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Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects. Read more
Applying the laws of physics in real-life situations, ranging from measuring brain activity to designing new materials and investigating space objects .

Would you rather specialise in pure physics or discover the interface between physics and astronomy, mathematics, chemistry or biology? The choice is yours. At Radboud University, you can choose from six specialisations and within each specialisation you’ll have plenty of room to customise your programme. We guarantee the highest quality for all specialisation programmes, resulting in number one rates by the Dutch ‘Keuzegids Masters’ for three years running.

In your internship(s), you can dive into theoretical physics or perform your own experiments: discover new material properties in Europe’s highest magnetic fields or with unique free electron lasers, study space objects with the telescopes on top of the Huygens Building or unravel brain activity with MRIs. It’s all possible on the Radboud campus. That’s why many international physicists come here to perform their experiments. Take Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, who revealed the amazing properties of graphene in our High Field Magnet Laboratory. In 2010, they received the Nobel Prize in Physics for those discoveries.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

Specialisations of Physics and Astronomy

- Particle and Astrophysics
In this Master’s specialisation you’ll unravel questions like: What are the most elementary particles that the universe consists of? What did our universe look like in the earliest stages of its existence? And how will it evolve? One of the topics is the Higgs particle, which is partially a Nijmegen discovery.

- Physics of Molecules and Materials
This specialisation focuses on the structure and properties of materials. You’ll work at the ‘terra incognita’ between quantum and classical physics, which is of great importance for designing next-generation materials and devices.

- Neuroscience
In this specialisation you’ll use your physics background to understand the communication between neurons in the brain. This fundamental knowledge can be applied in all kinds of devices, including hearing aids or Google glasses.

- Science in Society
This specialisation will equip you with the tools and skills to become a professional intermediary between science and society. You’ll learn to analyse (governmental) science communication and connect scientific knowledge with divergent perspectives and interests of various stakeholders.

- Science, Management and Innovation
This specialisation will teach you what is happening in the world of business and public administration, how innovation is managed in company strategies, how government designs policy and how that interacts with societal challenges.

- Science and Education (in Dutch)
Do you want to become a secondary school teacher in the Netherlands? In this Dutch-taught specialisation you’ll get the necessary didactic background and extensive experience in the classroom.

Why study Physics and Astronomy at Radboud University?

- It’s the best Master’s programme of its kind in the Netherlands, according to the Keuzegids Masters.
- Teaching takes place in a stimulating, collegial setting with small groups. This ensures that at Radboud University you’ll get plenty of one-on-one time with your internship supervisor.
- We have a multidisciplinary approach: you not only can specialise in Physics, but also in astrophysics, biophysics, mathematical physics, chemical physics or materials science.
- You’ll spend one year on research, and thus get an extensive experience in scientific methods.
- Radboud University hosts multiple state-of-the-art research facilities, such as the High Field Magnet Laboratory , FELIX laser laboratory, Nanolab and neuroimaging facilities (MRI, MEG, EEG, TMS). We also participate in the LHC particle accelerator in Geneva, the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina and various other large-scale research projects.
- On average, our graduates find a job within 2 months after graduating. A majority of these jobs are PhD positions at universities in the Netherlands and abroad.

Quality label

For the third time in a row, this programme was rated number one in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2015 (Guide to Master's programmes).

Career prospects

All specialisations of this Master’s programme are an excellent preparation for a career in research, either at a university, at an institute or at a company. However, many of our students end up in other business or government positions as well. Whatever job you aspire, you can certainly make use of the fact that you have learned to:
- Think in an abstract way
- Solve complex problems
- Make accurate approximations
- Combine theory and experiments

PhD positions

If you would like to have a career in science, it’s possible to apply for a PhD position at Radboud University. Of course, you can also apply at any other university anywhere in the world.

Positions in business or governmental organisations

To get an idea the various career opportunities, a sample of jobs performed by our alumni:
- Actuarial trainee at Talent & Pro
- Consultant at Accenture
- ECO Operations Manager at Ofgem
- Scientist at SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research
- Technology strategy Manager at Accenture
- Consultant Billing at KPN
- Communications advisor at the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM)
- Systems analysis engineer at Thales
- Technical consultant at UL Transaction Security
- Business analyst at Capgemini

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/physicsandastronomy

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The control and conversion of electric power using solid-state techniques are now commonplace in both the domestic and industrial environments. Read more
The control and conversion of electric power using solid-state techniques are now commonplace in both the domestic and industrial environments. A knowledge and understanding of the diverse disciplines encompassed by Power Electronics: devices, converters, control theory and motor drive systems, is now essential to all power engineers. Power electronics, driven by the need for greater energy efficiency and more accurate control of a wide range of systems, is developing rapidly.

This course aims to provide specialist education in power electronics and drive techniques, covering key fundamental principles along with modern applications and current practices. It provides a specialist education in power electronics and drives techniques, covering key fundamental principles along with modern applications and current practices.

Students will develop:

the analytical and critical powers for the development of hardware and software required for power electronics and drives
the ability to plan and undertake an individual project
interpersonal, communication and professional skills
the ability to communicate ideas effectively in written reports
the technical skills to equip them for a leading career in power electronics or electrical machine drive systems
an understanding of how power electronics are applied within key industries such as aerospace and power supply

Following the successful completion of the taught modules, an individual research project is undertaken during the summer term.

Previous research projects on this course have included:

Development of a microprocessor controlled variable speed permanent magnet motor for an aerospace application
Experimental determination of induction motor torque-speed curves under variable speed
Evaluation of stray reactance in a current source rectifier for marine propulsion motor drives and wind power generators
Design, build and testing of a DSP-controlled switched reluctance motor for an automotive power assisted steering application

Scholarship information can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/graduateschool/funding/index.aspx

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This course aims to provide a broad-based understanding of the subject and then a study of in-depth topics covering modern technology for Power Systems, Power Electronics and related subjects. Read more
This course aims to provide a broad-based understanding of the subject and then a study of in-depth topics covering modern technology for Power Systems, Power Electronics and related subjects. It will prepare students for a career as a professional engineer working in research, design or industrial applications.

The modular structure of the MSc in Electrical Engineering offers students a great deal of flexibility, allowing them to choose the
modules that most reflect their interests and feed into their research project. The modules cover the following subjects; power electronics, drives, power systems (including distributed generation and wind power), design of single and multi-variable control systems, motor and generator design, instrumentation and measurement. This course is suitable for graduates of related disciplines who wish to convert to electrical engineering.

Students will develop:
up-to-date knowledge of electrical engineering, including design and modelling techniques and applications
the ability to plan and undertake an individual project
interpersonal, communication and professional skills
the ability to communicate ideas effectively in written reports
the technical skills to equip them for a leading career in electrical engineering, especially in the areas of power electronics, power systems, electrical machines and control

Following the successful completion of the taught modules, an individual research project is undertaken during the summer term.

Previous research projects on this course have included:
Modular converter topologies for power system applications
Predictive control for an uninterruptable power supply
Power systems stability enhancement using Static Converter (STATCOM)
Sensorless permanent magnet motor drives for more electric aircraft applications

Scholarship information can be found at http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/graduateschool/funding/index.aspx

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This course delivers a broad coverage of all major disciplines in Electrical Power, including power electronics, electric drives, electrical machine design and power systems. Read more
This course delivers a broad coverage of all major disciplines in Electrical Power, including power electronics, electric drives, electrical machine design and power systems. It also covers important electrical power themes such as renewable energy systems and electric vehicles.

The Electrical Power MSc covers the following key subject areas:
-Electrical Machines
-Power Electronics
-Electric Drives
-Power System Operation
-Control of Electrical Power

A feature of the course is design of electrical systems for transportation and renewable energy applications. This is a particular specialisation of researchers in the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

You will develop a knowledge of industry standard computer aided design and analysis techniques appropriate to electrical power such as the use of software packages such as MagNet, MATLAB, Simulink, PSpice and ERACS.

Throughout the course you use industry standard test and measurement equipment, experimental hardware, and software packages relevant to the field of electrical and power engineering.

The course comprises a mixture of lectures, tutorials, coursework and practical laboratory classes. You will research a specialist topic of your choice through an in-depth project. Innovative educational techniques are designed to equip you with practical design skills and research methodologies.

As a graduate of this course you are equipped with the knowledge and practical experience to embark on a career as an engineer in the field of Electrical Power. You will also have skills in research and knowledge acquisition and a solid foundation for further postgraduate studies in the field of electrical engineering and power engineering.

Delivery

You take modules to a total value of 180 credits over three semesters. Taught modules, worth 120 credits, take place during the first and second semesters with exams held in January and May/June. An individual project, worth 60 credits, is undertaken over semesters two and three.

Background reading and design work take place during the second semester. The majority of experimental work and preparation of your dissertation takes place during the semester three.

Teaching takes place in lecture theatres equipped with audio visual equipment. Blackboard, a web based Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) supports your taught modules. Practical sessions are in small groups with experts in the field of Power Electronics, Electric Drives, Machines, and Power Systems and in modern laboratory and computing facilities.

Employability

We collect information from our graduates six months after they leave University. This is part of the Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey that every UK higher education institution takes part in.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and Engineering Council, and therefore provides a good foundation for professional registration.

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Laser Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Laser Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Laser Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

The two main research groups within the Department of Physics currently focus on the following areas of research:

Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group

Fundamental Atomic Physics
Condensed Matter and Material Physics
Analytical Laser Spectroscopy
Particle Physics Theory Group

String theory, quantum gravity and the AdS/CFT correspondence
Lattice gauge theories, QCD
Supersymmetric field theory, perturbative gauge theory
Field Theory in curved spacetime
Physics beyond the standard model

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Laser Physics programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate Cold Atoms and Quantum Optics student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Nanotechnology (Physics) at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Nanotechnology (Physics) enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

For MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) programme you will be guided by internationally leading researchers through an extended one-year individual research project. There is no taught element. The Nanotechnology (Physics) programme has a recommended initial research training module (Science Skills & Research Methods), but otherwise has no taught element and is most suitable for you if you have an existing background in geography or cognate discipline and are looking to pursue a wholly research-based programme of study.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the MSc by Research in Nanotechnology (Physics) in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

This MSc by Research in Nanotechnology comes under the Nano-physics and the life sciences research area at Swansea. The fundamental understanding of the electronic, structural, chemical and optical properties of materials on the nano-scale is essential for advances in nanotechnology, in particular the development of new devices via the incorporation of novel materials. Advances in experimental physics underpin these developments via characterisation and quantification of quantum phenomena which dominate at these length scales.

The Nanotechnology research concentrates on two main areas: determining properties of materials (e.g., graphene) on the nano-scale using scanning probe based techniques; the development of imaging and laser based spectroscopic techniques to study biological samples (e.g., imaging of cellular components and bacteria).

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Lattice Gauge Theory at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Lattice Gauge Theory enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Lattice Gauge Theory programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

You will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as World-leading or Internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of Lattice Gauge Theory programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Quantum Fields and String at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Quantum Fields and String enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Quantum Fields & String programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of the MSc by Research in Quantum Fields and String you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a student of the Quantum Fields and String programme in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

Read less
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships to study Theoretical Particle Physics at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc by Research Theoretical Particle Physics enables students to pursue a one year individual programme of research. The Theoretical Particle Physics programme would normally terminate after a year. However, under appropriate circumstances, this first year of research can also be used in a progression to Year 2 of a PhD degree.

As a student of Theoretical Particle Physics programme you will be fully integrated into one of our established research groups and participate in research activities such as seminars, workshops, laboratories, and field work.

Key Features

Swansea is a research led University to which the Physics department makes a significant contribution, meaning that as a postgraduate Physics student you will benefit from the knowledge and skills of internationally renowned academics.

The Department received top ratings of 4* and 3* in the 2008 RAE, which classified our research as world-leading or internationally excellent in terms of its originality, significance and rigour.

Links with Industry

Our two research groups, Particle Physics Theory (PPT) and Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics (AMQP), deliver impact with commercial benefits both nationally and internationally, complemented by a public engagement programme with a global reach.

Economic impacts are realised by the Department’s Analytical Laser Spectroscopy Unit (ALSU) which, since 1993, has worked with companies developing products eventually sold to customers in the nuclear power industry and military, both in the UK and overseas, and in the global aerospace industry. Computational particle physics work performed by the PPT group has spun-off a computer benchmarking tool, BSMBench, used by several leading software outfits, and has led to the establishment of a start-up company.

The AMQP group’s work on trapping and investigating antihydrogen has generated great media interest and building on this we have developed a significant and on-going programme of public engagement. Activities include the development of a bespoke software simulator (Hands on Antihydrogen) of the antimatter experiment for school students.

Facilities

As a postgraduate student in the Department of Physics you will have access to the following Specialist Facilities:

Low-energy positron beam with a high field superconducting magnet for the study of
positronium
CW and pulsed laser systems
Scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
Raman microscope
CPU parallel cluster
Access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Super computer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

Research

The Physics Department carries out world-leading research in experimental and theoretical physics.

The results of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2014 show that over 80% of the research outputs from both the experimental and theoretical groups were judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent.

Research groups include:

AMQP Group

The Atomic, Molecular and Quantum Physics Group comprises academic staff, postdoctoral officers and postgraduate research students. Its work is supported by grants from EPSRC, the EU, The Royal Society, the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales and various industrial and government sources. There are two main fields of research: Atomic, Molecular and Laser Physics and Nanoscale Physics.

PPT Group

The Particle Physics Theory Group has fourteen members of staff, in addition to postdoctoral officers and research students. It is the fourth largest particle physics theory group in the UK, and is supported mainly by STFC, but also has grants from EPSRC, the EU, Royal Society and Leverhulme Trust. The group recently expanded by hiring two theoretical cosmologists (Ivonne Zavala and Gianmassimo Tasinato). There are five main fields of research: Quantum Field Theory, Strings, Lattice Field Theory, Beyond the Standard Model Physics and Theoretical Cosmology.

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Working at the interface of chemistry, biology and physics. New insights emerge at the point where disciplines come together and, in order to understand how things work, it is important to study them from all angles. Read more

Overview

Working at the interface of chemistry, biology and physics
New insights emerge at the point where disciplines come together and, in order to understand how things work, it is important to study them from all angles. This is the approach we have chosen in teaching Science. As a Master's student you will find yourself at the interface of biology, chemistry and physics as you work to discover the secrets behind man, molecule and materials.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/science

Career prospects

Most of our graduates continue to do a PhD, either in Nijmegen or elsewhere. Our institutes have various vacancies every year. Graduates also find employment as researchers and managers in industry, in the commercial sector and in research institutes.

Our research in this field

Top research and facilities
The programme is closely linked to two internationally recognised Nijmegen institutes:
- Institute for Molecules and Materials
- Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour.

Both have state-of the-art research facilities capable of identifying the characteristics of molecules, materials and the human brain. There are:
- the magnets in the High Field Magnet Laboratory (HFML),
- the NMR and MRI facilities,
- the free electron laser
- the NanoLab.

Little wonder that these institutes and facilities attract top scientists from all over the world. As a Master's student in Natural Sciences you will find yourself in a dynamic research environment working alongside scientists who are leaders in their field.

- Great freedom and personal tutor
The programme offers you considerable freedom to follow your own interests. At the beginning of the programme you will select one study area from the three options available: physical chemistry, biophysics or chemical biology. Within this area you can choose from several specialisations ranging from material science to neural networks and from neurobiology to organic chemistry and nanoscience.
You will complete your main internship within one of the Nijmegen research groups. Here you will have a personal supervisor, with whom you decide on your subjects and research programme. Your second internship will be with a different research group or related to your variant.

- The Nijmegen approach
The first thing you will notice as you enter our Faculty of Science is the open atmosphere. This is reflected by the light and transparent building and the open minded spirit of the working, exploring and studying people that you will meet there. No wonder students from all over the world have been attracted to Nijmegen. You study in small groups, in direct and open contact with members of the staff. In addition, Nijmegen has excellent student facilities, such as high-tech laboratories, libraries and study ‘landscapes'.

Studying by the ‘Nijmegen approach' is a way of living. We will equip you with tools which are valuable for the rest of your life. You will be challenged to become aware of your intrinsic motivation. In other words, what is your passion in life? With this question in mind we will guide you to translate your passion into a personal Master's programme.

- Quality Label
This programme was recently rated number three in the Netherlands in the Keuzegids Masters 2014 (Guide to Master's programmes)

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/science

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Electronic and Electrical Engineering is a broad and rapidly-expanding set of disciplines. Read more

About the course

Electronic and Electrical Engineering is a broad and rapidly-expanding set of disciplines. Building on core teaching in electrical machines, electronic materials, and the way that electronic circuits interact, this course will allow you to choose from a wide range of optional modules from all our active research areas to tailor your learning in a way that meets with your requirements.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

Accreditation

All of our MSc courses are accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), except the MSc(Eng) Advanced Electrical Machines, Power Electronics and Drives and MSc(Eng) Bioengineering: Imaging and Sensing. We are seeking accreditation for these courses.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

Major Research Project.

Examples of optional modules

AC Machines; Advanced Control of Electric Devices; Energy Storage Management; Motion Control and Servo Drives; Permanent Magnet Machines and Actuators; Power Electronic Converters; Power Semiconductor Devices; Advanced Computer Systems; Advanced Integrated Electronics; Advanced Signal Processing; Semiconductor Materials; Principles of Semiconductor Device Technology; Packaging and Reliability of Microsystems; Nanoscale Electronic Devices; Energy Efficient Semiconductor Devices; Optical Communication Devices and Systems; Computer Vision; Electronic Communication Technologies; Data Coding Techniques for Communications and Storage; Principles of Communications; Antennas, Propagation and Satellite Systems; Mobile Networks and Physical Layer Protocols; System Design; Broadband Wireless Techniques; Wireless Packet Data Networks and Protocols.

Teaching and assessment

We deliver research-led teaching with individual support for your research project and dissertation. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.

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This one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric combines both ancient and modern fields of research. It is designed equally for students with a background in classics, in other humanities disciplines, and in other subjects including law and social science. Read more
This one-year, research-based postgraduate course in oratory and rhetoric combines both ancient and modern fields of research. It is designed equally for students with a background in classics, in other humanities disciplines, and in other subjects including law and social science. The programme offers preparation not only for advanced research at PhD level but also for a wide range of other careers in which oral and written communication are important, such as the media, the legal profession, politics and public relations.

It is taught by members of the Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric in the Royal Holloway Classics Department, where there is a strong concentration of expertise in classical rhetoric and oratory. It offers opportunities for collaborative work with other RHUL departments. The programme includes a core course on Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric, incorporating training in a range of analytical and scholarly research skills. A wide range of optional courses is available (including courses offered by other London institutions) and there are opportunities to pursue independent projects in any aspect of ancient or modern oratory and rhetoric, either as a self-contained package (for the PGCert and PGDip) or as a preparation for embarking on a substantial piece of research work for the MRes dissertation. The MRes can be taken as a self-standing qualification or as a preparation for a PhD, while the programme as a whole offers valuable transferable skills for non-academic careers and for continuous professional development.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/classics/coursefinder/mresrhetoric.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The only course of its kind in a major UK university

- Combination of analytical and historical perspective

- Enhances ability to construct and present persuasive argumentation, as well as analysing and evaluating that presented by others

- Wide choice of taught courses, independent projects and dissertation topics

- Centre for Oratory and Rhetoric – a concentration of scholarly expertise and a magnet for visiting experts from abroad

- Access to world-class research resources in Classics and related disciplines in and around London

Course content and structure

The course contains five elements with credit values as shown below.

1. Problems and Methods in Oratory and Rhetoric (core course incorporating research methods: 40 credits)

2. EITHER: Oratory and Identity (40 credits) OR: An optional course or courses to the value of 40 credits to be chosen from a list of courses offered by the Department, or by another department at Royal Holloway, or by other London institutions as part of the Intercollegiate MA programmes in Classics, Ancient History, or Late Antique and Byzantine Studies.

3. Independent Project 1 (20 credits): e.g. a ‘pilot’ study of an area to be covered in more detail in the dissertation, a critical survey of scholarly literature on a relevant topic, a rhetorical analysis of a text, or a comparative rhetorical study of texts from different traditions, cultures or periods.

4 . Independent Project 2 (20 credits): similar in scope to Project 1 but may also be a more creative type of project, e.g. a piece of original rhetorical composition, a reconstrution of the performance of a historical speech, or similar. Supporting audi-visual materials may be submitted as part of the project.

5. Dissertation (60 credits): a substantial piece of independent research on a topic in either ancient or modern oratory and rhetoric.

Students for the MRes take all five elements as shown above. Students for the PGDip take elements 1, 2, 3, and 4. Students for the PGCert take element 1 and at least one of elements 2, 3 or 4.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- an advanced knowledge of the foundations of rhetorical theory and practice

- an appreciation of the history of rhetorical theory and practice in the European tradition from Classical antiquity to modern times

- an appreciation of the applicability of rhetorical approaches to the study of communication in the modern world

- knowledge and understanding of such other areas of language, literature, history, politics, culture, or ideas as may be appropriate in order to pursue the chosen research project(s) to an advanced level

- the acquisition of appropriate knowledge of advanced scholarship in the chosen area(s).

- the ability to understand and analyse concepts relating to rhetorical theory and practice

- the ability to engage critically and at an advanced level in rhetorical analysis of texts (e.g. argumentation, character-projection, emotional strategies, structure, use of language)

- the ability to engage in the study of rhetoric and communication as historical and/or contemporary phenomena in human societies

- the ability to conduct research independently at an advanced level

- the ability to articulate and present arguments at an advanced level with clarity and persuasiveness

- the ability to engage in debate on scholarly issues, respecting the views of other participants

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including principally coursework essays, independent projects, and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

The MRes course is a new course and is designed to equip you with skills of research, analysis, critical thought and communication which will be valuable in a wide range of careers, as well as providing a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

Graduates from the Classics Department are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different areas, including careers in law, the media, politics, advertising, business, and the armed forces, as well as school and university teaching. We have also attracted mature students from a wide variety of previous careers.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Read more
Take advantage of one of our 100 Master’s Scholarships or College of Science Postgraduate Scholarships to study High Performance and Scientific Computing at Swansea University, the Times Good University Guide’s Welsh University of the Year 2017. Postgraduate loans are also available to English and Welsh domiciled students. For more information on fees and funding please visit our website.

The MSc in High Performance and Scientific Computing is for you if you are a graduate in a scientific or engineering discipline and want to specialise in applications of High Performance computing in your chosen scientific area. During your studies in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop your computational and scientific knowledge and skills in tandem helping emphasise their inter-dependence.

On the course in High Performance and Scientific Computing you will develop a solid knowledge base of high performance computing tools and concepts with a flexibility in terms of techniques and applications. As s student of the MSc High Performance and Scientific Computing you will take core computational modules in addition to specialising in high performance computing applications in a scientific discipline that defines the route you have chosen (Biosciences, Computer Science, Geography or Physics). You will also be encouraged to take at least one module in a related discipline.

Modules of High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc

The modules you study on the High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc depend on the route you choose and routes are as follows:

Biosciences route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Conservation of Aquatic Resources or Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems
Research Project in Environmental Biology
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Computer Science route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Software Engineering
Data Visualization
MSc Project
+ 30 credits from optional modules

Geography route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Modelling Earth Systems or Satellite Remote Sensing or Climate Change – Past, Present and Future or Geographical Information Systems
Research Project
+ 10 credits from optional modules

Physics route (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Graphics Processor Programming
High Performance Computing in C/C++
Operating Systems and Architectures
Software Testing
Programming in C/C++
Partial Differential Equations
Numerics of ODEs and PDEs
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Physics Project
+ 20 credits from optional modules

Optional Modules (High Performance and Scientific Computing MSc):

Software Engineering
Data Visualization
Monte Carlo Methods
Quantum Information Processing
Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena
Modelling Earth Systems
Satellite Remote Sensing
Climate Change – Past, Present and Future
Geographical Information Systems
Conservation of Aquatic Resources
Environmental Impact Assessment
Ecosystems

Facilities

Students of the High Performance and Scientific Computing programme will benefit from the Department that is well-resourced to support research. Swansea physics graduates are more fortunate than most, gaining unique insights into exciting cutting-edge areas of physics due to the specialized research interests of all the teaching staff. This combined with a great staff-student ratio enables individual supervision in advanced final year research projects. Projects range from superconductivity and nano-technology to superstring theory and anti-matter. The success of this programme is apparent in the large proportion of our M.Phys. students who seek to continue with postgraduate programmes in research.

Specialist equipment includes:

a low-energy positron beam with a highfield superconducting magnet for the study of positronium
a number of CW and pulsed laser systems
scanning tunnelling electron and nearfield optical microscopes
a Raman microscope
a 72 CPU parallel cluster
access to the IBM-built ‘Blue C’ Supercomputer at Swansea University and is part of the shared use of the teraflop QCDOC facility based in Edinburgh

The Physics laboratories and teaching rooms were refurbished during 2012 and were officially opened by Professor Lyn Evans, Project Leader of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. This major refurbishment was made possible through the University’s capital programme, the College of Science, and a generous bequest made to the Physics Department by Dr Gething Morgan Lewis FRSE, an eminent physicist who grew up in Ystalyfera in the Swansea Valley and was educated at Brecon College.

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The deployment of power electronic converters and electrical machines continues to grow at a rapid rate in sectors such as hybrid and all-electric vehicles, aerospace, renewables and advanced industrial automation. Read more

About the course

The deployment of power electronic converters and electrical machines continues to grow at a rapid rate in sectors such as hybrid and all-electric vehicles, aerospace, renewables and advanced industrial automation. In many of these applications, high performance components are combined into sophisticated motion control and energy management systems. This course will give you a rigorous and in-depth knowledge of the key component technologies and their integration into advanced systems.

Our graduates are in demand

Many go to work in industry as engineers for large national and international companies, including ARUP, Ericsson Communications, HSBC, Rolls-Royce, Jaguar Land Rover and Intel Asia Pacific.

Real-world applications

This is a research environment. What we teach is based on the latest ideas. The work you do on your course is directly connected to real-world applications.

We work with government research laboratories, industrial companies and other prestigious universities. Significant funding from UK research councils, the European Union and industry means you have access to the best facilities.

How we teach

You’ll be taught by academics who are leaders in their field. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) puts us among the UK top five for this subject. Our courses are centred around finding solutions to problems, in lectures, seminars, exercises and through project work.

Accreditation

All of our MSc courses are accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), except the MSc(Eng) Advanced Electrical Machines, Power Electronics and Drives and MSc(Eng) Bioengineering: Imaging and Sensing. We are seeking accreditation for these courses.

First-class facilities

Semiconductor Materials and Devices

LED, laser photodetectors and transistor design, a high-tech field-emission gun transmission electron microscope (FEGTEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) milling facility, and electron beam lithographic equipment.

Our state-of-the-art semiconductor growth and processing equipment is housed in an extensive clean room complex as part of the EPSRC’s National Centre for III-V Technologies.

Our investment in semiconductor research equipment in the last 12 months totals £6million.

Electrical Machines and Drives

Specialist facilities for the design and manufacture of electromagnetic machines, dynamometer test cells, a high-speed motor test pit, environmental test chambers, electronic packaging and EMC testing facilities, Rolls-Royce University Technology Centre for Advanced Electrical Machines and Drives.

Communications

Advanced anechoic chambers for antenna design and materials characterisation, a lab for calibrated RF dosimetry of tissue to assess pathogenic effects of electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones, extensive CAD electromagnetic analysis tools.

Core modules

Power Electronic Converters; AC Machines; Permanent Magnet Machines and Actuators; Motion Control and Servo Drives; Advanced Control of Electric Drives; Energy Storage and Management; MSc Individual Project; Major Research Project.

Examples of optional modules

Power Semiconductor Devices; Advanced Signal Processing; Packaging and Reliability of Microsystems; Electronic Communication Technologies; Systems Design.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll learn through research-led teaching, lectures, laboratories, seminars, tutorials and coursework exercises. Assessment is by examinations, coursework and a project dissertation with poster presentation.

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