into practice and gain invaluable experience of the workplace in this fast-moving environment. As well as the practical and technical skills of programming and other digital tools, they are equipped with a critical and analytical mindset and are well positioned to go on to pursue careers that focus on collaborative, innovative and creative thinking.

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

This MA/MSc is a truly interdisciplinary programme, and students can capitalise on UCL's world-leading strengths in information studies, computer science, the arts and humanities, and social and historical studies.

Students benefit from research teaching delivered by leading scholars and the excellent range of facilities available, including the UCL Library Special Collections, UCL Museums & Collections, and the UCLDH Digitisation Suite. Teaching by academic staff is supplemented by guest lectures given by experienced practitioners and expert industry professionals.

Students take advantage of our collaboration with many internationally important cultural heritage institutions including the British Museum and the British Library. Students undertake a work placement, where they have the opportunity to make professional contacts and gain invaluable experience, putting what they have learnt into practice. Past placement hosts have included the British Museum; British Library; Marx Memorial Library; Islington Museum; the Postal Museum; Ken Saro-Wiwa Foundation; Ubiquity Press; SOAS, University of London; UCL Grant Museum; and The Warburg Institute.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: Information Studies

68% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Course content. The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. Read more

Course content

The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. It is possible to write prose fiction (the novel or short story), poetry and drama. We are interested in literary fiction in all its forms.

Our MA Creative writing students 'read as writers', explore their reading in group discussions and engage in writing exercises designed to enlarge and stimulate their practice.

In the intensive MA workshops, students share work, learn to write to deadlines, learn how to redraft, polish, edit imaginatively and find the creative thread which, when followed, reveals how their own writing will achieve its optimum level.

All written assignments are accompanied by the writing of a commentary on the process; the commentary speeds and makes explicit a writer's discoveries, and so aids future practice.

Recent guest readers include: Simon Brett, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Vicki Feaver, Ed Hogan, Susanna Jones, Adam Marek, Bernard O'Donoghue, Michele Roberts, Jo Shapcott, Robert Shearman, Matthew Sweeney and Nick Warburton.

Our facilities

Over the past few years, we’ve redeveloped both of our campuses so that you have the best facilities available for your degree. We pride ourselves on the quality of the learning environment we can offer our students.

At the Bishop Otter campus there is an integrated approach to the provision of learning resources and support. We offer a substantial collection of books, journals and other materials to help you further your research. A range of study areas for group and quiet study including Wi-Fi areas for laptop use are available, or you can use our open access PC and Mac areas. We use an electronic learning environment with an expanding portfolio of online library resources from anywhere at any time.

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished. On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

  • 130 open access PC workstations
  • 45 Apple iMacs
  • Ample printing facilities
  • Netbooks available on loan
  • Professional editing suites
  • Media loans counter
  • Wi-Fi and plug points throughout

Where this can take you

Many of our writers go on to publish and win prizes. For instance, Isabel Ashdown's novel Glasshopper, written during the MA, was hailed as one of the five best debut novels of 2009 in The Observer. MA graduate Wendy French won the £5000 2010 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. These are just two recent examples of the success of our graduates.

The annual Publishing Panel of six specialists has regularly welcomed literary agents from agencies such as David Godwin Associates, Rogers, Coleridge and White, United Artists, Greene & Heaton, Janklow and Nesbitt, RAFT and Lucy Luck Associates. Agents join literary editors for a discussion of the publishing world today and how to approach an agent or editor. We have welcomed literary editors from Penguin/Hamish Hamilton, Chatto&Windus, Myriad Editions, Simon & Schuster, Pighog Press, the Frogmore Papers and producers from BBC Radio.

Indicative modules

The MA comprises four taught modules and a creative dissertation:

  • The Writing Studio enables writers to experiment in any genre prose, poetry or drama, while exploring key features of those genres. This first module also serves as induction to the MA and to the distinctive methods of the 'Chichester workshop'.
  • Metaphor and the Imagination encourages innovation and experimentation, pushing writers beyond their usual boundaries.
  • Sources and Transformations engages writers with the essential writerly skills of transforming both outer research and inner biographical concerns into fiction.
  • Launching the Manuscript encourages autonomy, sustaining the longer project, learning about the publishing industry and includes guest readers and the publishing panel.

The Manuscript (a creative dissertation of 20,000) allows writers to develop a longer piece of work through one to one tutorials with a tutor as a consultant reader.

Teaching and assessment

To gain a Postgraduate Diploma in Creative Writing, students need to complete four modules. Each module is assessed by an assignment of approximately 6,000 words or equivalent.

To gain an MA in Creative Writing, students need to complete all four modules and a dissertation of 20,000 words (or poetry/drama equivalents).



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“One of the greatest pleasures of my working life continues to be the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University – a department with a real sense of family, achievement and celebration, and an ethos of nurturing and innovation.”. Read more
“One of the greatest pleasures of my working life continues to be the Manchester Writing School at Manchester Metropolitan University – a department with a real sense of family, achievement and celebration, and an ethos of nurturing and innovation.”
Carol Ann Duffy – Poet Laureate and Creative Director of the Manchester Writing School

At the heart of the Manchester Writing School are our Masters programmes in Creative Writing, available to study on campus in Manchester, and also from anywhere in the world via online distance learning.

On our Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programme, you will explore and practice techniques and styles of modern and contemporary writing and apply these through the development of your own full-length book. MFA students undertake all of the elements of our MA Creative Writing programme (a taught element blending writing workshops with reading units, an elective, and a dissertation), then take an additional unit about the publishing industry and submit a full-length manuscript: a completed novel, poetry collection, book for children or young adults, or book about place. The MFA is available to complete over two years full-time or three years part-time/online.

You will be introduced to professionals from the publishing industries – agents, editors, publishers and publicists – and the School has strong links with many major arts, educational and cultural organisations. Our MFA model is unparalleled in coaching students through the development and completion of a full-length book under the sustained guidance of distinguished, practising writers and seeing those students achieve success in publishing.

You will specialise in one of the following routes:
-Novel Writing (including Short Fiction)
-Poetry Writing
-Writing for Children & Young Adults
-Place Writing

Applications are also welcome from those already holding an MA in Creative Writing (180 credits) – from Manchester Metropolitan or other universities – who would like to top-up to an MFA by taking an additional 120 credits (including the Manuscript unit).

Placement options

The Manchester Writing School is one the UK’s leading schools of creative writing. It is also home to ground-breaking outreach activities, international writing competitions, series of city-wide literary events, innovative publishing projects, and the Manchester Children’s Book Festival. These activities provide our students with many opportunities to get involved and develop their experience in a number of exciting directions.

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The MA in Medieval Studies allows study in medieval history, literature and manuscript studies. This interdisciplinary programme enables students to study the Medieval period from a range of different subject disciplines that embraces History, English, Theology, Celtic studies and Archaeology. Read more
The MA in Medieval Studies allows study in medieval history, literature and manuscript studies.

Course Overview

This interdisciplinary programme enables students to study the Medieval period from a range of different subject disciplines that embraces History, English, Theology, Celtic studies and Archaeology.

There are two compulsory modules that can be taken in the first or second semester, Research Methodology and Studying the Medieval. Research methods introduces students to the nuts and bolts of research, bibliographical and archival sources. ‘

'Studying the medieval' builds on this foundation to look more closely at record sources for Medieval Studies and at aspects of the study of medieval manuscripts, such as iconography and typology. This module is based in large part on the University’s special collections in the Roderick Bowen Library and Archives; unique in Wales this offers our students close and unrivalled access to our medieval manuscripts and early printed books

Students may then choose 4 further modules in medieval history (such as ‘Thomas Becket: archbishop, martyr, saint’) or medieval literature (such as ‘Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxon Heroic’).

For MA students the second part of the course comprises a 60 credit dissertation.

Modules

-‘Research Methodology’ (bibliographical and archival content)
-‘Studying the Medieval’ (medieval primary sources; manuscript study)
-‘The Cistercian World’ (medieval monasticism)
-‘Thomas Becket: archbishop, martyr, saint’ (medieval church history and hagiography)
-‘Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxon Heroic’ (medieval literature)

Key Features

The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter or via VLE and online learning technologies. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed researchers.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-The option to complete the full programme remotely through online and distance learning

Assessment

The individual modules (all 20 credit) are assessed by written assignments: essays, commentaries, short exercises. Those registering for or progressing to the MA complete a dissertation of 60 credits.

Career Opportunities

-Museum
-Archives
-Heritage sector
-Professional Writers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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The Medieval Literatures and Cultures MSc at Edinburgh is a flexible programme, allowing for either a specifically literary focus or a broader ranging and interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages. Read more

The Medieval Literatures and Cultures MSc at Edinburgh is a flexible programme, allowing for either a specifically literary focus or a broader ranging and interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages.

Edinburgh hosts a thriving medieval research culture. This flexible programme gives you the chance to draw on the broad range of academic expertise you’ll find here, and take advantage of the seminar series and other resources offered by our Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

You will gain a grounding in the advanced literary study of the European Middle Ages and the principles of manuscript study. Through option courses and a research project, you will have the opportunity to deepen your particular medieval interests, drawing on our strengths in the languages and literatures of medieval Europe, from medieval French and Latin to, for example, old Norse, old Irish and Middle English.

You will also have access to the impressive collections of the University, the National Library of Scotland, the National Museum of Scotland, the National Archives and the National Galleries.

Programme structure

You will take part in seminars and workshops, carried out over two semesters, followed by your independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

  • Reading the Middle Ages
  • Working with Pre-Modern Manuscripts

Option courses include those from the fields of history, Scottish studies, art history and divinity, as well as a variety of European literatures. Courses may include:

  • The Sources of Medieval History
  • Global Encounters in Medieval Art
  • Medieval Men and Masculinities
  • Chivalry and Crusade in Medieval France
  • Medieval Welsh Literature
  • Old Norse

Learning outcomes

You will gain a grounding in the concepts and genres that are key to advanced literary study of the European Middle Ages, and be introduced to the principles of manuscript study. The option courses and independent dissertation enable you to develop and deepen your particular medieval interests.

Career opportunities

The flexibility of focus this programme offers makes it an ideal foundation for advanced study, potentially leading to an academic career. Teaching or curatorship roles in cultural institutions are alternative career pathways, while the transferable skills you gain in communication, project management and presentation will prove a valuable asset to employers in any field.



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The MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture is an intensive one-year taught programme offering an all-round introduction to the literature of the 16. Read more

The MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture is an intensive one-year taught programme offering an all-round introduction to the literature of the 16th and 17th centuries, with particular focus on the work of William Shakespeare.

Highlights

  • Develop your skills as a researcher within a specific area of study by taking special topic modules in manuscript, print, speech and the editing of Renaissance texts. 
  • Become part of a welcoming and lively academic community. St Andrews is a consortium member of the Folger Shakespeare Library Institute in Washington DC and also hosts a number of research groups relevant to the English Renaissance.
  • Explore the key developments in modern and contemporary literary studies in dialogue with leading scholars in the fields of Shakespeare studies, Shakespearean book history, Renaissance popular literature and 17th-century literary culture.

Teaching format

Taught modules are comprised of weekly seminars and cover both elite and popular writing, the influence of other continental vernaculars, and the importance of print and manuscript media. Class sizes typically range from three to ten students.

Modules are assessed through coursework essays. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary.

During the course of the year, but with particular focus during the last four months, students will research and write a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choosing.

Further particulars regarding curriculum development.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment. For more details of each module, including weekly contact hours, teaching methods and assessment, please see the latest module catalogue which is for the 2017–2018 academic year; some elements may be subject to change for 2018 entry.



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About the program. The Bond University Master of Sports Science is designed to develop specialist knowledge and skills relating to strength and conditioning and high performance science of elite athletes. Read more

About the program

The Bond University Master of Sports Science is designed to develop specialist knowledge and skills relating to strength and conditioning and high performance science of elite athletes.

The program is suitable for graduates in exercise and sports science aspiring for a career in high performance sport, or for established professionals such as domestic and international strength and conditioning coaches, or high performance managers seeking professional updates.

This unique program places a strong emphasis on comprehensive practical experience and industry immersion, including a two semester full-time professional internship under the mentorship of a sports scientist.

Completed in only 1 year and 4 months (4 semesters), the first two semesters are comprised of specialist on-campus coursework, followed by the internship which incorporates applied sports science /strength and conditioning practice and a research component. This component is undertaken within a professional or semi-professional sporting organisation with whom Bond University has agreements for student internships. Alternatively, students may elect to undertake their internship with an external organisation or employer relative to their field of work, with prior approval from Bond University.  

The program will culminate with the submission of a peer-reviewed manuscript that may be eligible for publication, providing an additional pathway for you to progress to further postgraduate research.

The program provides you with exposure to authentic high performance sports science learning both on campus and in industry. The coursework component is delivered primarily at the world-class Bond Institute of Health & Sport, where you will gain exceptional, high-quality practical experience in our high performance gym, health science laboratories and sports science research laboratories. You will have access to specialised technology used in research to deliver a wide range of athlete testing and performance analysis. These facilities provide sports science testing and training services to a variety of elite and sub-elite athletes, providing an exceptional learning experience. 

Professional outcomes

The Master of Sports Science will enable you to apply knowledge and practical experience in high performance sports science across all levels of national and international sport.

Possible career opportunities include, but are not limited to:

  • Sports Scientist/ Strength and Conditioning Specialist positions in professional sport, working with teams or individual athletes
  • Sports Scientist/ Strength and Conditioning Specialist positions in national and international sporting organisations
  • Development officer for professional sporting and health orientated organisations
  • Corporate and community health and fitness consultant
  • Health promotion/ lifestyle consultant
  • Athletic/ sports program coordinator

Successful graduates may be eligible to progress to further post graduate research, leading to potential career options in research organisations and academia.

Structure and subjects

The Master of Sports Science consists of a specialised coursework and integrated research and internship model.

You must complete all of the following subjects:

Semester 1

Semester 2

Semester 3

Semester 4

*Subject names and structure may change 

Teaching methodology

The Master of Sports Science program uses a teaching methodology that involves a combination of lectures, tutorials, seminars, examinations, projects, presentations, assignments, computer labs and industry projects. Examination formats may include objective structure practical examinations, theory papers, assignments and oral presentations. The program will culminate with the submission of a peer-reviewed manuscript that may be eligible for publication. 

During coursework, you will be primarily located at the Bond Institute of Health and Sport, within the Cbus Stadium sporting precinct at Robina.

Internship and research

A unique feature of this program is the completion of an integrated professional placement and internship, under the mentorship of a sports scientist. This internship is completed full-time for 2 semesters, at a minimum of 500 hours with an elite sport organisation.

Bond University has affiliations with national and international elite sporting organisations and professional sports teams.

* Students intending to apply should be aware of the following: You may be required to attend internships with organisations in locations other than the Gold Coast region.These placements may involve additional associated costs (i.e. accommodation and travel) for which you will be responsible.

Research

Bond University has a burgeoning profile in health and sports science research. Major investment in infrastructure including the ‘Bond Institute of Health and Sport’ have fostered collaborations between ‘bench top’ scientists and practitioners, providing opportunities for innovative research.

Bond University is the lead institution for the Collaborative Research Network (CRN) for Advancing Exercise and Sports Science CRNAESS). The CRN-AESS brings together partners from key research and sports science institutions including the Australian Institute of Sport building research capacity and excellence in exercise and sports science, human genetics and bioinformatics, to better understand health, human performance and injury management.



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The aim of this course is to give you the opportunity to have an overall view and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Read more
The aim of this course is to give you the opportunity to have an overall view and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Its diachronic and interdisciplinary nature enables you to examine the elements which characterise Hellenic culture through the centuries, at the same time helping you to acquire a deeper knowledge of a certain period and discipline; including philosophy, history, law, religion, theatre, language, literature, papyrology and palaeography.

The Hellenic Institute, established in 1993, brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royall Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, based largely in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, but also in the Department of Drama and Theatre, and Byzantine Studies, which have always found a home in the Department of History.

It aims to consolidate existing strengths and to extend them by promoting the study of the Hellenic traditional across the centuries from archaic and classical Greece, through the Byzantine period, to the modern world.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mahistoryhellenicstudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Hellenic Institute seeks to bring together at a national and international level all those who share its interests. We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Institute of Historical Research and the Warburg Institute, as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.

- We maintain links with universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus. Scholars from the Universities of Athens, Ioannina and Cyprus regularly visit the Institute as part of collaborative research, offering their expertise to our students and members of staff.

- The Institute organises a range of lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and other events for students, scholars and the wider public, giving the opportunity to engage with experts in the field.

- We receive funding in support of our activities from the Ministries of Culture and Education of the Hellenic Republic, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, the A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), The Friends of the Hellenic Institute and private donors.

- The Institute offers a number of annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards in support of its students.

Department research and industry highlights

Collaborative research includes:
- Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus
- Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts
- Byzantine Autographs
- A Catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library
- The Porphyrogenitus Project: Lexicon of Abbreviations and Ligatures in Greek
- Minuscule Hands, c.800-c.1600
- Lexicon of Terms used in Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics
- Triadic Monarchy: The Concept of Monarchy in the Triadology of the Greek Fathers -
- Ecclesiological Repercussions and the Monastic Model
- The Greek Population of Rhodes under Hospitaller Rule
- The Greek Community in London, 1500-1945.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of Hellenic Studies and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

- an awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information

- a general appreciation of the varied and interlinked methodologies for understanding Greek antiquity, Byzantium, the post-Byzantine period and the Modern Greek world

- the reading and understanding of ancient, medieval and modern Greek texts, both in print and in manuscript

- a grasp of literary criticism necessary for understanding and appreciating the style of ancient, medieval and modern Greek authors

- an awareness of the main forms of material available to those studying Classical antiquity, the Byzantine, Post-Byzantine and Modern Greek world.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers, museum staff and teachers in secondary education. A considerable number of our graduates pursue MPhil/PhD studies in the field of Greek History and Culture at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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