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Masters Degrees (Magnetism)

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Our Physics MSc is highly flexible, giving you the opportunity to structure your course to meet your individual career aspirations. Read more

Our Physics MSc is highly flexible, giving you the opportunity to structure your course to meet your individual career aspirations.

The course gives you the opportunity to broaden and deepen your knowledge and skills in physics, at the forefront of research in the area. This will help to prepare you to progress to PhD study, or to work in an industrial or other business related area.

A key feature of the course is that you can choose to study a wide range of optional modules or focus on a particular area of research expertise according to your interests and future career aspirations.

Under the umbrella of an MSc in physics, you can specialise in astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging. Or you can take a diverse range of modules to suit your interests and keep their options open.

Course content

The course offers you a very wide range of optional modules, giving you the opportunity to specialise in areas such as astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging.

Modules studied may include: quantum field theory; superconductivity; general relativity; medical image analysis; cosmology; bionanophysics; magnetism in condensed matter; statistical mechanics; star and planet formation; elementary particle physics; quantum matter; and photonics.

Alongside your optional modules, you will undertake an advanced and extensive research project in one of the School of Physics and Astronomy’s internationally recognised research groups. This will enable you to develop advanced skills in research planning, execution and reporting, possibly leading to publication of your work in an international journal.

Course structure

Compulsory modules

  • MSc Project 75 credits
  • Advanced Literature Review 15 credits
  • Current Research Topics in Physics 15 credits

Optional modules

  • Cardiovascular Medical Imaging 10 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 10 credits
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging 10 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 10 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 10 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 10 credits
  • Digital Radiography and X-ray Computed Tomography 15 credits
  • Ultrasound Imaging 15 credits
  • Radionuclide Imaging 15 credits
  • Medical Image Analysis 15 credits
  • Cosmology 15 credits
  • Photonics 15 credits
  • Molecular Simulation: Theory and Practice 15 credits
  • Star and Planet Formation 15 credits
  • Advanced Quantum Mechanics 15 credits
  • Quantum Photonics 15 credits
  • Quantum Matter 15 credits
  • Magnetism in Condensed Matter 15 credits
  • Statistical Mechanics 15 credits
  • Advanced Mechanics 15 credits
  • Bionanophysics 1 15 credits
  • Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics 15 credits
  • Soft Matter Physics: Liquid Crystals 15 credits
  • Quantum Many-Body Physics 15 credits
  • Winds, Bubbles and Explosions 15 credits
  • Bionanophysics 2: Advanced Bionanophysics Research 15 credits
  • Advanced Group Industrial Project 15 credits
  • Superconductivity 15 credits
  • Soft Matter Physics: Polymers, Colloids and Glasses 15 credits
  • Quantum Transport in Nanostructures 15 credits
  • Quantum Field Theory 15 credits
  • General Relativity 15 credits
  • Quantum Information Science 15 credits
  • Advanced Physics in Schools 15 credits

For more information on typical modules, read Physics MSc in the course catalogue

Learning and teaching

Teaching methods include a combination of lectures, seminars, supervisions, problem solving, presentation of work, independent research, and group work (depending on the modules you choose to study).

Assessment

Assessment of modules are by problem solving exams and research assignments. The project is assessed on the ability to plan and conduct research and communicate the results in written and oral format.

Career opportunities

The specialist pathways offered by this course (in astrophysics, bionanophysics, soft matter physics, condensed matter physics, quantum technology, optical materials or medical imaging) allow you to tailor your course and focus on a particular area of research expertise according to your interests and future career aspirations.

Physicists are highly employable due to their high level of numeracy and mathematical competence, their computer skills, and their high level of technical academic scientific knowledge. They are employed by: industry, financial sector, defence, education, and more.

This course is also a clear route to PhD level study.

Careers support

We encourage you to prepare for your career from day one. That’s one of the reasons Leeds graduates are so sought after by employers.

The Careers Centre and staff in your faculty provide a range of help and advice to help you plan your career and make well-informed decisions along the way, even after you graduate. Find out more at the Careers website.



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Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area. Read more

Theoretical Physics

Theoretical physics is an international and highly competitive field. For several decades, Utrecht University's Institute for Theoretical Physics has been on the forefront of research in this area.

This programme serves as a gateway to understanding the fascinating world of physics, ranging from the unimaginably small scales of elementary particles to the vast dimensions of our universe.

The central goal of the Theoretical Physics programme is to obtain a detailed understanding of the collective behaviour of many particle systems from a fully microscopic point of view. In most physical systems, microscopic details determine the properties observed. Our condensed matter theorists and statistical physicists develop and apply methods for explaining and predicting these connections.

Examples include density functional theory, renormalisation-group theory and the scaling theory of critical phenomena. Dynamical properties are studied using such methods as kinetic theory and the theory of stochastic processes. These theories can be quantum mechanical, including theories of the quantum Hall effect, superconductivity, Bose-Einstein condensation, quantum magnetism and quantum computing. More classical are relationships between chaos and transport, nucleation phenomena, polymer dynamics and phase structure and dynamics of colloids.

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The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Read more

The Graduate Diploma is designed for graduates whose first degree may be inappropriate for direct entry to an MSc in Physics at a UK university. Though it may be taken as a free-standing qualification, most students take this programme as a pathway to the MSc. This pathway forms the first year of a two-year programme with successful students (gaining a merit or distinction) progressing onto the MSc Physics in second year.

Key benefits

  • King's College London offers a unique environment for the taught postgraduate study of physics. Our size enables us to provide a welcoming environment in which all our students feel at home. The Physics Department has been built up to its current strength in the last few years, which has allowed us to design a bespoke research department focused in three areas.
  • Particle physics and cosmology is led by Professor John Ellis CBE FRS, who collaborates closely with CERN, and this group provides unique lecture courses, including "Astroparticle Cosmology" as well as "The Standard Model and beyond".
  • The Experimental Biophysics and Nanotechnology research group is a world-leading centre for nanophotonics, metamaterials and biological physics. Here you can study the state of the art in experimental nanoplasmonics, bio-imaging, near-field optics and nanophotonics, with access to the laboratories of the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN). You will be offered our flagship module in "Advanced Photonics".
  • Theory and Simulation of Condensed Matter is a group of theoreticians with a critical-mass expertise in many-body physics and highly-correlated quantum systems—magnetism and superconductivity, and world-leading research in condensed matter, particularly in biological and materials physics. The group is a founding member of the prestigious Thomas Young Centre (TYC), the London centre for the theory and simulation of materials.

Description

Students will undertake a total of 120 credits

Course purpose

For students with an undergraduate degree or equivalent who wish to have the experience of one year in a leading UK Physics Department, or who may not be immediately eligible for entry to a higher degree in the UK and who wish to upgrade their degree. If you successfully complete this programme with a Merit or Distinction we may consider you for the MSc programme.

Course format and assessment

The compulsory modules are assessed via coursework. The majority of the other optional modules avaiable are assessed by written examinations.

Career destinations

Many students go on to do a higher Physics degree, work in scientific research, teaching or work in the financial sector.



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Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies. As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. Read more

Master's specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials

Revealing the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum mechanics and the classical world and inspiring new technologies.
As a scientist, you’re a problem solver. But how do you tackle a problem when there are no adequate theories and calculations become far too complicated? In the specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials you’ll be trained to take up this challenge in a field of physics that is still largely undiscovered: the interface between quantum and classical physics.
We focus on systems from two atoms to complete nanostructures, with time scales in the order of femtoseconds, picoseconds or nanoseconds. One of our challenges is to understand the origin of phenomena like superconductivity and magnetism. As theory and experiment reinforce each other, you’ll learn about both ‘research languages’. In this way, you’ll be able to understand complex problems by dividing them into manageable parts.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

Why study Physics of Molecules and Materials at Radboud University?

- At Radboud University there’s a strong connection between theory and experiment. Theoretical and experimental physicists will teach you to become acquainted with both methods.
- In your internship(s), you’ll have the opportunity to work with unique research equipment, like free electron lasers and high magnetic fields, and with internationally known scientists.
- We collaborate with several industrial partners, such as Philips and NXP. This extensive network can help you find an internship or job that meets your interests.

If you’re successful in your internship, you have a good chance of obtaining a PhD position at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM).

Admission requirements for international students

1. A completed Bachelor's degree in Physics
2. A proficiency in English
In order to take part in this programme, you need to have fluency in both written and spoken English. Non-native speakers of English* without a Dutch Bachelor's degree or VWO diploma need one of the following:
- A TOEFL score of ≥575 (paper based) or ≥90 (internet based
- An IELTS score of ≥6.5
- Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE) or Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE) with a mark of C or higher.

Career prospects

This Master’s specialisation is an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university or at a company. However, many of our students end up in business as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments
- Work with numerical methods

Graduates have found jobs as for example:
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

PhD positions

At Radboud University, we’re capable of offering many successful students in the field of Physics of Molecules and Materials a PhD position. Many of our students have already attained a PhD position, not just at Radboud University, but at universities all over the world.

Our approach to this field

In this specialisation, you’ll discover the interface between quantum mechanics and the classical world, which is still a ‘terra incognita’. We focus on two-atom systems, multi-atom systems, molecules and nanostructures. This is pioneering work, because these systems are often too complex for quantum calculations and too small for the application of classical theories.

- Theory and experiment
At Radboud University, we believe that the combination of theory and experiments is the best way to push the frontiers of our knowledge. Experiments provide new knowledge and data and sometimes also suggest a model for theoretical studies. The theoretical work leads to new theories, and creative ideas for further experiments. That’s why our leading theoretical physicists collaborate intensively with experimental material physicists at the Institute for Molecules and Materials (IMM). Together, they form the teaching staff of the Master’s specialisation in Physics of Molecules and Materials.

- Themes
This specialisation is focused on two main topics:
- Advanced spectroscopy
Spectroscopy is a technique to look at matter in many different ways. Here you’ll learn the physics behind several spectroscopic techniques, and learn how to design spectroscopic experiments. At Radboud University, you also have access to large experimental infrastructure, such as the High Magnetic field Laboratory (HFML), the FELIX facility for free electron lasers and the NMR laboratory.
- Condensed matter and molecular physics
You’ll dive into material science at the molecular level as well as the macroscopic level, on length scales from a single atom up to nanostructure and crystal. In several courses, you’ll get a solid background in both quantum mechanical and classical theories.

- Revolution
We’re not aiming at mere evolution of current techniques, we want to revolutionize them by developing fundamentally new concepts. Take data storage. The current data elements are near the limits of speed and data capacity. That’s why in the IMM we’re exploring a completely new way to store and process data, using light instead of electrical current. And this is but one example of how our research inspires future technology. As a Master’s student you can participate in this research or make breakthroughs in a field your interested in.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy/physics

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The MSc in Compound Semiconductor Electronics has been designed to provide you with advanced level knowledge and skills in compound semiconductor engineering, fabrication and applications, and to develop related skills, enhancing your engineering competency and employability. Read more
The MSc in Compound Semiconductor Electronics has been designed to provide you with advanced level knowledge and skills in compound semiconductor engineering, fabrication and applications, and to develop related skills, enhancing your engineering competency and employability.

This programme is jointly delivered with the School of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Compound Semiconductors (ICS). The ICS is an exciting new development at the cutting edge of compound semiconductor technology. The Institute has been established in partnership with IQE plc, to capitalise on the existing expertise at Cardiff University and to move academic research to a point where it can be introduced reliably and quickly into the production environment. It is unique facility in the UK, and aims to create a global hub for compound semiconductor technology research, development and innovation.

As a student on this programme, you will have the opportunity to undertake a 3-month summer project which will be based either within the Institute for Compound Semiconductors, or in placement with one of our industrial partners. We have strong, long-established industrial links with companies such as National Instruments and Mesuro and are therefore able to offer a portfolio of theoretical, practical, fabrication and applications-centred projects in both academic and industrial placement environments.

Our flexible curriculum contains a robust set of required modules and a number of elective modules which include the latest results, innovations and techniques and are designed to incorporate the most effective teaching and learning techniques.

Upon graduation, you will have the training, skill-sets and hands-on experience you need to succeed in the dynamic and highly competitive fields of compound semiconductors and advanced communications systems. Given the University’s unique position at the forefront of compound semiconductor technology, you will have a distinct advantage when applying for PhD studentships or employment in industry.

Structure

The MSc in Compound Semiconductor Electronics is a two-stage programme delivered over three semesters (autumn, spring, and summer) for a total of 180 credits.

• Stage 1: Autumn/Spring terms (120 credits, taught)

You will undertake required modules totaling 70 credits, covering essential skills.

You will additionally have the choice of 50 credits of optional modules from a total of 100 credits, with each module covering specialist skills.

You must successfully complete the 120 credits of the taught component of the course before you will be permitted to progress to the research project component.

• Stage 2: Summer term (60 credits, dissertation/research project)

The summer semester consists of a single 60 credit research project module of 3 months’ duration. You will be required to produce a research dissertation to the required standard in order to complete this module. Students completing Stages 1 and 2 will qualify for the award of the MSc degree.

Core modules:

High Frequency Device Physics and Design
RF Circuits Design & CAD
RESEARCH STUDY
Management in Industry
Software Tools and Simulation
Compound Semiconductor Fabrication
Compound Semiconductors Research Project

Optional modules:

Commercialising Innovation
Fundamentals of Micro- and Nanotechnology
High Frequency Electronic Materials
HF and RF Engineering
Optoelectronics
Magnetism, Superconductivity and their Applications
Low Dimensional Semiconductor Devices
Quantum Theory of Solids
Compound Semiconductor Application Specific Photonic Integrated Circuits

Teaching

A wide range of teaching styles will be used to deliver the diverse material forming the curriculum.

Lectures can take a variety of forms depending on the subject material being taught. Generally, lectures are used to convey concepts, contextualise research activities in the School and to demonstrate key theoretical, conceptual and mathematical methods.

You will practice and develop critique, reflective, analytical and presentational skills by participating in diverse learning activities such as research group meetings, seminars and open group discussions. At all times you will be encouraged to reflect on what you have learned and how it can be combined with other techniques and concepts to tackle novel problems.

In the practical laboratory sessions, you will put the breadth of your knowledge and skills to use, whether that be using your coding skills to automate a laboratory experiment, designing components for a large piece of equipment or troubleshooting research hardware. The emphasis on the MSc in Compound Semiconductor Electronics is squarely on acquiring and demonstrating practical skills which will be of use in a research environment and hence highly sought-after by employers.

When working on your dissertation you will be allocated a supervisor from among our teaching staff. Dissertation topics are typically chosen from a range of project titles proposed by academic staff, usually in areas of current research interest, although students are encouraged to put forward their own project ideas. Projects may also come forward from potential employers and industrial partners who may be able to offer work-based placements for the duration of the project work.

Assessment

Multiple assessment methods are used in order to enhance learning and accurately reflect your performance on the course. In the required modules, a mixture of problem-based learning, in-lab assessment, written assignment, simulation exercises, written and oral examinations and group-based case study work will be used.

Feedback provided by your MSc Tutor, Module Leaders and for some modules, your fellow students will allow you to make incremental improvements to the development of your core skillset.

The methods used on the optional modules vary depending on the most appropriate assessment method for each module, but typically include written and/or practical assignments together with a written and/or oral examination.

Career prospects

An MSc in Compound Semiconductor Electronics will open up opportunities in the following areas:

• Technical, research, development and engineering positions in industrial compound semiconductors, silicon semiconductors and advanced communication systems;

• Theoretical, experimental and instrumentational doctoral research;

• Numerate, technical, research, development and engineering positions in related scientific fields;

• Physics, mathematics and general science education.

Cardiff University’s unique position at the forefront of compound semiconductor technology will provide you with the opportunity to develop experience and build contacts with a range of leading companies and organisations.

Placements

There will be a number of industrial placements each year for the summer research project module, which will either be hosted at the Institute for Compound Semiconductors or at the industrial partner’s facilities. The number and nature of these projects will vary from year to year and will be assigned based on performance in formal assessments.

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The MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics has been designed to deliver thorough training and practical experience in compound semiconductor theory, fabrication and applications, and integration with silicon technology. Read more
The MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics has been designed to deliver thorough training and practical experience in compound semiconductor theory, fabrication and applications, and integration with silicon technology.

The programme is jointly delivered by the School of Physics and Astronomy and the Institute for Compound Semiconductors (ICS).  The ICS is an exciting new development at the cutting edge of compound semiconductor technology. The Institute has been established in partnership with IQE plc, to capitalise on the existing expertise at Cardiff University and to move academic research to a point where it can be introduced reliably and quickly into the production environment. It is unique facility in the UK, and aims to create a global hub for compound semiconductor technology research, development and innovation.

Our flexible curriculum contains a robust set of required modules and a number of cutting-edge elective modules, which include the latest results, innovations and techniques) and are designed to incorporate the most effective teaching and learning techniques.

As part of the programme you will undertake a 3-month summer project which will be based either in the School of Physics and Astronomy, within the ICS, or in placement with one of our industrial partners.  We have strong, long-established industrial links with companies such as IQE and are therefore in a unique position to be able to offer a portfolio of theoretical, practical, fabrication and applications-centred projects in both academic and industrial placement environments.  No other Russell Group university can boast such opportunities in this field.

Upon graduation, you will have the training, skillsets and hands-on experience you need to succeed in the dynamic and highly competitive field of compound semiconductors.

Distinctive features

• Cardiff University’s unique position at the forefront of compound semiconductor technology will provide you with the opportunity to develop experience and build contacts with a range of leading companies and organisations.

• Our specialist elective modules are delivered by expert scientists, who deliver their courses based on their research expertise and current research portfolio.

• We offer a range of specialist modules that give you the opportunity to tailor the programme to suit your interests and ambitions.
Whether you’re fascinated by superconductivity and magnetism or want to specialise in photonics we have modules to suit you. We also have modules designed to develop commercial skills and more technical options such as advanced LabVIEW programming.

• Central to the design of this programme is the opportunity to ownership of real theoretical or practical projects. You will have acquired a full year’s worth of practical research experience by the time you complete your MSc, greatly enhancing your CV and prospects for employment or further study.

• You will be trained in the practical use of the LabVIEW programming environment. Recognised by industry this will serve as a solid foundation for preparing for the National Instruments (NI) Certified LabVIEW Associate Developer (CLAD) examination.

• We currently offer the opportunity to take the CLAD examination for free as an extra-curricular activity, supported by our certified academic staff. CLAD status is industrially recognised and indicates a broad working knowledge of the LabVIEW environment.

• We encourage a “research group” atmosphere within which you’ll be given the opportunity to work together, across disciplines, to enhance each other’s learning and be a vital part of our thriving, international scientific community.

Structure

The MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics is a two-stage programme delivered over three terms.

• Autumn term (60 credits, taught)
You will undertake two required modules (30 credits total) covering core skills and three elective modules of 10 credits value each covering specialist skills.

• Spring term (60 credits, taught)
You will undertake three required modules (40 credits total) covering core skills and two elective modules of 10 credits each covering specialist skills.

You must successfully complete the 120 credits of the taught component of the course before you will be permitted to progress to the research project component.

• Summer term (60 credits, research project)
The summer term consists of a single 60 credit research project module of 3 months’ duration.  You will be required to produce a research dissertation and present your research to the School in order to complete this module.

Core modules:

Advanced Experimental Techniques in Physics
Study and Research Skills in Physics
Compound Semiconductor Fabrication
Concepts and Theory of Compound Semiconductor Photonics
Compound Semiconductor Application Specific Photonic Integrated Circuits
Compound Semiconductor Physics Research Project

Assessment

Multiple assessment methods are used in order to enhance learning and accurately reflect your performance on the course.  In the required modules, a mixture of problem-based learning, short practical projects, written assignments, coding exercises, written and oral examinations and group work will be used.

In some of the required modules there are weekly assignments.  The feedback provided for these allows you to make incremental improvements to the development of your core skillset, giving you ample opportunity to implement the suggestions made by our expert staff.

The methods used on the elective modules vary depending on the most appropriate assessment method for each module, but typically include written and/or practical assignments together with a written and/or oral examination.

All assessments make use of feedback, which can be divided into formative and summative feedback.

Career Prospects

An MSc Compound Semiconductor Physics degree will open up opportunities in the following areas:

• Technical, research, development and engineering positions in industrial compound semiconductors, silicon semiconductors and semiconductor photonics;

• Theoretical, experimental and instrumentational doctoral research;

• Numerate, technical, research, development and engineering positions in related scientific fields;

• Physics, mathematics and general science education.

Placements

There will be a number of industrial placements each year for the summer research project module, which will either be hosted at the ICS or at the industrial partner’s facilities.  The number and nature of these projects will vary from year to year and will be assigned based on merit demonstrated during the autumn and spring terms.

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