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Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area. Read more

Theoretical Physics

Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area.

This programme serves as a gateway to understanding the fascinating world of physics, ranging from the unimaginably small scales of elementary particles to the vast dimensions of our universe.

The central goal of the Theoretical Physics programme is to obtain a detailed understanding of the collective behaviour of many particle systems from a fully microscopic point of view. In most physical systems, microscopic details determine the properties observed. Our condensed matter theorists and statistical physicists develop and apply methods for explaining and predicting these connections.

Examples include density functional theory, renormalisation-group theory and the scaling theory of critical phenomena. Dynamical properties are studied using such methods as kinetic theory and the theory of stochastic processes. These theories can be quantum mechanical, including theories of the quantum Hall effect, superconductivity, Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum magnetism and quantum computing. More classical are relationships between chaos and transport, nucleation phenomena, polymer dynamics and phase structure and dynamics of colloids.

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The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics Euromasters offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner

Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study. The different learning outcomes of the potential awards may be summarised as follows:

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
-Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes

Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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Our MSc Physics programme will provide you will have exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills in physics. Read more
Our MSc Physics programme will provide you will have exposure to a very wide range of world-leading teaching and research skills in physics. As well as the modules offered by the Department of Physics, many optional modules are available from across the University of London, such as Queen Mary University of London, Royal Holloway University of London and University College London. You will undertake an extended research project supervised by one of our academic staff.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-msc.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

The programme consists of taught components combining specialised taught material in current areas of Physics and related disciplines, general research techniques, transferable skills and specialised research techniques together with a major research project. The project starts in January carrying through to the end of the programme. Experts in the chosen field will act as project supervisors.

The programme is run by the Department of Physics with some modules provided by the Department of Mathematics, the Randall Division of Cell and Molecular Biophysics and other University of London Colleges.

Topics include: nanotechnology, biophysics, photonics, cosmology and particle physics.

- Course purpose -

The MSc programme provides experience of research in rapidly developing areas of physics and related disciplines. Provides experience of the planning, administration, execution and dissemination of research, and equips students with the background knowledge and transferable and generic skills required to become an effective researcher.

- Course format and assessment -

From October to March you will study specialised taught material, attend lectures and seminars, carry out related assessed tasks, prepare an assessed research proposal, select your project topic and plan how your project will be performed. Lecture courses attended between October and March will be assessed by examination in May. Other assessments include a project plan and a patent draft. You will carry out your project full-time from April with a mid-project review and submission and oral presentation in September. Your project will contribute 50 per cent of the marks for your degree and you must also achieve at least 50 per cent in each module. The taught material is also assessed by essays and exercises.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a PhD in Physics, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

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The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Read more
The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification, most students take this programme as a pathway to the MSc. This pathway forms the first year of a two-year programme with successful students (gaining a merit or distinction) progressing onto the MSc Physics in second year.

Key benefits

- King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.

- Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".

- The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".

- Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials.

Visit the website: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/taught-courses/physics-grad-dip.aspx

Course detail

- Description -

Students will undertake a total of 120 credits, from the following modules:

- Mathematical Methods in Physics III
- Statistical Mechanics
- Spectroscopy and Quantum Mechanics
- Particle Physics
- Optics
- Solid State Physics
- General Relatvity and Cosmology
- Fundamentals of Biophysics and Nanotechnology
- Introduction to Medical Imaging
- Laboratory Physics II
- Computational Lab
- Nuclear Physics
- Quantum Mechanics for Physics I
- Mathematical methods in Physics
- Symmetry in Physics
- Electromagnetism
- Astrophysics

- Course purpose -

For students with an undergraduate degree or equivalent who wish to have the experience of one year in a leading UK Physics Department, or who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to upgrade their degree. If you successfully complete this programme with a Merit or Distinction we may consider you for the MSc programme.

- Course format and assessment -

The compulsory modules are assessed via coursework. The majority of the other optional modules avaiable are assessed by written examinations.

Career prospects

Many students go on to do a higher Physics degree, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.

How to apply: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/apply/taught-courses.aspx

About Postgraduate Study at King’s College London:

To study for a postgraduate degree at King’s College London is to study at the city’s most central university and at one of the top 20 universities worldwide (2015/16 QS World Rankings). Graduates will benefit from close connections with the UK’s professional, political, legal, commercial, scientific and cultural life, while the excellent reputation of our MA and MRes programmes ensures our postgraduate alumni are highly sought after by some of the world’s most prestigious employers. We provide graduates with skills that are highly valued in business, government, academia and the professions.

Scholarships & Funding:

All current PGT offer-holders and new PGT applicants are welcome to apply for the scholarships. For more information and to learn how to apply visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/study/pg/funding/sources

Free language tuition with the Modern Language Centre:

If you are studying for any postgraduate taught degree at King’s you can take a module from a choice of over 25 languages without any additional cost. Visit: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/mlc

Read less
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students. Read more
The MSc Physics offers you the flexibility to tailor your studies according to your interests, building on the research strengths of our friendly Department, and the supportive environment that we provide for our students.

We collaborate with a variety of partners across the academic, public and industry communities, including the National Physical Laboratory.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

You will select modules from a wide range of fundamental and applied physics topics. The application-focused modules are co-taught by practitioners in public service and industry to ensure that students gain real-world insight.

A module in research skills will prepare you to apply your new knowledge and skills in an eleven-week research project undertaken during the summer.

Your chosen research projects can open the door to many careers, not just further research. They will give you tangible experience of working independently and communicating your work effectively and efficiently in written form: key requirements in many professions.

Why not discover more about the subject in our video?

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied full-time over one academic year and part-time students must study at least two taught technical modules per academic year. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation. The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Introduction to Biology and Radiation Biology
-Radiation Physics
-Radiation Measurement
-Detection Instrumentation
-Radiation Laboratory Skills
-Experimental and Professional Skills for Medical Physics
-Research Skills
-Non-linear Physics
-Topics in Theoretical Physics
-Imaging and Remote Sensing
-Diagnostic Applications of Ionising Radiation Physics
-Radiation Protection
-Extended Group Project
-Therapy Physics
-Non-ionising Radiation Imaging
-Nuclear Power and Non-ionising Radiation
-Environmental Physics and Environmental Protection
-Astrophysical Dynamics
-Quantum Magnetism and Superconductivity
-Advances in Nanophotonics
-Research Project and Dissertation
-Special Relativity
-Modern Analytical Techniques
-Nuclear Astrophysics
-Light and Matter
-Advanced Quantum Physics
-Cosmology and Galaxy Formation
-Semiconductor Physics and Technology

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

The primary aim of the programme is to provide a high quality postgraduate level qualification in physics.

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

Students will:
-Be able to demonstrate an advanced understanding of theories and ideas in a sub- discipline of Physics
-Have insight into current topics and problems of that sub-discipline in a professional and/or academic context
-Be able to apply their knowledge and practical understanding of scientific methodology in their chosen research topic (e.g. experimental techniques, simulation tools, developing theoretical models etc.)
-Analyse, evaluate and interpret data produced and/or summarised in the literature in their chosen area of speciality
-Be able to carry out a scientific investigation under the guidance and advice of their supervisor
-Acquire, analyse, interpret and draw conclusions from their findings with the appropriate numerical methods and due consideration to uncertainties; they will also be able to critically evaluate the significance of their conclusions, strengths and weaknesses of their study in the context of up-to- date literature relevant to their research topic and present their work in written form to the scientific audience of their speciality in a professional and concise manner
-Throughout the programme, students will develop the ability to manage their own learning in terms of time management as well as identifying and accessing the resources required for their academic study

Subject knowledge and skills
-A systematic understanding of their chosen area of specialisation in an academic and professional context together with a critical awareness of current problems and / or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by the state of the art
-A comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own research project
Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of radiation-based, experimental research projects
-An ability to evaluate and objectively interpret experimental data in their chosen topic of specialisation
-Familiarity with generic issues in management and safety and their application in a professional context

Core academic skills
-The ability to plan and execute under supervision, an experiment or investigation and to analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions from them
-The ability to evaluate the level of uncertainty in results, understand the significance of uncertainty analysis and be able to compare these results with expected outcomes, theoretical predictions and/or with published data, along with the ability to evaluate the significance of results in this context
-The ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in their chosen discipline of specialisation
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Personal and key skills
-The ability to communicate complex scientific ideas, the conclusions of an experiment, investigation or project concisely, accurately and informatively
-The ability to manage their own learning and to make use of appropriate texts, research articles and other primary sources
-Responsibility for personal and professional development
-The ability to use external mentors for personal / professional purposes
-Knowledge and understanding
-Knowledge of physics, technology and processes in the subject of the course and the ability to apply these in the context of the course
-Ability to research problems involving innovative practical or theoretical work
-Ability to formulate ideas and response to problems, refine or expand knowledge in response to specific ideas or problems and communicate these ideas and responses
-Ability to evaluate/argue alternative solutions and strategies independently and assess/report on own/others work with justification

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-The ability to plan and execute, under supervision, an experiment or theoretical investigation, analyse critically the results and draw valid conclusions
-Students should be able to evaluate the level of uncertainty in their results, understand the significance of error analysis and be able to compare their theoretical (experimental) results with expected experimental (theoretical) outcomes, or with published data
-They should be able to evaluate the significance of their results in this context
-The ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences

Professional practical skills
-Technical mastery of the scientific and technical information presented and the ability to interpret this in the professional context
-Ability to plan projects and research methods in the subject of the course
-Understand and be able to promote the scientific and legal basis of the field through peer and public communication
-Aware of public concern and ethical issues in radiation and environmental protection
-Able to formulate solutions in dialogue with peers, mentors and others

Key / transferable skills
-Identify, assess and resolve problems arising from material in lectures and during experimental/research activities
-Make effective use of resources and interaction with others to enhance and motivate self –study
-Make use of sources of material for development of learning and research; such as journals, books and the internet
-Take responsibility for personal and professional development
-Be self-reliant
-Responsibility for personal and professional development

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

Read less
Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies. As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. Read more

Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials

Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies.
As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. But how do you tackle a problem when there are no adequate theories and calculations become far too complicated? In the specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials you’ll be trained to take up this challenge in a field of physics that is still largely undiscovered: the interface between quantum and classical physics.
We focus on systems from two atoms to complete nanostructures, with time scales in the order of femtoseconds, picoseconds or nanoseconds. One of our challenges is to understand the origin of phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. As theory and experiment reinforce each other, you’ll learn about both ‘research languages’. In this way, you’ll be able to understand complex problems by dividing them into manageable parts.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Why study Physics of Molecules and Materials at Radboud University?

- At Radboud University there’s a strong connection between theory and experiment. Theoretical and experimental physicists will teach you to become acquainted with both methods.
- In your internship(s), you’ll have the opportunity to work with unique research equipment, like free electron lasers and high magnetic fields, and with internationally known scientists.
- We collaborate with several industrial partners, such as Philips and NXP. This extensive network can help you find an internship or job that meets your interests.

If you’re successful in your internship, you have a good chance of obtaining a PhD position at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM).

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Physics
2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- A TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based
- An IELTS score of ≥6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university or at a company. However, many of our students end up in business as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments
- Work with numerical methods

Graduates have found jobs as for example:
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

PhD positions

At Radboud University, we’re capable of offering many successful students in the field of Physics of Molecules and Materials a PhD position. Many of our students have already attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In this specialisation, you’ll discover the interface between quantum mechanics and the classical world, which is still a ‘terra incognita’. We focus on two-atom systems, multi-atom systems, molecules and nanostructures. This is pioneering work, because these systems are often too complex for quantum calculations and too small for the application of classical theories.

- Theory and experiment
At Radboud University, we believe that the combination of theory and experiments is the best way to push the frontiers of our knowledge. Experiments provide new knowledge and data and sometimes also suggest a model for theoretical studies. The theoretical work leads to new theories, and creative ideas for further experiments. That’s why our leading theoretical physicists collaborate intensively with experimental material physicists at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Together, they form the teaching staff of the Master’s specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials.

- Themes
This specialisation is focused on two main topics:
- Advanced spectroscopy
Spectroscopy is a technique to look at matter in many different ways. Here you’ll learn the physics behind several spectroscopic techniques, and learn how to design spectroscopic experiments. At Radboud University, you also have access to large experimental infrastructure, such as the High Magnetic field Laboratory (HFML), the FELIX facility for free electron lasers and the NMR laboratory.
- Condensed matter and molecular physics
You’ll dive into material science at the molecular level as well as the macroscopic level, on length scales from a single atom up to nanostructure and crystal. In several courses, you’ll get a solid background in both quantum mechanical and classical theories.

- Revolution
We’re not aiming at mere evolution of current techniques, we want to revolutionize them by developing fundamentally new concepts. Take data storage. The current data elements are near the limits of speed and data capacity. That’s why in the IMM we’re exploring a completely new way to store and process data, using light instead of electrical current. And this is but one example of how our research inspires future technology. As a Master’s student you can participate in this research or make breakthroughs in a field your interested in.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

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