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Masters Degrees (Ma In Education)

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The Education MA at Brunel University London is designed for those with a broad interest in education and enables students to undertake a high-level, critical evaluation of educational theory and practice. Read more

About the Course

The Education MA at Brunel University London is designed for those with a broad interest in education and enables students to undertake a high-level, critical evaluation of educational theory and practice.

The course develops the skills and confidence needed to enhance professional practice in learning organisations.

Attendance (full-time) is required 2 evenings per week.

Attendance (part-time) is required 1 evening per week.

Classes run from 5.00 to 8.00pm.

This course is available as the MA in Education or the MA in Education with a specialism in:

-Leadership and Management
-Science, Maths, Technology (STEM) Education
-Social Justice, Equity and Inclusion
-The University reserves the right not to run a specialism where the numbers are insufficient to make it viable in a particular year.

Aims

-You will learn to identify problems and questions in areas of interest and to design study plans or research strategies to deal with them.
-You will undertake a high-level, critical evaluation of educational theory and practice.
-You will develop the skills and confidence to enhance professional practice in learning organisations.
-You will undertake a critical and informed evaluation of relevant research.

Course Content

The programme has a flexible structure which meets individual student needs and includes: core modules covering the central issues of educational study and research: Assessment, Learning and Teaching, and Professional Education. The option modules provide breadth of study and the dissertation module allows you to undertake a substantial, critically-informed, independent research assignment in a particular area of educational study.

Candidates who are successful on the MA programme, particularly in their dissertation, may apply for entry to higher degrees, including the taught Doctorate of Education or the research-based PhD.

The organising principles which underpin the programme provide links between the MA modules and our research strengths. These research strengths are in the areas of:

-Professional Education
-Enhancing Teaching and Learning
-Inclusive Education
-Modules (all compulsory )
-Issues and Perspectives in Education
-Disciplines of Education
-Social and Educational Diversity: the Nature and Implications of Social and Individual Differences in Education
-Catering for Social and Individual Differences in Education: Policy and Practice
Issues in STEM Education
-Towards Effectiveness in STEM Education
-Coaching for Educational Leadership
-Educational Leadership: Theories and Perspectives
-Dissertation: All students enrolled on the MA in Education award will be offered a choice of focus for their dissertation which allows them to opt for a specialist MA in Education award.

Recent examples of dissertations by students taking this course include:

-evaluation of a project in ICT
-an investigation of teaching programmes for children with dyslexia
-provision for gifted and talented pupils.

Read more about the structure of postgraduate degrees at Brunel and what you will learn on the course - http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/pg/postgraduate-taught-course-information/taught-programme-structure

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/423896/MA-Education-2015-16-v1.pdf

For more information on the Special Features of this course and the Teaching and Assesment, please visit this link - http://www.brunel.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/education-ma

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The MA Education. International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. Read more
The MA Education: International Education offers the opportunity to work with researchers who have developed leading perspectives in understanding comparative and international education policy and practice. The programme is particularly relevant to students from developed and developing countries who plan to work in professional, management, and education roles in both national education systems and internationally.

The programme situates the study of international education within a complex and changing world where education and education professionals are called upon to play equally complex and challenging roles in promoting economic growth and competition, while at the same time supporting the development of sustainable and cohesive societies and promoting equity and social justice.

Course structure

The course is structured over three trimesters and totals 180 credits (90 ECTS). It is available in campus-based mode, low-residency mode or online-only. You can start in September or February and will study for 60 credits per trimester. In your first trimester you will study the MA Education core module Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) plus your award core module (30 credits). In the second trimester you will study the core module Social Science Research (30 credits), plus two 15-credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award. If you take the low residency option, the face-to-face teaching of all modules will take place during two 2-week intensive blocks (typically in September and February).

Modules

Trimester 1
In your first trimester you will study two compulsory core modules totalling 60 credits.
Core Module:
Education: Economics, Politics and Society (30 credits) explores how education can be understood in a complex and globalised world where it is seen by many governments as a significant factor in economic growth and competition. You will learn how to question the policies and organisations involved in defining the purposes, content and outcomes of education.
Award Core Module:
International Education and Globalisation (30 credits) looks at education within a global context and deals with issues such the role of international organisations, anti-globalisation critiques, cultural hegemony and the political economy of education within the global knowledge economy.
Trimester 2
In your second trimester you will study one compulsory core module, and two 15 credit elective modules, one of which may be a shared elective from another MA award. This will total 60 credits.
Compulsory Core Module:
Social Science Research (30 credits) sets educational research within the broader context of the social sciences and introduces a range of qualitative and quantitative methodologies and methods from which you can select the most appropriate for your dissertation.
Elective Modules:
Education and Development (option 15 credits) considers the relationship between education and international economic, social and human development. It focuses on patterns of international investment in education, key aspects of the discourses of education policy and key challenges to ensuring a quality education for all in both developed and developing countries.
Education, Conflict and Peace (option 15 credits) looks at the role of education in violent conflict before moving on to consider humanitarian and development initiatives to deliver education in conflict and emergencies. It explores issues of gender, displacement, children’s experience of conflict, and educational policy for peace and citizenship.
International Higher Education (shared option 15 credits) develops understanding of contemporary international higher education. Specific aspects of policy (widening participation; research, creativity and innovation; New Public Management) are explored through case studies of international Higher Education reform and management.
Trimester 3
In your third trimester you will research and write your Dissertation (60 credits) on a topic relevant to your award.
Dissertation (60 credits) enables you to study and research an aspect of education theory, policy or practice in depth, guided by an expert to arrive at your own synthesis of a topic to take forward into your career.

Teaching methods

For the campus-based mode of study, some lectures and seminars will take place during the day, whilst others may be in the evening or at weekends. For low-residency students the teaching will be concentrated into two 2-week blocks (typically around 6 hours per day). The course also makes extensive use of online teaching, particularly for the low-residency and online only modes. This will include a combination of individual and shared learning using the Bath Spa University virtual learning environment.

Staff / Tutors

-Dr Peter Jones: Senior Lecturer in International and Global Education: Peter has an extensive research and teaching background in International and Comparative Education. His research has addressed the role of the European Union in developing education policy for Higher Education, Early School Leaving and the Knowledge Economy. He is interested in Education in Post-Socialist and Transition Countries as well as the role of the EU in Central Asia.

-Dr. Julia Paulson: Lecturer in Education Studies: Julia’s research interests are in education and conflict and in education and development. She has worked on these issues with NGOs in Latin America, West Africa, the UK and Canada. She has also worked as an education consultant for international organisations like UNICEF, UNESCO and the World Bank. She has published on education and reconciliation, transitional justice, teaching about violent conflict and education in emergencies. She is editor of Education and Reconciliation published by Bloomsbury in 2012 and she completed her doctoral research at the University of Oxford on the role of Peru’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in educational reform in 2011.

Course assessment

There are no written exams on this course; each module is assessed through coursework. This typically involves an essay of 2,500 words for a 15-credit module or 5,000 words for a 30-credit module. For some modules assessment may be by verbal presentation or online activity. The dissertation is 15,000 – 20,000 words and focuses on an area agreed with a specialist tutor.

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Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice. Read more
Our Higher Education MA has been built with practising university teacher in mind. It encourages you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules, allowing you to graduate a more confident university teacher with the skills and knowledge to shape professional practice.

PROGRAMME OVERVIEW

Through online delivery of content, our Higher Education MA offers you the flexibility to create a programme that suits your professional development needs in the field of university teaching, and is offered on a part-time basis over five years.

The programme allows you to construct your own developmental pathway through a choice of optional modules. You will do this by engaging with the explicit pedagogic framework that underpins the programme, emphasising the connections between concepts, theory and practice, teaching and research, disciplinary methods, and teachers and students.

On the programme you will analyse issues relating to your everyday teaching practice, share practice and explore solutions with your fellow participants and tutors.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

This programme is studied over three academic years and is part-time via distance learning. It consists of eight taught modules and a dissertation.

On successful completion of the PGDip in Higher Education and a review of a portfolio of work via an accreditation panel, participants may apply to become a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy (subject to accreditation). The following modules are indicative, reflecting the information available at the time of publication. Please note that not all modules described are compulsory and may be subject to teaching availability and/or student demand.
-Teaching in Your Own Discipline
-Researching in Higher Education
-Research Dissertation
-Signature Concepts in Higher Education
-Evaluating Educational Research
-Assessment and Feedback
-From Student Voice to Co-Enquiry
-Peer Observation of Teaching
-Moving into Academic Leadership
-Designing Technology Enhanced Learning
-Exploring Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Clinical Teaching
-Technical and Professional Skills Teaching in Veterinary Education

EDUCATIONAL AIMS OF THE PROGRAMME

-Contribute to the development of participants' theoretically informed understandings, and teach in ways that support epistemological access for a diverse student body
-Respect participants' disciplinary backgrounds, and encourage participants to interrogate the nature of their own disciplines and relate this to ideas presented in the programme
-Promote reflective practice, requiring critical engagement based on evidence and theory with the roles and practices of higher education teaching, rather than having as its goal the teaching of a set of generic skills and techniques
-Disrupt participants' existing beliefs about teaching and learning

PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES

The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes. The overarching programme learning outcomes are to:
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Knowledge and understanding
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education

Intellectual / cognitive skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Critically assess the role of theory, methodology and evidence in the policy and/or practices of higher education
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Professional practical skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature

Key / transferable skills
-Evaluate the appropriate approaches for applying teaching and learning strategies within various contexts
-Apply theoretically informed understandings to various contexts in higher education
-Justify an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue using appropriate theoretical and/or methodological frameworks
-Evaluate the analytical outcomes of an investigation of a personally selected higher education issue within the context of the higher education literature
-Further details of the programme’s pedagogic framework is available by contacting the programme team. The programme is aligned to the requirements of the UK Professional Standards Framework at D3 which relates to Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy.

Initial enquires should be directed to Dr Dawn Morley -

STUDENT EXPERIENCE

As part of induction to the programme, you will have a discussion with a personal tutor to help you make the appropriate choices for your professional learning journey based on your previous teaching and learning experience in the higher education context and your developmental aspirations.

A personal tutor will work with you to develop a personalised plan to ensure you get the most from the programme by developing your professional knowledge and skills.

REGISTRATION

As we recognised that you will be working within your own higher education institutions while you study, the programme is offered as part-time registration. It is anticipated that the Diploma would be completed within two years of registration and the Dissertation would normally be completed within an additional year.

You will be registered initially for the MA in Higher Education (180 credits). However, you can choose to step-off at Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) or the Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) Level.

You can decide to study for a general MA in Higher Education or a MA in Higher Education with a specialist pathway. Specialist pathways are only available for the MA in Higher Education (not at the award of Diploma).

If you decide, a pathway is right for you, you will need to take 60 credits from the specialist modules and conduct research within the Research Dissertation module on an area relating to the pathway. The following are the three specialist pathways available:
-Academic Leadership
-Technology Enhanced Learning
-Veterinary Education

If you decide to take the Academic Leadership pathway, you will be awarded for example, 'MA in Higher Education (Academic Leadership)'.

Postgraduate Certificate
The postgraduate certificate is built around the compulsory module of 'Teaching in Your Own Discipline'. You will choose three optional modules that help builds your own professional pathway and suits your needs.

Postgraduate Diploma
For the Postgraduate Diploma, based on your personal/professional development plan, you will choose three further modules that fulfil your personal and professional aims and which strengthens your activities, knowledge and professional values in your career.

You will also do the compulsory module of 'Researching in Higher Education', which aims to help you to start thinking about how to investigate and explore issues that intrigues and challenges you in the Higher Education landscape.

MA
For the MA in Higher Education, you will have to conduct a piece of independent research as part of the compulsory Research Dissertation module.

This allows you to investigate an issue that you have personally selected that will contribute to your growing understanding of your professional practice.

GLOBAL OPPORTUNITIES

We often give our students the opportunity to acquire international experience during their degrees by taking advantage of our exchange agreements with overseas universities.

In addition to the hugely enjoyable and satisfying experience, time spent abroad adds a distinctive element to your CV.

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Science Education. This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in science education, whether as teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students.

Applicants are strongly advised to ensure that they submit applications no later than 1st September if they wish to begin a course of study beginning in the same year. No guarantee can be offered that applications received after this date will be processed for a September start date.

The Department also welcomes applications from people interested in studying for a PhD in science education in its areas of expertise (see below).

Why come to York?

The University of York Science Education Group (UYSEG) has an outstanding international reputation for the excellence of its work in research and curriculum development in science education. Our school science programmes such as Science: the Salters Approach, Salters Advanced Chemistry, Salters Horners Advanced Physics and, most recently, Salters Nuffield Advanced Biology and 21st Century Science are widely used in this country, and have received international acclaim. Science: the Salters Approach and Salters Advanced Chemistry have been adapted for use in many other countries, including Belgium, Hong Kong, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, South Africa, Spain, Swaziland and the USA. If you come to York, you will have the opportunity to work with one of the leading groups in science education.

As members of the University of York Science Education Group, the science education staff in the Department of Education have made a significant contribution to the high profile of science education at York. Science specialist staff currently in the Department include Professor Robin Millar, Professor Judith Bennett, Martin Braund and Fred Lubben. All hold major grants for research and development in science education.

Areas of expertise include assessment, attitudes to science, the use of context-based approaches to the teaching of science, curriculum development (including international collaboration on projects), evaluation of curriculum interventions, gender issues in science education, practical work in science, scientific literacy, systematic reviews of research literature, and the transition from primary to secondary school. Current international work includes involvement in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) project and a number of initiatives in Southern Africa.

The reputation of the University of York Science Education Group was a major contributory factor in York being chosen as the home of the new National Science Learning Centre, which opened in September 2005 and offers a programme of professional development courses for science teachers.

Programme Aims

The programme offers specialist tuition within an established framework for MA provision in the Department. The aims of the programme are:
-To enhance knowledge and understanding in science education
-To develop educational research capabilities and skills in the fields of education and science education
-To contribute, where appropriate, to professional development by enhancing capacity to investigate aspects of one or more of educational theory, policy and practice

Programme Content

Term 1
-Science, Education and Society (20 credits)
-Research methods in education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Bilingualism
-Citizenship education
-Cross-linguistic influences in second language acquisition
-Discourse Analysis
-Education and social justice
-Evaluating ESOL classroom practice
-Intercultural communication in education
-Learning and teaching second/foreign language reading
-Motivation in education
-Teaching and assessing speaking skills
-Teaching and assessing writing skills
-Teaching and learning in schools
-Teaching World English
-Topics in second language acquisition

Term 2
-Recent research and innovation in science education (20 credits)

One option module from a list of about 10 (20 credits). Options are likely to include:
-Approaches to English teaching
-Contemporary issues in teaching
-Cross-cultural perspectives on language and discourse
-Developmental Psycholinguistics
-Learning and teaching grammar in a second language
-Pragmatics: language, meaning and communication
-Psychology of language and language learning
-Qualitative and quantitative data analysis
-Teaching and learning citizenship and global education
-Teaching English for academic purposes
-The practice of English language teaching
-Testing and assessment in English language teaching

Term 3
Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits). Classes are spread over Terms 2 and 3.

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September.

Students will also be able to attend the department series of research seminars for Masters students which includes talks by visiting speakers.

Assessment

Students will complete:
-Four assessed coursework essay assignments (each 4,000 to 5,000 words in length)
-An exam in Research Methods in Education
-An assessed presentation + dissertation outline + ethics audit
-A dissertation of 12,000 words in length

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Our postgraduate courses can be used to complement teacher training/development programmes and voluntary or paid roles which focus on the more practical elements of teaching. However, other than our PGCE, our courses are not teacher training programmes in themselves.

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This programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study international education and globalisation, as they intersect, at master’s level. Read more
This programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study international education and globalisation, as they intersect, at master’s level.

International education and globalisation are challenging and contested concepts; in this programme you will analyse the meaning, scope and dimensions of international education and globalisation (as they intersect). You will also consider relevant educational purposes, methods and approaches in international education.

Importantly, you will engage in the critical analysis of the assumptions and evidence that underpin change and reform to policy and practice in international education.

The programme will provide cutting edge knowledge, skills and understandings at the intersection between the two fields of study so that you can make a significant future contribution to international education. For example, you will explore the implications of a shifting global educational landscape such as how to prepare learners for an increasingly connected and mobile global society.

You will be equipped to:

- critically analyse and apply research in the fields of international education and globalisation (as they intersect)
- undertake small scale research yourself.

Your prior educational experience will be valued as a source of evidence. You will be encouraged to analyse, share and build on these experiences as a basis for collective learning. As such we welcome students with a diversity of experience and interests, including those with:

- professional experience in formal or informal education, charities, non-governmental organisations or governmental organisations
- aspirations to pursue a career or research in international education and globalisation
- aspirations for promotion in international and global education contexts.

Programme features

- unique amongst master’s programmes in education, with a focus on the interrelationships between international education and globalisation

- a distinctive focus on bridge building between practice and theory throughout all elements of the programme

- an excellent way to develop your research skills or progress to doctoral level study

- prepares you to make a significant future contribution to practice and policy in international education

- will help you to fast track your career; the international education sector increasingly requires master’s level qualifications for promoted posts (completing this in 12 months is an efficient way to progress your career)

- you will have access to cutting edge research and international experts in the fields of international education and globalisation.

You can find out more about this programme by viewing a recording of a webinar (https://vimeo.com/155981301).

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-inter-edu-global/

Programme structure

This is a 90 credit programme, that follows a semester-based structure (one 12 credit core unit is provided across the two semesters, while two other 12 credit units are delivered per semester).

- Core Units
You must study all four units in addition to the Dissertation.

- Research Methods in International Education and Globalisation (12 credits) (Taught across Semester one and two)
- Education in an International and Global Context (12 credits) (Semester one)
- Education, Globalisation and Change for International Education and Globalisation (12 credits) (Semester one)
- Learning and Culture (12 credits) (Semester two)
- Dissertation: International Education and Globalisation (30 credits) (March-September)

Optional units:
You must select one of the following units (your choice will depend on your interests in either; leading educational innovation, or, education and development in low and middle income countries).

- Education and International Development (12 credits) (Semester two)
- Leading Educational Innovation in International Education and Globalisation (12 credits) (Semester two)

View Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ed/THED-AFM44.html) for further information.

Learning and teaching

This programme is research-led but is also informed by professional perspectives in international education. Throughout the programme your prior (international) education experience will be valued as a source of evidence.

Learning and teaching takes place through lectures, workshops and seminars blended with on line learning opportunities and group/ individual study. You will become increasingly independent as the year progresses and as you work towards your Dissertation with the support of an expert supervisor.

Methods of assessment

A variety of formative assessment methods will be used throughout the programme to review your progress and support your further learning. You will have opportunities to demonstrate your knowledge, understanding and skills using a range of assessment methods.

The Dissertation unit is assessed by a 15,000 word research report.

Assessment of other units will include:

- formal academic style writing tasks (5,000 words in total)
- tasks in which you communicate your learning via different media (such as webpages and podcasts) and in different styles depending on audience (disseminating to researchers, policymakers and practitioners for examples).

Careers

This programme will enable you to make a significant future contribution in the fields of international education and globalisation; we are committed to ensuring that you acquire a range of subject-specific and generic skills (including employability skills).

Our graduates will go on to work in a wide variety of education-related careers, such as:

- teaching or lecturing in international education contexts (such as international colleges and schools, English medium schools, schools in low and middle income countries)
- teacher education posts worldwide
- leadership roles in international education or globalisation
- administration in international education or globalisation
- research in universities or other organisations (government, business, voluntary and international)
- educational policy makers or analysts (at local, national, international levels)
- education roles in charities and NGOs.

About the department

The Department of Education is a thriving academic community focused on furthering our understanding of policy, culture, pedagogy and diversity within a global educational context. We hold a strong national and international reputation for our research.

We have an excellent network with a wide range of educational institutions including, schools, colleges, universities, local authorities and government departments, within the UK and also internationally.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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If you are a graduate working in education and looking for academic and professional development and experience in research education, this could be the course for you. Read more
If you are a graduate working in education and looking for academic and professional development and experience in research education, this could be the course for you. It is flexible, part-time (for most participants) and is designed to be suitable for busy professionals. You can aim for the full MA degree (180 credits) from the start or begin with the smaller Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) and stop there or build credits on afterwards towards the MA. You may already have some credits (e.g. from a PGCE or a CPD course) which you may be able to use towards the MA (subject to certain conditions).

The modules are designed to allow you to articulate your personal learning needs and goals , as well as to help you to apply key research issues from reading and reflection on your own situation. Throughout your studies you will be questioning evidence and assumptions, exploring the implications of alternatives and sharing your results in order to influence professional practice. You will be developing as a practitioner researcher and making a difference in your workplace.

There are a number of study modes available including school-based study groups, residential weekends and summer schools, supported self-study and specialist study programmes (e.g. for Specialist Teachers of Primary Mathematics). Most students experience a range of study modes across the full MA which culminates in a dissertation.

Start date: February/May/October

What you will study -

There is a range of five modules available, allowing you to follow your personal interest and specialism when you work towards the learning outcomes.

These are divided into five areas:

- Examining Innovations in Subject Specialism [or area of expertise].
- Undertaking Educational Ethnography/ Action research
- Investigating the Intersections between Public Policy and Aspects of Professional Practice.
- Developing Research Education and Skills
- The MA is completed with a dissertation of 15,000 words underpinned by research in an educational setting.

“I thought at the start that I wouldn’t be able to keep up, with the pressures of work and home, but how wrong I was. I have managed somehow to juggle my time - it has been wonderful.” Vanessa, MA in Education student

Assessment -

We aim to make assessment an integral part of your learning. Each assignment outline is developed to reflect your own working reality and the precise format is negotiated with a tutor.

One module is assessed through 50% assignment and 50% presentation. All other [4] assignments are written assignments in the form of reports, portfolios and assignments.

Please send your applications to the following address:

Admissions
Bishop Grosseteste University
Longdales Road
Lincoln
LN1 3DY

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This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. Read more
This MA is unique in combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art. Offered by The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Centre for Buddhist Art and Conservation at The Courtauld, the MA was established as a one-year degree in 2013. In order to build on and expand the strengths of the programme, the MA is changing in 2017 to a two-year degree taught in collaboration with SOAS.

The MA now brings together world-famous institutions: The Courtauld for the study of art history and conservation, and SOAS for the study of Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Drawing on the unique strengths of the two institutions and their exceptional faculties, the new curriculum of the MA provides detailed and systematic teaching over two years. Each discipline is introduced, expanded and integrated to allow students to obtain the best possible learning experiences and skills acquisition. Designed to provide increased specialisation over the two years, the course culminates in research and a substantial dissertation in the final months.

Offered once every two years, applications are now invited for the programme beginning autumn 2017. Taught by a wide range of specialists from both The Courtauld and SOAS, the MA also benefits from teaching by visiting experts. The course includes study trips to museums in the UK and Europe, and a longer study trip to India to develop an appreciation of Buddhist art in its original contexts. Students also benefit from conferences and public events regularly held by the Ho Centre at The Courtauld.

Drawing also on the research and conservation work undertaken by The Courtauld’s Conservation of Wall Painting Department in Bhutan, China and India, this MA is specifically designed to equip students with knowledge of:

‌•the central concepts of Buddhism, and their historical diffusion;
‌•the history of Buddhist art in its various religious, social and cultural contexts;
‌•the materials and techniques involved in the making of various types of Buddhist art;
‌•approaches to the conservation of Buddhist art, including understanding of the ethical, technical and administrative issues involved.

This MA provides a comprehensive grounding in the history of Buddhism, Buddhist art and its conservation for those intending to pursue further specialist conservation education, and for those who wish to proceed into related fields such as art-historical research, curating, and site-management.

About eight students are accepted on the MA. Applicants from different academic and geographical backgrounds are encouraged to apply. Previous experience in any of the fields covered by the MA is not required.

Please Note: Plans are being made for the redevelopment of The Courtauld’s home at Somerset House. The project, called Courtauld Connects, will include the development of state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities. During the redevelopment the location of some teaching will move. Further information on Courtauld Connects will be published on The Courtauld’s website over the coming months.

Programme Structure

This two-year MA combining the study of Buddhism, Buddhist art, and the techniques and conservation of Buddhist art, is structured to provide increased specialisation during the course, with a substantial dissertation at the end. The programme consists of interwoven strands. Led by Professor David Park and Dr Giovanni Verri at The Courtauld, and by Dr Christian Luczanits and Dr Vincent Tournier at SOAS, it includes teaching by a wide range of specialists from both institutions and from elsewhere. Some strands will be taught at The Courtauld or on-site, while for others students will join classes at SOAS.

Year 1
The objectives of this year are to provide a grounding in the concepts of Buddhism and their historical diffusion; an appreciation of the chronological development, regional variations and major themes of Buddhist art; an understanding of the making of different types of Buddhist art, and of the ethical, legal and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art; and an interdisciplinary exposure to the imagining and presentation of Buddhas and their achievements in South Asia, juxtaposing the textual perspective with what is communicated through imagery. The formal teaching is reinforced through a study trip in the second term to museums in Paris or elsewhere in Europe, and in the third term by a longer study trip to India.

‌•Strand 1: Critical Concepts in Buddhist Studies Convenor: Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course is designed to provide a broad understanding of the major processes and dynamics at work in the growth and development of Buddhism as a pan-Asian religion, and with the key methodological tools required to approach this major cultural force in its fascinating diversity.

•Strand 2: History of Buddhist Art Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Christian Luczanits (SOAS) This course provides an overview of Buddhist art with regard to its chronological development, regional variations, major themes, and the multiplicity of different media. Buddhist art in collections will also be studied, examining aspects of collecting and display.

•Strand 3: The Making of Buddhist Art, and Conservation Principles Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to the making of Buddhist art from its origins. Primary sources and technical studies are used to understand the different types of materials employed. It will also provide an introduction to the principles, ethics and other issues underlying the conservation and display of Buddhist art.

•Strand 4: Imag(in)ing Buddahood in South Asia Convenors: Christian Luczanits & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course engages in an interdisciplinary manner with the central idea of Buddhism, as it developed within and beyond its South Asian cradle. Bringing together the expertise of an art historian and a historian of Buddhist thought, it will provide exposure to a diversity of approaches to textual, iconographic, and archaeological sources, to understand how Buddhas and their achievements were imagined, presented and encountered by Buddhist practitioners.

‌•Strand 5: Study trip to museums in Europe To examine Buddhist art in major museums in Paris or elsewhere, considering art-historical, technical and conservation aspects, as well as display and management issues.

•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Convenor: David Park (The Courtauld) To examine the measures directly involved in the preservation of Buddhist art in museums and in situ; and to examine particular major case studies in detail with regard to the legal, ethical, management, practical and other issues involved.

Year 2
Strand 6 continues in Year 2. More specialised teaching is introduced in a variety of areas: texts, and their relationship to Buddhist objects; the scientific examination and imaging of Buddhist art; and a choice of specialised courses in Buddhist studies and Buddhist art, allowing students to pursue particular interests and to assist in the choice of dissertation topic. The dissertation, undertaken over a period of fourteen weeks, should consider an aspect of the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history or use of Buddhist art.

‌•Strand 6: Fragile Inheritance: the Conservation of Buddhist Art Continued from Year 1

•Strand 7: Texts on and around Buddhist objects Convenors: David Park (The Courtauld) & Vincent Tournier (SOAS) This course will

‌-explore the many ways by which texts inform, respond to, and accompany Buddhist objects across Asian societies. It will, in particular, -explore the Text-Image relationship, examining how textual and visual narratives respond to each other. It will introduce students to the methods of epigraphy and codicology, including the increasing use of imaging technologies.

‌•Strand 8: Analysis and Imaging of Buddhist Art Convenor: Giovanni Verri (The Courtauld) This course provides an introduction to methods of examination and analysis through the use of visual observations and scientific instruments, and an introduction to and basic instruction in the technical imaging of Buddhist art including multispectral imaging.

•Strand 9: Choice of one of the following specialised courses in Buddhist Studies and one in Buddhist Art at SOAS Students will select these courses in consultation with their tutors, on the basis of their previous background and career objectives; options will also depend on availability at SOAS. This further specialism will aid students in their choice of dissertation topic. Presentations and discussions at The
Courtauld will enable students to harmonise their experience.

Specialised Course in Buddhist Studies

-Buddhism in Tibet (Ulrich Pagel)
-Chinese Buddhism in the Pre-modern Period (Antonello Palumbo)
-East Asian Buddhist Thought (Lucia Dolce)
-The Buddhist Conquest of Central Asia (Ulrich Pagel)
-Specialised Course in Buddhist Art

-Buddhist and Hindu Art of the Maritime Silk Route (Peter Sharrock)
-Collecting and Curating Buddhist Art in the Museum (Louise Tythacott)
-Illustrated Manuscript Cultures of Southeast Asia (Anna Contadini & Farouk Yahya)
-Sacred Art and Architecture of Ancient Korea (Charlotte Horlyck)
-The Figure of the Buddha: Theory, Practice and the Making of Buddhist Art History (Ashley Thompson)
-Tibetan Buddhist Monuments in Context (Christian Luczanits)

‌•Strand 10: Dissertation: A major component of the MA is a 12,000-word dissertation, undertaken in the second and third terms of Year 2. The dissertation topic should focus on the original techniques, conservation, management, curating, history, or use of Buddhist art. Students are encouraged to design their research to reflect the interdisciplinary nature of the MA. Selection of the topic will be undertaken in the first term of Year 2 in consultation with course tutors, and will include assessment of the state of research, and production of an illustrated outline proposal with references.Topics have been varied; those of the previous one-year MA have included:

-19th– and early 20th-century copies and photographs of the Ajanta murals;
-narrative and biography in early Tibetan teacher portraits;
-tree and forest imagery in Buddhist Yamato-e handscroll paintings;
-technical study and investigation of Nagthangs;
-materials and techniques of red dyed gold from Southeast Asia;
-the influence of Tibetan Buddhism on Ming Imperial porcelains;
-examination and assessment of the environmental conditions of the Textile Museum of Bhutan.This range demonstrates the scope for students to research avenues that significantly develop their individual interests and skills, while also providing a contribution to the field.

Teaching Methods

Teaching methods and work required of the students are related to each strand and include:

‌•lectures: to impart factual information;
‌•seminars: to provide a forum for open discussion, and to allow assessment of the development of the individual student’s critical abilities;
‌•student seminars: to develop skills in gathering, organising and presenting a body of information, including visual material;
‌•essays: to develop skills in written communication and research methodology;
‌•reports: on the study trips;
‌•tutoring: to provide individual guidance, and to allow monitoring of the student’s progress.

How to Apply

Before starting your application, please ensure that you read and refer to the following three sets of information. Then access our Online Application System by selecting the relevant "Apply Now” link from the table of courses, below.

Follow this link for the information: http://courtauld.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/postgraduate-how-to-apply

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Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly… Read more
Why do languages change? Why does your mobile device suggest funny completions for words you are typing? How did it happen that Finnish is spoken mostly in Finland, but its linguistic relatives are scattered over a larger area? How can you study a language that does not have a standard orthography? Why can you sometimes tell where other people come from just by their accent? Why do some people stick to their dialect, but others give it up when they move to the city? Should you try to support language diversity? Can we save languages that are spoken by a very small number of people? How can computer-synthesised speech be made to sound more human? Why do some languages seem so much more difficult to learn - are they inherently more complex?

This Master's programme will provide you with an understanding of the nature and diversity of human language and with the theoretical tools for working with language material. If you are interested in languages but are unable to decide which of them you want to study, this Master's programme offers several fields of specialisation. One of them might be just perfect for you.

During your studies, you will:
-Gain an in-depth understanding of the basic structure of language, its subsystems (phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics) and their mutual relationships.
-Learn the fundamentals of linguistic analysis and language description.
-Familiarize yourself with linguistic concepts, theories, descriptive models and the associated research methods.
-Learn how language is related to cognition, speech and interaction as well as to social structures, culture and society.
-Learn to use various methods and technical tools in order to manage and analyze language data.
-Gain a good understanding of linguistic variation and diversity: what is common to the world's languages and how they differ, how language changes through time, how languages influence one another, how individuals cope with multilingual situations and how communities speaking endangered languages can be supported.

After completing your studies, you will be able to work independently in various fields that require multidisciplinary expertise in linguistic sciences. You will have the theoretical knowledge and skills that are required for postgraduate studies in the doctoral programme in language studies.

The University of Helsinki will introduce annual tuition fees to foreign-language Master’s programmes starting on August 1, 2017 or later. The fee ranges from 13 000-18 000 euros. Citizens of non-EU/EEA countries, who do not have a permanent residence status in the area, are liable to these fees. You can check this FAQ at the Studyinfo website whether or not you are required to pay tuition fees: https://studyinfo.fi/wp2/en/higher-education/higher-education-institutions-will-introduce-tuition-fees-in-autumn-2017/am-i-required-to-pay-tuition-fees/

Programme Contents

Linguistic Diversity in the Digital Age is an integrated international programme that offers you a comprehensive view of all subfields of the science of language. As a student in the programme you will be able to choose among four specialist options: (1) General Linguistics, (2) Phonetics, (3) Language Technology, and (4) Diversity Linguistics.

General Linguistics
Gives you comprehensive in-depth training in a wide range of theoretical and methodological approaches to language structure and language in use. Special emphasis is put on language typology in a global perspective as well as the documentation and description of endangered and previously undocumented and under-documented forms of speech.

Phonetics
Introduces you to the tools for working with the articulatory, acoustic and perceptional aspects of human speech from a multidisciplinary perspective. At the more advanced level, you will become acquainted with the methods of experimental phonetics.

Language Technology
Combines linguistics with digital technology in an interdisciplinary approach with close links to computer science. The focus areas include natural language processing (NLP) for morphologically rich languages, cross-lingual NLP and language technology in the humanities.

Diversity Linguistics
Encompasses all aspects of linguistic diversity in time and space, including historical linguistics as well as the extralinguistic context of languages: ethnicities, cultures and environ­ments. The areal foci in Diversity Linguistics are Eurasia and Africa.

These four specialist options interact at all levels. There is a study module common to all students in the programme regardless of the specialist option they choose. The integration of these four perspectives into one programme is unique - no similar programme exists anywhere else.

In the context of “Humanities”, the programme has the closest relationship to natural sciences, and many subfields of the programme involve methods directly linked to laboratory sciences, including digital technology and neurosciences.

The teaching in the programme includes lectures and seminars, practical exercise sessions, reading circles, fieldwork excursions, as well as work practice (internship). The broad spectrum of teaching methods guarantees optimal support for your learning processes.

Programme Structure

The scope of the Master of Arts degree is 120 credits. The degree contains the following studies:
-Studies common to all students in the programme (30 credits)
-Advanced studies in the specialist option (at least 60 credits)
-Other studies (up to 30 credits)

The target duration of full-time studies leading to an MA degree is two years.

All students in the programme take the same courses during the autumn semester of the first year.

Then you will focus on your specialist option (general linguistics, phonetics, language technology, or diversity linguistics). This block of studies consists of courses (at least 30 credits) and of the final project, which is your Master's thesis (30 credits).

Additionally, you choose other studies: modules offered either by the other specialist options within this Master's programme or by other programmes within the University of Helsinki. The size of such optional study modules is typically 15, 25 or 30 credits. Courses offered by other universities can also be included here.

The studies in your own specialist option as well as the other studies may also include an internationalization period (e.g. student exchange) and work practice or other working life oriented study units. Working life and career development perspectives are integrated in many courses in the programme.

You will complete your studies systematically. At the beginning of your Master’s studies, you will prepare your first personal study plan (PSP). In this, you will receive support especially from the staff of the Master's programme. Guidance is also given at the Faculty level.

Career Prospects

After graduation, students of the programme find employment in a wide variety of positions, in which special knowledge of language is required.

One path prepares you for a research career, and many graduates work as researchers in Finland and abroad. You can also work in the political, diplomatic, and educational sectors, as well as research administration. Further potential employers are found in the publishing industry, media and journalism, public relations and communications of business and public administration, as well as NGOs.

If you choose a technological orientation, you may work in language technology firms or more generally in the IT sector. Big international companies are in constant need of experts in speech and language technology. Additionally, there is a vibrant field of domestic companies, some established ones and many promising start-ups. Some students have founded their own companies and become entrepreneurs.

Note that it is not possible to graduate as a (subject) teacher in the LingDA Master's programme.

In honour of the University of Helsinki's 375th anniversary, the Faculty of Arts presented 375 humanists during year 2015. Get to know the humanists! http://375humanistia.helsinki.fi/

Internationalization

Linguistics is by definition an international field. Language capacity is a feature common to all human beings, and the objective of linguistics as a science is to study both the universal background of language as a phenomenon and the global diversity of languages as expressions of social and cultural heritage.

In the LingDA programme, internationalization is present in several forms and at several levels:
-The programme functions in English and accepts international students from all countries.
-The programme recruits students representing a variety of linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
-The students are encouraged to study and master many languages from both the practical and the theoretical points of view.
-The students are encouraged early on to get engaged in documentational and typological field work among speakers of little documented languages in various parts of the world.
-The students are encouraged to use the opportunities of international exchange that the university offers.

The programme has a high international profile and all teachers have wide international contact networks. At the university of Helsinki, linguistics was internationalized as early as the 19th century. Finland is a country where, in particular, ethnolinguistics and field linguistics were developed and practised much earlier than in most other European countries. Some of the regions where Finnish ethnolinguists have been active include North and Central Eurasia, the Near and Middle East, East Asia, South Asia, and Africa. This tradition of field-work-oriented linguistics is today carried on by the HALS (Helsinki Area and Linguistic Studies) research community. At the same time, the more recent fields of linguistics, including phonetics, language technology, and typology, have developed their own international profiles.

Research Focus

The MA programme Diversity Linguistics in the Digital Age combines several research fields in which the University of Helsinki has long been a global leader. Language research in Helsinki has always maintained its strong commitment to a better understanding of cultural areas and their history. Situated in an ideal place for the study of language history and contact linguistics of various Eurasian language families, the study of Uralic languages has a long tradition in Helsinki. Our interest in the culturally and historically informed study of language reaches well beyond that, though, spanning Asia, Europe and Africa.

Our language research is empirically driven and informed by linguistic typology. The question of linguistic complexity, its significance for language and cultural history, and its intersection with ecological models is a hallmark of the Helsinki School of Linguistics. We explore new horizons in area and language studies by combining cutting edge research in linguistic typology with field work based descriptive linguistics and linguistic anthropology.

A unique asset at the University of Helsinki is the presence of various language technology initiatives at the forefront of the digital humanities. The study of morphologically complex languages plays a great role here, and special attention is paid to lesser researched languages.

Each of the four study lines of our MA programme thus corresponds to a University of Helsinki focus area. Our language-related research is typically multidisciplinary and involves more than one linguistic specialty. This is also a crucial feature in our MA programme. Students receive theoretical, thematic and methodological training for research or other professional careers that require problem-solving skills in order to maintain linguistic diversity and to support people’s linguistic well-being.

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The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Global and International Citizenship Education. Globalisation is perhaps the key driving force of modern education systems. Read more
The Department of Education offers a one-year (12 month) taught full time MA in Global and International Citizenship Education.

Globalisation is perhaps the key driving force of modern education systems. Schools (and other educational enterprises in universities, businesses and communities) are part of a global network. This programme explores important issues about what it means to be a citizen in a global world - what could and should be done by educators to respond to the needs of individuals and groups in nation states and the new global society. We discuss issues about rights and duties and communities in the UK, Europe and globally and explore learning, teaching and assessment methods in schools and beyond.

This programme will be attractive to all those who have an interest in social studies education. This includes political and ideological education, moral education and education for diversity. This is a broad field that includes global education, comparative education, international education, intercultural understanding and citizenship education. In particular, the programme explores how to help people understand society and develop the skills to take part in it. This includes investigations of European citizenship and global citizenship education and focusing on learning and teaching methods. The programme will be of interest to those who see themselves as current or future teachers, researchers or policy makers. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students. Examples of what our graduates have done include PhD research in Australia; becoming and academic in a university in Japan; being an international student advisor at a university in the USA; working in business and in higher education in China.

Programme Aims

The MA programme aims to:
-Provide advanced-level study of forms of education appropriate for global citizens
-Illuminate the nature of citizenship and global education through insights into comparative education
-Link citizenship and global education to wider issues in society (history, politics and culture) and education via rhetorical and other perspectives
-Develop personal, academic and professional language skills in English
-Develop basic research capabilities in the field of citizenship and global education

Programme Content

Term 1
In term 1 there are 2 compulsory modules:
-Citizenship Education (20 credits)
-Research Methods in Education (20 credits)

And one option module (20 credits) which may be chosen from the full list of modules available to all taught MA students. Modules that may be of particular interest to MAGICE students are likely to include:
-Education and Social Justice
-Intercultural Communication in Education
-Motivation in Education
-Teaching and Learning in Schools

Term 2
-Teaching and Learning Citizenship & Global Education (20 credits)

And one option module (20 credits) from the full list of modules available to all taught MA students. Modules that may be of particular interest to MAGICE students are likely to include:
-Contemporary Issues in Teaching
-Cross-cultural Perspectives on Language and Discourse
-Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis
-Gender, Sexuality and Education
-Higher Education in the 21st Century

Term 3
-Planning and Communicating Research (20 credits, classes spread over Terms 2 and 3)

The third term and the summer is also devoted to writing a dissertation (60 credits) based on a small-scale research study to be submitted by early September. Previous studies have included an examination of global education; universities as sites of global citizenship; studying the media.

Careers

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of sectors within education and higher education, but also in journalism, information management, human resources and other careers.

Others find employment opportunities in the civil service, NGOs and other international organisations.

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The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/. Read more
The MA in Digital Media is unique in its combination of practical and theoretical approaches to contemporary media and technology- http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/ma-digital-media-technology-cultural-form/

The established and exciting degree is designed to help you understand digital transformations in media, culture and society and apply this understanding in practice, in the media and creative industries and in further research. You will be equipped with skills that can be applied to current and future developments in digital media, social media, computing and other aspects of technology.

The MA in Digital Media educates aspiring media practitioners and academics as well as early and mid-career professionals who seek to reflect on their roles in a structured and stimulating learning environment designed to give all students up-to-the-minute knowledge of digital media and the skills to apply that knowledge to future developments.

The MA offers two pathways:

-Pathway 1 is a theory programme where you learn about developments in digital media and technology from a wide range of perspectives

-Pathway 2 is a theory and practice programme where you improve your skills, understanding and experience in one of the following areas:

Documentary
Image making
Journalism
Writing

Acclaimed academics and practitioners

Benefit from the experience and expertise of one of the world’s leading media and communications departments. You'll be taught by theorists and practitioners of international standing: Sarah Kember, Joanna Zylinska, Graham Young, Tony Dowmunt, Angela Phillips, Julian Henriques and David Morley.

Work placements and internships

The MA in Digital Media regularly attracts offers of work placements and internships. Recently these have come from Google, The Science Museum and N1creative.com.

Facilities

Our students have access to state-of-the-art facilities including well-equipped lecture and seminar rooms, exhibition spaces, computer facilities and digital media suites.

The department is also currently host to the renowned philosopher of media and technology, Bernard Stiegler and students will have access to his modulein Media Philosophy as well as priority access to the innovative and popular option After New Media. Designed to complement the MA in Digital Media, this course provides a framework for thinking about the current media environment as well as future forms of human and computer interaction.

An established record

The MA in Digital Media has been redefining media theory and practice since 2004. Our students become proficient in:

the history, sociology and philosophy of digital media
the application of critical conceptual skills to specialist areas and future forms of media
multimedia skills in image making (photography, video, animation, graphic art) script writing, journalism and documentary
MA Digital Media students have access the pioneering option ‘After New Media’, a non-assessed online module which explores the themes of self mediation, ethical mediation and intelligent mediation, and develops a framework for thinking about 'life' after new media. As befits a course of this kind we will be combining media, and exploring their pedagogic potential – uniting digital-online technologies with more traditional teaching formats, such as reading groups, seminars and an end of year symposium.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Dr Sarah Kember.

Modules & Structure

The programme consists of:

Two compulsory core modules
Pathway 1 - between two and four option modules (worth 60 credits) OR
Pathway 2 - a two-term practice block (worth 30 credits) and either one or two option modules (worth 30 credits)
The dissertation or the practice/theory project

Assessment

Seen take-home paper; essays; dissertation or practice/theory project and other production work in the area of documentary, image-making, journalism or fiction.

Programme overview

This is an exciting programme which offers a critical, contextual and practical approach to digital media and technology. It problematises approaches to the 'new' media in academic and professional debate, especially those which overemphasise the potential for radical social change led by a homogenised technology itself.

The programme is defined by its resistance to technological determinism and its insistence on the importance of addressing the social and historical contexts within which a range of media technologies are employed. In order to provide a contextual framework and facilitate the conceptualisation of digital media and technologies as fully cultural forms and processes, the programme will draw on a range of disciplines including: media and cultural studies, sociology, anthropology and philosophy. However, the programme will remain focused on key contemporary concerns about the potential role of digital media in society and on refiguring the contours of the 'new' media debate.

The programme offers two pathways. Pathway 1 addresses central theoretical and conceptual concerns relating to digital media. Pathway 2 combines theoretical analysis and practical work, offering students the opportunity to explore new media theories and concepts in practice. Pathway 2 is primarily aimed at students who already have some experience in one of the areas on offer: documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism; writing. It is meant to appeal to media industry professionals who are keen to reflect critically on their practice within a structured learning environment, graduates of practice-based courses but also those who have gained their practical experience in documentary; digital photography and image making; journalism or writing in informal settings.

Programme structure

The first compulsory core course is Digital Media - critical perspectives and this is taught in a small workshop format in the Autumn term. This course functions as a foundation for the second core course and offers students a map of the key debates in digital media. The course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions and is supported by the provision of one-to-one tutorials.

The second compulsory core course is Technology and Cultural Form - debates, models, dialogues and this develops questions of technology, power, politics and subjectivity which were introduced in the first core course. The first part of this course highlights the key conceptual concerns of a contextualised approach to digital media plus the relevant debates and models formulated by key figures in the field. The second part of this course aims to generate a dialogue between theoreticians and practitioners around some of the most intellectually stimulating, contentious and contemporary ideas in the field without necessarily seeking a resolution. This course is taught in ten two hour workshop sessions during the Spring term and is supported by the weekly provision of one-to-one tutorials.

Students are required to take options from the lists provided by the Media and Communications, Anthropology, Comparative Literature and Sociology Departments as well as the Centre for Cultural Studies. Examples might include: After New Media, Nature and Culture, Cultural Theory, Globalisation, Risk and Control, Embodiment and Experience, Political Communications. Options are taught primarily through lectures and seminars and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

Each student's option profile is discussed with the programme convenor in order to ensure that the balance of subject-specific topics is appropriate for the individual concerned. Option courses are taught primarily through lectures, seminars and tutorials and take place in the Autumn or Spring terms.

All students are required to produce either a 12,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor or a practice/theory project in the area of documentary, photography and image making, journalism or fiction. The length of the practical element is dependent on the media and the form used and will be agreed in advance with the supervisor. It will, however, be comparable with practical projects undertaken in practice MA programmes in the relevant field. Students undertaking the practice/theory project will also be expected to submit a 3-4000 word analysis of their practice which locates it within the theoretical debates explored in the MA as a whole. This essay may be presented as a separate document or as an integral part of the project depending on the nature of the project and by a agreement with both theory and practice supervisors.

Programme outcomes

The programme's subject specific learning outcomes require students to analyse and contextualise developments in digital media and technology with reference to key debates in the history, sociology, anthropology and philosophy of the media. Students who opt for the practice/theory pathway will also be required to produce material of publishable or broadcast standard and to evaluate the ways in which theoretical and practical insights intersect. All students will develop a wide range of transferable qualities and skills necessary for employment in related or unrelated areas. These are described by the Quality Assurance Agency as: 'the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility, decision-making in complex and unpredictable situations, and the independent learning ability required for continuing professional development'.

By the end of the programme students will be able to:

-Map and critically evaluate key debates in the field of new media
-Analyse and contextualise current and future developments in digital media and technology
-Evaluate and articulate key historical, sociological, anthropological and philosophical approaches to the study of digital media and technology
-Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of at least four differing areas of inquiry
-Demonstrate an advanced level of conceptual knowledge and (where relevant) practical skill appropriate for a sustained piece of work in the field
-Prepare and deliver clearly argued and informed work
-Locate, retrieve and present relevant information for a specific project
-Manage a complex array of competing demands and work effectively to a deadline
-Work resourcefully and independently
-Think critically and/or work practically within a given context

Skills

We provide graduates with skills that are cutting edge: in the critical analysis and/or creative production of digital media; in the disciplinary knowledge and conceptual frameworks necessary for current and future forms of media and technology; in the awareness of how digital media and technologies are re-shaping society from the ways we communicate (through social media and web 2.0) to the increasingly ‘smart’ environments in which we live.

Careers

Our programme provides a theory and practice pathway and prepares students for work in the following areas:

-media and creative industries; advertising, marketing and PR (graduates of the MA Digital Media have found work with Virgin Media, Google, the BBC and other leading organisations worldwide)
-research and academia (graduates from this programme have gone on to study for PhD degrees in higher education institutions around the world and also here with us)
-media production and new media art (graduates have exhibited, published and produced work in photography, journalism, TV, documentary, film and multimedia)

Graduate Ekaterina discusses her career:

"I work for a company, called Visual DNA, which already sounds like life happening After New Media. The company is the largest data provider in Europe and is totally multinational. We actually try to analyse human visual DNA, you memories, feelings, thoughts about the future, anticipations, etc by creating personality quizzes where instead of verbal answers we tend to use images.

My role is as Creative Developer. It involves working with images from concept to finding/shooting and post-production. My qualifications perfectly matched what they’ve been looking for, Digital Media rocks!

My tip for the new-to-be-graduates is this: physically go to places and companies and talk to people. It really opens up loads of possibilities, and when I tell someone where I’ve graduated from they look impressed, and there is some sort of respect coming from them."

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

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The MA Education programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study education at a master's level. Working independently within a challenging but supportive environment, you will be provided with the tools and resources to undertake and use educational research. Read more
The MA Education programme will give you an unparalleled opportunity to study education at a master's level. Working independently within a challenging but supportive environment, you will be provided with the tools and resources to undertake and use educational research. You will also be supported in researching and reflecting on your own practice.

The programme aims to:
- improve your research, analysis and critical thinking skills
- enhance your professional practice through greater theoretical understanding of current educational issues.

The MA Education is designed for teachers, lecturers, trainers, educational leaders, managers and administrators, and those aspiring to a career in education.

Programme features:
- Choose from one of four Study Pathways to focus your learning where you want to develop.
- Flexible study options include Summer Schools, Study Centres and distance learning.
- Undertake a small scale research project in the context of your own or your institution's policy and practice.
- Optional opportunity to study for the International Baccalaureate Educators’ Certificate alongside the MA Education.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-educ/

Study Pathways

You can choose one of the following Study Pathways as part of this programme:

MA Education:
The MA Education is our most popular degree and allows you the greatest flexibility in choice of units and dissertation topic (with the exception of those opting to take the International Baccalaureate Educator Certificates who are required to take specific units).

MA Education (International Education):
This pathway is designed for those who wish to develop knowledge and an understanding of issues relating to education beyond the national context. Depending upon your interests, you can focus on issues relating to educational practices in different national systems, on international schools and/or on other issues cutting across national contexts.

MA Education (Learning and Teaching):
If you wish to develop the practice and your understanding of Learning and Teaching then this is the pathway for you. Core units draw on theory of learning and teaching processes (with children and adults) and the role of technology.

MA Education (Educational Leadership and Management):
This pathway is designed to meet the needs of experienced educational professionals who wish to inform their work as leaders and managers, or who aspire to a leadership role, through an in-depth understanding of current educational management practice, theory, research and policy.

Ways of studying - flexible study options

You can choose from a variety of ways to study this programme.

- Summer School (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/postgraduate/ways-of-studying/summer-school/)
- Study Centres (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/postgraduate/ways-of-studying/study-centres/)
- Distance Learning (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/postgraduate/ways-of-studying/distance-learning/)

If you wish, you can complete the programme entirely though distance learning, however we recommend you try to attend at least one face-to-face unit as it is valuable to spent time in a study environment with tutors and other students.

Programme structure

For the 90 credits required for the MA Education, you acquire 60 credits through taught units and 30 credits by completing a dissertation. Typically, you complete five 12 credit taught units. One of the taught units must be the Research Methods in Education which is worth 12 credits, another of the taught units must be Understanding Learners and Learning or Education and Society (your choice may depend on which pathway you choose).

- Distance learning study commences at two fixed points in the year, 1st March and 1st September.
- Units taught at Summer School start in July
- Units are taught at Study Centres throughout the year.
- You can study units in any order, but you must complete each unit within six months.
- 175 study hours is expected for each unit.
- You can study up to two units at any one time and you have between two and five years to complete the programme.

View summary table (http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/images/ma-education-programme-table.jpg) or Programme & Unit Catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/ed/ed-proglist-pg.html#B) for further information.

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed by assignment and dissertation. As you progress through the units and successfully pass the assignments, you will receive feedback and grades, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching methods at Summer Schools and Study Centres include; lectures, student-led seminars, workshops, group work, tutorials, Moodle (virtual learning environment), and other electronic communications.

If there are less than six students enrolled on a unit scheduled at Summer School, the unit will still run, but it may be taught on a Directed Tutorial basis. You will be provided with resources to help your study and individual or group tutorials will be timetabled in order to make sure your learning needs are fully met.

Distance Learning takes place online; enabling you to study independently with the support of a tutor. The Wiki environment offers you a number of alternatives for working flexibly with your learning materials. In addition, there are opportunities to link up with other students and leave feedback about your experience.

Methods of assessment

Assessment consists of a written 5000 word assignment for each unit of study, together with a 15,000 word Dissertation.

Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL)

If you have studied, but not completed or received an award, for postgraduate Masters level units in education from another institution, you may be eligible to transfer credit for this prior learning.

- Depending on the programme of study, you may transfer up to 40% of the total credits required for the MA/Postgraduate Certificate/Postgraduate Diploma in Education.

- Credit must have been obtained recently (less than 8 years ago at the time of the award of the qualification to which it contributes).

- Claims for APL will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

- If you obtain APL you will still be required to study Research Methods in Education and either Education and Society or Understanding Learners and Learning (unless your previous study has sufficient overlap with any of the units, in which case exemption may be considered).

- Use of APL credit may affect your options when selecting a study pathway.

Careers

This programme is ideal for those wishing to progress their career within an educational organisation.

Many of our graduates have gone on to be leaders and managers within educational settings; while others started their educational careers in teaching, lecturing or administration. This degree will also prepare you for further study at Doctoral level (PhD or EdD).

About the department

The Department of Education is a thriving academic community focused on furthering our understanding of policy, culture, pedagogy and diversity within a global educational context. We hold a strong national and international reputation for our research.

We have an excellent network with a wide range of educational institutions including, schools, colleges, universities, local authorities and government departments, within the UK and also internationally.

Find out more about the department here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/education/

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society. Read more
Now more than ever, we need to invite everyone in society, of all ages, to be part of the solution. The Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication program will empower you, and give you the depth and insight to lead and motivate others in developing a sustainable, environmentally sound society.

Who It’s For

The MA in Environmental Education and Communication is for those interested in how education and communication can help develop environmentally sustainable social and economic systems. Learning how we can educate and communicate to engage those in our workplaces, communities and nations towards such a goal involves all sectors of society– agriculture, health, governance, media, business, architecture, community development, science, education, recreation and more.

Students likely already know about the complexities of our current unsustainability and the challenges faced by environmental educators and communicators trying to address this problem. Our program is designed for those who wish to widen their perspective on environmental and related social issues, deepen their understanding of those areas essential to a skilled educator and/or communicator, explore different ways of understanding the causes of our current unsustainable society, and develop attributes essential to effective leadership.

Participants seek opportunities to learn with others from diverse backgrounds, to engage in core classes, co-operative projects, team planning, and group discussions to reach a better understanding of the language, expertise, and concerns of a wide range of education and communication professionals.

Students are typically professionals with bachelor's degrees and at least two years' experience working or interest in environmental education and communication.

Graduates of the program have gone on to advance in a variety of fields, from creating schools within the public and private education systems, to leading communications sections within major national and international non-profit organizations, to advising senior government ministers and Premiers, to gaining their PhD degrees with one alumni recently taking on a professorial position in a North American university.

Financial Awards

Royal Roads University has a variety of awards, scholarships, and bursaries available to help offset your tuition fees. The MA in Environmental Education and Communication program has a comparatively high success rate in Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) grant competitions and many of the program’s students win significant financial awards. The SSHRC award at the MA level often aids the competitiveness of students for future grants, and grant writing is a marketable skill The unique advising structure and ability to gain one-to-one aid in grant writing are important features of RRU that help account for this success.

Outcomes

Graduates will return to their career with a range of theoretical knowledge and analytical and communications skills and competencies. Graduates have the skills and knowledge to develop and implement innovative programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with science-based information, psychologically-sound strategies, and culturally-appropriate, philosophically-nuanced and educationally-sophisticated approaches to current environmental issues.

Graduates will be able to:
-Develop and implement programs to provide students, clients and other audiences with up-to-date, reputable scientific and technological information, as well as traditional knowledge, about current environmental issues and opportunities
-Apply the best current knowledge of learning and cognition to the design, development, and implementation of programs about environmental education and communication
-Design, develop and implement environmental communications and education programs using a range of formats and incorporating relevant current technologies and media
-Evaluate the status of public information and prior knowledge concerning environmental values, issues and opportunities
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the range of perspectives (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, values) towards the environment and human activity in the environment
-Evaluate environmental information and education programs
-Develop and implement strategies to foster conflict resolution, constructive dialogue and community knowledge construction concerning environmental issues
-Develop approaches to nurture effective and responsible environmental actions on the part of corporations, governmental and non-governmental organizations and citizens' coalitions
-Provide up to date information about innovations in environmental communication and education
-Possess a sophisticated awareness of the nature of contemporary human-environment issues and their implications for education and communications programs
-Develop a systems perspective on problems in environmental education and communications
-Develop an understanding of environmental education and communication functions within organizational contexts

Delivery Method

Combining the best of short residencies and innovative web-based instruction, the MA in Environmental Education and Communication program allows both busy working professionals and those just beginning their careers to get the most out of their academic experience. This combination of learning experiences allows students to benefit from the intensity of the program while still being able to meet the demands of family and workplace.

Participants in the MA program take 11 courses (41 credits) including the thesis course. Six courses are taken on-campus, and five are delivered at a distance through Internet-based technologies.

Certificate students take the first three courses in the schedule for a total of 9 credits. Diploma students take the first nine courses for a total of 24 credits.

We will utilize a range of educational methodologies, including case studies, field studies, cultural studies, team projects, lectures and seminar discussions, and online modules. RRU has become a leader in the delivery of web-based interactive distance education courses, and these will be of great value during non-residential periods.

Residency
Over two years, MA students attend two separate three-week residencies and one final two-week residency. The first residency introduces the cohort of students to each other, the faculty, and the RRU style of education as they participate in their first two courses. The middle residency incorporates two courses, may have a more directed field-based orientation, and helps prepare students for their thesis research. The final residency allows completing students to present their thesis findings to the larger environmental education and RRU community and incorporates their final courses, preparing them to be leaders in the field.

Students should expect to be fully occupied during the residency period. The regular classroom schedule is Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. with homework, readings, and team meetings done outside of these hours. There are activities during the regular workday and in the evenings. In addition to educational activities, there are a number of planned field trips and recreational events.

Online Courses
Online courses are delivered through the innovative use of internet technologies. Students draw on a range of learning resources, while using online discussion groups and drop boxes to develop and complete the electronic submission of both individual and team assignments.

Students take one nine-week distance course at a time. Each distance course requires an average time commitment of 10 - 20 hours per week.

Program Laddering
The structure of the program is laddered so that individuals are able to complete a Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, or full Master's degree.

-The Graduate Certificate program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the Diploma or Master of Arts in Environmental Education and Communication. The Certificate would be awarded upon successful completion of a residency and one distance-based semester (approximately five months). Students may apply for transfer to the Diploma or MA stream during the Graduate Certificate program, or apply to the Diploma or MA program once they have completed the Certificate
-The Graduate Diploma program was designed to be taken on its own, or to ladder into the MA in Environmental Education and Communication. The Diploma would be awarded upon successful completion of two residencies and one distance-based semester (approximately 12 months). Students may apply for transfer to the MA stream during the Graduate Diploma program, or apply to the MA program once they have completed the Diploma
-The full two-year program leading to the MA is delivered through a combination of three residential periods, three distance-based semesters, and a thesis

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This course is a way to build on your professional skills and educational leadership. Are you a teacher or educationalist who would like to develop your professional practice? The aim of this course is to support your career development while also enabling you to develop advanced research and study skills. Read more
This course is a way to build on your professional skills and educational leadership.

Course overview

Are you a teacher or educationalist who would like to develop your professional practice? The aim of this course is to support your career development while also enabling you to develop advanced research and study skills.

This full-time course develops your professional practice as a teacher or educationalist. You will learn advanced research and study skills while acquiring Masters-level knowledge that is shaped by your personal interests and career aspirations.

We also offer a part-time Education MA and a distance learning Education MA, which may suit you if you need more flexible studying options.

There are four titles for the MA available, depending upon the modules chosen for study. The titles available are:
-MA Education (Generic)
-MA Education (Advanced Professional Practice - Secondary)
-MA Education (Advanced Professional Practice - Primary)
-MA Education (Special Educational Needs, Disability and Inclusion)

The content of the course can be tailored to your particular interests, with a range of modules available from our MA suite. Options may include ‘Advanced Pedagogical Practice’, ‘Assessment Theory into Pedagogical Practice’ and ‘Leading Organisational Effectiveness in Education’. You can also choose to undertake a negotiated individual study in education. For those who are returning to higher education, we provide plenty of support including classes to assist with academic writing.

MA Education (Special Educational Needs, Disability and Inclusion): This specialism is designed for professionals who are involved with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND). The course equips you to develop SEND provision, allowing young people to reach their full potential in school and to make a successful transition into adulthood while continuing your broader professional development and also the opportunity to acquire Masters-level skills in research and analysis.

The research element of the course is excellent preparation if you decide to go on to a higher degree such as a PhD. The research element is supported by the University’s Centre for Pedagogy whose specialisms include teaching styles, motivation, human relationships in learning and comparative education.

Most people who join the course already have a PGCE or another teaching qualification. Your written outputs, together with the experiences and activities of the course, will provide a portfolio of evidence that can open up new opportunities and a fresh stage in your career.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/courses/educationandsociety/postgraduate/education-generic-part-time/

Course content

This course offers considerable flexibility over the choice of modules from our MA suite. At Masters level, responsibility for learning lies as much with the student as with the lecturer. The course is structured as follows:
-You will choose three option modules from the MA suite (30 Credits each)
-You will complete the core module ‘Research Methods in Education’ (30 Credits)
-You will also undertake a Masters project/dissertation (60 Credits)

Modules in the MA suite may include the following:
-Development of Learning: A Case Study (30 Credits)
-Negotiated Individual Study in Education (30 Credits)
-Advanced Pedagogical Practice (30 Credits)
-Leading Organisational Effectiveness in Education and Training (30 Credits)
-Assessment Theory into Pedagogical Practice (30 Credits)
-Approaches to Teaching and Learning for Learners with Special or Additional Needs (30 Credits)
-Barriers to Learning (30 Credits)
-Inclusive Education (30 Credits)

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods which include tutor input, seminars, workshops, support sessions, collaborative group work and discussion, tutorials, presentations, interactive practical sessions and directed private study.

Compared to an undergraduate course, you will find that this Masters course requires a higher level of independent working. Assessment methods include written assignments including the dissertation and oral and written presentations.

Facilities & location

The University of Sunderland has been a centre for training in education since 1908.

Course location
The course is based at our Sir Tom Cowie Campus at St Peter’s. The Campus is on the banks of the River Wear and is less than a mile from the seaside. It’s a vibrant learning environment with strong links to educational institutions and a constant exchange of ideas and people.

The campus also includes the Prospect Building – which mirrors our City Campus Gateway style in the main reception area. It also is home to the main campus library as well as several catering areas, which look out onto the river. Prospect Building underwent a recent 1.25m re-development to ensure it continues to meet the needs of the modern day student.

University Library Services
We have got thousands of books and e-books on education topics, with many more titles available through the inter-library loan service. We also subscribe to a comprehensive range of print and electronic journals so you can access the most reliable and up-to-date academic and industry articles.

Some of the most important sources for your course include:
-EBSCO Professional Development Collection, which is a specialised collection of over 500 education journals, including full-text education journals dating back to 1965
-British Education Index, which contains information on research, policy and practice in education and training in the UK
-Australian Education Index, which covers more than 130,000 documents relating to educational research, policy and practice
-Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), which is a comprehensive, searchable bibliographic and full-text database of research and information. Over 650 journals are indexed
-JSTOR (short for ‘Journal Storage’), which provides access to important journals across the humanities, social sciences and sciences
-Lexis, which provides access to legal information as well as full-text newspaper articles

IT provision
When it comes to IT provision you can take your pick from hundreds of PCs as well as Apple Macs in the David Goldman Informatics Centre and St Peter’s library. There are also free WiFi zones throughout the campus. If you have any problems, just ask the friendly helpdesk team.

Employment & careers

On completing this course, your skills and understanding will be enhanced for roles in teaching, educational management and other educational settings.

Higher salaries are available for those who develop their professionalism and achieve the status of Excellent Teacher or Advanced Skills Teacher.

Teachers who take on additional responsibilities such as the co-ordination of provision for those with Special Education Needs can also expect to command a higher salary.

Past graduates from this course have gained employment in roles such as the following:
-Special needs and inclusion
-Senior management in education
-Special Educational Needs teacher

A Masters qualification also gives you broader career options including possible roles in lecturing, journalism, the media and arts administration. The research elements of a Masters course prepare you for further postgraduate studies at doctoral level.

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This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11. Read more
This MA programme is especially designed for those with an interdisciplinary background who wish to more fully comprehend core issues and approaches within International Relations post 9/11.

At the dawn of a third millennium, the pace of integration among the world’s regions and populations is breathtaking. Powerful forces – the emergence of transnational economies, the lightning speed of global communications, and the movement of peoples, cultures and ideas into new settings – are reshaping notions of citizenship, society and community.

At the same time, however, older religious hatreds, sectarian violence and new fundamentalisms are recasting existing states and disintegrating individual, national and international notions of security. Such dynamics demand that we rethink why we are and where we are today, but also reconsider historical interpretations of past change within and among the world’s regions. To understand the global condition requires a thorough and sensitive understanding of diverse interests, ethnicities and cultures. The purpose of this new postgraduate award in International Relations (IR) is to foster within students a global perspective and encourage a multicultural awareness of contemporary problems.

Why study with us?

IR is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. It is not so much a single discipline; rather it is a study of a particular type of behaviour whose comprehension requires the insight and methods of a number of disciplines. Although your MA is set within a strong political and sociological framework, the course is enhanced through the support of Law, History, and American Studies.

IR provides an opportunity to engage with and adapt to changing international, national and regional realities post 9/11. The security implications of the events of 9/11, and the impact of global developments on everyday lives, are present in the public mind as never before. The Palestinian question, western intervention and civil war in Iraq, nuclear proliferation, international crime and terrorism are just some of the recurrent themes that have taken on a new urgency and demand our attention.

IR develops critical awareness, conceptual understanding, sound research methods, and originality in the application of knowledge. Your MA will provide you with an appropriate set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-changing’ global context. Current social, political and economic globalisation demonstrates the inexorable importance of the ‘international’ and the increased relevance of this knowledge dimension at both academic and practice levels.

Course content

International Relations is a vital and dynamic field of intellectual inquiry that offers an interdisciplinary exploration of human interaction. Students undertaking the course will come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and it is not assumed that all students will have similar abilities or skills. It is not our aim to encourage further specialisation along the line of a student’s first degree but rather to complement existing knowledge and build upon transferable capabilities. Overall this is a unique opportunity for graduates both with and without International Relations training to study at a very high level for a postgraduate degree with global relevance.

Our aim is to foster a set of intellectual skills to enable more informed and effective participation in an ‘ever-shrinking’ global society. This goal is to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging foundation in approaches to the study and practice of international relations while developing an understanding and sensitivity to key issues in diverse areas of the modern world. The MA offers an exciting opportunity for graduates to develop their understanding of international affairs both theoretically and through their own or others’ experience.

Course modules (16/17)

-International Relations Theory: Great Debates, New Directions
-Major Organisations in the International Order
-Methodology and Research Design in International Relations
-The Peoples’ Republic of China: Foreign Policy Dilemmas
-European Integration
-America after 9/11
-The Politics of Latin American Development
-The International Politics of the Post-Soviet Space
-The Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa
-Politics of International Communications
-Dissertation
-The International Relations of the Pacific Rim
-The Political Economy of East African Development
-Comparative Transnational Criminology
-European and International Human Rights
-National Security, Terrorism and The Rule of Law
-Political Economies of International Development
-The Politics of Aid

Methods of Learning

The Master’s award in International Relations is designed to provide a rounded education and broadly based qualification for UK graduates and equivalently qualified foreign students, particularly those who lack an international dimension through their previous study. It is awarded after completion of a mixture of taught courses and a programme of research. The MA lasts at least one year (if taken full time, two years part time), and is to be taken by persons with honours degrees (or equivalent achievement). Also on offer (and commensurate with this standard of education) are advanced short courses leading to Postgraduate Certificates and Postgraduate Diplomas in IR.

In common with all universities, certain elements of the course are compulsory and other elements chosen. To be awarded the MA in International Relations each student must achieve 180 credits at Master’s level (here called CATS (Credit Accumulation and Transfer Scheme)). This includes 40 CATS of compulsory modules in International Theory, 20 CATS of compulsory methodology and research training, and a 60 CATS compulsory dissertation of between 15,000 and 20,000 words. Compulsory modules define the intellectual basis of IR as a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary subject while providing a firm foundation in theoretical issues and debates. They also develop the cognitive skills for specialist study and the practical skills for research. You gain the remaining 60 CATS through a wide choice of designated modules. All modules build upon the research and teaching expertise of individual tutors, and cover a wide range of themes in diverse areas of the globe – not just North America and Western Europe but the Middle East, Latin America, China and the Pacific Rim among others. A key aim is to develop a sensitivity and awareness of varied geo-political settings while comprehending the impact of change upon states, societies and individuals. Students are taught to discuss international problems to a high standard while applying the ways of analysis adopted by IR scholars to a range of issues.

We hope all candidates might be encouraged and enthused to achieve the MA. Yet we also recognise that some students may prefer to study in ‘stages’ – funds or time permitting. This is why we provide a named Postgraduate Certificate and a named Postgraduate Diploma. A Postgraduate Diploma in International Relations is available if students successfully complete 120 CATS points but do not complete the 60 CATS dissertation. Alternatively, there is the opportunity to achieve a Postgraduate Certificate in International Relations by successfully gaining 60 CATS points including 40 CATS of IR theory but excluding 20 CATS of methodology/research and of course the 60 CATS dissertation module.

All of this gives you, the student, the added flexibility of opting in or out of awards as personal or financial circumstance change. It gives the added incentive of an identifiable and quantifiable award at each stage of study while consistently encouraging and widening your participation in postgraduate enterprise. This strategy also enables an individual to complete their study within a timescale suitable to their own specific needs. Multiple points of entry (February and September) over a one or two year cycle further facilitate this.

Schedule

At Master’s level study, we aim to encourage student-led debates and exchange of ideas. Modules will typically alternate fortnightly between classes on campus and online learning activities. Each module incorporates a variety of teaching methods in class, including workshops, student presentations and discussions of primary and secondary materials (such as film, images, documentary sources and online resources). Online learning activities include online seminars, discussion boards, podcasts and blogs.

Full-time students get six hours of timetabled contact per week, part-time students have three hours. This does not include individual tutorials or dissertation supervision.

Independent study and assessment time equate to approximately 18 hours per week full time or nine hours part time.

Assessments

Your MA in International Relations is assessed through a variety of types of coursework and the dissertation. Assessment items include essays, literature reviews, presentations and research reports. There are no examinations. All coursework reflects the high level of intellectual demands associated with a taught MA and has the aim of developing a range of oral and written skills. You need to be prepared to commit yourself to substantial reading and thought for successful completion of an MA. This time includes preparation for assignments, seminars and the dissertation element.

Although teaching strategies vary according to individual modules, considerable emphasis is placed upon student-based learning in order to foster effective critical participation and discussion as overall course objectives. This means lectures and tutor-led teaching provide overviews of major theories and themes but the seminar or workshop is where learning is consolidated, exemplified and used in more student-centred contexts.

Modules typically make use of current case study material, video teaching media as well as practical exercises and the more traditional lecture and seminar activities. Tutorials are very important in facilitating and directing the learning of cognitive skills on a personal basis – by working within the context of your individual needs, appropriate goals can be set, for example, in relation to essay preparation and feedback.

At each stage you are encouraged to plan and organise your own learning. This allows greater time to be spent on critical evaluation – so reinforcing and extending your learning experience. Mixed methods of teaching and learning are utilised in seminars to achieve aims and outcomes, including tutor input, structural discussions, small group work, presentations, guided reading of designated course material, and wider reading appropriate to Master’s level. Student-led presentations and small group work develop your transferable skills and enhance your capacity for critical reflection. The academic essay has a central function in every module in allowing you to engage with and reflect upon the key skills required to demonstrate knowledge and understanding in IR. Coursework for all modules, but particularly in methods modules, allows students to acquire skills that they will then use in the dissertation.

Facilities and Special Features

-Strong staff expertise.
-Enthusiastic teaching team providing a supportive atmosphere for research.
-The core modules consider classic texts and the very latest thinking on international theory.
-Focus on the study of distinct global regions not just Europe, North America or the West.
-All students are assigned a personal tutor and will be encouraged to form study groups with colleagues.
-Guest speakers are a feature of this MA.
-Students will find the course team warm and approachable.

Careers

Previous students have used our MA in a variety of ways. It can be a bridge to further study – with several former students having gone on to do a PhD. As a prestigious qualification, it can enhance career opportunities in a wide range of occupations, for example, teachers have used the course to gain curriculum knowledge and career progression. Many students take the course purely because they have enjoyed History as a degree or as a personal interest and wish to pursue the subject further.

Progression to a taught postgraduate course is a path chosen by those wishing to further their careers, those intending to pursue further research and those who seek principally to satisfy their own intellectual interests. Successful completion will lead to the award of MA. This will complement a candidate’s existing qualifications. Additionally, it is envisaged that the programme’s breadth and depth will provide you with a suitable background for careers in public and private sectors where there is a need for international expertise.

The award of MA demonstrates an intellectual flexibility and high level of analytical, written and verbal skills. Increasingly, employers are looking for graduates with skills and knowledge which are not found (or perceived by employers to be found) among many recent graduates. This MA will give you, the graduate, a distinctive product in a highly competitive and expanding graduate employment market. Employers report that a person with a background in International Relations is more likely to find a career in the rapidly changing international environment than a person with another form of postgraduate qualification.

The MA IR thus aims to provide you with a suitable foundation for careers in both private and public sectors where there is a need for international sensitivity. Students wishing to engage in later doctoral research (where we have capacity) or in careers within voluntary organisations, civil and diplomatic service, international organisations, research posts or journalism will particularly benefit from it. We now have excellent links with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, Members of European Parliament and representatives from the United Nations, as well as a number of pressure groups.

In sum, our core purpose is to nurture not only a robust intellectual flexibility but also the high levels of analytical, written and verbal skills attractive to employers from globally focused agencies and business. Our aim is to provide you with an excellent background and competitive edge for further study or a wide variety of careers in an ever-expanding job market.

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The Management of Special Education in Developing Countries is a full-time programme is for teachers, administrators and non-governmental organisation (NGO) staff who are working in special education in developing countries and who wish to develop their management or leadership expertise. Read more
The Management of Special Education in Developing Countries is a full-time programme is for teachers, administrators and non-governmental organisation (NGO) staff who are working in special education in developing countries and who wish to develop their management or leadership expertise. Although most students are not from the EU, this course is also suitable for UK/EU students. The programme combines modules in Special Education with modules in International Studies in Education, using theory and practice from both in order to enable participants to improve management practice in the national context in which they work. A research dissertation also enables participants to put together management and special education in a uniquely relevant way for them.

This International Studies in Education programme has been taught at the School of Education for 50 years, and the School has one of the largest SEN departments in the UK. In consultation with tutors, you will choose modules totalling 100 credits from those available in the International Studies in Education and Special Education programmes, with a minimum of two modules from either field. You will also need to take the Practioner Inquiry in Education (PIE) module. A research dissertation will enable you to put together management and special education in a way which is uniquely relevant way for you.

About the School of Education

The School of Education has a long-standing reputation as a centre of excellence for teaching and research in a wide range of areas of educational practice and policy. It is an international leader in education with a history of top rated research. In the 2016 QS World Rankings, it was ranked 28th in the World and joint 7th in Europe/UK.
The School employs over 100 academic staff who teach more than 2,500 students. It is home to a number of departments and research centres with a history of top rated research and is an international leader in education.
School of Education ranking:
- Ranked 6th in the Guardian University League Tables 2017
- Ranked 10th in the 2017 Complete University Guide
- In Top 3 for HEI provision in the Good Teacher Training Guide
- Ranked 28th in the World in the 2016 QS World Rankings
- Ranked 9th overall for Research in the 2014 REF (with more than 82% of research rated as ‘internationally excellent’ (3*) or ‘world leading’ (4*).
- Rated 'outstanding' in latest Ofsted inspection (2013) for its Teacher Training programmes
- Ranked third for Education in The Times Good University Guide 2017

Funding and Scholarships

There are many ways to finance your postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. To see what funding and scholarships are available, please visit: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgfunding

Open Days

Explore postgraduate study at Birmingham at our on-campus open days.
Register to attend at: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopendays

Virtual Open Days

If you can’t make it to one of our on-campus open days, our virtual open days run regularly throughout the year. For more information, please visit: http://www.pg.bham.ac.uk

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