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This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more
This course will help and encourage you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of literary non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. The programme, located in the School of Humanities and Cultural Industries, has become established as one of the leading courses of its kind.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

The MA in Creative Writing is concerned with imaginative writing, which includes novels, short stories, poetry and non-fiction. The emphasis is upon encouragement, to help you to find and pursue a direction in your writing, and to understand the process of offering a manuscript for publication.

Because of the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who, every year, form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers. Frequent visits by other writers, literary agents, publishers, broadcasters and other professionals connected with writing ensure that students are given plentiful advice about how to place work and make decisions about their careers as writers.

The course is not for the writer whose only interest is in their own work, but rather for the writer who can benefit from working closely with fellow students and with tutors, many of whom are practising and published writers.

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.

It is implicit in the course philosophy that critical reading aids the development of writers. Workshops, in which you look constructively at each other’s writing, and context modules, to study the ways in which writers meet certain challenges, are integral parts of the course.

MODULES

The full MA programme consists of two writing workshops, two context modules and the Manuscript (a double module):

Workshop One - You can either start with a general writing workshop in which you experiment with a range of forms, or a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Workshop Two - This is a specialist workshop in prose fiction or poetry.

Context Modules - These modules examine genres and look at ways in which writers meet challenges from the public world. At least five of the following are offered each term:

• Writing and the Environmental Crisis
• Suspense Fiction
• Contemporary American Writing
• The Writer and Place
• Modernism and Postmodernism
• Writing and Gender
• The Short Story
• Writing and Politics
• Reviewing and Journalism
• Narrative Non-Fiction
• Genres of Television Drama
• The Love Story
• Writing for Young People

The Manuscript - For this module each student brings a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. You are assigned a specialist tutor.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

Students take two three-hour seminars a week for the workshop and context modules. The Manuscript is completed between June and September. Students meet tutors regularly during this period. A residential writing weekend is an essential part of the course.

TUTORS

Tutors include prestigious, best selling and award winning writers, such as Gerard Woodward (novelist and poet); Tim Liardet (poet); Tessa Hadley (novelist); Andrew Miller (novelist); Carrie Etter (poet); Samantha Harvey (novelist); Steve May (radio dramatist, playwright and novelist); Richard Kerridge (nature writer); Paul Evans (nature writer); Lucy English (novelist and poet); Mimi Thebo (novelist); Jonathan Neale (novelist, dramatist and non-fiction writer); Tricia Wastvedt (novelist); Celia Brayfield (novelist); Jenni Mills (novelist); Neil Rollinson (poet). In addition you will have the opportunity to meet a wide range of writers, publishers and literary agents.

VISITING WRITERS

Readings and seminars conducted by writers are built into the programme. Visiting writers have included Moniza Alvi, John Burnside, Stevie Davies, Helen Dunmore, Roy Fisher, Peter Flannery, Nick Hornby, Michael Hulse, Emyr Humphreys, Kathleen Jamie, Mimi Khalvati, Toby Litt, Tony Lopez, Benjamin Markovits, Les A. Murray, Tim Pears, Ashley Pharoah, D.B.C. Pierre, Jem Poster, Philip Pullman, Fiona Sampson, Michael Schmidt, Matthew Sweeney and Fay Weldon. There will also be visits from publishers, literary agents and broadcasters. Every year there are opportunities to show work to agents and editors who visit.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

Assessment is by coursework only. Each writing workshop is assessed on the basis of a folder of creative writing and an early draft of part of the Manuscript. Each context module is assessed on the basis of an essay and a folder of creative responses. The Manuscript is 35,000–40,000 words (or the equivalent for poetry and scriptwriting).

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This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children’s writing. Read more
This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children’s writing. It is supported by visiting speakers from the children’s publishing world, including agents, editors, publishers and authors.

Leading Children's Literary Agent Jodie Marsh (United Agents) offers an annual prize for the 'most promising writer for young people'. We have an excellent track record of graduates achieving publication. Novels by Gill Lewis, Sam Gayton, Elen Caldecott, Jim Carrington, Alex Diaz, Marie-Louise Jensen, Sally Nicholls, Maudie Smith, Che Golden, C.J. Skuse and Sarah Hammond and picture books by Karen Hughes have all been published in the last five years. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children's Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were both shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize, and Elen was longlisted for the Carnegie award for How Kirsty Jenkins Stole the Elephant.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is for writers for children of all ages, from the picture-book age through to adolescent and ‘crossover’ writing which aims at markets among adults as well as young people. Though prose fiction is likely to be the main area studied, students will have the chance to look at writing in all forms, including poetry, picture book texts and non-fiction.

The course supports students to create a significant body of writing, with practical plans for its place in the real world of publishing. It is based on the principle that most writers learn and benefit from working closely with their fellow writers, in a disciplined supportive setting, and with tutors who are practising and published writers in their field.

MODULES

Writing Workshops - In the first semester’s writing workshop you will explore a variety of formats and approaches, gaining a sense of the different age- ranges and forms. This is also an introduction to the writing workshop experience which is the heart of the course. In the second semester’s workshop you will be asked to choose your area of writing, and use the workshop’s feedback and encouragement to explore it in more depth. Full-time students take one writing workshop in Semester One and one in Semester Two. Part-time students take one workshop each year.

Context Modules - Each full-time student takes one of these in the first semester and one in the second semester. The first semester’s context module, Writing for Young People: Forms, Ages and Stages, is concerned with the writer’s relationship with their audience, a sense of the history of and issues raised by children’s writing. The second semester’s module looks at Contemporary Children’s Publishing, and aims to give a realistic grasp of the choices open to new writers in the field. Part-time students take one of these context modules in each year of study.

Manuscript - This is the development of a manuscript as near to publishable quality as possible. It is supported by tutorials with a manuscript supervisor. It may be a novel, a book of stories, a collection of poems or picture book texts.

TEACHING METHODS AND RESOURCES

The course is modular and offered for full and part-time study. Part-time students take the same course over a two-year period, taking one module each semester. Students complete four taught modules (two writing workshops and two context modules) plus a manuscript (double module).

Modules are normally taught via tutor-led writing workshops, organised in 11 weekly three-hour sessions on the Corsham Court campus. The manuscript is taught via one-to-one tutorials, working with a tutor with particular knowledge of your field of work. Throughout the course, there will be special events to bring in writers to discuss their work, plus literary agents and editors with practical advice on the publishing process. Our current writer in residence is Marcus Sedgwick.

TUTORS

This course is taught by publishing writers and depending on timetables will include:

• Julia Green: her novels for young adults include Blue Moon, Baby Blue and Hunter’s Heart (Puffin), Breathing Underwater, Drawing with Light and Bringing the Summer (Bloomsbury)and her most recent novel for younger children is Tilly’s Moonlight Fox (Oxford University Press).
• Steve May: author of Dazzer Plays On and One Chance (Egmont).
• Jonathan Neale: his novels for children are Lost at Sea and Himalaya.
• Mimi Thebo: author of Wipe Out, Hit the Road Jack, Get Real (Harper Collins); Drawing Together (Walker).
• Steve Voake: his novels include The Dreamwalker’s Child, The Web of Fire, The Starlight Conspiracy, Blood Hunters, Fightback and Dark Woods (Faber & Faber), plus his Daisy Dawson and Hooey Higgins series for younger readers (Walker Books).
• Children’s publishing industry specialists John Mclay and Janine Amos

ASSESSMENT METHODS

The assessed coursework for each Writing Workshop is a folder of creative writing. For the first Context Module the coursework is an essay of approximately 2,500 words and a folder of creative responses. The second context module is assessed by a portfolio of writing tasks connected to the children’s publishing industry, including two book proposals. The manuscript is 35,000-40,000 words, or the equivalent in poetry or picture book texts.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Most of our students want a career as a published children’s author, and many have gone on to achieve this. Others have found work in the children’s publishing industry, or in libraries, bookshops and teaching or other work with young people.

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This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. Read more
This is a programme for practising writers who wish to improve their craft, learn about contemporary forms of writing and continue to reflect on their progress. This is in both terms of a distinctive philosophy of writing (to answer the question, ‘What kind of writer am I?’), and in terms of the practicalities of making creative work public.

You should have some experience of writing fiction, poetry or prose (although there is not a requirement for this work to have been published), or scriptwriting, and wish to further your skills within the academic context of creative writing as an academic discipline. You will work with a core team of professional writers and other professionals to develop your creative work and nurture an understanding about the nature of your continuing creativity, aiming towards producing a final manuscript for possible publication.

What will I study?

You will begin straight away to experience the benefits of the regular workshops that form an integral part of the programme. You will discuss the work of others on the MA as well as learning from their discussion of your work. You will also receive tutor feedback.

You will study a variety of contemporary literature which will feed into your writing where needed, along with a study of the poetics of contemporary writers (that is, the things writers have written about their own writing philosophies and practices). The aim is to influence your practical development, allowing you to develop your own poetics and philosophy of composition.

In the first weeks of the course you will research markets and outlets for your work and complete submissions of your writing. You will also compile a professional development audit of your activities so far (which may not be extensive, of course). You will be asked to keep a log throughout the programme to enable you to track your development.

How will I study?

The writing workshops are always taught in small groups, but the discussion groups involve seminars with a lecture component.

During the manuscript module (a dissertation) you will work one-to-one with your manuscript supervisor, bringing your months of study to a final creative fruition. All the modules you will take have been designed specifically for writers.

This is not the kind of ‘Creative Writing’ course that requires you to pick from already existing English Literature modules. The modules have been custom-designed for you.

How will I be assessed?

You will present your creative writing with a short example of poetics relating to the piece. You will write about works of contemporary literature and about the poetics of these writers, though you will approach these tasks from the perspective of a fellow-writer. All this work will help you develop towards the final piece of work, The Manuscript. The professional development audit and logs will be marked on a pass / fail basis.

Who will be teaching me?

A team of seven, with extensive experience in poetry, fiction, non-fiction, short stories and scriptwriting teach on the programme. The team will be complemented by visiting speakers and visiting writers.

What are my career prospects?

The thinking behind the professional development strand is that writers seldom exclusively work as writers, but need to learn to combine their principal involvement and passion for literary composition with other activities (whether they are of a literary nature or not).

Of course, as a Masters in a humanities subject you will find this qualification useful in a variety of professional contexts, such as in school teaching, which encourages staff to work at Masters level. It provides a sound basis for further study (e.g. PhD work in Creative Writing).

Previous graduates have gone on to publish with major publishers, win prizes, edit magazines and books, and are active in the pedagogy of Creative Writing as a robust academic discipline.

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Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Read more
Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

Key Benefits

- A strong tradition of Shakespeare and early modern literary studies at King's

- Unique access to unparalleled collections at the British Library and to the expertise of world-class curators, who will teach the core module and supervise some dissertations

- Close links with the London Shakespeare Seminar, the London Renaissance Seminar, and with the Institute of English Studies

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/early-modern-english-literature-text-and-transmission-ma.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

This MA programme focuses on the transmission of key early modern literary texts makes it unlike any other programme of its kind. Transmission is understood both as the circulation of literary texts in manuscript and print and their reception. Students will therefore learn to read early modern handwriting, to transcribe neglected literary manuscripts and rare printed texts and to edit them for the modern reader.

By focusing on transmission, this MA programme will also make students aware of the impact of the materiality of the text and of the material conditions of its (re)production on its interpretation. The specific process whereby a literary text reaches its readers or its audience is always central to its interpretation.

The core module taught at the British Library is specifically designed to teach students how to search collections of early modern manuscripts and rare books held in major research libraries worldwide and how to identify the agents involved in their production, transmission and preservation in libraries and private collections.

- Course purpose -

Early Modern English Literature taught with the British Library; a unique opportunity to study early modern literary works, including Shakespeare, in light of recent critical approaches and as print and manuscript material artefacts. Ideal foundation for doctoral work and careers in the arts, education, curatorship and broadcasting.

- Course format and assessment -

Core and optional modules assessed by coursework, plus a dissertation.

Career propsects:

We expect some students will pursue PhD level study in the area, leading to a teaching or academic career. Other students will be ideally placed for jobs in the arts, creative and cultural industries, curatorship and broadcasting.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 21 universities worldwide (2016/17 QS World University Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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Based at the University’s internationally recognised Centre for the History of the Book, this programme brings together theory and practice to explore cultural history, intensive archival research and the latest intellectual developments in this specialised field. Read more

Programme description

Based at the University’s internationally recognised Centre for the History of the Book, this programme brings together theory and practice to explore cultural history, intensive archival research and the latest intellectual developments in this specialised field.

This programme provides an introduction to Book History as a concept and provides a general overview of the key developments in the field, tracing the movement from scribal culture to hand printing, from industrialisation to new technologies.

You will be taught by leading international experts, combining traditional bibliography, special collections training and advanced theoretical approaches, to advance your knowledge and practical skills.

As well as the major manuscript and printed collections held by the University, you will have access to the National Library of Scotland (which holds one of the most important collections for the study of bibliography in Europe).

Programme structure

Over two semesters, you will complete two compulsory and two option courses, along with a course in research methods, followed by an independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Cultures of the Book
Working with Collections
Option courses may include:

Working with Pre-modern Manuscripts
Expanding the Book: Image and Literacy in Valois France
Print Culture and the Enlightenment: Edinburgh and London, 1710-1814
Working with Pre-modern Manuscripts
Critical Theory: Issues and Debates
Digital Humanities for Literary Studies
Shakespeare Adapted
Poor Things: Capitalism, Reification and 20th Century Literature
Modernism: Text, Image, Object

Work placement/internship opportunities

Work placements allow students to take advantage of the exceptional resources in Edinburgh for the study of books in order to gain hands-on experience that will be beneficial in their future careers.

Placements may take place internally, for example in the Centre for Research Collections at the University Library, or externally with several partner organisations.

You will receive training from the placement supervisor, and will undertake well-defined projects in the course of your placement, such as cataloguing, conservation, collation, digitisation and other kinds of work.

You will reflect on your placement in a poster presentation, and it will provide material for an academic essay. Regular academic oversight of the work placement will be provided by the Course Organiser.

Learning outcomes

By the end of the programme, you will have a firm grasp of:

the extensive range of media forms and technologies, from manuscript to electronic text
the issues surrounding conservation, cataloguing, digitisation, and the display and management of collections
advanced archival research methodologies in manuscript and print

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During the nineteenth century, many of the features of modern cultural, social, and political life were established. This programme allows you to study literature in English with a focus on the Victorian period, placing texts in the context of massive upheaval. Read more

Overview

During the nineteenth century, many of the features of modern cultural, social, and political life were established. This programme allows you to study literature in English with a focus on the Victorian period, placing texts in the context of massive upheaval.

You’ll develop your understanding of research methods, improving your skills in preparation for writing the dissertation as well as for a range of careers. You’ll also choose from optional modules within the Victorian pathway – and you can take a broader approach with modules from across the School of English. Taught by leading researchers in their fields, you’ll be able to focus on your interests and explore new texts and contexts.

You’ll benefit from studying in a major nineteenth-century cultural and industrial centre, with all of the archives, museums, galleries and architecture the region has to offer. The family home of the Brontës is a short trip away in Haworth, and the city’s galleries and libraries contain substantial material to support your research.

Our extensive library resources help to make the University of Leeds a stimulating environment for critical thinking. The world-class Brotherton Library contains a wealth of archival, manuscript, and printed material in its Special Collections, including the original manuscript of Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel Sylvia’s Lovers (1864) and her only surviving manuscript diary. You’ll also find works, including much correspondence, by the Brontë family as well as extensive collections of letters to and from figures including Gaskell, Thackeray, Dickens, Henry James, Thomas Hardy, and Bram Stoker among others.

The degree is also available to study part-time over 24 months. The part-time MA may be of special interest to those who are working in related fields as part of their career development.

Course Content

In your first semester you’ll take a core module which builds your knowledge of research methods in literary studies. You’ll also take the first of your three optional modules – at least one optional module must focus on the Victorian period, but you can choose up to two modules from across the range offered by the School of English if you want to expand your knowledge in different directions. You’ll take your two remaining optional modules in the following semester.

Throughout the programme you’ll gain specialist knowledge in areas that suit your interests as well as improving your skills in research and analysis. You’ll demonstrate these qualities when you submit your dissertation by the end of the programme in September – an independent research project on a Victorian literary topic of your choice.

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The Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture MLitt offers an all-round introduction to the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries. Read more

MLitt in Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture

The Shakespeare and Renaissance Literary Culture MLitt offers an all-round introduction to the literature of the sixteenth and seventeenth-centuries. It covers both elite and popular writing, the influence of other continental vernaculars, and the importance of print and manuscript media. Students who choose to study at St Andrews will be taught by expert scholars in small groups. The School of English prides itself on its support of student work through detailed feedback and commentary.
Our aim is that students should leave the programme more fluent and accomplished writers than they entered it, better informed about the literature of the English Renaissance, and capable of producing interpretative prose of the highest quality.

• Fully explore the literature and culture of the English Renaissance (c. 1500-1700).
• A particular focus on the work of William Shakespeare.
• A range of critical and interpretative perspectives, selecting from a range of available module options.
• Manuscript, print, speech, and the editing of Renaissance texts.
• All foreign language texts will be taught in translation.

Teaching methods: Seminar.
Assessment: Coursework essays, Dissertation.
Contact hours: Weekly seminars for core modules, each lasting 90 minutes; for Special Topics, six hour-long meetings over the course of one semester.

Features

* Research excellence in all periods of English literature from Old English to the present day.

* Members of the School include winners of the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry, Whitbread Prize, T S Eliot Prize for Poetry, the Forward Poetry Prize, the Geoffrey Faber Prize, the Somerset Maugham Award, the Canongate Prize, the Petrarca Preis, the Prix Zepter Prize and a Commonwealth Writers Prize for fiction.

* St Andrews is one of only three universities outside the USA in the Folger Institute consortium.

Postgraduate community

The School has a vibrant postgraduate community of around 80 students (full and part time) with a dedicated administrator who manages and advises on all postgraduate matters from admissions queries to PhD vivas, ensuring continuity for both postgraduates and staff.

Postgraduates meet regularly at the School’s Postgraduate Forum and at various voluntary seminar series organised by English or other Schools within the Faculty of Arts. The crossfertilisation of ideas between traditional literary / theoretical research and creative writing provides a uniquely stimulating environment supporting the usual individual meetings between postgraduate students and their supervisors. All taught postgraduates have access to research funds to help offset the costs of attending conferences or other research libraries.

Students are part of a welcoming and lively academic community. There is an active student-run Literary Society and the Postgraduate Forum, where postgraduates meet to present and discuss their ongoing work. Each semester, the School invites distinguished visiting academics and creative writers to lead seminars, lectures and workshops as part of our regular research events.

Facilities

The teaching rooms and staff offices of the School of English are housed in two nineteenth-century stone buildings, Castle House
and Kennedy Hall, opposite St Andrews Castle and overlooking the sea. 66 North Street, the School’s dedicated Centre for research students, is only a few minutes’ walk away. It offers bench rooms with PC workstations for all postgraduates, both taught and research. This lovely nineteenth-century building also has a well-used kitchen, common room and sunny garden. The encouragement of postgraduate study is a special concern of ours, and the number of postgraduate students has grown markedly in recent years.

The University Library has outstanding resources for research in English. The Copyright Deposit Collection contains approximately 40,000 volumes, covering the whole subject area from 1709 to 1837, and approximately 5,000 volumes of periodicals which ceased publication before 1841. Some of this material is not held in the National Library of Scotland. The print collection therefore offers an impressive range of opportunities for research in eighteenth-century literature, the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism.

The University Library also subscribes to a wide variety of online databases, including JISC Historic Books for access to almost all printed books to 1800, and Defining Gender 1450- 1910 for material supporting the School’s work in gender and sexuality studies. Manuscript collections extend from mediaeval archives through some of the world’s most detailed records of eighteenth and nineteenth-century reading to the papers of the contemporary poet Douglas Dunn. Postgraduates have the opportunity to work with expert Library staff in areas ranging from palaeography to digital humanities.

Additional application information

All MLitt applicants should submit a sample of written work of around 2,000 words. This must be a critical academic essay (or extract) related to the proposed field of study. Applicants for the MLitt programme in Creative Writing should also include a typed portfolio of original verse, prose or play/ screenwriting (around 10 poems or 10-15 pages of prose or play/screenwriting). In addition, all applicants should submit a Supplementary Application Form in place of a personal statement. The form may be downloaded from the website at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/applying/documents/

Funding: investing in your future

The School of English normally offers a small number of its own awards for suitably qualified applicants who have been accepted for an MLitt. These are open to both home/EU and overseas students. Up-to-date information can be found at: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/funding/

Recent School of English taught postgraduate students have also succeeded in obtaining funding from a variety of external sources in order to study here, including the Marshall Scholarship, the Ransome Trust and Scotland’s Saltire Scholarship fund.

Details of these and other scholarship opportunities and initiatives can be found on the University’s scholarships webpages: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/study/pg/fees-and-funding/scholarships/taught/

Careers

Following a taught postgraduate course in English at the University, students go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, marketing, publishing and teaching. Others continue in academia, moving on to a PhD. The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

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The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you will explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies. Read more
The history of people, their societies and cultures is the focus of this programme, where you will explore how people have lived and died across periods and geographies.

Core modules will improve your research skills and introduce you to key concepts and issues in social and cultural history. You will also choose from a wide range of optional modules, allowing you to focus on societies and periods that interest you.

You could study apartheid in South Africa, communities and castes in India, birth and death in medieval Europe or social movements in the USA. Youll be able to focus on gender, race and religion as well as other issues that have shaped the lives of individuals and communities.

Taught by expert researchers within the School of History and the Leeds Humanities Research Institute, this programme uses the latest approaches and thinking in social and cultural history to give you an insight into the lives of others.

Facilities

From the beginning of the programme you'll study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you'll also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You'll also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the Making History: Archive Collaborations optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You'll be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You'll submit this by the end of the programme in September..
We have a wealth of resources allowing you to explore topics that interest you. The world-class Brotherton Library and its Special Collections contain a huge number of early printed, archive and manuscript materials including the Liddle Collection on the First and Second World Wars, Leeds Library of Vernacular Culture, manuscript and commonplace books, travel journals and one of the best collections of cookery books and household manuals in the country.

Extensive collections of national, regional and local newspapers from over the years are available on microfilm, as well as cartoons and satirical prints from the British Museum and extensive collections of letters and correspondence. There is even the Yorkshire Fashion Archive and M&S Archive on campus, allowing you to gain a real insight into popular culture over time.

This programme is also available to study part-time over 24 months

Course Content

From the beginning of the programme you will study core modules developing your knowledge and skills in social and cultural history, building your understanding of research methods and exploring central concepts and debates in the subject.

In both semesters, you will also have the chance to choose optional modules from a wide range on offer, allowing you to focus on issues, themes and societies that interest you. You could draw on the diverse expertise of our tutors to select modules across Indian, African, American, British and Latin American history.

You will also have the opportunity to work collaboratively with partner organisations, such as the West Yorkshire Archive Service, by studying the Making History: Archive Collaborations optional module.

This programme will equip you with a broad skill set for historical research as well as a good base of subject knowledge. You will be able to demonstrate these with your dissertation, which allows you to conduct independent research on a topic of your choice. You will submit this by the end of the programme in September.

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As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. Read more
As one of the most established MAs in Creative Writing in the country, Chichester has a long record of student successes.All our courses are taught by practising novelists, short story writers, poets and dramatists. In addition to this, there are regular visits by other writers. The final taught module includes a session given by agents and editors. Staff are also willing to advise on professional issues of placing work.

The MA in Creative Writing is designed to give students a structure within which they can develop both their writing and imaginative critical skills, experimenting with the wide range of possibilities available to the contemporary writer. It is possible to write prose fiction (the novel or short story), poetry and drama. We are interested in literary fiction in all its forms.
Our MA Creative writing students 'read as writers', explore their reading in group discussions and engage in writing exercises designed to enlarge and stimulate their practice.
In the intensive MA workshops, students share work, learn to write to deadlines, learn how to redraft, polish, edit imaginatively and find the creative thread which, when followed, reveals how their own writing will achieve its optimum level.
All written assignments are accompanied by the writing of a commentary on the process; the commentary speeds and makes explicit a writer's discoveries, and so aids future practice.
Recent guest readers include: Simon Brett, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Vicki Feaver, Ed Hogan, Susanna Jones, Adam Marek, Bernard O'Donoghue, Michele Roberts, Jo Shapcott, Robert Shearman, Matthew Sweeney and Nick Warburton.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni Discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00


Many of our writers go on to publish and win prizes. For instance, Isabel Ashdown's novel Glasshopper, written during the MA, was hailed as one of the five best debut novels of 2009 in The Observer. MA graduate Wendy French won the £5000 2010 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine. These are just two recent examples of the success of our graduates.

The annual Publishing Panel of six specialists has regularly welcomed literary agents from agencies such as David Godwin Associates, Rogers, Coleridge and White, United Artists, Greene & Heaton, Janklow and Nesbitt, RAFT and Lucy Luck Associates. Agents join literary editors for a discussion of the publishing world today and how to approach an agent or editor. We have welcomed literary editors from Penguin/Hamish Hamilton, Chatto&Windus, Myriad Editions, Simon & Schuster, Pighog Press, the Frogmore Papers and producers from BBC Radio.

Student Successes

Jane Rusbridge’s first novel, The Devil’s Music, was published by Bloomsbury in the summer of 2009. It is described as ‘a beautifully told story of family secrets and betrayal, involving knots, Harry Houdini and the shifting landscape of memory.’ The novel was started as part of her MA dissertation project. Jane's second novel, Rook, was published in 2012 and was a Guardian Readers' Book of the Year. Jane has won or been placed in several national and international short story competitions, including the WritersInc ‘Writer of the Year’ award (2005), the Ilkley literature Festival competition (2005), the Bluechrome Short Story competition (2005), the Bridport (2003, 2005) and the Fish Prize (2006). Jane's website can be found at http://janerusbridge.co.uk/

All these stories were written while studying on the MA. MA assignment poems have featured in The Interpreter's House, Red Hot Fiesta, New Beginnings, First Time, and the Surrey Poetry Competition anthology. Jane’s story ‘Sputnik’ was published in Mslexia (2006) and ‘The Devil’s Music’ – a chapter from the novel – was published by Route (2006).

On the Third Day by Kate Betts won Channel 4’s ‘The Play’s The Thing’ script-writing competition in 2006. The play was performed in The New Ambassadors Theatre, London. Michael Billington, renowned theatre critic for The Guardian, wrote, ‘Betts reveals a bold theatrical sense’ and ‘a gift for wry humour’ while Charles Spencer of The Telegraph praised the ‘emotional candour and generosity’ of the script. Kate featured each week in the major Channel 4 serial documentary, The Play’s The Thing.

Bethan Roberts' fourth novel, Mother Island (Chatto and Windus), was winner of Jerwood Fiction Uncovered Award in 2015. Bethan's first novel, The Pools, which evolved from her MA dissertation, was published by Serpent's Tail in the summer of 2007.

While on the MA, Bethan was selected for the prestigious Arvon/Jerwood mentoring scheme for writers under 35. Entry was highly competitive, with only 9 creative writers chosen from MA courses throughout the country. As part of the scheme, Bethan completed her novel under the guidance of an experienced novelist. Bethan has also published short stories, all written for the MA, including 'Family Portrait' (MsLexia, 16, 2003). She won The Olive Cook Award (Society of Awards) for another short story in 2006. Bethan's website can be found at http://bethanrobertswriter.co.uk/

Gabrielle Kimm wrote her first novel, My Last Duchess (Sphere 2010) on the MA in Creative Writing. Since then Sphere have gone on to publish The Courtesan’s Lover (2012) and The Girl with the Painted Face (2013). Gabrielle's website can be found at http://gabriellekimm.co.uk/

Indicative modules
The MA comprises four taught modules and a creative dissertation:

The Writing Studio enables writers to experiment in any genre prose, poetry or drama, while exploring key features of those genres. This first module also serves as induction to the MA and to the distinctive methods of the 'Chichester workshop'.

Metaphor and the Imagination encourages innovation and experimentation, pushing writers beyond their usual boundaries.

Sources and Transformations engages writers with the essential writerly skills of transforming both outer research and inner biographical concerns into fiction.

Launching the Manuscript encourages autonomy, sustaining the longer project, learning about the publishing industry and includes guest readers and the publishing panel.
The Manuscript (a creative dissertation of 20,000) allows writers to develop a longer piece of work through one to one tutorials with a tutor as a consultant reader.

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The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. Read more
The Early Modern Studies MA offers an innovative blend of skills training (palaeography and historical bibliography), object-based learning and museum visits. The core modules cover a wide range of disciplines, giving you a broad understanding of the early modern period. You can then tailor your programme to suit your interests, with over forty optional modules, covering the culture, history and society of the early modern.

Degree information

The MA will teach you critical reading skills, the ability to assess and weigh evidence, and construct persuasive arguments. It combines training in book history, bibliography, and paleography with a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of the early modern period.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of two core modules (30 credits), between two and four optional modules (60 credits) and a dissertation (90 credits).

Core modules
-Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories, Cultures A
-Early Modern Exchanges: Methods, Histories and Cultures B

Optional modules (indicative list) - up to 60 credits from a list which varies each year. An up-to-date list is available on our website. Below is an indicative list, showing modules that have been offered previously.
-Shakespeare in his Time
-Sex and the Body in Early Modern Europe
-From Renaissance to Republic: The Netherlands: 1555-1609
-Early Modern Science
-The Self and the World: Theoretical Approaches to Travel Writing
-Aztec Archaeology: Codices and Ethnohistory
-Early Modern Books and Their Readers: Historical Bibliography for Researchers
-I.T. for Graduate Research
-Paradoxes of Enlightenment: German Thought from Leibniz to Humboldt
-Political Thought in Renaissance Europe
-The Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe
-Trade, Money and Institutions in the Ottoman Mediterranean 1600-1914
-Early Modern Handwriting and Manuscript Culture for Researchers
-Giordano Bruno
-The Public Sphere in Britain, 1476-1800: Print Culture, Censorship and Propaganda
-Men on the Moon: Cosmic Voyages in the Early Modern Period
-Thinking with Women: Gender as an Early Modern Category
-Web 0.1: Early Modern Information Culture, c.1450-c.1750
-The Conquest of Mexico
-Witches in History, Fiction and Scholarship

Dissertation/report
All students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 18,000 words.

Teaching and learning
The programme is delivered through a combination of tutorials, seminars, workshops, presentations, class discussions and library, archive, museum and gallery visits. Assessment is through essays, annotated bibliography and the dissertation.

Careers

Many of our students have been accepted to undertake further study as research students both at UCL and elsewhere, including the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, York and Swansea. In addition our students have been successful in obtaining funding and prizes including the Bryce-Jebb and Dorris Russell Scholarships and the prestigious John Edward Kerry Prize awarded by the Malone Society. Graduates may also find careers in the heritage or cultural industries.

Employability
This MA will give you a very specific skill set, including manuscript handling and archival research. Depending on the optional modules you select you may also develop language skills and knowledge in information technologies and database use. These skills will make you very employable within the heritage or cultural sectors, as well as library work, the arts, and other roles which require information management.

Why study this degree at UCL?

A bespoke programme of study, unique to your interests; there are over forty optional modules, all taught by leading scholars, in a wide range of subjects including art, history, law, literature, politics and science.

Practical, hands-on modules, with ‘traditional’ skills such as palaeography and textual bibliography taught alongside the latest techniques in databases and XML. The programme includes fieldtrips to museums, archives and galleries.

Privileged access to a wide range of world-class museums, rare-books libraries and archives in central London. Located in Bloomsbury, it is a short walk to the exceptional resources of the British Library and the British Museum.

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We have one of the greatest concentrations of world-leading medievalists in the UK, covering the entire span of the Middle Ages and a wide range of regions from Ireland to Byzantium. Read more
We have one of the greatest concentrations of world-leading medievalists in the UK, covering the entire span of the Middle Ages and a wide range of regions from Ireland to Byzantium. This Masters in Medieval History provides you with thorough research training and a wide set of transferable skills in the conception, design and execution of a research project.

Why this programme

-Glasgow is home to the Glasgow Centre of Medieval & Renaissance Studies and the Centre for Scottish & Celtic Studies.
-You will enjoy access to the Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history. The collection also offers printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-Our programme has strong links with the University's Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, giving you access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will join an extensive medieval research community. Glasgow has active charter and chronicle research groups in medieval studies, a reading group and regular staff-student seminars. The annual Edwards Lecture is the keynote event in the calendar of this scholarly community.

Programme structure

Our History Masters are built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

If you choose to study Medieval History, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with the specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of inquiry.

Core courses
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses - course options may include
-Chivalry and warfare in late Medieval Europe, c1300-1500
-Constructing faith: systems of belief and religious networks in the Middle Ages
-From antiquity to the Middle Ages
-Introduction to medieval manuscript studies
-Barbarians in the Mediterranean
-Popular revolt in the late Middle Ages
-The Crusades
-The Normans
-Medieval paleography

To widen your approach and develop an interdisciplinary perspective, you are also strongly encouraged to take one or two complementary courses in cognate subjects, such as:
-Explorations in the Classical tradition
-Inventing the 'Clash of Civilisations': East against West from Homer to Hadrian
-Approaching the past: sources and methods in medieval Scottish and Celtic Studies
-Themes in later medieval Scottish archaeology
-Early Christian monuments of Scotland
-Heritage and cultural informatics

Courses in Latin, Scottish literature, English literature, theology, history of art and other College of Arts subjects can also be studied, by agreement with the programme convener.

Career Prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

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The MA in Medieval Studies allows study in medieval history, literature and manuscript studies. This interdisciplinary programme enables students to study the Medieval period from a range of different subject disciplines that embraces History, English, Theology, Celtic studies and Archaeology. Read more
The MA in Medieval Studies allows study in medieval history, literature and manuscript studies.

Course Overview

This interdisciplinary programme enables students to study the Medieval period from a range of different subject disciplines that embraces History, English, Theology, Celtic studies and Archaeology.

There are two compulsory modules that can be taken in the first or second semester, Research Methodology and Studying the Medieval. Research methods introduces students to the nuts and bolts of research, bibliographical and archival sources. ‘

'Studying the medieval' builds on this foundation to look more closely at record sources for Medieval Studies and at aspects of the study of medieval manuscripts, such as iconography and typology. This module is based in large part on the University’s special collections in the Roderick Bowen Library and Archives; unique in Wales this offers our students close and unrivalled access to our medieval manuscripts and early printed books

Students may then choose 4 further modules in medieval history (such as ‘Thomas Becket: archbishop, martyr, saint’) or medieval literature (such as ‘Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxon Heroic’).

For MA students the second part of the course comprises a 60 credit dissertation.

Modules

-‘Research Methodology’ (bibliographical and archival content)
-‘Studying the Medieval’ (medieval primary sources; manuscript study)
-‘The Cistercian World’ (medieval monasticism)
-‘Thomas Becket: archbishop, martyr, saint’ (medieval church history and hagiography)
-‘Beowulf and the Anglo-Saxon Heroic’ (medieval literature)

Key Features

The programmes are delivered on the University’s campus in Lampeter or via VLE and online learning technologies. They are taught through seminars, small workshops and individual tutorials and supervision that enable detailed and personalised feedback.

Access to a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) enables additional learning, especially work-shopping, to take place outside the sessions and supports the development of a mutually supportive cohort of committed researchers.

Moreover this programme will offer:
-Expert tuition from research active specialist staff
-Exceptional resources in the specialist holdings of the Roderic Bown Library
-Small seminar based classes
-Residential programme based on our beautiful and inpiring campus in Lampeter
-The option to complete the full programme remotely through online and distance learning

Assessment

The individual modules (all 20 credit) are assessed by written assignments: essays, commentaries, short exercises. Those registering for or progressing to the MA complete a dissertation of 60 credits.

Career Opportunities

-Museum
-Archives
-Heritage sector
-Professional Writers
-Marketing
-Expert tuition from professional writers, poets, novelists, dramatists, script-writers
-An opportunity to learn about publishing through the design and production of the annual anthology
-An opportunity to read your work at such events as the Hay Festival
-Programme delivered on our beautiful and inspiring campus in Lampeter

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The Medieval Literatures and Cultures MSc at Edinburgh is a flexible programme, allowing for either a specifically literary focus or a broader ranging and interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages. Read more

Programme description

The Medieval Literatures and Cultures MSc at Edinburgh is a flexible programme, allowing for either a specifically literary focus or a broader ranging and interdisciplinary approach to the study of the Middle Ages.

Edinburgh hosts a thriving medieval research culture. This flexible programme gives you the chance to draw on the broad range of academic expertise you’ll find here, and take advantage of the seminar series and other resources offered by our Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies.

You will gain a grounding in the advanced literary study of the European Middle Ages and the principles of manuscript study. Through option courses and a research project, you will have the opportunity to deepen your particular medieval interests, drawing on our strengths in the languages and literatures of medieval Europe, from medieval French and Latin to, for example, old Norse, old Irish and Middle English.

You will also have access to the impressive collections of the University, the National Library of Scotland, the National Museum of Scotland, the National Archives and the National Galleries.

Programme structure

You will take part in seminars and workshops, carried out over two semesters, followed by your independently researched dissertation.

Compulsory courses:

Reading the Middle Ages
Working with Pre-Modern Manuscripts
Option courses include those from the fields of history, Scottish studies, art history and divinity, as well as a variety of European literatures. Courses may include:

The Sources of Medieval History
Global Encounters in Medieval Art
Medieval Men and Masculinities
Chivalry and Crusade in Medieval France
Medieval Welsh Literature
Old Norse

Learning outcomes

You will gain a grounding in the concepts and genres that are key to advanced literary study of the European Middle Ages, and be introduced to the principles of manuscript study. The option courses and independent dissertation enable you to develop and deepen your particular medieval interests.

Career opportunities

The flexibility of focus this programme offers makes it an ideal foundation for advanced study, potentially leading to an academic career. Teaching or curatorship roles in cultural institutions are alternative career pathways, while the transferable skills you gain in communication, project management and presentation will prove a valuable asset to employers in any field.

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The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours. We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. Read more
The only Creative Writing MA in the UK which is dedicated solely to the novel and ensures you finish yours.

Who is it for?

We take students of any age and from anywhere in the world. All you need is a desire to write exciting words and spend two years working on a novel.

All our group teaching is conducted in the evening – so if you have a job or a family, you can still take this course. We actively seek to attract people who, with other life commitments, are still committed above all to writing great fiction.

David Young, Crime Thriller MA - "The chance to have a novel-length manuscript read and challenged by leading published crime writers is what attracted me to the MA course. The focus is on writing your own novel and giving you the tools to do that, rather than getting bogged down in literary criticism. I'd thoroughly recommend it."

Objectives

At the end of the Novels MA course, you will be very different; you will have written a novel.

This course is designed to provide a supportive and thought-provoking, yet challenging, environment for novelists to develop their skills, experiment with approaches to writing, learn about the industry and, most importantly, complete a polished novel ready to send to publishers and agents.

This MA allows you to focus on one of two areas: Literary Novels or Crime Thriller Novels. As a focused, high-intensity course, we only have a maximum cohort of 14 students each year for each genre, therefore you must apply and be awarded a place for Literary Novels or Crime Novels at the outset.

At the core of the Novels course is the experience of established writers. Everyone who teaches on this MA course is a working, published novelist. Their experience underpins all the teaching.

Teaching and learning

Workshops, seminars and lectures are 6pm to 9pm every Tuesday and Wednesday of the first two terms. Thereafter tutorials are fixed at mutually convenient times – we are happy to work around other life commitments.

Everyone who teaches on this course is a published and working novelist – we strongly believe that only published writers understand everything it takes to write a novel. The core of the teaching comes in one-to-one tutorials which are used to discuss a minimum of 10,000 words of your novel in progress. Thus, across the two-year programme we read and discuss more than 200,000 words of creative writing by each student.

In the first two terms, we aim to provide you with your toolbox for when you start the novel. This covers every way in which you might approach constructing and writing and polishing your novel: we look at the word, the sentence, the paragraph, the chapter and the entire plotting and structuring of a full-length novel. During these terms, we encourage you to experiment with your writing, to find skills and aptitudes you didn’t know you possessed. We also examine published novels, taking them apart like clockmakers, to see how the constituent parts make them tick. That said, there is no literary criticism on this course – we are not theorists, we are a craft-based course, teaching you the techniques and devices (and pitfalls) required when writing your first novel.

In addition to the tutors and lecturers, there are Q and A sessions with visiting guest authors in each term.

Modules

For this course you are required to write 2,000 words a week for 100 weeks. 2,000 in order to generate 1,000 polished, edited words. During the first two terms, the exercises require 1,000 words each week. For the remaining 80 weeks of the course, you need to write a novel and the average length is 80,000 words. This is a serious course for serious writers who want to work hard and write better.

In addition, during the first two terms there are two other modules requiring an analysis and an outline.

Term 1
-Fundamentals of fiction
-Storytelling (Part 1)
-Reading as a Writer

Term 2
-Experiments in style
-Storytelling (Part 2)

Term 3-6
-Complete your novel

Career prospects

The focus is for you to finish a novel and use City’s unparalleled industry links to help start our literary career as a published novelist.

At the end of this course, you will have the manuscript of your novel and we will do everything we can to assist you to find an agent to represent you who will then work to find a publisher for it.

Our recently published alumni include:
-Rod Reynolds
-Hannah Kohler
-Jem Lester
-David Young

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The aim of this course is to give you the opportunity to have an overall view and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Read more
The aim of this course is to give you the opportunity to have an overall view and appreciation of Greek history and culture, from the Homeric and Classical age, through the Hellenistic and Roman times, the Byzantine and Post-Byzantine period to the modern world. Its diachronic and interdisciplinary nature enables you to examine the elements which characterise Hellenic culture through the centuries, at the same time helping you to acquire a deeper knowledge of a certain period and discipline; including philosophy, history, law, religion, theatre, language, literature, papyrology and palaeography.

The Hellenic Institute, established in 1993, brings together two areas of teaching and research in which Royall Holloway has long excelled: the study of the language, literature and history of Ancient Greece, based largely in the Department of Classics and Philosophy, but also in the Department of Drama and Theatre, and Byzantine Studies, which have always found a home in the Department of History.

It aims to consolidate existing strengths and to extend them by promoting the study of the Hellenic traditional across the centuries from archaic and classical Greece, through the Byzantine period, to the modern world.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/history/coursefinder/mahistoryhellenicstudies.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The Hellenic Institute seeks to bring together at a national and international level all those who share its interests. We collaborate closely with other Colleges and research centres in the University of London, including the Institute of Classical Studies, the Institute of Historical Research and the Warburg Institute, as well as the British Library, Lambeth Palace Library and The Hellenic Centre, a cultural meeting place for the Greek community in London.

- We maintain links with universities overseas, especially in Greece and Cyprus. Scholars from the Universities of Athens, Ioannina and Cyprus regularly visit the Institute as part of collaborative research, offering their expertise to our students and members of staff.

- The Institute organises a range of lectures, seminars, conferences, workshops and other events for students, scholars and the wider public, giving the opportunity to engage with experts in the field.

- We receive funding in support of our activities from the Ministries of Culture and Education of the Hellenic Republic, the Ministry of Education and Culture of the Republic of Cyprus, the A.G. Leventis Foundation, the Hellenic Foundation, the Orthodox Cultural Association (Athens), The Friends of the Hellenic Institute and private donors.

- The Institute offers a number of annual fees-only studentships, bursaries and other awards in support of its students.

Department research and industry highlights

Collaborative research includes:
- Thomas de Aquino Byzantinus
- Seminar on Editing Byzantine Texts
- Byzantine Autographs
- A Catalogue of the Greek Manuscript Collection of Lambeth Palace Library
- The Porphyrogenitus Project: Lexicon of Abbreviations and Ligatures in Greek
- Minuscule Hands, c.800-c.1600
- Lexicon of Terms used in Palaeography, Codicology and Diplomatics
- Triadic Monarchy: The Concept of Monarchy in the Triadology of the Greek Fathers -
- Ecclesiological Repercussions and the Monastic Model
- The Greek Population of Rhodes under Hospitaller Rule
- The Greek Community in London, 1500-1945.

On completion of the course graduates will have:

- a detailed knowledge and understanding of the methodologies of Hellenic Studies and their limitations

- an understanding of advanced, current research issues relevant to the discipline

- an awareness of the multiplicity of material available and the strengths and weaknesses of the various forms of historical information

- a general appreciation of the varied and interlinked methodologies for understanding Greek antiquity, Byzantium, the post-Byzantine period and the Modern Greek world

- the reading and understanding of ancient, medieval and modern Greek texts, both in print and in manuscript

- a grasp of literary criticism necessary for understanding and appreciating the style of ancient, medieval and modern Greek authors

- an awareness of the main forms of material available to those studying Classical antiquity, the Byzantine, Post-Byzantine and Modern Greek world.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, written examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers as researchers, museum staff and teachers in secondary education. A considerable number of our graduates pursue MPhil/PhD studies in the field of Greek History and Culture at the Hellenic Institute of Royal Holloway and at other universities in Britain and abroad.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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