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Masters Degrees (Man)

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Goal of the pro­gramme. Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How can we change food behaviour?. Read more

Goal of the pro­gramme

Why do we eat the way we do? What happens to food in our body? How does nutrition maintain our health? How do we study the way people use food? How does culture influence our food choices? How is food discussed in the media? How can we change food behaviour?

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food-Related Behaviour focuses on human nutrition and related behaviour from the perspective of public health nutrition, nutrition physiology and social sciences. The innovative, thought-inspiring programme is built around human nutrition, food behaviour and food consumption. 

The goal of the Master’s programme is to enable you to

  • Understand the significance of nutrition to bodily functions and health
  • Learn to analyse the physiological, psychological, social and cultural aspects that determine food choices of individuals and communities
  • Recognise the diversity of food and nutritional issues and ways to influence them

Pro­gramme con­tents

The Master’s Programme in Human Nutrition and Food-Related Behaviour focuses on

  • The role of nutrition and other lifestyle factors in promoting health and preventing illness
  • The mechanisms through which food impacts our body at the molecular biology level
  • Food choices and consumption behaviour, and means of influencing them through policies, interventions and communication
  • Food services and their management
  • Food culture and social movements
  • Research methods in the fields of nutrition and food-related behaviour
  • The Master’s thesis
  • Other studies, which you can choose according to your interests

The multidisciplinary University of Helsinki provides numerous options for other studies.

The courses incorporate different methods of study, such as

  • Contact teaching, lectures
  • Group work
  • Oral presentations
  • Written reports (individual, pair, group)
  • Independent study
  • Laboratory work and other assignments and related reports
  • Learning journals, oral group examinations, written examinations, take-home essays
  • Seminars

The diversity of learning methods enhances the development and application of critical thinking, argumentation and problem-solving skills.



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The aim of this course is to provide students with a state-of-the-art collection of knowledge, understanding, and skills in the area of Advanced Computer Science. Read more

The aim of this course is to provide students with a state-of-the-art collection of knowledge, understanding, and skills in the area of Advanced Computer Science. This collection aims to be of particular depth so as to provide the student with the relevant knowledge, understanding, and skills to prepare them for a career in Computer Science research. It is designed for students with a good first degree in Computer Science or related areas who wish to deepen their understanding, knowledge, and skills, and aim at a research career in either Industry or Academia.

A student following this course chooses two themes, each consisting of a conceptually coherent set of two course units of 15 credits each, and they take three course units out of these. In addition, they follow three Research Seminars COMP80122, COMP80131, COMP80142 of 5 credits each. This will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills in Research methodology, ethics and professional issues, as well as communication and presentation skills. As part of COMP80122, students actively participate in the school's annual research symposium, held in reading week between Period 1 and 2.

Teaching and learning

We use a variety of teaching forms, from face-to-face lectures via supervised and unsupervised labs, to self-study elements and supervised projects. Where appropriate, we use blended learning and enquiry based learning.

All our taught course units use coursework as a part of fomative assessment, to deepen and assess both knowledge and understanding and to teach and assess relevant skills.

Coursework and assessment

Course units are assessed through coursework (50%) and end-of-semester examination (50%). However, flexibility is allowed in the delivery and assessment, allowing methods appropriate for each subject. If a course unit's specific features require it for assessments through 66% coursework and 34% exam, or other distributions.

Further information is available at http://intranet.cs.man.ac.uk/intranet_subweb/postgrad

Course unit details

A student following this programme chooses two themes, each consisting of a conceptually coherent set of two course units of 15 credits each, and they take three course units out of these. In addition, they follow three Research Seminars COMP80122, COMP80131, COMP80142 of 5 credits each. This will provide students with the necessary knowledge and skills in Research methodology, ethics and professional issues, as well as communication and presentation skills. As part of COMP80122, students actively participate in the school's annual research symposium, held in reading week between Period 1 and 2.

This makes up the 60 credits taught part of the course.

The MRes research project is worth 120 credits and consists of the following parts: a taster project (10 credits) plus the research project (110 credits), which can but do not have to be related to the same subject and supervised by the same supervisor. The taster project is assessed via a short report. The research project is assessed in two parts, through the Project Progress Report (30 credits) and the Dissertation (80 credits).

A student who chooses two themes that belong to a given pathway, and whose project is in an area suitable for this pathway (which is determined by the examiners) can choose to graduate with an MRes in Advanced Computer Science with a specialisation in an available themes in their course options.

Facilities

  • Newly refurbished computing labs furnished with modern desktop computers
  • Access to world leading academic staff
  • Collaborative working labs complete with specialist computing and audio visual equipment to support group working.
  • Over 300 Computers in the School dedicated exclusively for the use of our students.
  • An Advanced Interfaces Laboratory to explore real time collaborative working;
  • Nanotechnology Centre for the fabrication of new generation electronic devices;
  • An e-Science Centre and Access Grid facility for world wide collaboration over the internet.
  • Access to a range of Integrated Development Environments (IDEs)
  • Specialist electronic system design and computer engineering tools.

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Our Advanced Computer Science courses have an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Advanced Computer Science courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

The MRes in Advanced Computer Science particularly focuses students to explore further study at research level, or to careers in industrial or academic research and development.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.



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This is a high quality course aimed at imparting advanced knowledge across a broad range of Computer Science and offering training in advanced skills. Read more

This is a high quality course aimed at imparting advanced knowledge across a broad range of Computer Science and offering training in advanced skills. It is suitable for those who wish to enhance their computing skills in order to improve their contribution to IT-related industry or to pursue R&D in academia or industry.

A student following the Advanced Computer Science course chooses two from about a dozen themes, each of which combines two related course units that build on top of each other. Certain combinations are integrated into specialised 'pathways' . A student who opts to follow the pathways will have the pathway specialism included in their degree certificate.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Course unit details

A student following the Advanced Computer Science course chooses two from about a dozen themes, each of which combines around four related course units that build on top of each other. Certain combinations are integrated into specialised pathways

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Our courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia. The MSc is also a route to further study at research level, or to careers in industrial or academic research.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Automotive industry design is undergoing a very swift and radical change and this course prepares automotive engineers to deal with this complex and fast development. Read more
Automotive industry design is undergoing a very swift and radical change and this course prepares automotive engineers to deal with this complex and fast development. Our applied approach to design, manufacture and testing of automotive products ensures that our graduates are ready for automotive industry, with excellent employability prospects. In addition, our location is in the heart of one of Europe's biggest concentrations of high-tech businesses and the UK motorsport valley. This offers unrivalled opportunities for students to collaborate with automotive industry and their supply chain. It keeps students abreast with the current developments in automotive technologies, production methods, processes and management techniques. Our teaching is centred around our state-of-the-art laboratories in a purpose-designed engineering building.

Why choose this course?

You will be taught in a purpose-designed engineering building, by staff with exceptional knowledge and expertise in their fields. Lecturers include world-leaders in research on sustainable vehicle engineering, and those with experience of designing and working with major automotive manufacturers such as TATA, MAN and BMW. Our visiting speakers from business and industry provide professional perspective, preparing you for an exciting career; for more information see our industrial lecture series schedule. We have close links with industry including the BMW MINI plant in Oxford, Porsche, Ford, MAN, MIRA and other national and international partners. Our research incorporates the latest developments within the sector with high profile visiting speakers contributing to our invited research lectures.

In REF 2014 57% of the department's research was judged to be of world leading quality or internationally excellent with 96% being internationally recognised. Regular visits to automotive industry and their supply chain provide students with opportunities to explore technical challenges and the latest technology - to get a flavour of the activities within our department see 2015 highlights. You will have the opportunity to join our acclaimed Formula Student team (OBR), mentored by our alumni and visiting lecturers from automotive and motorsport industry. You will put theory into practice by competing with the best universities from around the world. Find out more about Formula Student at Brookes by visiting the Oxford Brookes Racing website: https://obr.brookes.ac.uk/

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) and The Institute of Engineering and Technology meeting the academic requirements for full Chartered Engineer status.

This course in detail

The course is structured around three periods: Semester 1 runs from September to December, Semester 2 from January to May, and the summer period completes the year until the beginning of September.

To qualify for a master's degree you must pass the compulsory modules, one of two alternative-compulsory modules and one optional module, along with the dissertation.

Compulsory modules
-Advanced Vehicle Dynamics
-Sustainable Engineering Technology.
-Advanced Engineering Management

Alternative-compulsory modules (you must pass at least one of these):
-Noise, Vibration and Harshness
-Vehicle Crash Engineering

Optional modules (you take one of these, unless you take both alternative-compulsory modules above):
-Advanced Vehicle Aerodynamics
-Engineering Reliability and Risk Management
-CAD/CAM
-Advanced Powertrain Engineering

The Dissertation (core, triple credit) is an individual project on a topic from automotive engineering, offering an opportunity to develop a high level of expertise in a particular area of automotive engineering, including use of industry-standard software and/or experimental work, the module will also provide you with research skills, planning techniques, project management. Whilst a wide range of industry-sponsored projects are available (e.g. MAN (Germany), VUHL (Mexico), McLaren (UK), AVL (Austria), Arctic Truck (Iceland) etc.), students are also able undertake their own projects in the UK and abroad, to work in close co-operation with a research, or commercial organisation.

Please note: As our courses are reviewed regularly as part of our quality assurance framework, the choice of modules available may differ from those described above.

Teaching and learning

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide further input.

Careers and professional development

Our graduates enjoy the very best employment opportunities, with hundreds of engineering students having gone onto successful careers in their chosen industry. Many of our students go on to work with leading automotive or motorsport companies in the UK and worldwide.

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This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Read more

This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Working with tutors and other writers on the course, you’ll develop your writing and build up a substantial body of work. Weekly workshops are taught by a strong team of published writers, and there are regular visits by literary agents, publishers, magazine editors and broadcasters, as well as other writers.

Due to the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers every year.

COURSE STRUCTURE AND CONTENT

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.

You’ll learn:

• To plan a manuscript (a novel, collection of short stories, collection of poems or book of literary non-fiction) and complete it, or a substantial part of it, brought to publishable quality or as near as possible.

• To understand literary form, style and genre, as relevant to your chosen form of writing

• To acquire a variety of relevant writing techniques, and research techniques to support writing, and adapt them to your particular creative project.

• To understand and respond creatively to questions arising from the subject-matter, themes, genres, traditions and other literary contexts with which your chosen manuscript is engaged.

• To receive and give precise and sensitive critical feedback in workshop groups and one-to-one tutorials.

• To respond creatively to feedback provided by tutors and other students, adapting that feedback to your particular vision of your book.

• To understand choices and opportunities relevant to your chosen manuscript, including questions of how to place your work, and the role of agents, publishers and editors.

MODULES

Each student will take two workshop modules, two context modules and a double module entitled 'The Manuscript':

In the first trimester ‘Professional Skills’ provides intensive group discussion and some plenary lectures. You’ll bring short pieces of writing to workshop groups consisting of a tutor and not more than seven other students. There are separate groups for prose and poetry. You’ll submit a manuscript proposal halfway through the module.

In trimester two, you’ll take a second workshop module in either prose or poetry.

Each context module explores connections between your creative writing and the wider world as represented by a theme or genre. Seminars are divided between considering set texts and workshopping your creative writing. You’ll take a context module in trimester one and another in trimester two.

In trimester three, ‘The Manuscript’ will be taught by means of one-to-one tutorials. This is the culmination of the course – the book, or substantial part of a book.

For more information on course structure and modules please go to: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/courses/pg-creative-writing/

TEACHING METHODS

You’ll be taught in group workshops and seminars, one-to-one tutorials, plenary lectures and a residential weekend.

TUTORS

The teaching team in 2015-16 included the novelists Ian Breckon, Nathan Filer, Maggie Gee, Tessa Hadley, Samantha Harvey, Philip Hensher, Beatrice Hitchman,Tricia Wastvedt, Fay Weldon and Gerard Woodward, the poets Tim Liardet, Lucy English, Neil Rollinson and Sean Borodale, the historical novelists Celia Brayfield and Kylie Fitzpatrick, the nature writer and memoirist Richard Kerridge, the nature writer Stephen Moss, the travel writer Joe Roberts and the literary memoirist Gavin Cologne-Brookes.

ASSESSMENT METHODS

You’ll be assessed entirely by coursework: mainly creative writing, plus two short essays, a manuscript proposal and a short commentary on the manuscript in progress.

For more information on assessment please see the course handbook: https://www.bathspa.ac.uk/media/bathspaacuk/course-handbooks/course-handbooks/PG-Creative-Writing-Handbook-2016-17.pdf

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; been long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, Orange Prize, Costa Prize and the Guardian First Book Award; received the Betty Trask Prize, Manchester Book Award and a W.H. Smith New Talent Award, and reached the best-seller lists.

ALLUMNI SUCCESS

In recent years, several current or former students have been awarded excellent contracts for novels; Two were long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, three for the Orange Prize, one for the Costa Prize and one for the Guardian First Book Award. One received the Betty Trask Prize; another the Manchester Book Award; another a W.H. Smith New Talent Award. One reached the best-seller lists. Student poets have had their poetry accepted for publication in numerous literary journals, including Ambit, Magma, London Magazine, Poetry Wales, PN Review and The Reader, among others, and have been placed in such competitions as the Bridport, the Frogmore, Mslexia, and Writers Inc. Janklow and Nesbit Ltd, a leading literary agency, awards an annual prize for the best novel or novel in progress by a student on the course.



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In the past twenty years, the Web has transformed society and changed the way we work, trade, learn, do science, organise our lives, and play. Read more

In the past twenty years, the Web has transformed society and changed the way we work, trade, learn, do science, organise our lives, and play. The Web is, on the one hand, a network of interlinked computers, protocols, and software and, on the other hand, a socio-cultural phenomenon that influences law, the media, business, science, etc. To shape and work with the current and future forms of the Web, we need to understand its underlying design principles and concepts, relevant issues and techniques, and how these interact and influence each other. The fast changing nature of the Web means that such a deep understanding is essential to understand the latest developments and their potential.

The Advanced Web Technologies pathway is centred around a core theme of the same name, Advanced Web Technologies, and combines it with a choice of closely related yet complimentary themes, including Software Engineering 1 & 2, Making Sense of Complex Data, and Learning from Data. Students following this theme will gain an understanding and insight into the technologies that deliver the Web as we see it today. The topics covered include underlying languages and standards used to represent information on the web; techniques for understanding and managing data and information in a web context; and techniques and technology used to design and deliver web infrastructure.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Advanced Web Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern Wed infrastructure, ranging from the obvious Web developers and system providers to basically all companies employing or developing Web technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent… Read more

Artificial Intelligence is a well-established, exciting branch of computer science concerned with methods to make computers, or machines in general, intelligent - so that they are able to learn from experience, to derive implicit knowledge from the one given explicitly, to understand natural languages such as English, Arabic, or Urdu, to determine the content of images, to work collaboratively together, etc. The techniques used in AI are as diverse as the problems tackled: they range from classical logic to statistical approaches to simulate brains.

This pathway reflects the diversity of AI in that it freely combines a number of themes related to AI techniques, namely Making Sense of Complex Data, Learning from Data, Reasoning and Optimisation, and Advanced Web Technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Artificial Intelligence pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern AI formalism and technologies such as Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Semantic Technologies. This includes the obvious positions in the games industry, but also positions in finance, commerce, and scientific research, and many more.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Individuals, governments and organizations now routinely connect their computers to the Internet to communicate, provide services, and access massive stores of shared information. Read more

Individuals, governments and organizations now routinely connect their computers to the Internet to communicate, provide services, and access massive stores of shared information. These on-line activities, many conducted beyond national boundaries, have opened up enormous opportunities for security attacks such as identity thefts, computer hackings, privacy breaches, technical sabotages, etc. Addressing security threats and attacks in this vast and complex distributed environment is an immensely challenging task.

The Computer Security pathway is centred round a core Security theme that introduces students to fundamental security topics that arise in the design, analysis, and implementation of networked and distributed systems. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they may apply their newly acquired skills. The pathway is designed for students who wish to specialize in the security aspect of the Information Technology field.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Computer Science MSc courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

Security plays a role in almost all areas where computers are being used, including, for example, finance, healthcare, consumer products, and public services. Thus students who have followed the Computer Security pathway will be ideally placed in any of these areas, especially in positions where they need to be aware of security issues and solutions.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Computer Systems Engineering is a well-established branch of Computer Science, closely related to Electrical Engineering, and concerned with software-hardware integration and the development of high-performance and energy-efficient embedded systems, for example as used in mobile computing. Read more

Computer Systems Engineering is a well-established branch of Computer Science, closely related to Electrical Engineering, and concerned with software-hardware integration and the development of high-performance and energy-efficient embedded systems, for example as used in mobile computing. Aspects covered include questions such as how software can be designed to make use of new, ever more powerful (and often multicore) hardware, or how hardware can be designed to support certain software paradigms. The School of Computer Science is home to internationally renowned research groups working on these challenging tasks, and students following the Computer Systems Engineering pathway will have the opportunity to profit from their understanding of current technology and visions of how to exploit, for example, the formidable complexity of the billion transistor microchips that semiconductor technology will make commonplace over the next decade.

This pathway combines two themes, namely the Parallel Computing in the Mulit-core Era theme and the Mobile Computing theme. The former provides the student with techniques and tools to successfully develop concurrent multicore systems, while alleviating problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. The latter provides the student with an understanding of the current state of the art in computing to support mobility for telecommunications.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

The MSc in Advanced Computer Science has an excellent record of employment for its graduates. Opportunities exist in fields as diverse as finance, films and games, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, consumer products, and public services - virtually all areas of business and society. Manchester Computer Science MSc courses are considered among the best in the country and our graduates are actively targeted for the very top jobs in industry and academia.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Efficient management of data and knowledge are key factors not only to the success of almost any enterprise, but also to the successful handling of today's vast amounts of science related data. Read more

Efficient management of data and knowledge are key factors not only to the success of almost any enterprise, but also to the successful handling of today's vast amounts of science related data: with the transition to the information age and the knowledge economy, data has become both increasingly central and critical to all activities. For example, imagine the huge amounts of genomic or patient data available electronically, and how the quality of their management can affect society.

The Data and Knowledge Management pathway allows students to take specialist themes concerned with methods and technologies for the adequate management of data and knowledge. The Managing Data theme focuses on the design, maintenance, and query processing of both structured and unstructured databases. The Learning from Data theme covers principles, algorithms, and technologies underlying machine learning, probabilistic modelling, and optimisation, while exposing students to relevant applications. The Advanced Web Technologies theme provides students with a deep understanding of the technologies that are being used to support the continuing evolution of the Web, including Semantic Web technologies.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Data and Knowlege Management pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern data and knowledge management tools and technologies. This includes data and knowledge engineering positions in all areas where data is stored and managed electronically, i.e., in all areas, including the finance, retail, and healthcare sector.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Read more

These are exciting times in biology and medicine. The genomics revolution is opening up whole new areas of research - from new insights into how organisms function, to new understandings of disease and disease processes. Medicine is currently involved in the largest and most ambitious IT project in the world - the capture and interpretation of electronic patient records. This information will make health care much more effective and can help spot new diseases early - whilst they can still be contained and controlled. At the heart of all these developments are data and knowledge - and a real need and demand for the skills and techniques that computer scientists can bring these problem areas. Biology and healthcare now provide some of the fastest growing and most challenging areas for computer scientists to apply their skills.

The Digital Biology pathway is centered around a central theme of Biohealth Informatics. The theme is specifically designed for computer scientists without any previous experience of medicine or biology and will help you to develop the core skills needed to work or research (as a computer scientist) in these rapidly evolving fields. This core theme is complemented by a range of other themes that allow students to develop additional skills which have important applications in healthcare and biology.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Digital Biology pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers with healthcare providers, the pharmaceutical industry, and bio-health research institutes.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfills the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. Read more

Semantic Technologies is a relatively new term that describes all areas concerned with using and developing software and methodologies for meaning-centred manipulation of information. The aim is to provide software and methodologies so that web resources, data in databases and raw data associated with programs can be processed and manipulated in a more intelligent way. This requires storing, understanding, manipulating and reasoning about the meaning of the data. Semantic technologies are increasingly being used in such varied applications as the semantic web, health care and biomedical domains, the life sciences, software/hardware industries and the automotive industry.

The Semantic Technologies pathway combines themes such as 'Data on the Web' with 'Ontology Engineering and Automated Reasoning'. These core offerings can be combined with any other theme. Good complementary themes are Data Engineering, Managing Data, Learning from Data, Security and Software Engineering.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Semantic Technologies pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in software companies or for healthcare providers who are using or developing Semantic Technologies.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. Read more

Microprocessor manufacturers have recently presented the software industry with its most serious challenge ever, by switching from serial execution architectures clocked at ever-increasing clock rates to ever-more parallel multi-core architectures clocked at a constant (or even decreasing) clock rate. The consequences will be profound because parallel computational activities will need to be handled as the norm, rather than the exception; programmers of the future will need skills that are currently possessed by very few, due to the inherent complexities of parallel systems.

This pathway is centred round a core theme, Parallel Computing in the Multi-core Era , that introduces students to the aforementioned complexities, and provides techniques and tools that can alleviate the ensuing problems of correctness, reliability, performance and system management. Subsidiary themes allow students to investigate broader areas in which they might apply their newly learned skills.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Multi-Core Computing pathway have all the career options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students following this pathway are well placed for careers in the software industry since they will acquire the necessary skills to design and develop software that makes the most out of state-of-the-art multi-core architectures. This includes the games industry, the financial sector, and all other areas in which high performance computing is key.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Software Engineering is a well-established, central part of Computer Science, and concerned with the design and use of techniques to support humans to build… Read more

Software Engineering is a well-established, central part of Computer Science, and concerned with the design and use of techniques to support humans to build software systems that are reliable, adaptable, usable, maintainable, etc, despite the fact that they are usually developed by large groups of people with different ideas, conceptualisations, or working styles, and against a tight schedule and possibly conflicting or unclear requirements. The understanding and mastering of these techniques is essential both for people who are part of this group and for those managing such a group or project.

The Software Engineering pathway combines two themes of the same name, Software Engineering 1 & 2. These themes covers both an overview of existing approaches to Software Engineering, and two particular approaches at the forefront of Software Engineering research and practice; Pattern-based and Component-based Software Development.

Teaching and learning

Computational thinking is becoming increasingly pervasive and is informing our understanding of phenomena across a range of areas; from engineering and physical sciences, to business and society. This is reflected in the way the Manchester course is taught, with students able to choose from an extremely broad range of units that not only cover core computer science topics, but that draw on our interdisciplinary research strengths in areas such as Medical and Health Sciences, Life Sciences and Humanities.

Coursework and assessment

Lectures and seminars are supported by practical exercises that impart skills as well as knowledge. These skills are augmented through an MSc project that enables students to put into practice the techniques they have been taught throughout the course.

Facilities

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 

Career opportunities

Students following the Software Engineering pathway have all the career choices and options as described for general Advanced Computer Science.

In addition, students of this pathway are ideally placed to work in positions requiring an understanding of modern Software Engineering techniques and tools. This includes the obvious positions in the games industry, but also positions in finance, commerce, software project management, etc.

We maintain close relationships with potential employers and run various activities throughout the year, including career fairs, guest lectures, and projects run jointly with partners from industry. This is managed by our Employability Tutor; see the School of Computer Science's employability pages for more information.

Accrediting organisations

This programme is CEng accredited and fulfils the educational requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer when presented with a CEng accredited Bachelors programme.



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Building people’s resilience to disasters and conflict. One of the key development challenges of our time is the increasing number of people placed at risk of crises and disasters; people's vulnerability increases due to shocks and trends as a result of natural and man-made hazards. Read more

Building people’s resilience to disasters and conflict

One of the key development challenges of our time is the increasing number of people placed at risk of crises and disasters; people's vulnerability increases due to shocks and trends as a result of natural and man-made hazards.

The number, complexity and impact of disasters are increasing which heightens the need for better disaster management. Disaster Risk Management (DRM) has become one of the cornerstones of international development: there is urgency to reduce disaster losses and a need to minimize the impact of disasters on sustainable development. 

Disasters are, in essence, the result of poorly managed risk and human failure to introduce appropriate risk reduction measures. Effective crises and disaster responses therefore demand a shift away from reactive Emergency Relief to pro-active Disaster Risk Reduction. DRM therefore combines the concept of response and recovery (in the post-disaster phase) with the concept of prevention, mitigation and preparedness (the pre-disaster phase). 

Graduates of DRM will be better able to respond to natural and man-made disasters in increasingly complex and dynamic environments. In the context of increasing climate variability and climate change (slow-onset disasters), this specialization pays attention to linking Disaster Risk Reduction with Climate Change Adaptation. The DRM specialisation also touches on conflict, making the course also relevant for those working in tense and conflict affected regions. 

Central to the DRM specialisation is the focus on reducing the negative impacts of disasters and conflict on peoples’ lives and livelihoods and to build people’s resilience to disasters, crises and conflict.

Competences

At graduation, you will have developed the ability to:

  •  To apply disaster and conflict theories to real-life crises and disaster settings;
  • To understand the changing roles, responsibilities and modes of operations of key DRM actors;
  • To design and conduct risk and context analyses aimed to identify appropriate disaster response strategies and options;
  • To analyse and strengthen local risk governance;
  • To apply emerging good-practice integrated approaches to address crucial issues in building community resilience;
  • To address challenges faced by agencies and staff in responding to crises, including safety and security concerns; 

Career opportunities

Within an increasingly complex and dynamic context, graduates are trained and equipped to enhance community resilience of communities and reduce the impact of crises and disasters on sustainable development. 

Graduates have acquired new insights and know how to use innovative approaches, which have proved their potential to build community resilience to better manage risks as required by the nature of today’s crises and disasters. By looking through a disaster and conflict lens, graduates can make an important contribution to sustainable development.  



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