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IN BIOFORCE. 1) Opening Sessions. Objectives. To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme. Read more

Modules Contents and Objectives

IN BIOFORCE

1) Opening Sessions

Objectives: To introduce the pedagogical objectives and contents to participants. To ensure that the expectations of trainees are coherent with the learning objectives defined for the programme.

Contents: Bioforce presentation. Introduction of the learning programme and objectives.

2) Immersion Internship

Objectives: To facilitate group cohesiveness and participant involvement within the programme.
To make a detailed presentation of the components of the MSc in HPM.
To encourage a joint reflection about humanitarian and development issues.
Show awareness of its own strengths and limitations as a humanitarian programme manager.

Contents: Presentation, preparation and organization of the immersion internships. Discussion and group work on Humanitarian topics.

3) Framework of Humanitarian Aid

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with thorough knowledge of the humanitarian sector and issues at stake: stakeholders, systems, coordination mechanisms, legal and ethical framework, Q&A initiatives and applications relating to programme management.

Contents: Humanitarian actors, systems and challenges. International humanitarian law, ethics & principles. Quality & Accountability initiatives, methods & practical tools.

4) Managing People & Organisations

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage themselves, other people, and organisations involved in humanitarian programmes.

Contents: Strengthening organisational capacity. Change management. Quality & Accountability in people management. Creating & developing trust in diverse teams. HR processes : HR organisation, recruitment, performance management, staff development. How to lead: leadership, management & delegation. Managing team safety and security.

5) Managing Programmes & Projects

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To enable participants to choose and apply appropriate tools to manage all stages of the project cycle in humanitarian contexts.

Contents: Programme Cycle Management (PCM):

- Assessment & analysis
- Planning & implementation
- Monitoring & evaluation

Cross-cutting issues in PCM (participation, targeting...) Quality & Accountability in programme management.

6) Managing Finance & Funding

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the critical skills and confidence required to raise funds for humanitarian programmes, and to manage financial resources accountably.

Contents: Donors & donor strategies. Quality & Accountability in finance management. Budgeting & proposal writing. Funding strategies & opportunities. Key principles & concepts of financial management. Practical aspects of financial management.

7) Training of Trainers for Capacity Building in the Sector

Objectives/Learning outcomes: To provide participants with the appropriate methods & tools to develop, facilitate, monitor & evaluate capacity building activities.

Contents: Designing & implementing training activities.

8) Field Exercise

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Develop, through a field scenario-based exercise, operational capacity and autonomy of the trainees.

Contents : Within an operational framework, students will have to implement capabilities developed during the training period. The exercise is based on 5 days role play scenario. Students are placed in the position of aid actors in a context of humanitarian/emergency intervention. They have to implement several programs in the field on behalf of different NGOs. They operate in a complex emergency context where multiple players are involved.

IN ESC GRENOBLE

NB : For the ESC Students it is possible to follow “English track programme” described bellow or to follow a second semester in an English spoken abroad university.
For the other students, they must follow the “English track programme”.

1) Advanced Decision Techniques

Objectives/Learning outcomes: Good knowledge of quantitative tools for decision-making.

Contents: This course presents the main quantitative modelling and simulation tools to help in decision-making.

2) Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on the strategic choices: the decisions that shape the future of an organization. This course will address first the strategic choices that the manager must operate in an entrepreneurship environment (opportunity, business model design), then different options for development and growth patterns (growth internal / external growth, mergers and acquisitions, alliances).

3) Corporate Governance

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, the students:

- will know how to position and use concepts and techniques in finance, accounting, management control and law learnt during the common core subjects in a more global framework of analysis,
- will have learnt the legislation covering corporate governance,
- will be aware of the present developments in practice and the principal discussions concerning corporate governance,
- will be able to establish a diagnosis on the quality of a company's corporate governance.

Contents: It is essential for every manager to understand who determines the objectives of corporations and of other organizations, how they are governed and how their managers are incentivized and monitored. The course covers the following themes: value creation, the legal rules and the practices of company management(remuneration, ethics, social responsibility, governance "codes"), the legal rights and the behaviour of shareholders, the impact of financial markets on governance (shareholders activism, takeovers, LBOs). In addition the students have the opportunity to apply the main concepts and techniques of finance, accounting and management control to the case of a listed company.

4) Geopolitics

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to:

- acquire the basics of a geopolitical culture allowing them to develop a reading list for current geopolitical and economic affairs,
- understand the geopolitical conditions for undertaking business in certain emerging and/or risk-laden geopolitical situations.

Contents: The object of this course is to allow students to acquire knowledge about geopolitical and economic affairs in certain zones and emerging and risk-related countries in the world. During the course, the following themes will be covered:

- the globalisation of the economy and its players, notably national States, and international and non-governmental organisations,
- geopolitical and economic analysis of certain countries and zones: Brazil, Russia, China, the Mediterranean and Africa,
- the problems of Afghanistan and Pakistan will also be discussed,
- Europe will be studied through analysis of the different themes mentioned above.

5) Global Marketing and Strategy

Objectives/Learning outcomes : Students will be able to:

- critically analyse and propose well-justified solutions to key Global Marketing Strategy issues.
- develop a Strategic Marketing plan to go global.

Contents: This module takes a decision-making perspective to Marketing Strategy issues, specifically in the global context.

The course will cover:

- Globalization decision and process,
- International market selection,
- International marketing research,
- International market entry strategies and expansion,
- Standardization versus Adaptation of 4 Ps.

6) Leadership and Responsible Management

Objectives/Learning outcomes: At the end of this course, students will:

- understand the organizational and managerial specificities of contemporary organizations,
- know about recent developments in organizational thinking relating to institutional theory, power and politics, routines, and organizational cognition,
- be able to reflect on the specific challenges to leadership and corporate social responsibility in contemporary organizations.

Contents: This course addresses key issues for understanding and managing contemporary organizations. It seeks to move beyond simple managerialist views by integrating recent developments in organizational thinking with the dual challenges of organizational leadership and corporate social responsibility. Topics covered in this course include institutionalized environments, innovation and entrepreneurship, social movements, networks and social capital, power and politics in contemporary organizations, organizational routines and decision making, sense making and cognition in organizations, and organizational change. Each topic will be introduced through case studies alongside theoretical readings, and each of the course sessions will discuss the consequences of these topics for both leadership processes and corporate social responsibility.
The course will be demanding in terms of class preparation, contribution and after-class work, and hopefully rewarding in terms of generating novel insights into contemporary organizational and managerial challenges.

Applied Research Project

During the whole training period, the students, divided into sub-groups of 2-3 students, work on a problematic related a strong issue in the humanitarian and development sector. It is an applied research which leads to a written report in English and its presentation before a jury composed by the tutor and the partner if possible and relevant. This applied research is an integral part of the training programme and it is monitored by a tutor.
The month of December will be specifically dedicated to work on this project.
During the second semester, even if students are abroad, they have to organize themselves to work on this project.
The grade given on this work will be included in the final transcript.

OBJECTIVE

To work as a team during the whole training period to sort out a humanitarian and/or development management issue.

This project will require:

- To write a report in English (20,000 – 25,000 words) which may remain confidential; it is possible to write a summary for the organisation in a foreign language if required. Students have to submit the final report to the tutor 15 days before the oral presentation. The deadline for the oral presentation is mid-november 2014 (15 November 2014);
- To write a case study-based summary;
- To prepare the oral presentation to the jury in English.

STUDENTS’ PROFILES

Students involved in this applied research are from the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management delivered by ESC Grenoble and Bioforce.

EXPECTED RESULTS

- A specific humanitarian and/or development management issue is defined.
- A bibliographical research is consolidated.
- Concrete proposals and outlooks are drawn up.
- A critical analysis is provided.
- Relevant recommendations are made.

The definition of the issue has to be validated by both Bioforce and ESC Grenoble. A specific deadline will be communicated by Bioforce.

Rigor in diagnostic, analysis and facts interpretations, as well as recommendations will be required.
This work aims to support organizations in their development and functioning. In this way, we expect students to be creative (while being realist) and to practice benchmarks. This research work is neither an operational mission nor a counseling one. The report presented is not an internship report.

EXEMPTION OF “GRAND MÉMOIRE” – FOR THE ESC STUDENTS

Usually, ESC Grenoble students have to write a “Grand mémoire” during their enrollment. As they already write a specific applied research report, they benefit from an exemption of this “Grand mémoire”.

Assignment

Students from the MSc in HPM have to realize an assignment, after their study period, during 20 weeks at least. The presentation before a jury must be done before the 15th of November 2014.
The aim of this assignment is to reinforce students’ autonomy and to further develop their skills as a humanitarian programme manager in the humanitarian and development sector.

Students are to submit to Bioforce assignment terms of reference in order to be validated. As a second step, the ESC Grenoble will give the final validation.

The ESC Grenoble is in charge of all administrative issues regarding the assignment.

The evaluation process for the assignment is the following:

- A written report including :
- a context (region, country, organisation, programme, …) presentation,
- a description and analysis of the objectives and results obtained,
- an analysis of the key challenges faced during the assignment,
- an analysis of the impact of the training period on their professional capacities as a humanitarian programme manager.

- An oral presentation before a jury.

The final mark will be a global mark including the written report and the oral presentation.

Assessment Process

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN BIOFORCE

The assessment process includes the following exams:

- An individual written exam for the “Managing people and organizations” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing programmes and projects” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.
- An individual written exam for the “Managing finance and funding” module. This exam may consist of theoretical questions, exercises or case study linked with the module’s learning outcomes. The student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20 to successfully complete the module.

ASSESSMENT PROCESS IN GRENOBLE ECOLE DE MANAGEMENT

It is a two-stage process:

- For each module, a continuous assessment is managed by a Grenoble Ecole de Management’s permanent professor.
- For some modules, an exam is organized.

To be successfully completed, the student has to obtain a minimum of 10 out of 20. Each module’s responsible define the share of continuous assessment and exam.

CONDITIONS OF GRADUATION

The diploma is delivered to the students:

- Having obtained a minimum of 10 out of 20 to all exams;
- Having produced and supported the presentation of a report demonstrating analysis and synthesis skills.

Admission

To participate to the MSc in Humanitarian Programme Management, the prerequisites are the following:

- Master 1 level or Bachelor’s degree (four years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying at least 1 year of professional experience as a project coordinator, administrator or logistician in international solidarity
- By special dispensation, a L3 (licence) level or Bachelor’s degree (three years of higher education after baccalauréat) for applicants justifying an outstanding work experience (more than one year).
- have an English language proficiency level of B2 (according to European language levels - Self Assessment Grid).
- Have a profesional project in programme management (Programme coordinator, Logistics coordinator…)

Please note that these prerequisites provide a base for any validation of the application form. The final decision lies with the Coordinators of the training programme.”

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Whether you're looking for a broad-ranging business degree or the ability to become a specialist in key business discipline, the Master of Business will develop your professional expertise and advance your business career. Read more
Whether you're looking for a broad-ranging business degree or the ability to become a specialist in key business discipline, the Master of Business will develop your professional expertise and advance your business career.

An innovative and industry-focused course, the Master of Business has a strong emphasis personal development, ethics, corporate governance and social responsibility. A key feature of the course is the personal development program which will enhance your leadership and interpersonal skills and transform the way you operate in professional contexts.

The course addresses all facets of business development, and provides a solid foundation for those without business experience. It connects research and practice to make you a stronger communicator and problem-solver, and will broaden your understanding of management and business ethics.

As part of the course you can build your knowledge and extend your expertise in one of the following specialisations:

Business, ethics and society
Commercialisation
Information technology
Law and responsible business
Managing human capital
Marketing
Project management
Quantitative business analysis
Risk management
Supply chain management
Sustainability

The flexible structure of the Master of Business enables you select units that give you a broadly applicable business qualification. Alternatively, you may prefer to choose one of the listed specialisations, effectively tailoring your studies to your particular interest or career aspirations.

The strong reputation of the Master of Business means our graduates are highly sought after, both in Australia and overseas. Graduates of the course pursue careers across the spectrum of business, including roles in human resources, management, marketing, science and commercialisation, project management, risk management or logistics.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-b6005?domestic=true

Overview

Please select a specialisation for more details:

Business, ethics and society

Business, ethics and society investigates and activates the role of business as ethical and social leaders. The specialisation equips students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and practical issues of internal and external ethical and societal forces that businesses face, respond to and activate. Business, ethics and society especially develops students' critical engagement and leadership capabilities to manage diversity, inclusiveness, and work and life. These capacities are developed within a strong context of ethics and corporate responsibility, and the domestic and international environments in that organisations operate. The specialisation prepares students for active managerial roles within organisations in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Commercialisation

Commercialisation is the process or cycle of introducing a new product or production method into the market. The commercialisation process or cycle can be applied in many different contexts, including: art, design, and architecture; arts and humanities; business and economics; education; engineering; information technology; law; medicine, nursing and health sciences; pharmacy and pharmaceutical sciences; and science and technology. The specialisation provides a comprehensive business-focused setting to help students develop the necessary business and entrepreneurial acumen and commercialisation knowledge to succeed. Commercialisation especially develops students' new venture finance, patenting, innovation, and wealth pathways skills and knowledge. The specialisation prepares students, particularly facilitated by the commercialisation project, for commercialisation and entrepreneurial roles within organisations in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Information technology

The information technology discipline allows students to build upon the core program with six units dealing with current practices and emerging strategies for the application of information technology in business management. Students are introduced to management of the creation, storage, recall and dissemination of business records within organisation-wide frameworks and they will gain a high-level of understanding of the processes of project management. Units are taught by the Faculty of Information Technology.

Law and responsible business

The fortunes of a business can quickly turn around if it does not pay proper attention to the laws that regulate its organisation and activities. The law provides the framework for all aspects of business from the internal management of business organisations to their relationships with clients, consumers and the public. The units in this specialisation provide students with an understanding of the legal framework within which business operates and the fundamental laws that regulate business activities and transactions, with particular emphasis on how legal and social responsibility considerations should impact business decision-making.

Managing human capital

Managing human capital is the recognition of people as valuable contributors, and the systems and operations for investing in people to enhance their contributions. The specialisation equips students with an understanding of the theoretical foundations and practical issues of managing and developing people within an international context. Managing human capital develops students' strategic and operational people management knowledge and skills, particularly for diverse, inclusive, and productive workplaces. This specialisation prepares students for careers in human resource management, industrial relations, consulting, public sector management, and general people management roles.

Marketing

Marketing is a fun, dynamic, complex activity (and discipline) that focuses on providing value to both organisations and consumers. Very simply, marketing is about matching what an organisation has (or can do) with someone who wants it. Marketing is about selling, it is about advertising, but it also so much more. The study and practice of the 'so much more' is what makes marketing so interesting!

In today's dynamic and global business environment, marketing permeates all areas of operations and forms an integral element of business growth and achievement. Highly qualified, innovative and international marketing practitioners, supported by well researched and pertinent marketing knowledge, are increasingly in demand.

Project management

A project is a collection of activities and resources undertaken to achieve planned objectives, which could be defined in terms of time, quality and cost or economic outcomes. Project management is the process of ensuring defined goals are achieved in relation to a project. This specialisation provides graduates with the knowledge, technology and processes employed in project management that allow them to pursue such professional roles in industry and government. This specialisation will provide graduates with an understanding and ability to apply the theories and concepts of project management, and will assist in a variety of roles in industry or government. Graduates will be able to analyse requirements for the management of given projects, identify the applicable methods and develop innovative project management strategies and processes.

Quantitative business analysis

Students will be provided with advanced quantitative skills required to carry out statistical analysis in business, economics and finance. They will also develop skills to report on the findings of their quantitative analysis.

Risk management

Risk is defined by AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009 as 'the effect of uncertainty on objectives'. The management of risk is an evolving discipline that builds on current knowledge in a diverse range of activities. The risk management specialisation focuses on operational and financial risk in today's commercial world. It provides extended skills in the strategic and process applications of risk management and prepares for the increasingly complex risk management issues faced in many areas of business and government. It prepares graduates for roles that are required to address business, insurance and financial risk. The range of units undertaken will greatly assist those seeking employment in managerial positions where risk management is an expanding field of practice.

Supply chain management

Supply chain management involves the coordination of people, organisations, technologies and processes to ensure optimal supply of products and services. This specialisation develops students' capacity to design and optimise supply chains, and to manage them to achieve strategic business outcomes. Supply chain management enhances students' skills and knowledge in innovation and improvement, business optimisation, services and operations management, and sustainable operations management. The specialisation prepares students for careers in supply chain management roles in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

Sustainability

The sustainability specialisation focuses on current practices and emerging strategies for improving corporate sustainability, particularly in social, economic and environmental domains. The units within this specialisation will provide insights into sustainability from the perspectives of governance, ethics and management. This specialisation is suited to those who want to enhance their knowledge and skills in both business and sustainability issues and who seek employment in environmental governance or corporate sustainability management. It will also suit those who want to enable organisational and individual change in support of sustainability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/business-and-economics

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/business-b6005?domestic=true#making-the-application

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The Advanced Engineering Management Programme (AEMP) is delivered jointly by Birmingham Business School (BBS) and the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (EPS), combining the expertise and strengths of both schools to offer a high quality, distinctive and flexible course. Read more

The Advanced Engineering Management Programme (AEMP) is delivered jointly by Birmingham Business School (BBS) and the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences (EPS), combining the expertise and strengths of both schools to offer a high quality, distinctive and flexible course.

The programme introduces students to core management concepts in semester one before selecting one of four specialist pathways in semester two. Students also have the opportunity to choose a mixed pathway route, tailoring the course to their requirements.

The Construction Management pathway provides advanced training to graduates to develop their construction management skills enabling them to play leading roles in a professional capacity in both the civil engineering and building industries. The skills gained will provide them with ability to respond to changing requirements of the construction industry in both the UK and overseas. The programme includes lectures, tutorials, workshops, industrial seminars, site visits and individual projects.

Find out more about the other specialist pathways:

Course details

This programme addresses management in the construction industry in its widest sense. The purpose is to provide advanced training to graduates aspiring to higher or middle management positions in the civil engineering and building industries. It addresses the working of those organisations, as well as disciplines and techniques of practical use in the management and implementation of all stages of construction and civil engineering projects. This opens up a wide range of career opportunities, as many of the techniques are applicable both within and outside the construction industry. 

The programme includes lectures, tutorials, workshops, industrial seminars, site visits and an individual project.

Semester one modules are taken by all students to develop a firm base of general knowledge and techniques for further specialised management study. Delivered by leading academics in Birmingham Business School (BBS), the management content is research led, drawing on the expertise and reputation of BBS to help deliver a high quality experience for students. Topics include strategy, innovation, marketing, organisational behaviour and financial management. 

Semester two sees students move into a pathway of their choice, where the key management concepts tackled in the first semester will be complemented by the exploration of practical management applications by academics from the School of Engineering, drawing upon its wealth of research experience and industrial links. 

This new structure will allow us to present the core principles in semester one and then to demonstrate their application in semester two before you progress into the summer and the opportunity to investigate and develop a contemporary Engineering Management topic via a 60 credit research project.

Examples of project titles:

  • BP in the Global Oil Industry
  • Human Resources Management at Royal Bank of Scotland
  • Analysis of the Hellenic Steel Industry
  • Strategic Repositioning of the BMW Group

You can expect to be exposed throughout to up-to-date knowledge of current and future trends in the management of your chosen field whilst developing the skills of critical evaluation and analysis that you will need as an engineer of tomorrow. We look forward to welcoming you.

Specialist pathways

To apply and start studying on one of the specialist pathways, please visit the pathway programme pages;

Study part-time

The Advanced Engineering Management Programmes can be studied on a part-time basis over the duration of up to five years. Modules will be studied over a two-week period, therefore you can undertake one module per term or complete more if you would like to finish the course sooner. Module dates and times are yet to be confirmed, but if you have any queries about studying part-time you can contact .

Learning and teachment

Construction Management provides a ground in the main disciplines and techniques and to develop personal skills of practical use in the management and implementation of construction and civil engineering projects.

The programme addresses the management of technical (engineering) techniques, the development of personal, interpersonal and project management skills, and provides a fundamental understanding of the social, economic, resource management and legal frameworks within which the construction project takes place. Generally, The purpose of the course is to prepare the student to make an effective contribution to the project management of the whole enterprise and environment in which she/he will work.

The content of the programme takes into account the dominant position of the engineer at every stage in the development of a civil engineering project. Since the engineer is normally chosen to fill a position with responsibility for technical, financial and contractual decisions and for the overall management and administration of a project, the programme is directed to satisfying these needs.

The home of Birmingham Business School is University House, conveniently situated on the edge of the main campus opposite the main gate of the University. To the elegant old house of 1908, that houses staff rooms and social space, a new multi-million pound state of-the-art teaching and learning complex has been added giving a unique combination of historic elegance and cutting-edge facilities.

Our students benefit from advanced teaching technology. All fifteen lecture theatres and seminar rooms contain comprehensive audio-visual equipment and sound systems, as well as wireless connectivity and data projection. Three large PC clusters add to computing facilities already available to students across the campus. The main lecture theatre, seating 200, is often utilised outside term-time as a conference facility for local industry.

Civil Engineering at Birmingham is housed in modern buildings which provide facilities for undergraduate Civil Engineering programmes, the postgraduate Master of Science and Postgraduate Diploma programmes, post-experience programmes and an active PhD research centre. We have well equipped laboratory and computing facilities and make a point of undertaking work in co-operation with industry. The majority of the academic staff have had professional engineering experience which is often continued by means of research contracts and consultancies with private and public organisations. We have an impressive record of publications in engineering and scientific journals.



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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

The Brunel Science Postgraduate Certificate (PGCE) is a M-level course with 60 credits that can contribute to further Master's level study in Education, subject to approval.

The course will equip you with the knowledge, understanding and skills necessary to teach science and the ability to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the vital role of the teacher and the school in ensuring excellence in the educational experiences of young people

Undertake professional practice which enables you to evidence the Teachers’ Standards which facilitate the award of Qualified Teacher Status

Understand the relationships between Education and science within current national and government frameworks, and critically reflect on the impact of these in the work of schools and the educational experiences of young people

Recognise the contribution that science as part of the whole school curriculum makes to the development of the individual learner and groups of learners

Think critically about what it means to be scientifically educated and how this informs curriculum planning and design within the subject area

Apply a thorough knowledge and understanding of science (Physics) National Curriculum to the planning of curriculum experiences for pupils in school

Demonstrate competence and confidence in your ability to teach across the contexts for pupil learning in the mathematics National Curriculum range and content, applying principles of continuity and progression

Use subject knowledge and relevant course specifications to plan and deliver the 14-16 curriculum including examination and vocational courses

Demonstrate an understanding of the subject knowledge and specification requirements for the 16-19 curriculum

Utilise a range of teaching strategies to meet the identified learning needs of a wide range of pupils

Utilise a range of resources, including information and communication technology, to enhance pupil learning in physics

Understand the importance of safe practice and safeguarding and apply these in working with young people both within and beyond lessons

Use a wide range of class management strategies to maximise pupil learning

Understand the principles of inclusion and apply these to ensure equality of opportunity for all pupils in the subject area

Understand national frameworks for assessment within the subject area and use these to support the recording and analysis of data, and the subsequent use of this to plan the next phase of learning

Raise the status of the subject area by demonstrating high standards of professionalism at all times

Understand the crucial role of professional learning for the teacher, the pupils and schools.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I
This module covers the following GPE themes:

Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.

You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II
This module covers the following GPE themes:

Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.

You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III
This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:

Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

As a qualified science teacher you may be required to teach National Curriculum general science to Key Stage 4, as well as your particular specialism to ‘A’ level and beyond. To this end, the course aims to facilitate your transformation into a well-educated, well-trained, confident and motivated science educator.

Along with English and mathematics, science is one of the three core subjects of the National Curriculum and since all pupils have to study a broad, balanced curriculum in science there is a demand for well-qualified and skilled science teachers. Most pupils entering secondary school are excited at the prospect of work, for the first time in a fully equipped laboratory, and secondary school science teachers have to build upon and sustain this interest for the subject.

To meet this challenge we need capable, skilled and enthusiastic teachers who are able to motivate young people and lead them to discover the wonders of science.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list. The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006.

We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of QTS. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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If you want to develop a specialist career in multinational enterprises, this course offers high-level strategic learning in a range of areas. Read more
If you want to develop a specialist career in multinational enterprises, this course offers high-level strategic learning in a range of areas.

This course will provide you with the specialist knowledge to manage and adapt supply chains, and pioneer logistics in a growing field of industry. If you are looking to refine your skills or further progress within the profession, this course will enable you to gain a better understanding of how to apply strategic thinking in senior decision-making roles.

The University of South Wales is a preferred provider of professional and Masters level qualifications for the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) and the Chartered Institute of Purchasing and Supply (CIPS). The course is also accredited by the Institute of Operations Management (IOM). These accreditations highlight the industry-level standards embedded within the course and ensure your learning can be applied and inform best practice in the modern workplace.

Upon successful completion of this course, you will gain MCIPS (in addition to three years’ work experience) and MCILT (with an average mark of 50% across the course with work experience, which will be assessed by the professional body). You are also set to gain from further exemptions from the Institute of Operations Management.

This course includes field trips that enable you to understand the practical implications of logistics and supply chain management in a variety of industrial settings (additional costs may apply).

See the website http://courses.southwales.ac.uk/courses/492-msc-international-logistics-and-supply-chain-management

What you will study

There are two pathways available to students studying the MSc International Logistics and Supply Chain Management course. Modules of study for each pathway depend upon whether students complete a 60 Credit Dissertation or a 20 Credit management project. The normal mode of study will be to undertake the 20 credit management project route.

Route One

- Sustainable Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
The module will explore the strategic need, role and value for logistics, purchasing and supply chain research within organisations in order to achieve sustainable supply chain networks in the future. Examining the major changes that are currently affecting logistics and supply chain strategies and how management in the future will be influenced by new structures, reconfiguration of material and information flows, the role of technology in evolving supply chains and the key issues in managing this transition process. This module aims to provide an integrative view of the complex inter- and intra-organisational dynamics which contribute to sustained organisational success and maximisation of competitive advantage. Exploring the sustainable supply chain from a global and local perspective.

- Commercial Relationships (20 credits)
This module explores the
 theory and practical application that underpins the processes involved in
formation of commercial agreements and relationships with external organizations.The module will examine the
current and relevant approaches to achieve an effective commercial agreements
by identifying with and critically evaluating the activities and documentation involved; the legal processes and terms and the main contractual arrangements required for a commercial agreements and relationship with customers and / or suppliers.

- Strategic Operations Management (20 credits)
This module aims to provide an appreciation of operational processes, techniques, planning and control systems with reference to both manufacturing and service industries from a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

- Globalisation of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
This module aims to identify the key drivers and trends that are increasing the globalisation of industries, markets and sectors, including the role of the SME. Also explore the structure and management and main activities of a global and international logistics and supply networks.

- Strategic Systems Thinking (20 credits)
This module aims to develop and enhance the skills and knowledge explored to enable participants to actively consider how they may personally make a difference in the different strategic contexts which may confront them. In particular, students will focus on innovative practices and an inclusive social approach to business and organisational development.

- Economies, Markets and Decision Making in International Contexts (20 credits)
The module aims to develop the ability to analyse the macroeconomic and micro frameworks within which strategic decisions are made. To develop the ability to solve problems which relate to management decision-making in the context of changing economic and market conditions.

- Project Management and Consultancy Skills (20 credits)
This module aims to critically explore and examine project management and consultancy skills in a business and supply chain context. Enabling students to understand and explore relevant and key project management techniques and principles and the impact that they have on operations, supply chain and business processes. Students will be able to use consultancy skills to reflect, monitor and evidence the ‘management of self’ in a marketing and business context.

- Research Methods (20 credits)
The module aims to develop your understanding and research skills in a management and/or professional development context; critically reviewing a range of research methodologies and methods of providing management information for decision making.

- Management Project (20 credits)
The module explores the concept, theories and practice of project management and consultancy skills. This module builds on the research methodology skills and requirements of critical debate established throughout the program and shows how these key skills are vital within a business context to ensure rigorous decision making. It examines combining the traditional research skills with project management and consultancy skills to enable an evidenced based approach to problem solving within an organisation.

Route Two

- Sustainable Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
The module will explore the strategic need, role and value for logistics, purchasing and supply chain research within organisations in order to achieve sustainable supply chain networks in the future. Examining the major changes that are currently affecting logistics and supply chain strategies and how management in the future will be influenced by new structures, reconfiguration of material and information flows, the role of technology in evolving supply chains and the key issues in managing this transition process. This module aims to provide an integrative view of the complex inter- and intra-organisational dynamics which contribute to sustained organisational success and maximisation of competitive advantage. Exploring the sustainable supply chain from a global and local perspective.

- Strategic Operations Management (20 credits)
This module aims to provide an appreciation of operational processes, techniques, planning and control systems with reference to both manufacturing and service industries from a qualitative and quantitative perspective.

- Globalisation of Logistics and Supply Chain Management (20 credits)
This module aims to identify the key drivers and trends that are increasing the globalisation of industries, markets and sectors, including the role of the SME. Also explore the structure and management and main activities of a global and international logistics and supply networks.

- Strategic Systems Thinking (20 credits).
This module aims to develop and enhance the skills and knowledge explored to enable participants to actively consider how they may personally make a difference in the different strategic contexts which may confront them. In particular, students will focus on innovative practices and an inclusive social approach to business and organisational development.

- Economies, Markets and Decision Making in International Contexts (20 credits)
The module aims to develop the ability to analyse the macroeconomic and micro frameworks within which strategic decisions are made. To develop the ability to solve problems which relate to management decision-making in the context of changing economic and market conditions.

- Research Methods (20 credits)
The module aims to develop your understanding and research skills in a management and/or professional development context; critically reviewing a range of research methodologies and methods of providing management information for decision making.

- Dissertation in Purchasing, Logistics, Supply Chain (60 credits)
You’ll be required to produce an extended piece of written postgraduate research, involving a significant piece of student-directed learning, based on a detailed investigation into a key area.

Learning and teaching methods

You can study the MSc International Logistics and Supply Chain Management full-time, part-time or online. The full-time programme starts in September and February.

Full-time: Full-time students study Stages One and Two in an academic year, followed directly by the dissertation. Part-time students usually complete one stage each academic year followed by the dissertation.

Part-time: We offer part-time weekend delivery, where you come to the University for one weekend every six weeks. For those who want to tailor a programme that suits their needs, we can be flexible in terms of when, where and how often lectures take place. This is useful for organisations and associations.

Online: The University of South Wales also offers online delivery through our partners the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT). Please note that CIPS accreditation is not available through our online course.

Work Experience and Employment Prospects

Graduates are able to demonstrate specialist knowledge to help them manage and adapt their global supply chains to respond to the dynamic needs of 21st century business. You will also be able to lead logistics and supply chain management in a growing field, and develop a specialist role in multinational enterprises. The additional professional accreditations associated with this Masters course will enable you to make a significant step in developing your professional career moving forward.

Assessment methods

Part-time students usually complete one stage each academic year followed by the dissertation, which can be completed in nine months.

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See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php. The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. Read more
See the department website - http://saunders.rit.edu/graduate/mba_program.php

The master of business administration degree provides students with the capabilities for strategic and critical thinking needed for effective leadership in a global economy where creative management of both people and technology is vital. The curriculum begins with a solid grounding in the functional areas of business and combines that foundation with the flexibility that allows students to specialize in one or two areas of expertise. In the classroom, students learn the latest theories and concepts, and how they can be immediately applied to solve problems in the workplace.

Plan of study

The MBA program requires 48 credit hours and consists of 16 courses, 11 of which are devoted to core functional areas and five available in concentration areas and as electives.

- Concentrations

An MBA concentration is a sequence of three courses in one discipline, giving you in-depth knowledge in that subject matter. In addition to the program's core courses, at least one area of concentration must be selected to complete the MBA program.

Our most popular MBA concentrations are featured below. Customized concentrations can also be created that leverage graduate courses offered at Saunders, as well as the other RIT colleges, providing a wide array of disciplinary focus areas. While several examples are provided, many possibilities exist. Students may also elect to complete a second concentration, if they choose. A graduate advisor can assist in developing a customized plan of study.

- Accounting

Designed for students planning to enter corporate accounting, this concentration is also an excellent complement to a concentration in finance or management information systems.

- Entrepreneurship

The entrepreneurship concentration is designed to enable students to recognize and commercialize attractive business opportunities—either by new independent ventures or by established firms seeking growth or rejuvenation. It involves integrating all functions of business (marketing, innovation, finance, accounting, etc.) within one coordinated value-creating initiative.

The concentration requires an applied entrepreneurial learning experience that may be satisfied through either the Field Experience in Business Consulting (MGMT-753) course or an approved commercialization project. These projects may involve students developing their own businesses or working with RIT incubator companies, local start-up firms, or RIT multidisciplinary commercialization projects.

- Environmentally sustainable management

With a goal of familiarizing students with environmentally sustainable business practices, this concentration is attractive to those with an overall interest in understanding how firms can manage social and political demands for more environmentally sustainable products and operations. It may be of particular interest to those students in industries with a significant environmental impact such as the automotive, chemical, energy, transportation, or agricultural industries, where environmental issues are central to operational and strategic decision making.

- Finance

This concentration is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge in finance and allow students to choose courses appropriate for a career in investments or corporate finance. Students interested in investments will acquire advanced skills in securities evaluation and portfolio management. Those interested in corporate finance will acquire advanced skills in budgeting, planning, global financing and operations, and corporate risk management.

- International business

This concentration prepares graduates for today's global business environment. Regardless of size, nearly all enterprises operate globally: sourcing, producing, researching, and marketing worldwide. Suppliers and competitors are not only across the street, they are around the globe. Balancing the needs of local, regional, and national communities--and the benefits attained from global competition and cooperation--requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. Managers and professionals must be able to think, market, negotiate, and make decisions designed for the diversity, complexity, and dynamism that are the hallmarks of global business.

- Management and leadership

Managers need to combine effective leadership with analytical reasoning. The management and leadership concentration provides students with the leadership skills needed to be successful managers in business, nonprofit, and public organizations. Students develop the essential analytical and decision-making skills for today's rapidly changing world. They learn why change is difficult, when to initiate change, and how to introduce and manage change in the workplace. These courses also prepare students for the demands of managing people and projects.

- Management information systems

This concentration enhances students' understanding of modern information systems. It was designed for students who may not have a background in computers or information systems.

- Marketing

The overall process of entering markets, creating value for customers, and developing profit for the firm are the fundamental challenges for today's marketing manager. Effective marketing must consider the target audience, along with the changing business environment and competitive pressures of technological and global challenges. Additionally, digital media, the Internet, and big data continue to drive the development of our global marketplace. Digital marketing is evolving quickly creating an enormous need to understand the implications of these shifts for strategic initiatives in marketing and advertising.

- Operations management and supply chain management

This concentration focuses on providing the knowledge to assist in developing, and implementing, efficient supplier systems in order to maximize customer value. Supply chain management is focused on the coordination of the associated processes required both within a business, as well as across businesses/suppliers, to deliver products and services - from raw materials to customer delivery. In addition to courses covering project management, quality control, process improvement and supply chain management, additional electives allow students to broaden their knowledge base across other relevant operations and supply chain management functions.

- Product commercialization

This concentration targets students who are interested in developing expertise in managing the marketing-related activities required to move new products and services through preliminary business and development stages to a successful launch. The commercialization of new corporate offerings is increasingly important as product life cycles get shorter.

- Quality and applied statistics

This concentration is for students interested in studying the technical aspect of managing quality (i.e., statistical quality control). Students gain an understanding of the basics of statistical process control, quality improvement, acceptance sampling, and off-line quality control techniques such as the design of experiments.

- Technology management

In a constantly changing environment, the ability of an organization to innovate and renew itself is critical if it is to survive and prosper. Technology managers, who are typically responsible for the innovation and application of new technology, are central to the long-term strategy and success of their companies. To manage these processes well, managers need to understand both business and technological perspectives. Co-op or internship experience in high-technology settings may be helpful to students pursuing a specialty in technology management.

- Customized concentration options

In addition to the above concentrations, MBA students may create a customized three-course concentration utilizing graduate courses from Saunders and other RIT colleges. Some examples are listed below, while additional options may be pursued on a case by case basis. To create a customized concentration the approval of a Saunders College graduate advisor is needed, and course prerequisites may apply.

- Communication and media technologies

Communication, and the technologies for message creation and dissemination, is at the center of dramatic economic, social, and cultural changes occurring as a result of technological development and global connectedness. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, prepares students for careers as communication experts in commerce, industry, education, entertainment, government, and the not-for-profit sector.

- Health systems administration

Specifically designed for students employed in the health care environment, this concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, introduces up-to-date, industry-relevant content that is continually developed in response to the changing health care environment. All courses in this concentration are offered online.

- Human resource development

The field of human resource development has grown in both size and importance over the last decade, leading to a higher demand for educated and skilled human resource professionals. This concentration, offered by the College of Applied Science and Technology, provides education in training, and career and organizational development.

- Industrial and systems engineering management

Organizations need individuals who possess a blend of technical and business skills, as well as the integrated systems perspective needed to commercialize complex products and services. This concentration, offered by the Kate Gleason College of Engineering, may be significantly interdisciplinary.

- Information technology

Corporations are aware of the cost savings and performance improvement possible when information technology is applied in a systematic manner, improving organizational information flow, employee learning, and business performance. Information technology includes a mixture of computers and multipurpose devices, information media, and communication technology. Students may choose from the following areas of specialization: Web programming/multimedia, software project management, programming, or telecommunications. This concentration is offered by the B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences.

- Print media

Leadership and management in the print media industry require an understanding of the cutting-edge technology and emerging markets to articulate a corporate vision that encompasses new opportunities and directions. This concentration, offered by the College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, is designed to provide a solid technical background in cross-media digital workflow processes and a keen understanding of the issues and trends in the print media industry.

- Public policy

Formulating public policy and understanding its impact are critical, whether you work in government, not-for-profit, or the private sector. This concentration, offered by the College of Liberal Arts, gives students the skills to effectively formulate public policy and evaluate its impact, particularly as related to science and technology issues. The courses focus on policy formation, implementation, and analysis.

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The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. Read more
The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the construction industry who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within the construction sector.

We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. For example, prominent companies in the industry are represented in our Professional Liaison Group.

The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time programme or as an open learning programme (a combination of distance learning with intensive on-campus study periods) which is normally taken over two years. There are two entry points: September and January.

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/project-management-in-the-built-environment/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a whole range of management skills and knowledge including project finance, technology, law and contract by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients. They are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.
- There are four intensive study weeks during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- Our students come from a wide range of backgrounds and locations. Many have originally studied subjects outside the realm of the built environment such as law, psychology, architecture and geography, and others have been or still are (in the case of our open-learning students) employed in project management roles. As a result, there are great opportunities to share experiences, to gain a better understanding of the industry and the range of challenges that project managers face and also to benefit from the many different approaches to problem solving that is a feature of such a diverse group of students.

- Our graduates span the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, India and USA.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, approximately 80% of our research, with our colleagues in other Built Environment areas, was judged to be of ‘international’ quality, with approximately 40% rated as ‘internationally excellent’ or ‘world leading’.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for distance-learning study. Communication with distance-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations.

Many of our current students already hold degrees in fields outside the realm of the built environment including law, psychology and geography, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing projects. They hail from as far afield as Nigeria and India, with backgrounds ranging from languages to architecture.

This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the PBL approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the distance-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

Careers

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector.

Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module

Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Our teaching is backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work.

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage/li>
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

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The Management MSc programme offers. Specialist pathways which reflect the distinctive strengths of Brunel Business School. marketing and branding, technology and innovation, entrepreneurship and research. Read more

About the course

The Management MSc programme offers:

Specialist pathways which reflect the distinctive strengths of Brunel Business School: marketing and branding, technology and innovation, entrepreneurship and research.

Emphasis on developing employability and career development skills.

UK commercial visits and the option of a week-long overseas study tour.

Optional 14 week work placement.

The programme possesses considerable strengths including the existence of a diverse and international mix of faculty and students. Students benefit from research-informed teaching, as well as practical and professional support to their academic and vocational development.

MSc Management is offered in four specialisations:

MSc Management (General Management) – developing a generalised knowledge of theory and its practical applications to business, public sector and third sector organisations.

MSc Management (Branding and Marketing) – combining a generalist study of management with a specialist study of marketing and branding issues followed by a related dissertation topic.

MSc Management (Technology and Innovation Management) – combining a generalist study of technology and innovation issues followed by a related dissertation topic.

MSc Management (Creative Industries) – combining a generalist study of management with a specialist study of the media industry and media management issues followed by a related dissertation topic.

Aims

MSc Management offers students a critically aware understanding of management and organisations relevant to career paths. This is achieved through an advanced study of organisations, their management and the changing contexts in which they operate.

This course provides preparation and development for a career in any sector.

Course Content

The course will provide you with an advanced and applied understanding of contextual forces on organisations – be they legal, ethical, economic, environmental, social and technological; together with business strategy, markets and customers, financial management and the management and development of people.

Compulsory modules for all pathways:

Entrepreneurship
Financial Resources Management
Business Planning
Strategic Management
Understanding Business and Management Research
Dissertation
If placement route is chose: Placement / Consultancy Preparation

Pathway-specific modules

MSc Management (General Management)

Choose two elective modules from:

International Business Ethics and Corporate Governance
Organisational Behaviour
International Marketing
Corporate Branding Theory and Issues
Creative Contexts
Media Issues
Knowledge Management, Social Networks and Innovation
Technology Management

MSc Management (Marketing and Branding Management)

Corporate Branding Theory and Issues
International Marketing

Plus one elective module from:

Organisational Behaviour
Technology Management
Creative Contexts

MSc Management (Technology and Innovation Management)

Knowledge Management, Social Networks and Innovation
Technology Management

Plus one module from:

Creative Contexts
International Marketing
Organisational Behaviour

Work Placements

MSc Management with 14 weeks Work Placement (Optional)
The MSc Management (with Professional Practice) incorporates a compulsory work placement component of 14 weeks which allows students to take their learning outside the classroom and pairs them with companies in the UK.

Brunel Business School is amongst the first few Business Schools in the UK to introduce postgraduate placements for students completing their Masters programmes as far back as 2011. This feature, pioneered in the UK for undergraduate students by Brunel University, is becoming more popular amongst more mature students, for whom such a placement can often serve as a springboard to often extremely competitive labour market. Postgraduate work placement employers cover all related expenses with many also providing a salary.

At Brunel we provide many opportunities and experiences within your degree programme and beyond – work-based learning, professional support services, volunteering, mentoring, sports, arts, clubs, societies, and much, much more – and we encourage you to make the most of them, so that you can make the most of yourself.

Teaching

As an active research university, international level research findings by Brunel Business School tutors are regularly used in lectures. Tutors on this programme are leaders in the field of management and active researchers within one of the six centres of research within the school.

Modes of Study

1-year full-time in September: The taught element of the course (September to April) includes eight modules; delivery will be by a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials/group work. A further four months (May to September) is spent undertaking the dissertation.

1-year full-time in January: The taught element of the programme includes 8 modules which are delivered in two terms (four in January to April, and four in September to December); delivery will be by a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials/group work. The dissertation is undertaken May to August, and then can be completed January to March after the second teaching term.

Assessment

Modules are typically assessed by individual assessment and an examination in May.

Teaching methods include lectures and informal small study groups.

Coursework and examination assignments place considerable stress on the ability to think and reason critically, but constructively.

The dissertation (12,000 words) is the capstone demonstration of these various skills, requiring students to conceive, justify, design in detail and execute a major project.

Assessment may include some numerical analysis tasks as well as reporting on published financial data.

Tasks related to the gathering of published data or field investigation to new data.

Individual and/or group presentations using laptops, PCs and digital projectors.

Special Features

Brunel Business School won the Times Higher Education Awards Business School of the Year 2013

You can be both generalist and specialist at the same time with bolt-on specialist areas of choice such as: Marketing and Branding, Innovation Management or Creative Industries.

Employment experience and work placement of 14 weeks
Career progression and finding suitable jobs are key for our students; hence employment experience is part of the degree programme. From your placement you identify a project, linked to the dissertation, and produce an internal consultancy report for a company.

Showcasing the degree certificate to future employers
Your specialist study and specialist placement experience is showcased on your actual degree certificate, to make it obvious for any potential employer looking for a candidate who really stands out.

Engaging with businesses at high level
The Business Life programme is really supportive to your career prospects with a range of opportunities such as meeting with industry guest speakers, visits to companies and factories, and international business tours.

Accreditation

Chartered Management Institute (CMI): A number of Associate memberships to the CMI are open to graduates of Brunel Business School postgraduate programmes, offering discounted full membership rates upon application. Members of the CMI may use the following letters as appropriate: 'ACMI', Members 'MCMI' and Fellows 'FCMI'.

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The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. Read more
The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry.

We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager.

The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years).

See the website http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying-at-brookes/courses/postgraduate/2015/construction-project-management/

Why choose this course?

- Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme.

- Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work.

- The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach.

- Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients.

- Students are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers in the construction industry are well-advanced.

- There are four intensive study periods during the programme where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops and share experiences.

- The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers. Whether you have a degree in a construction related discipline such as Civil Engineering or Architecture, or have a strong background working in construction, if you want to be a Construction Project Manager this is the course for you.

- Our graduates have an exemplary employment record and now span the globe, working in countries including India, Pakistan, South Africa, Canada, Australia, Peru, Middle East and China.

- Our teaching is backed up by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work.

- Many members of staff are part of Brookes' Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD), a leading research and promotional organisation noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form.

- Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence.

Teaching and learning

Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice.

In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus.

Approach to assessment

Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other.

Field trips

A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department.

The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country.

The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects.

Student body

The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Students will normally hold degrees in fields within the realm of the built environment including Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects.

Our students hail from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery.

Typically the open-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that Construction Project Managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully.

Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries.

How this course helps you develop

Graduates of the Department of Real Estate and Construction have an outstanding employment record. Local and national construction companies, developers, project managers, house-builders, surveyors and housing associations regularly recruit our graduates.

Many of these companies visit the department annually to meet students for graduate positions. Our graduates are recognised as having an excellent level of communication, presentation and problem-solving skills.

Careers

All of our open-learning students are employed full-time by prominent companies in the sector. Full-time students find similar employment shortly after graduation. They typically hold (Assistant) Project Manager positions. However, the breadth of knowledge that our students gain gives them the flexibility to function effectively in a number of different roles.

Free language courses for students - the Open Module
Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses.

Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are:
- studying at a Brookes partner college
- studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses.

Research highlights

Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional/commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), our Unit of Assessment (UoA 16) ranked 4th within the University in terms of its Grade Point Average (GPA). We hold the 11th position in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment.

Many members of staff are part of the Oxford Institute of Sustainable Development (OISD). This research and promotional organisation is noted for its work on sustainable technology in buildings and sustainable urban form among many on-going projects.

A recent HEFCE report into sustainable development in higher education in England suggests that the OISD is one of the key players in sustainable development research.

Research areas and clusters

Areas of interest include:
- sustainability, adaptation and resilience to climate change
- Building Information Modelling (BIM)
- collaborative supply networks for procurement and delivery of project
- building economics
- forecasting techniques
- risk management
- social networks in project environments
- managing complex projects
- management of knowledge and innovation as a source of competitive advantage
- adaptive re-use of existing buildings
- facilities management
- health and safety.

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Water is vital. Drought, floods and water footprint are crucial topics across the globe. Read more

Water is vital. Drought, floods and water footprint are crucial topics across the globe.

The Water Management Option was one of the original options of our MSc Environmental Technology course first offered in 1977, and remains at the cutting edge today, with research into the balance between water treatment, energy use, climate change and legislation being the focus of intense interest.

Aims

The aim of the option is to produce graduates who understand the challenges posed by water supply and water resources management, and who meet the demands of organisations concerned with the water environment and water technology. These include water companies, regulators, consultancies and research organisations. Changing priorities in these organisations mean there is an increasing emphasis on management in addition to the traditional broad foundation in the basic concepts of water technology and the water environment. As a result, the Water Management Option spotlights and develops management techniques, with two extended consultancy-style projects, one run in conjunction with Hounslow London Borough Council and the other with Anglian Water plc. In addition to lectures and tutorials the students develop their research and presentation skills in a dynamic, cooperative and competitive environment.

At the end of the course, the student will understand the basic concepts of water technology and the water environment both locally and globally, and be able to:

  • apply this understanding to water management issues
  • select and use a range of appropriate management techniques
  •  communicate effectively with others concerned with water management issues, (for example environmental engineers)
  •  apply this knowledge and skill to water management issues in both the developed and developing world
  • work professionally within an organisation, cooperating with others and communicating ideas in oral and written form.

Content

The Option comprises a number of modules designed to introduce the student to the broad range of scientific, environmental and management issues relevant to man’s effects on the Earth’s most precious resource. In addition to lectures, delivered by a of leading practitioners from regulators, water companies, consultancies, research and other environmental organisations, there are seminars and practical coursework assessments that provide experience of contaminated land remediation and strategic investment planning for water supply and wastewater treatment.

Module Aims and Learning Outcomes

Environment and Health

  • To give the student a foundation in science and policy basics to understand aspects of environmental management and technology and its impact on health.
  • Be able to explain the main chemical and biological processes important in the physical environment, the parameters that define environmental quality and its effect on health.

Water Technology and Management

  • To introduce the student to the various unit processes used in water treatment, including underlying theory and technology.
  • Be able to describe the basic concepts of water treatment technology and the selection of unit treatment processes.

Environmental Policy and Resource Management

  • To provide students with an introduction to the legal, technical and practical issues involved in contaminated land and resources management.
  • Be able to appreciate the challenges for the management of contaminated land and be able to describe the basic concepts in relation to resources and waste management.

Environmental Decision Making and Tools

  • To introduce students to some of the most important policy tools and techniques to assist them in decision-making.
  • Be able to select and use various management techniques and policy tools to support decision- making in environmental and water management and policy.

Integrated Land and Water Management

  • To provide students with an overview of problems, potential remedies and possible outcomes involved in holistic management of the environment.
  • Be able to assess environmental problems and environmental relationships in order to propose holistic solutions that maximise overall benefits and minimise adverse impacts.

Environmental Pollution and Assessment

  • To enhance students' understanding of the pollution pathways in the environment from source to receptor.
  • Be able to describe water recycling technologies and assess the physical and chemical processes involved in the progress of pollutants from source to receptor.

Finally, a four-day study tour incorporating a programme of visits gives operational insight into many aspects taught on the option. Visits to sites concerned with water and environmental resource management and related environmental conservation projects are complemented by visits designed to give an understanding of the technology used for water and wastewater treatment.

Careers

Graduates from our course have a very high success rate in achieving well paid employment. This is commonly in environmental consultancies and to a lesser extent in water utility companies, the Environment Agency, Defra and other regulators, and water charities in the UK, in the European Union and overseas.

Graduates from recent years have taken up positions and careers in the following companies:

  • Anglian Water
  • Arcadis Geraghty Miller
  • CH2M Hill
  • Dames and Moore
  • Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions
  • Environment Agency
  • ERM
  • Mott MacDonald
  •  Parsons Engineering Science
  •  Posford Duvivier
  • Thames Water

Fieldwork

Students undertake two assessed pieces of coursework over the option term. One piece of coursework is in collaboration with a water company, Anglian Water and in addition to team research with other option members it involves a visit to the Anglian Water premises in East Anglia. The other piece of coursework is conducted in collaboration with the Hounslow London Borough Council. It builds on the theme of integrated land and water management and incorporates a day of water and soil sampling on Hounslow Heath in London (working alongside another of the MSc Options – Environmental Analysis & Assessment).

Anglian Water Placement

The opportunity exists for one student to carry out the MSc Environmental Technology Course Water Management Option over two years, which includes a 16 month industrial placement with Anglian Water. The programme provides the chosen candidate with an Anglian Water-financed bursary and payment of tuition fees (at UK/EU rate).  Please visit the website to find out more.



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In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Course Structure

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Optional modules+ (choose 4):

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

International Strategic Management: This module introduces the language of strategy and explores the link between strategic and operational management.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

+ Your optional modules must include either International Strategic Management or Marketing Strategy, and at least 2 Law options.

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Why choose this course?. At the end of the course, students taking the course will be expected to have. You will have the opportunity to engage with a range of learning approaches during the course of your study. Read more

Why choose this course?

At the end of the course, students taking the course will be expected to have:

You will have the opportunity to engage with a range of learning approaches during the course of your study.

You will take part in lectures, workshops and seminars. Some of these will be more traditional whereas others will require you to undertake research before coming together to discuss project and programme issues with a range of students and academic staff.

You will have seminars from industry practitioners and have the opportunity to discuss your projects with them to gain real world insight into the problems you are trying to solve.

You will have the opportunity to work in a range of study facilities to develop practical skills and understand the link between the theory and practical implementation of projects and programmes, with a deep understanding of benefits and risks. Throughout the weekly class sessions and through use of the on-line support material, you will obtain skills required to successfully implement and manage a range of diverse projects and programmes with confidence.

Often working on assessment and project briefs you will develop solutions to meet real world problems/requirements in project and programme management and be able to present these to your peers, practitioners and third parties in order to obtain balanced and current feedback.

What happens on the course?

  1. Financial Management of Projects
  2. Project Management
  3. Programme Management
  4. Leading Transformation and Change
  5. Legal Obligations
  6. Research Methods and Professional Skills
  7. Dissertation

Why Wolverhampton?

This course will appeal to anyone who is looking to advance in Programme and Project Management. The topics are practical, with an emphasis on the application of the knowledge gained and applied to many learning situations, including the use of case studies, live round-table debate, team-working exercises, applied coursework, blended learning environments, and independent study. Students are encouraged to gain knowledge in their field through extensive reading, and to apply this research in a more formal way. The completion of a dissertation demonstrates the range of academic and professional skills gained at the University of Wolverhampton. Students will have support within classroom time and dedicated workshops, small working groups, and personal tutors to develop the student to help gain a higher level of achievement.

You will also have the benefit of relevant experience of staff in disciplines. Issaka Ndekugri is a world class expert on the managerial, administrative and legal aspects of decision-making in the procurement of infrastructure and other engineered assets and related professional services. With advanced degrees in Engineering, Management and Law from world class universities and relevant industry experience, he is the rare type of well rounded professional hybrid able to communicate with a wide range of functional managers/directors in organisations on a highly informed basis. His experience has been built on direct employment in roles involving the negotiation and administration of large infrastructure projects and employment as an academic and consulting with industry on best practice in the procurement of products, works and services. He has undergone world class training in negotiation (in the Harvard Business School), membership and chairing of dispute boards on major international infrastructure projects (by the international Dispute Resolution Board Foundation based in Seattle) and mediation (by CEDR, the London-based international Centre for Effective Dispute Resolution).

Career highlights: Member of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s College of Experts; Peer Review Editor for Construction Law Journal; Member of Editorial Boards of: the International Journal of Law in the Built Environment; the Institution of Civil Engineer’s Journal of Management, Procurement and Law; Founder of FIDIC-NET, the international network of experts in the international procurement of infrastructure; Published 100+ papers/articles and textbook entitled The JCT Building Contract: Law and Administration, which won Gold award of the Chartered Institute of Building’s International Literary Award Scheme; £ 1.3+ million of grants from: former DTI, European Social Fund, Learning Skills Council, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, City University of Hong Kong, Society of Construction Law, Worshipful Company of Arbitrators’ First Charitable Trust; External examiner to: University of Central Lancashire, University of Manchester, Salford University, Loughborough University, Leeds Metropolitan University, United Nations’ Asian Institute of Technology, Thailand; Supervision of 8 successful PhD candidates

He is currently Professor of Construction and Engineering Law in the University of Wolverhampton and Director of the University’s Construction Law Postgraduate Programme.

Career Path

Graduates of this course will gain knowledge to equip them for employment in a range of managerial positions including: Programme Manager, Project Manager, Change Manager, Risk Manager and Benefits Realisation Manager, Project Planner.

What skills will you gain?

t the end of this course you, the student, will be able to:

1. apply project management systems, tools, and methodologies in a wide range of contexts involving extensive supply chains and gain maximum benefits realisation;

2. work effectively within different types of team environments and manage and lead such teams in compliance with employment law;

3. exercise leadership in the administration of project contracts to achieve budgetary, schedule, benefits and quality targets with appropriate dispute avoidance/resolution strategies;

4. analyse risks and uncertainty affecting complex projects and programmes to arrive at sound decisions and judgements in the absence of complete data and communicate conclusions clearly and effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences;

5. demonstrate understanding of the operation of major projects and programmes as temporary organisations and behaviour within such organisations and related competence in the design and implementation of organisation structures, strategies, systems and procedures for complex programmes not only across business sectors but also in the public sector

6. demonstrate competence to develop new knowledge and problem-solving competence through research

Springfield Campus

Our new Springfield site is a £100 million project to turn a 12 acre, Grade II listed former brewery, into an architecture and built environment super-campus.

https://www.wlv.ac.uk/about-us/developing-our-campus/springfield-campus/

Join us on Social Media

Faculty of Science and Engineering on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/wlvsae/

Faculty of Science and Engineering on Twitter

https://twitter.com/WLVsci_eng



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The Pollution Management option focuses on the interface and interaction between science, technology, and policy in the environment. There is an emphasis on local issues, but these are inescapably set within the context of regional and global developments. Read more

The Pollution Management option focuses on the interface and interaction between science, technology, and policy in the environment. There is an emphasis on local issues, but these are inescapably set within the context of regional and global developments. We draw on best practice in the UK and Western Europe, applied not only here but also in Africa, the Middle East, Asia and the Americas.

Aims

In Western Europe and North America, many short-range pollution problems of past decades have been solved, but business and industry find themselves operating in an environment where the public and government demand ever more stringent environmental standards. Other parts of the world might be seen as following some way behind this trend and learning from it, including where examples of acute local and regional pollution remain in a context of a pressing need for rapid socio-economic development. Globalisation is an additional, external source of pressure on every nation to meet the highest environmental standards that are increasingly prevalent elsewhere. In many cases, however, developing countries have an opportunity to learn from our mistakes as well as our successes. In particular, the trend of the past was for environmental protection to be an expensive luxury. Today, it is possible to find a different and more efficient path to a better quality of life for everyone, now and in the future, by protecting the environment in a way that leads simultaneously to an increase in economic prosperity. There is therefore continued growth in demand for graduates with expertise in pollution management:

  • Within the UK and European Union
  • Working from the UK but exporting expertise to other parts of the world
  • World-wide, especially in the rapidly developing economies of Latin America, Africa, and Asia, and in Eastern European and Mediterranean regions having increasing levels of trade and political interaction with the European Union.

Responses to pollution at least must reassure the public it is safe, or allow adaptation to or protection from its effects. A better approach is to control concentrations of a pollutant in the environment, but the best solution is to prevent its formation in the first place.

Integrated Pollution, Prevention and Control is a major development in this area, pioneered in the UK and now led by the European Union, bringing together management, planning, and communication as well as end-of-pipe technological solutions. But this needs to mesh with other kinds of regulatory and voluntary initiatives, especially where non-industrial sources of pollution including transport and agriculture make an important contribution, in more and less developed countries alike.

Content

The Option is divided into six modules, covering all the major areas of environmental concern, and there is a significant interdisciplinary element throughout, reflecting the philosophy of the MSc as a whole. They should not be considered as stand-alone, but should be seen as a closely integrated whole:

Module Aims and Learning Outcomes

Environment and Health

  • To give the student a foundation in chemistry, microbiology and policy basics to understand aspects of environmental management and technology and their impact on health.
  • Describe the main chemical and biological processes important in the physical environment and environmental technology and parameters that define environmental quality.

Air Pollution and Climate Control

  • To familiarise students with how our incomplete but expanding scientific understanding of pollution is translated into policy and practice for Air Pollution & Climate Control management.
  • Be able to integrate understanding of atmospheric chemistry and physics together with biological implications and pollution control technology, with the application of Air Pollution modelling and monitoring for review and assessment of air quality & Climate.

Waste and Resource Management

  • To provide students with an introduction to policies that aim to manage human activities with a focus on waste management to prevent, reduce, or mitigate harmful effects on nature and natural resources.
  • Be able to understand the principal features of UK and EC environmental policies and appreciate from a management point of view the principal waste and resouce related problems today.

Environmental Decision Making and Tools

  • To introduce students to some of the most important policy tools and techniques to assist them in decision-making.
  • Be able to select and use certain management techniques and policy tools to support decision- making in environmental management and policy.

Environmental Pollution and Assessment

  • To enhance students' understanding of the pathways in the environment followed by pollutants from source to receptor
  • Be able to assess the physical and chemical processes involved in the progress of pollutants from source to receptor, and manage the impacts the pollutants may have on a range of receptors.

Water Technology and Pollution

  • To introduce the student to the various unit processes used in water and wastewater treatment, including underlying pollution theory and treatment technology.
  • Be able to describe the basic concepts of polluted water treatment technology and the selection of unit treatment processes.

Careers

The majority of the graduates enter environmental consultancy both in the UK and abroad usually within the risk assessment and contaminated land areas. A second path of graduates is to regulatory agencies/government bodies such as the Environment Agency of England & Wales and the Department of Environment, Food & Rural Affairs. Other paths have included further study, the retail sector and banking. To date, the Option has had an excellent track record of employment with over 90% of graduates employed within 12 months of completing the MSc.

 • PhD, Technical University of Athens

• Projects Manager, British Council, Brazil

• Environmental Health Officer, London Borough of Newham

• Assistant Director, Science & Technology Division, Ministry of Science, Technology and the Environment Malaysia

• Field Engineer, Schlumberger (Angola)

• Senior Consultant, Arthur D. Little

• General Director, Environmental Management, Environment Ministry, Mexico

• Partner and Director of UK Environmental Services, Price Waterhouse Coopers

• Technical Director, Stanger Science & Technology

• Senior Lecturer, Roehampton University

• Quality Control Engineer, Chiyoda Corporation, Doha, Qatar

• Head of Environmental Audit, Body Shop International

• Head of Solid Waste Control, Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department



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Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015). All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). Read more

About the course

Our Primary and Secondary PGCEs are "Outstanding" (Ofsted, 2015).

All our Education courses have been developed in collaboration with Partnership schools and the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL). This ensures not only the highest possible quality of provision, but also relevance in reflecting national and school-level priorities in Education.

Aims

School and Local Authorities are increasingly seeking to employ teachers with not only high levels of competence and skill in classroom practice, but practitioners who have advanced subject knowledge for teaching and enhanced knowledge of systems and theories relevant to education. Therefore, the aims of this program are:

-to enable student teachers to develop a critical understanding of issues and theories that impact upon classroom practice in teaching, learning and assessment in secondary schools;
-to support student teachers in their exploration and critical reflection on their own and others practice in relation to national and regional priorities and policies and current research relevant to the Key Stages for this programme;
-to promote student teachers' practical teaching skills and subject knowledge for teaching across the relevant Key Stages for this programme, making links with relevant theory to inform practice.

The programme aims to further develop students' existing transferable skills in communication, literacy, numeracy and critical reasoning. It is suitable for those who wish to gain employment as teachers and who aspire to progress to leadership and management roles in schools or in the wider world of education. It will provide an excellent foundation for progression to either higher academic or advanced professional qualifications.

Course Content

The PGCE is an intensive programme, which combines an exploration of principles and methods of teaching and learning with practical school-based teaching placements. It lasts for 36 weeks from early September to late June.

The Secondary programme prepares you to work with pupils aged 11-16. At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our Partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

The PGCE Secondary courses are structured around three modules, which share a generic General Professional Education (GPE) component. The GPE programme involves an enquiry based learning approach, which combines taught sessions with independent professional learning activities (PLAs). These PLAs require independent research, which is either school-related or school-based. The three PGCE modules are:

1. Education Studies I

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Professionalism, values and reflective practice;
Safeguarding, child protection and e-safety;
Understanding curriculum and the National Curriculum;
Supporting learners, learning and effective behaviour management;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with SEND and SEBD;
Effective planning and teaching to promote pupil progress;
Assessment and its role in promoting effective learning.
You will also focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

2. Education Studies II

This module covers the following GPE themes:
Applying for your first post;
Understanding data analysis to support effective teaching and learning;
Behaviour for learning and the wider professional responsibilities of the subject teacher;
Inclusive education, with a specific focus on supporting pupils with English as an Additional Language, pupils receiving the Pupil Premium and able pupils;
Safeguarding with a focus on the Prevent and Channel national strategy and bullying and homophobic bullying.
You will also continue to focus on teaching and learning issues of particular concern to your phase or subject specialism.

3. Education Studies III

This module focuses specifically on supporting student teachers to make an effective transition into their first post and examines the following themes in GPE:
Preparing for induction and the professional learning action plan for your first post;
Pathways into leadership in education;
Learning outside the classroom;
Contributing to the wider aspects of the formal and informal curriculum and your wider professional role as a teacher.

Subject Specific Course Content

The aim of Physical Education is to develop physical competence so that all children are able to move efficiently, effectively and safely and understand what they are doing. The outcome, physical literacy, is as essential as literacy and numeracy to ensure the holistic educational development of young people in our society.

The PGCE Secondary Physical Education course at Brunel University London has a long standing national reputation for high quality teacher education in our subject area. The course is very popular, drawing on outstanding expertise and experience in this field from both academic and school staff. Many of our alumni have gone on to become school leaders, not only within Physical Education, but also as members of senior management teams in school at an early stage in their career because of the high standards and expectations we have for our student teachers. We retain very close links with our community of Physical Education alumni and many of them go on to be mentors for our student teachers, are involved in selection and recruitment of the next generation of PE teachers from Brunel or contribute to aspects of teaching on the programme where they have specific expertise.

School Experience

School-based professional learning is a compulsory element of all programmes leading to a recommendation for QTS. The course involves the statutory requirement of at least 120 days of school experience in the form of block school placements undertaken in at least two different contexts.

Our current partnership schools are mainly located in the West London area and adjoining Home Counties. We have developed close links with a number of very good schools over a number of years, and offer placements within carefully chosen schools that provide an appropriate professional learning experience. The ethnic and cultural diversity of the schools we work with is a distinctive aspect of our provision and we are equally proud of the diversity of our student teacher cohort, who reflect the communities in which many of them go on to work as teachers.

You will be allocated a school-based mentor, selected for their experience and expertise, who is there to help you develop and learn while you are on placement. The importance of this person should not be underestimated. Teaching is a very challenging profession and with the help of your school-based mentor and your University tutor we aim to make sure that you have support every step of the way, encouraging reflection and development.

Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS), Childcare Disqualification and Prohibition Orders

As an accredited provider of Initial Teacher Education we have to have regard to the Department for Education’s statutory guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education, when carrying out their duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. We ensure that all student teachers have been subject to Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) criminal records checks, including a check of the children’s barred list.

The Department for Education has published statutory guidance on the application to schools of the Childcare (Disqualification) Regulations 2009 and related obligations under the Childcare Act 2006. We undertake our responsibility to ensure that the student teachers are not, therefore, disqualified from childcare or that the student teacher has obtained a childcare disqualification waiver from Ofsted. We also check that candidates are not subject to a prohibition order for teaching issued by the Secretary of State.
We also offer student teachers the opportunity to experience placements in alternative settings, which include special schools, Pupil Referral Units (PRUs), young offenders institutions. This further demonstrates our commitment to preparing teachers to work with young people in a diverse range of educational contexts.

Teaching

We adopt an enquiry-based learning approach in our PGCE Secondary courses where students are encouraged to research and investigate a range of broad and subject specific educational themes and issues and bring their findings back for discussion in interactive lectures, workshops and seminars. These themes and issues address national, regional and partnership priorities as well as specific areas for investigation with the subject area.

Assessment

Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE)
The PGCE Secondary programme carries 60 Master’s Level credits and requires you to successfully complete three formally assessed pieces of academic work during the year.
All of these assessments also require an accompanying portfolio of evidence.
The Master’s Level credits provide an excellent foundation for future academic and professional study.

Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)
Alongside the PGCE academic award for your programme, you will also be assessed for the recommendation of QTS. In order to be recommended for QTS you are required to demonstrate that you have met the Teachers’ Standards (DfE, 2013) in both the University and in school and alternative education settings. All aspects of the programme are designed around you being able to demonstrate that you are meeting the Teachers’ Standards.

Part 1 of the Teachers’ Standards require you to:

Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils
Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils
Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge
Plan and teach well structured lessons
Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils
Make accurate and productive use of assessment
Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment
Fulfil wider professional responsibilities
(Teachers’ Standards, DfE, 2013)

Part 2 of the Teachers’ Standards require students to demonstrate the highest standards of personal and professional conduct.

As the PGCE is a professional course, 100% attendance is an expectation.

Recommendation for Qualified Teacher Status will be made by the Secondary PGCE Examination Board for all those who successfully demonstrate the Teachers’ Standards as shown in the requirements for University and school-based work.

Special Features

As a leading centre of education and with roots in teacher education dating back to 1798, we are able to provide first class teacher education that is internationally recognised.

A Brunel PGCE is a recognised symbol of quality teacher education which accounts for our high employment rates.

At the heart of our programmes is a vision that our student teachers’ teaching will impact positively on pupil progress over time in schools and that our partnership activities with schools will contribute to school improvement. We aspire for all our students to be outstanding teachers.

You will benefit from an established partnership between Brunel and a variety of educational institutions and local schools. Brunel education degrees offer multicultural placement learning opportunities. For example, our location in West London and our diverse and well-established schools network means you will gain highly-valued placement learning experiences in vibrant multicultural schools.

Beyond ITE, for early career teachers we offer the Masters in Teaching (MAT), where students can utilise their 60 PGCE Masters level credits to continue their postgraduate studies part-time, whilst also meeting the requirements outlined for Newly Qualified Teachers (NQTs) and early career development. Where schools have qualified for Enhanced Partnership status with Brunel University London, NQTs in those schools have access to the first year MAT module for free, illustrating our commitment to supporting NQTs into and through their first year of teaching. We also offer a Masters in Education (MAEd), a Doctorate in Education (EdDoc) and PhD postgraduate routes through the Department of Education. This continuum of provision ensures a commitment to teacher education and professional learning at all stages and the growing community of professional practice strengthens our Partnership.

Staff are nationally and internationally recognised for their research, and liaise with government and other agencies on education policy issues. The Department of Education is host to a number of research centres, including the Brunel Able Children’s Centre. The process of learning is informed by cutting-edge research by staff in the strands of: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Pedagogy and Professional Practice (PPP).

You can take advantage of free access to our excellent University Academic Skills service, ASK.

We have an award winning Professional Development Centre.

Our library has been nominated for national awards for its outstanding provision.

We have on-site volunteering opportunities through our Brunel Volunteers provision.

Our Disability and Dyslexia Service team have an excellent track record of support for students.

Our Union of Brunel Students provides you with a range of additional support and a broad range of extra-curricular opportunities and social events.

There is excellent University-wide access to PCs and the Internet, as well as free loan of media equipment and music/recording studios, and web space on the University server.

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Effective use of renewable energy and improvements in the efficiency of power generation facilities will enable better energy management in the future and help reduce environmental impact. Read more

Why take this course?

Effective use of renewable energy and improvements in the efficiency of power generation facilities will enable better energy management in the future and help reduce environmental impact. This course responds to an urgent need for specialists in energy and power systems management, as well as a growing skills shortage of people with core knowledge in this field.

The course provides relevant, up-to-date skills that will equip both graduates and working professionals in the advanced concepts of sustainable electrical power and energy generation. It offers skills for operation, control, design, regulation and management of power systems and networks of the future. You will also receive training in and understanding of energy production, delivery, consumption and efficiency.

What will I experience?

On this course you will:

Benefit from experts in the industry who will deliver part of the course as visiting lecturers, bringing professional expertise and industry-relevant material
Be encouraged to reach a level of competence and professionalism where you can effectively integrate your technical and non-technical knowledge to solve a range of problems of a complex nature
Learn in a challenging and stimulating study environment
Develop a range of key skills by means of opportunities provided in the study units
Being an MSc course, you are encouraged and expected to be able to reach a level of competence and professionalism where you can effectively integrate your technical and non-technical knowledge to solve a range of problems of a complex nature.

What opportunities might it lead to?

The course will help to maximise your career potential in this field and equips you to work as an engineer, at an advanced level, in the fields of energy and power systems management.

Module Details

You will study several key topics and complete a four-month individual project in which you apply your knowledge to a significant, in-depth piece of analysis or design. Projects are tailored to your individual interests and may take place in our own laboratories or, by agreement, in industry. Experts from Industry (STS Nuclear) deliver part of the course as visiting lecturers, bringing professional expertise and industry-relevant material to the programme.

Here are the units you will study:

Power Systems Technology: This unit provides an in-depth overview of contemporary electrical power systems. It covers the elements of electrical power systems including generation, transmission and distribution in the mixed energy source paradigm.

Electrical Machines and drives: Provides an in-depth overview of the operational principles and physical design of DC and AC electrical machines as well as broad understanding of concepts of power electronics and power electronic converters, so that you can describe their application and selection criteria. You will develop an understanding of the issues present in converter design, including the impact of physical layout and heat dissipation.

Energy Systems: Focuses on the techniques and principles of operation of thermodynamics and combustion systems, as well as the provision and management of energy. It also focuses on power generation and combined systems, BioMass processers application of heat and fluid transfer.

Renewable and Alternative Energy: Provides an in-depth coverage of the principles of renewable and alternative energy systems: Winds, Solar, BioMass, Geothermal, Fuel Cells, Hydrogen Technologies and Nuclear Energy.

Nuclear Technology: A study of nuclear engineering including the theory of atomic and nuclear physics, methods and benefits of generating electricity from nuclear power plants, and the effects of ionising radiation. The nuclear fuel cycle and the associated environmental impacts are also considered. The development of international guidance on nuclear and radiological safety and a comparison of national regulatory structures are analysed. The importance of safety cultures, safety behaviours and safety cases is a key element throughout this module.

Energy Management: The unit is specifically designed to provide the students with the basic of economical analysis and evaluation of energy projects and asset management as well as risk and hazard assessment, comprising legislation, hazard identification and quantification, quantified risk analyses, methods of elimination/mitigation, economic appraisal of integrated renewable, and petroleum projects; with numerous pertinent case studies.

Programme Assessment

You will be taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars, tutorials (personal and academic), laboratory sessions and project work. The course has a strong practical emphasis and you will spend a significant amount of time in our Energy, Power systems and Electronic laboratories.

A range of assessment methods encourages a deeper understanding of engineering and allows you to develop your skills. Here’s how we assess your work:

Written examinations
Coursework
Laboratory-based project work
A major individual project/dissertation

Student Destinations

This course is designed to respond to a growing skills shortage of people with core knowledge in energy and power systems management. It is an excellent preparation for a successful career in this ever expanding and dynamic field.

On successful completion of the course, you will have gained the skills and knowledge that will make you attractive to a wide variety of employers with interests ranging from overall system design to the more detailed development of subsystems. You will acquire the ability to critically evaluate methodologies, analytical procedures and research methods in energy and power systems management and in the use of state-of-the-art computational tools, the design of sustainable electrical power systems and networks and regulatory frameworks. For practicing engineers with professional business experience, the course is an opportunity to update your knowledge of current design practice and also to familiarise themselves with developments in codes and methods of analysis.

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