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Masters Degrees (Management And Law)

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In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MBA in Law and Management emphasises both professional and vocational development as well as an awareness of key legal and regulatory issues that play a central role in the successful management of modern enterprises of all types and sizes. You will develop an understanding of higher-level managerial skills and concepts, and their application in practical situations. You will have the opportunity to examine the law and regulation that affects business in a wide range of key areas.

Course Structure

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Finance for Managers: This module is designed for those who aim to achieve a basic understanding of financial management and control, and who require an understanding of finance in order to manage an organisation effectively. Financial planning and control are central themes, as well as the appraisal techniques of investment projects.

Optional modules+ (choose 4):

Marketing Strategy: This module critically evaluates the contributions of various schools of thought in marketing, and examines the relevant analytical models and management practices, with emphasis on the strategic importance of marketing to all organisations.

International Strategic Management: This module introduces the language of strategy and explores the link between strategic and operational management.

Knowledge Management: This module examines the processes whereby organisations and individuals develop and utilise their knowledge bases. Successful knowledge management hinges on people, culture and technology. As such it has professional and academic links with organisational behaviour and organisational learning.

Contemporary Issues in Management: This module analyses strategic decision-making within business. You will develop a critical understanding of the strategic processes of business management, the interconnections with the functional domains of marketing, human resource management and corporate finance, and the management of knowledge systems.

New Venture Creation: This module examines the advantages and disadvantages of the various routes to business start-up, including new venture creation, or establishing a business based on your own expertise, experience and ideas; buying an established business; purchasing a franchise; and succession through a family firm, an increasingly common way of becoming involved in entrepreneurial activity.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

+ Your optional modules must include either International Strategic Management or Marketing Strategy, and at least 2 Law options.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Commercial and Maritime Law at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study International Commercial and Maritime Law at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The wide range of LLM degrees including LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law offered by the Swansea College of Law and Criminology gives students the advantage of choice and specialism. For the student who does not wish to specialise to that extent, the College of Law and Criminology offers a general LLM postgraduate degree (LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law). This general LLM provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in both Commercial and Maritime Law by choosing specialised modules from both areas of law.

Key Features of International Commercial and Maritime Law

The LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law course is built upon the wide range of research of high calibre produced by the members of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, who are also teaching diverse modules at the course. Teaching is research-led and practice-driven aiming at producing global graduates educated and equipped for distinguished personal and professional achievement. Teaching methods on the International Commercial and Maritime Law LLM are geared towards our students’ needs, conducted mainly through seminars and tutorials in small classes.

The LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law requires commitment to study throughout one calendar year. Students on the International Commercial and Maritime Law course are given the opportunity to develop a number of important skills which are not only essential to those wishing to become lawyers but are valuable, transferable skills in themselves in other employment contexts. The Shipping and Trade Law Department offers its students dedicated resources, including IT facilities and teaching rooms. Students on the International Commercial and Maritime Law course are fully supported by the College's dedicated Law Librarian and the Law Library holds an extensive selection of legal materials and on-line services such as Lexis and Westlaw. Students are encouraged to make full use of the facilities offered by the Postgraduate Faculty and, in particular, to take advantage of training sessions run by the Faculty, such as the legal research methods and Employability sessions, as well as of the Visiting Lectures’ series.

Modules

The LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law degree is modular, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances, a student of the International Commercial and Maritime Law course may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts: Part I consists of 4 taught modules each weighted at 30 credits. Students pursuing the LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law may choose any four options from the modules listed below. At least one module must be chosen from the asterisked (*) modules and at least one module from the double asterisked (**) modules.

Admiralty Law (*)

Carriage of Goods by Sea, Land and Air (*)

Charterparties: Law and Practice (*)

Law of the Sea (*)

Marine Insurance Law (*)

Oil and Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities (*)

Competition Law (**)

E-Commerce (**)

International Corporate Law and Governance (**)

International Intellectual Property Law (**)

International Trade Law (**)

Law of Intellectual Assets Management and Transactions (**)

Law and Practice relating to International Banking and Commercial Payments (**)

Ship and other Mobile Assets Finance Law (**)

International Commercial Arbitration

Part II is composed of two projects (LLM Research Projects) and is weighted at 60 credits. The LLM Research Projects will customarily be researched and written up over the summer period following the successful completion of the taught modules and are designed to enable LLM students to develop their research skills.

For further information on modules please visit the LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law page.

Extra-Curricular Activities

Throughout their studies, LLM in International Commercial and Maritime Law students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities and enhance their practical understanding of shipping, insurance and commercial practice. Such activities include;

- employability lectures
- guest lecture series delivered inter alia by former judges, directors of international organisations and prominent partners from city law firms
- networking events, including an Annual LLM Career Fair
- visits to a number of leading enterprises within the City of London which also give our students another chance to network with professionals working in the commercial and maritime field
- mooting training throughout the year, including tailored guidance and weekly training classes
- free English language classes designed to assist you in improving your critical legal thinking and writing

Careers & Employability

The International Careers Adviser at Swansea runs weekly workshops for international students, for example, on how to improve career prospects and improve interview techniques. The Postgraduate Department also employs two dedicated LLM employability officers who run a series of talks to develop the skills of LLM students and inform their career plans.

The Department also enjoys close links with many City law firms. For example, one of our professors on the LLM programme was a senior partner, and is now a consultant with, Ince & Co, a leading London law firm, specialising in international trade, insurance and shipping law. The IISTL provides training programmes for London City solicitors, P&I Clubs and shipping organisations. Many of our graduates secure employment shortly after completing their degrees. Several international firms keep a close relationship with the Shipping and Trade Law Department and regularly send representatives for guest lectures and graduate recruitment purposes. Also every year the Department hosts the LLM Careers Fair which is attended by representatives from a wide range of local and international organisations. For further information on the Employability initiatives, please visit http://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/shipping-trade-law-department/llmemployabilityinitiativesandresults/

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The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. Read more
The MBA in Banking and Law will develop knowledgeable and capable banking executives and banking lawyers who will move quickly into key positions in the financial sector. The degree focuses on the financial and strategic management of banks and other financial institutions as well as the increasingly complex legal and regulatory structures within which banks and their executives have to operate. The legal issues will cover a wide range of topics at UK, EU and international level with which a modern banker needs to be familiar. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business options. You will gain practical insight and skills in a range of financial, legal and strategic management topics in the supply of international financial services as well as key Law subjects which have a direct impact on Banking practice. Case studies and contemporary issues figure prominently in the programme, particularly focusing on the lessons to be learnt from the recent ‘credit crunch’ and the issues for international financing and regulation that this has thrown up.

Compulsory modules:

Organisations and People: This module examines key issues arising from contemporary research in organisational behaviour (OB) and human resource management (HRM). It provides an integrated analysis of management, organisations and people, developing the conceptual, strategic and practical skills necessary for managers in complex, global organisational contexts.

Management Research: This module analyses the philosophical basis for research in the management sciences, and examines a number of key methodological issues and approaches. Research designs for both quantitative and qualitative research methodologies are developed, including interviews, case studies, focus groups, surveys and experiments.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks and other financial services firms. Three key themes are: identification and management of the trade-off between risk and return; improvement of a bank’s value using market models; and external market-based tests of bank performance.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk. You will investigate the determinants of the efficiency of international banks, and evaluate the implications for banks’ strategic decision-making.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. Read more

Overview

International law is an increasingly important field of study and practice. Never before has international law taken such a central position in public debates. The regulation of financial markets, environmental protection, the management of migrations or the prosecution of war criminals are all areas in which international law plays a major role. International law does not only affect the behaviour of states and intergovernmental institutions. Neither is it simply a discipline of diplomats, academics and philosophers. International law today dominates the activity of transnational corporations, NGOs and individuals, from footballers to victims of human rights violations. As a result, governments, international institutions, NGOs, businesses and law firms are increasingly looking for individuals capable of dealing with complex issues of transnational law.

Why Study International Law at Keele?

The Keele Law School has a long tradition of academic expertise in the field of international law. International law has been taught at Keele by world-renowned experts such as Michael Akehurst and Patrick Thornberry. In recent years, the Keele Law School has invested heavily in the area of international law. Students will be taught be dynamic academic staff with a wide range of expertise and research interests.

The Keele LLM in International Law differs from most existing LLMs in several important respects:

- Flexibility: the programme is based upon a ‘pathway’ structure, where students tailor their degree according to their needs and preferences. Depending on their choice of electives, students can graduate with any one of the following degrees: LLM in International Law; LLM in International Law and Politics; LLM in International Law and Human Rights; LLM in International Law and the environment; LLM in International Law and Business.

- Interdisciplinarity: students can choose from a wide range of electives offered not only within the Law School, but also within the School of Politics, International Relations and Philosophy (SPIRE) and the Keele Management School (KMS).

- Skills: students can study modern languages – including key UN languages – as part of their degree, increasing their range of professional skills. Keele currently offers courses in: Arabic, Mandarin Chinese, French, German, Japanese, Russian and Spanish.

- Professional opportunities: students interested in more hand-on practical experience have the possibility to do work placements as part of their degree, with any one of our partner institutions (UN agencies, international tribunals, non-governmental organisations, law firms, etc. – places are limited).

Keele is located on a beautiful and safe campus – the largest of its kind in the country – and has been ranked in the top 5 universities in the UK for student satisfaction.

See the website https://www.keele.ac.uk/pgtcourses/internationallaw/

Course Aims

The aims of the LLM in International Law are to:
- Provide students with a practical and theoretical understanding of the role, nature and functioning of international law.

- Encourage students to develop a critical awareness of the social, historical and political contexts in which international law operates.

- Provide a degree of specialisation in areas of international law of professional or intellectual interest to students.

- Develop students’ research skills in the context of supervised research on an agreed topic in public international law and encourage the production of original and creative scholarship.

- Encourage students to develop critical, analytical and problem-solving skills which can be applied to a wide range of legal and non-legal contexts.

- Provide a strong educational foundation that enhances a student’s prospects of professional, commercial or academic employment.

Teaching & Assessment

The LLM in International Law is taught by a team of talented academics and practitioners. Members of our staff hold degrees from the most prestigious Universities in Europe and North America (Sorbonne, Oxford, Cornell etc.). They have published widely on questions of United Nations law, international trade law, international investment law, dispute settlement, international criminal law, human rights law, international environmental law, or international legal theory. They have acted as legal advisers to governments and international organisations, have worked as human rights field officers, and have been consulted by the House of Lords on burning issues such as human trafficking.

The programme is taught principally through semester-long modules. During each taught module, students take part in lectures, tutor-led seminars and discussions, small group exercises, and case studies. Each module is accompanied by extensive independent study and throughout the course students are encouraged and required to undertake independent reading.

The programme is assessed principally, though not exclusively, through written work. Written work may be in the form of research essays, final examinations, blog discussions or reflective portfolios. Through the essays, students demonstrate their understanding of a particular area of international law (or one of the other taught subjects, i.e. human rights/environment/politics/business) as well as their ability for original thinking and high-level written communication skills.

The final form of assessment is the dissertation, which is an extended (15,000 – 20,000 words) and in-depth piece of writing that brings together all of the skills that students have learned throughout the programme. As part of the dissertation, students are also required to prepare a dissertation proposal and give an oral presentation (as part of the graduate research workshop).

Additional Costs

Modules across the programme will include recommended core and supplemental texts. Costs will vary depending on the particular text (Law textbooks vary between £20-40).

Apart from additional costs for text books, inter-library loans and potential overdue library fines we do not anticipate any additional costs for this post graduate programme.

Careers Development

The LLM in International Law will enable entry into a range of occupations where specialist expertise knowledge is needed. It provides an ideal basis for those seeking employment as international law practitioners in relevant national and international organisations (government agencies, UN bodies, NGOs), multinational corporations, or transnational law firms. Equally, the programme will equip students for further study in the form of a postgraduate research programme, such as a PhD, by providing appropriate research training and an introduction to key thinkers and scholarship.

Find information on Scholarships here - http://www.keele.ac.uk/studentfunding/bursariesscholarships/

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The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas. Read more
The Kent LLM (and associated Diploma programme) allows you to broaden and deepen your knowledge and understanding of law by specialising in one or more different areas.

This specialisation is designed for people who already work, or intend to work, within the criminal justice system, whether for the police, probation service, prison service or other organisations, or those with an interest in such matters. It covers criminal law and procedure in the UK, internationally and comparatively. It examines criminal justice systems from a range of perspectives, including the management of organisations, human rights, the psychological and sociological causes of criminal behaviour and social and economic perspectives.

There is close co-operation with the MA in Criminology run by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research. Students on the LLM and MA can take modules from both programmes. Criminology has specialists in many areas including criminological theory, research methods, youth crime, gender, cultural criminology and terrorism.

Studying for a Master's in Law (LLM) at Kent means having the certainty of gaining an LLM in a specialist area of Law. The Kent LLM gives you the freedom to leave your choice of specialism open until after you arrive, your specialism being determined by the modules you choose.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/114/criminal-justice

About Kent Law School

Kent Law School (KLS) is the UK's leading critical law school. A cosmopolitan centre of world-class critical legal research, it offers a supportive and intellectually stimulating place to study postgraduate taught and research degrees.

In addition to learning the detail of the law, students at Kent are taught to think about the law with regard to its history, development and relationship with wider society. This approach allows students to fully understand the law. Our critical approach not only makes the study of law more interesting, it helps to develop crucial skills and abilities required for a career in legal practice.

The Law School offers its flagship Kent LLM at the University’s Canterbury campus (and two defined LLM programmes at the University’s Brussels centre). Our programmes are open to non-law graduates with an appropriate academic or professional background who wish to develop an advanced understanding of law in their field. You study within a close-knit, supportive and intellectually stimulating environment, working closely with academic staff. KLS uses critical research-led teaching throughout our programmes to ensure that you benefit from the Law School’s world-class research.

Course structure

You can tailor your studies to your particular needs and interests to obtain an LLM or Diploma in Law in a single specialisation, in two specialisations jointly, or by choosing a broad range of modules in different areas of law to obtain a general LLM or Diploma in Law.

Your choice of specialisation will be shaped by the modules you take and your dissertation topic. To be awarded an LLM in a single specialisation, at least three of your six modules must be chosen from those associated with that specialisation and your dissertation focusing on that area of law. The other three modules can be chosen from any offered in the Law School. All students are required to take the Legal Research and Writing Skills module. To be awarded a major/minor specialisation you choose three modules associated with one specialisation, and three from another specialisation, with the dissertation determining your 'major' specialisation.

For example, a student who completes at least three modules in International Commercial Law and completes a dissertation in this area would graduate with an LLM in International Commercial Law; a student who completes three Criminal Justice modules and three Environmental Law modules and then undertakes a dissertation which engages with Criminal Justice would graduate with an LLM in Criminal Justice and Environmental Law.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of this specialisation stream. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation and student demand. Most specialisation streams will require you to study a combination of subject specialisation modules and modules from other specialisation streams so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

LW871 Policing

LW846 International Criminal Law

LW886 Transnational Criminal Law

LW924 European Union Criminal Law and Procedure

Assessment

The postgraduate programmes offered within the Law School are usually taught in seminar format. Students on the Diploma and LLM programmes study three modules in each of the autumn and spring terms. The modules normally are assessed by a 4-5,000-word essay. Students undertaking an LLM degree must write a dissertation of 15-20,000 words.

Programme aims

This programme aims to provide:

1. LLM: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) advanced research, writing and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.
PGDip: The opportunity to develop (a) expert knowledge and a sophisticated understanding of particular areas of law; (b) written and oral communication skills of general value to postgraduate employment.

2. LLM: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of particular areas of law.
PGDip: A sound knowledge and systematic understanding of the institutional structures, key principles of law and policy and influential ideas, theories, assumptions and paradigms of the subjects studied.

3. LLM & PGDip: A degree of specialisation in areas of law and policy chosen from the LLM option streams available and an opportunity for students to engage with academic work at the frontiers of scholarship.

4. LLM & PGDip: A critical awareness of the operation of law and policy, particularly in contexts that are perceived to be controversial or in a state of evolution.

5. LLM: The skills to undertake supervised research on an agreed topic in their specialisation and to encourage the production of original, evaluative analysis that meets high standards of scholarship.

6. LLM & PGDip: Critical, analytical and problem-solving skills that can be applied to a wide range of contexts.

7. LLM & PGDip: The skills of academic legal research and writing.

8. LLM: A sophisticated grounding in research methods.

Careers

Employability is a key focus throughout the University and at Kent Law School you have the support of a dedicated Employability and Career Development Officer together with a broad choice of work placement opportunities, employability events and careers talks. Details of graduate internship schemes with NGOs, charities and other professional organisations are made available to postgraduate students via the School’s Employability Blog.

Many students at our Brussels centre who undertake internships are offered contracts in Brussels immediately after graduation. Others have joined their home country’s diplomatic service, entered international organisations, or have chosen to undertake a ‘stage’ at the European Commission, or another EU institution.

Law graduates have gone on to careers in finance, international commerce, government and law or have joined, or started, an NGO or charity.

Kent has an excellent record for postgraduate employment: over 94% of our postgraduate students who graduated in 2013 found a job or further study opportunity within six months.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Joint LLM Comparative and European Private International Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary private international law, from comparative and European prospective, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions. Read more
The Joint LLM Comparative and European Private International Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary private international law, from comparative and European prospective, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions.

Why study at Dundee?

Building on the success of the Joint LLM in International Commercial Law, Dundee Law School has established a partnership with the University of Toulouse to run a joint LLM programme in Comparative and European Private International Law.

This is a topic of increasing practical importance in the era of globalisation - where to litigate, what law should be applied, and when can foreign judgments be recognised. This unique programme will explore the contrasting approaches of the common law and civil law worlds.

In the Spring semester (January-March) students will undertake private international law modules at Dundee, and then over the summer a dissertation.

In September, students will go to Toulouse to undertake a range of private international law modules, all taught through English.

What's great about Comparative & European Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course is designed for graduates in Law. However, the LLM can be taken both by students who have already studied private international law at undergraduate level as well as by those who are new to the subject, for the latter will be provided with additional instruction.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

Modules

At Toulouse, students will take a number of compulsory modules on core and specialist aspects of private international law.

Fundamental Private International Law
Private International Law Applications
Contract Law in European Context
International Organisations as Law Makers
European Criminal Law.
European contract and business law as well as international law are also covered.

In addition, students are required to attend intensive courses offered by invited foreign professors. At Dundee, students have to choose 2 private international law modules.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes. While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

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Are you ready to take your career in the world of commercial law to the next level?. The Master of Commercial Law is for those working in roles that require a sound grasp of commercial law issues. Read more
Are you ready to take your career in the world of commercial law to the next level?

The Master of Commercial Law is for those working in roles that require a sound grasp of commercial law issues. The course focuses on areas that include corporate and competition law, banking and finance law, and tax law and allows students to choose from an extensive range of domestic and international commercial law units. Our offering of units is designed to cater to a variety of career aspirations and interests. In this course, you will investigate contemporary law issues, practice and scholarship, and evaluate complex issues relevant to the field from theoretical, international and interdisciplinary perspectives.

The Master of Commercial Law provides a formal course of training for non-lawyers working in law-related fields (e.g. accountants, company administrators, management personnel, and related business areas). It provides students with the opportunity to obtain a specialist qualification in commercial law and provides a springboard from which to launch or further your career in this complex and evolving professional area.

We are one of the most prestigious law schools in Australia, and this course is offered at our Monash University Law Chambers, in the heart of the legal district of Melbourne.

The course offers a choice from a broad range of commercial law areas, or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. With units covering areas such as international trade law, competition law, corporate and white collar crime and corporate finance—to name a few, you will gain thorough theoretical and practical grounding in commercial law and practice. You will also develop the advanced professional skills and specialist knowledge required for work in this dynamic field.

We provide the flexibility to choose a program of study to suit your interests, skills and professional goals. Full-time or part-time study options allow you to continue to work, as well as meet personal commitments.

The course enhances your capacity to undertake independent research, and includes options for a pathway to doctoral studies.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/commercial-law-l6001?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts. Part A: Commercial law knowledge and Part B Extending specialist knowledge electives and research.

PART A: Commercial law knowledge
The studies enable you to develop specialised knowledge and advanced skills in areas of commercial law that suit your interests, skills and career goals.

PART B: Extending specialist knowledge electives and research
These studies will provide you with in-depth knowledge of a wide range of areas commercial law or you can select from across the range of Masters law elective units. You will focus on sources of information relevant to commercial law and the application of research methods and specialist discipline knowledge and skills necessary to support law-related work in those closely interrelated fields. Depending on your interests and motivation, you can choose a program of study in which you plan and execute a major research-based project with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/law

Faculty of Law

- Who we are

Monash Law is one of the largest and most prestigious law schools in Australia. We have a broad teaching base, strong international links and offer our students a variety of experiential learning opportunities. We are proud to offer a range of Undergraduate, Masters and Research degrees and provide legal education and training to over 3500 undergraduate and postgraduate students at any one time.

- Study with us

Studying a Law degree with Monash, your qualification will be internationally recognised as one of the world's best. We have a long established reputation as one of Australia's leading law schools and are a member of the prestigious Group of Eight universities, recognised globally for excellence in research, teaching and scholarship.

When you commence your Law degree with us, you commence your study of Law from day one. You can gain tangible, real legal experience in our two Clinical Legal Education Centres or undertake an international law program in Italy and Malaysia. Whatever your choice, a Law degree from Monash equips you with practical and transferable skills that you can take to your future career.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/commercial-law-l6001?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Oil and Gas Law at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Oil and Gas Law at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The business of hydrocarbon energy supply remains one of the most fundamental aspects of global commerce and natural resources law in the modern era. It is not limited to exploitation of petroleum but encompasses many different aspects of law and business, from protecting the intellectual property rights of new oil and gas technology, to complex joint venture contracts, and to compensation regimes for pollution liability.

Key Features

Students pursuing the LLM in Oil and Gas Law have the opportunity to study an impressive and diverse choice of subjects of relevance to this growing area of law, enabling them to study and understand the complex legal features of the petroleum industry.

The LLM in Oil and Gas Law course is built upon the wide range of high calibre research produced by the members of the Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law, who are also teaching at the LLM in Oil and Gas Law. Teaching is research-led and practice-driven aiming at producing global graduates educated and equipped for distinguished personal and professional achievement. Teaching methods are geared towards our students’ needs, conducted mainly through seminars and tutorials in small classes.

The LLM in Oil and Gas Law requires commitment to study throughout one calendar year. Students are given the opportunity to develop a number of important skills which are not only essential to those wishing to become lawyers but are valuable, transferable skills in themselves in other employment contexts. The Department of Shipping and Trade Law offers its postgraduate students dedicated resources, including IT facilities and teaching rooms. Students are fully supported by the College's dedicated Law Librarian and the Law Library holds an extensive selection of legal materials and on-line services such as Lexis and Westlaw. Students are encouraged to make full use of the facilities offered by the Postgraduate Faculty and, in particular, to take advantage of training sessions run by the Faculty, such as the legal research methods and Employability sessions, as well as of the Visiting Lectures’ series.

Modules

The LLM in Oil and Gas Law is modular, with students required to accumulate 180 credits to graduate. In appropriate circumstances, a student may graduate with a merit or distinction. Each programme is divided into two parts: Part I consists of 4 taught modules each weighted at 30 credits.

Oil and Gas Law students are required to take four modules from the following list. It is compulsory for students on the LLM in Oil and Gas to study International and Transnational Aspects of Oil and Gas Law . Students will also be required to take 3 modules from the rest of the modules listed below:

Oil & Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities

Charterparties: Law and Practice

International Commercial Arbitration

International Trade Law

Law and Practice in International Banking and Commercial Payments

Law of Intellectual Assets Management & Transactions

Law of the Sea

Marine Insurance

Following the successful completion of the taught modules, students proceed to Part II, which is composed of two projects (LLM Research Projects). At least one of the LLM Research Projects must be written in the area of International and Transnational Aspects of Oil and Gas Law or Oil & Gas Law: Contracts and Liabilities. The LLM Research Projects will customarily be researched and written up over the summer period and are designed to enable LLM students to develop their research skills.

For further information on the modules, please visit the LLM in Oil and Gas Law page.

Extra-Curricular Activities

Throughout their studies, LLM students are provided with the opportunity to take part in a number of extra-curricular activities and enhance their practical understanding of shipping, insurance and commercial practice. Such activities include;

- employability lectures
- guest lecture series delivered inter alia by former judges, directors of international organisations and prominent partners from city law firms
- networking events, including an Annual LLM Career Fair
- visits to a number of leading enterprises within the City of London which also give our students another chance to network with professionals working in the commercial and maritime field
- mooting training throughout the year, including tailored guidance and weekly training classes
- free English language classes designed to assist you in improving your critical legal thinking and writing

Careers and Employability

The Department of Shipping and Trade Law employs two dedicated LLM employability officers who run a series of talks to develop the skills of LLM students and inform their career plans.

The Department also enjoys close links with many City law firms. For example, Holman Fenwick Willan (HFW), one of the foremost shipping and commercial law firms in the world, has very generously agreed with Swansea Shipping and Trade Law Department to sponsor the best student in Oil and Gas Law. The Institute of International Shipping and Trade Law (IISTL) provides training programmes for London City solicitors, P & I (protection and indemnity) Clubs and shipping organisations. The Swansea LLM is well known internationally. Many of our graduates secure employment shortly after completing their degrees. Several international firms keep a close relationship with the Department of Shipping and Trade Law and regularly send representatives for guest lectures and graduate recruitment purposes. Also every year the Department hosts the LLM Careers Fair which is attended by representatives from a wide range of local and international organisations. The Fair enables our LLM students to meet and talk face to face with prospective employers. For further information on the Employability initiatives, please visit http://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/shipping-trade-law-department/llmemployabilityinitiativesandresults/ and http://www.swansea.ac.uk/law/shipping-trade-law-department/llmstudentsdestinations/

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Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. Read more

Overview

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprised of law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. The MSc in Management of Intellectual Property explores the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trade marks and the other core areas within this field.

This Masters of Science is primarily aimed at science and engineering graduates who wish to pursue a career as patent or trade mark attorneys, though it is also open to graduates from all academic backgrounds who wish to study Intellectual Property (IP) at postgraduate level.

There is continued need for expertise in intellectual property law and management in industry, commerce and the innovative and creative industries, and this MSc gives you the opportunity to study IP to a high level. The programme offers a professional stream (for science and technology graduates), and a business stream, available to graduates from all fields looking to expand their knowledge of the application and management of IP.

Professional stream
The professional stream is directed towards graduates (primarily sciences and other technical industries, but also from all other backgrounds) seeking qualification as patent and trade mark attorneys.

Business stream
Students on the business stream will gain profound knowledge of the law and its operation with a view to working in areas such as the press and media, the entertainment industry, the internet and software industries, or the luxury goods industries. Further sectors where knowledge in Intellectual Property and related areas is seen as a particular advantage include governments, international organisations, universities or non-governmental institutions.

This programme will:
◦Give you a choice of two streams to suit your background; a professional stream for science and engineering graduates, and a business stream for graduates of other disciplines.
◦Offer science and engineering graduates the opportunity to gain professional exemptions from Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys (CIPA) and Institute of Trade Mark Attorneys (ITMA).

What is Intellectual Property (IP) law?

Intellectual Property Law has become an interdisciplinary field comprising law, engineering, medical science, economics, and numerous other fields. This programme teaches the foundations of this area of law with relation to patents, trademarks and the other core areas within this field.

Why study Intellectual Property law?

The MSc Management of Intellectual Property programme was developed as we recognised the increasingly important role of intellectual property in our modern economy. There is an emerging need in industry, in commerce and in those professions concerned with intellectual property law, for science and technology graduates who have studied intellectual property law to a high level. In industry, particularly in small and medium-sized firms involved in research and development, where there is no in-house lawyer or patent agent, there is often a need for an intermediary between the firms and the external lawyer or patent agent for example; or for an executive to handle the inward or outward licensing of technology, to negotiate research and development contracts (where ownership of intellectual property is usually central to the bargaining) or generally to have a basic knowledge of current developments in the field of business law (eg. contract law, product liability law) insofar as these may relate to the firm's present or future activities.

With the introduction of the new business stream we also offer a distinct avenue for graduates from all backgrounds to gain valuable knowledge of intellectual property.

Structure of the MSc in Management of Intellectual Property

Classes usually commence mid-September with examinations in May/June. Courses are taught during the day at Queen Mary University of London campuses and usually take place between 9.00am and 5.00pm.

There is an initial Basic English Law examination which takes place two weeks after the start of the programme. Students then select which stream they wish to undertake.

Compulsory modules:

◦Study project (45 credits)
◦Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice (non-credit bearing but all students must pass this module at the start of the programme)

All students require 180 credits in total.

Professional stream students have core modules plus one free choice half module of 22.5 credits. In addition to this, professional stream students also sit two additional papers to gain exemption from the foundation papers of CIPA and ITMA, both papers must be passed to gain the exemption for either institution.

Business stream students have a free choice of 135 credits (three full modules or six half modules, or a combination of the two.)

All students are required to study the core subject units: Patent law, Copyright and designs law, Law of trade marks and unfair competition, Competition law, and Basic principles of English law, evidence and practice in term one. Occasional additional second semester options may be available.

]]Modules:]]

Read the full module descriptions on the QMUL web site.

Modules which run annually:
◦The law of copyright and design I (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦The law of patents I and II (Compulsory for Professional stream)
◦Trade mark law I and II (Compulsory for Professional Stream
◦Study Project (Core Module for all students)
◦The law of competition I
◦Media law
◦Trade mark law I
◦The law of patents I
◦Intellectual property in food, biotechnology and agriculture
◦Intellectual property in the United States.

Modules which may run but cannot be guaranteed:
◦Competition law and licensing I and II
◦The law of copyright and design I and I
◦Information technology law
◦Intellectual property transactions
◦Licensing practice.

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In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Read more
In today’s global competitive marketplace, the successful corporate executive needs to understand how the legal system and legal regulation can impact on their own area of expertise. Accordingly, the BangorBusinessSchool and the Bangor School of Law have combined to offer an innovative suite of interdisciplinary MBA and MA programmes.

The MA in Banking and Law is an interdisciplinary programme that will enable the student to study key legal and regulatory developments affecting the financial sector. This includes the regulation of financial services, security instruments, corporate finance, arbitration and other issues affecting modern banks at UK, EU and international level. As well as the general principles of International Banking Law, you will also choose from a wide range of law and business. The programme will equip candidates with higher level knowledge in both the Banking and Law areas, as global Banking practice today is heavily influenced by the Law. In particular the financial and regulatory lessons to be drawn from the so-called ‘credit crunch’ in the USA and the UK will be examined. The MA degree is suitable for those who wish to adopt a predominantly non-quantitative approach to their studies.

Course Structure
January intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of January to June and September to January and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

September intake: Taught modules are undertaken in the period of September to June and will involve the study of 120 credits. The dissertation (or equivalent) is valued at 60 credits and is undertaken during the period of June to September.

Compulsory modules:

Research Methods: This module develops knowledge of intermediate and advanced research methods, and provides a basis in research methodology for those who may eventually wish to pursue research degrees.

Bank Financial Management: This module provides a grounding in the nature, strategic context and managerial functions of financial management in banks, and other financial services firms.

International Banking: This module examines the origins of international banking, the activities of international banks, the markets in which they participate, and the sources of risk.

Financial Institutions Strategic Management: This module examines the main theoretical and practical issues concerning banking business. You will develop a critical awareness of the theory of the banking firm, the motives for international banking, and regulatory and structural issues impacting on bank behaviour.

Financial Crises and Bank Regulation: This module examines why banks and financial markets are inherently vulnerable to crises, and analyses the role of policy makers and institutions. The roles of monetary policy, bank supervision and regulation, corporate governance and ratings agencies in mitigating or exacerbating crises are considered.

International Banking and Capital Markets Law: This module will provide a sound understanding of the law and practice of modern international banking, including the regulation and prudential supervision of banks in the UK and EU in the areas of capital adequacy and risk management.

Optional Law modules (choose 2):

Comparative Corporate Governance: Major corporate scandals in the US, Europe and the UK in recent years have raised questions about the organisation and governance of companies, in particular large multinational organisations. The growth of private equity buy-outs has also raised issues of transparency and accountability.

Credit and Security Law: The supply of credit is the lifeblood of industry but of course a lender will require security. This module will examine in detail the provisions relating to the regulation of the supply of credit to consumers and business.

International Corporate Finance Law and Merger Regulation Law: This module focuses on the study of leading case law and selected legislation, relating to international mergers and their financing from several common law countries such as the USA, Britain, Ireland, Canada, Australia and New Zealand, as well as China, India and the EU.

International Commercial Arbitration: This module considers the theoretical and institutional structure of arbitration and alternative dispute resolution, examines the legal framework within which disputes are resolved and reviews the practice of international commercial arbitration.

Consumer Law: This module focuses on the main areas of legal liability and the pitfalls that can arise if an organisation does not comply with the relevant consumer protection rules both in the UK and Europe.

Intellectual Property Law: This module addresses the fundamentals of intellectual property law, the definition and scope of copyright; the authorship, ownership, duration and qualification for copyright protection.

Competition Law: This module focuses on the theory and law of competition, focusing on UK competition law, and EU competition law relating to the control of restrictive practices, vertical and horizontal restraints and abuse of a dominant position. Comparative regimes, in particular that of the US, are examined.

Industrial Property Law: This module examines the history and development of industrial property law in the UK, EU and internationally. It covers the law relating to trade secrets, patents, copyrights, design rights and trademarks.

World Trade Law: This module studies aspects of the regulation of international trade through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the World Trade Organisation.

International Insurance Law: Insurance plays an important role in commerce and risk management. Insurance contracts are governed by the rules of general law of contract. The module explores the nature and scope of the contract of insurance, considers the general principles of insurance, and examines the relationships between parties to a contract.

International Taxation Law: This module studies the basic principles of income taxation of international transactions involving taxpayers of several European countries (including the UK, the Netherlands, France, Germany, Ireland), the US, Australia, Canada and Japan.

Employment Law: Modern employment law is complex, and imposes major compliance costs on employers. This module covers contract of employment, minimum wage legislation, discrimination against employees, and unfair dismissal actions before Employment Tribunals.

International Environmental Law: This module focuses on internationally recognised principles and values concerning environmental protection, and how they are translated into legally enforceable tools. Methods of environmental regulation are analysed and compared.

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The LLM Corporate & Commercial Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary and commercial law, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions. Read more
The LLM Corporate & Commercial Law programme aims to provide advanced instruction in key aspects of contemporary and commercial law, that are of particular contemporary relevance and which will benefit and interest students coming from a wide range of legal traditions.

Why study Corporate & Commercial Law at Dundee?

The corporate modules at Dundee provide students with a detailed understanding of core issues relating to corporate law and corporate governance as well as allowing for specialisation in intellectual property law.

The programme will also develop a wide range of transferable skills including in research, written and oral presentation and time management.

What's so good about Corporate & Commercial Law at Dundee?

In the Times Good University Guide 2012 Dundee Law School was placed 7th in the United Kingdom law school rankings, and we were ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2011 National Student Survey (NSS).

In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise Dundee Law School was one of only two law schools in the United Kingdom to achieve a 100% international standard classification, with half of our submissions being graded internationally excellent or world leading. Our commitment on is to provide high quality instruction, with a focus on matters of practical relevance, to prepare students for a successful legal career, whether at home or abroad.

Postgraduate culture

Dundee Law School prides itself as being a friendly Law School where all members of staff are accessible and students are treated as individuals and valued members of our legal community.

We offer all new students an induction programme at the start of each semester, to ensure that all students have the necessary understanding of the UK and European legal systems as well as core principles of public and private law.

We seek to integrate all LLM students into the life of the Law School, and invite you to all guest lectures and seminars. We also have an annual reading party to a beautiful country house location, where you are joined by senior staff and can work on academic skills and dissertation preparation.

Who should study this course?

This course has been developed for those individuals with a background in law who wish to specialise and expand upon their existing knowledge and ability in the area of corporate and commercial law.

How you will be taught

Students are taught through a mix of lectures, seminar discussions and tutorials.

What you will study

To qualify for the LLM in Corporate & Commercial Law, students must complete at least 2 options which adopt a specifically corporate focus and complete their dissertation on a corporate law topic.

The Corporate modules at Dundee provide students with a detailed understanding of core issues relating to corporate law and allow for specialisation in the fields of corporate governance, as well as in banking and finance.

Principles of Corporate Law provides a strong central core which links to many of the other modules in the programme. This module focuses on the structure and development of company law in the United Kingdom in an international context. It covers the radical re-shaping of company law in the United Kingdom in 2006 which will almost certainly impact on the reform of corporate law in other jurisdictions which have shaped their corporate regimes on earlier UK legislation.

Corporate Governance covers issues relating to the distribution of power within companies and looks at governance regimes across the world. The impact of Enron and Worldcom have made governance issues much more high profile than had previously been the case. Dundee's strength in the field of corporations is equally reflected in the specialised option in Banking and Financial Services.

Alongside the corporate modules, students may select options from the School's broad commercial law portfolio, which includes: Intellectual Property Law; Principles of International E-Commerce, Competition Law and International Taxation Law.

How you will be assessed

Substantive modules: continuous assessment plus end of semester examinations in December and March/April. Compulsory dissertation: 12-15,000 words.

Careers

Dundee graduates have reached the highest levels of success in the profession as senior partners, Queen's Counsel, judges and front bench politicians.

We have close links with employers and we offer programmes to support and develop the employability of our students. Our good reputation throughout the profession and close links to employers help Dundee graduates find employment.

The Law School runs an annual Law Fair which attracts law firms and employers from around the UK and further afield. Law firms also regularly visit the law school on an individual basis for recruitment purposes. While many students study law in order to qualify to practise, the skills acquired in a law degree are also attractive to many prospective employers in professions such as:

The Police
Banking
Journalism
Management
Civil service

Find out more about legal careers from our Careers Service.

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawcultsoc/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. Read more
The Law Conversion Course - Legal Studies Common Professional Exam (CPE) is an accredited conversion course for non-law graduates aiming for a professional career in law. It satisfies all the requirements of the professional bodies including the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Transform your career

With over 30 years of expertise, LSBU Law has shaped the professional futures of thousands of law students. Study law in the heart of the capital - connected and convenient, with excellent transport options and a short walk from the Royal Courts of Justice.

Steps to becoming a solicitor or barrister

On successfully completing the CPE you are eligible to enter the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course (for intending barristers), which has some additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency.

Experienced tutors

The course is taught by an experienced team of tutors most of whom are solicitors or barristers which provides you with invaluable insight into the details of legal principals and real case examples.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/law-conversion-legal-pgdip-cpe

Modules

You'll study seven modules required by the professional bodies for students intending to apply for the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC):

- Introduction to the English legal system
You'll be introduced to the basic structure of the English Legal System and the essential aspects of civil and criminal litigation. You'll explore sources of law and key skills such as statutory interpretation, reading of law reports and the concept of judicial precedent. This introductory course will assist you in the study of the core modules, where legal skills will be developed further.

- Law of the European Union
Law of the European Union reflects the importance of EU law in the English Legal system. It is important to the management of the UK economy and relevant to the financial practitioners in the City. Business leader's decisions are influenced by EU competition law. It is important to migrants and practitioners of immigration law, to consumers and trading standards officials, to all employees through employment law and to all of us in relation to the environment.

- Obligations 1 (law of contract)
This module covers the principles of English contract law, sources, development, application in context and reform and includes reference to European developments. Contract is treated from formation to discharge and remedies with underlying concepts, rationales and influences and its relation to other forms of liability. Through the subject treatment, particularly examination of judicial reasoning and legislative technique, knowledge and skills are taught and/or developed. Skills include problem-solving, critical evaluation, reasoned argument and communication.

- Obligations 2 (law of tort)
You'll learn about civil liability in tort, focusing on an in-depth analysis of negligence, employers' liability for accidents at work, occupiers' liability for dangerous premises, manufacturers' liability for dangerous products, defences and vicarious liability. You'll develop your legal skills by reading and critically analysing cases and will apply your knowledge to complex, yet everyday, problem scenarios. You'll be encouraged to become critical and independent thinkers, and to communicate your ideas and awareness of the role of policy and the need for reform in the law of tort. In addition to its importance as an area of academic interest, tort is of practical significance to the intending practitioner, featuring heavily in the case scenarios of Legal Practice and Bar Professional Courses, as well as in everyday legal practice.

- Public law
You'll study the fundamental laws, practices and principles of Public law which define and influence the relationship between the individual and the state as characterised by various governmental institutions in the UK. Detailed consideration is given to the fundamental mechanisms by which human rights are protected and government is subject to legal and political accountability. Various skills are developed including those of analysis, critical evaluation and problem solving.

- Land law
Land law is a study of relationships. You'll study the relationship between the land and the rights which can exist in or over it, the relationship between the various persons who own an estate or interest over the land or want to defeat the competing interests in or over the land. You'll look at the rights and duties of each party to that relationship, how these relationships co-exit and what happens when the relationships come into conflict. Land Law governs the relative priorities enjoyed by two or more interests concerning the same piece of land. Land Law creates clear rules and formalities as to how the owner of an interest in land can acquire, transfer or extinguish that interest in land. You'll study the interests over land which Land Law is prepared to recognise and how these interests must be protected to ensure enforceability against third parties.

- Criminal law
This module aims to develop your ability to analyse and critically evaluate problems in Criminal Law so that you become independent and reflective legal practitioners able to contribute to public debate on legal issues. The main areas taught are: murder, manslaughter, non-fatal offences against the person including sexual offences and a variety of property offences including theft and fraud, accomplice liability and inchoate offences. You'll have additional support by way of on-line quizzes and narrated summaries.

- Equity and trusts
Principles of Equity are vital in the administration of justice. The 'trust' is a legal doctrine developed from those principles of equity which is fundamental to the commercial, business and employment worlds (pensions) and to individuals in the gifting of their property (personal trusts; wills).

- Project module
The project module satisfies the requirement of the academic stage of legal education that one other area of legal study must be successfully undertaken in addition to the seven modules which constitute the "Foundations of Legal Knowledge." It comprises the completion of a 4000 word extended essay, under the supervision of a member of the academic staff, based on the analysis of legal literature which takes differing interpretations over an issue related to law or its underlying theories. Its aim is to foster the development of the key elements of legal reasoning and legal method, research methods used in the conduct of autonomous research in law or law related topics as well as the development of skills in relation to the review and evaluation of journal articles, advanced texts and other secondary legal material.
Dissertation for the award of LLM

- Dissertation (LLM only)
This is an optional module as it is not required to complete the academic stage of legal education and so is not required to obtain the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. Its successful completion is required to obtain the LLM. A prerequisite to undertake this module is the successful completion and award of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and the common professional examination. It comprises the completion of a 15,000 word Master's level dissertation under the supervision of an appropriate academic member of staff. It requires the student to independently conceive, plan and execute an appropriate piece of research based on firm academic and theoretical foundations. The module builds upon the research skills already acquired in the successful completion of the postgraduate diploma in legal studies and common professional examination.

Assessment

Most modules are assessed by exams, exams plus coursework or presentations.

Award
X8 modules = PgDip + CPE
X8 modules and dissertation = LLM

Employability

- Solicitor or Barrister
This course can lead to one of many careers in law from a professional qualification as solicitor or barrister to a wide variety of careers in both public and private sectors.

While our graduates may go on to join professional courses leading to qualification as a solicitor or barrister, the Diploma is also useful for numerous jobs that value skills in analysis, clear communication, efficient organisation and reasoned persuasion.

- BSB and SRA
This course is fully recognised by the Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority and constitutes completion of the Academic Stage of Training for the purposes of further study on either the Legal Practice Course (for intending solicitors) or the Bar Professional Training Course for intending barristers (with additional entry requirements including an aptitude test and English language proficiency).

LLM Progression

Unlike a Graduate Diploma in Law our PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE is a postgraduate level qualification. After successfully completing the course you'll accumulate sufficient postgraduate credits to be eligible to submit for the further award of LLM by dissertation.

The LLM is an optional qualification additional to your Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Studies. To obtain the LLM you must successfully complete a supervised 15,000 word dissertation for which preparation has already been undertaken by your successful completion of the project module forming part of the programme leading to the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. The Masters dissertation is usually submitted in the semester following completion of the PgDip Legal Studies plus CPE. You'll not be required to attend classes when researching and writing your dissertation and you'll therefore be able to enrol on the Legal Practice Course or Bar Professional Training Course in the September following the successful completion of the PgDip in Legal Studies.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Teaching and learning

The primary aims of the course are to ensure that you achieve a sound understanding of English law covered in the seven foundation subjects, which provides a solid grasp of the structure and operation of the English legal system.

Classes consist of a mixture of lectures and smaller group meetings where exam technique and problem solving approaches are practiced. The course is well supported by online materials and search resources, which can be accessed off-campus.

You'll have free access to OUP Law TROVE to access books for all foundation subjects.

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