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Masters Degrees (Ma English)

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This Pathway in English Literature considers the relationship between literatures from a variety of historical periods. Register your interest. Read more

This Pathway in English Literature considers the relationship between literatures from a variety of historical periods.

Register your interest

Apply now

The English Literature MA pathway is ideal if you don’t wish to be confined to a specific period or disciplinary area. It asks fundamental questions about our ideas of literature and how these might have changed over time.

The pathway’s compulsory module, ‘The Production of Texts in Contexts’, opens up these questions by looking at a broad array of literature from a variety of historic periods. It considers how innovations in printing and publishing have affected writing, and asks to what extent political and social change conditions and defines authorial identities and practices.

Apart from the compulsory core module briefly described below, students taking the generic English Literature pathway can freely choose their remaining three modules from all the other existing pathways and thus sample different topics from different periods. Below are additional links to those pathways that allow you to see the rich variety of staff research interests and specialisms.

The Production of Texts in Context

The Production of Texts in Context is a trans-historical module that ranges across many different literary periods from the early middle ages to the present day. The module is team-taught so students experience teaching by ten to eleven different staff members, each of whom presents a topic related to their own particular interests and period specialisms. The teaching team and the topics represented vary from year to year according to staff availability, with recent topics including Ballad and Carol (Alfred Hiatt), The Making of Paradise Lost (Joad Raymond), The Eighteenth-Century Newspaper (Chris Reid), Victorian Serialised Fiction (Matt Ingleby), Experimental Writing and Early Twentieth-Century Publishing (Scott McCracken), The Coming of Age Novel in Global Literature (Charlotta Salmi), Book Prizes and Literary Production (Huw Marsh), and Contemporary Graphic Narrative (Sam McBean). For the essay assignment students pick a subject relating to one of the topics and can seek advice from the relevant staff member. There is also a designated member of staff who acts as module convenor, sits in with students on the weekly seminars, and is able to offer general help and guidance.

Compulsory modules:

You also choose one of the following

Researching Modern CultureLondon Panoramas: Research, Culture and the Long Eighteenth Century, or The Material Text, 1300-1700

Option modules:

You choose three modules from a wide-ranging list of options that changes from year to year. 

In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

Students may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London. 

In addition to taught modules, we run a range of research seminars to which all MA students are invited. Some of these are linked to our interdisciplinary Research Centres, such as the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, the Centre for Religion and Literature in English and the Centre for the History of the Emotions. Others are collaborations with other institutions, such as the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar. With visiting speakers from across the world, these seminars are an opportunity to meet other postgraduate students and members of staff and to learn about the latest developments in research.



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The Writing in the Modern Age pathway offers you the opportunity to study British and international Modernist literature and culture with politics, art history, philosophy, psychoanalysis, theology, postcolonialism, and critical theory. Read more

The Writing in the Modern Age pathway offers you the opportunity to study British and international Modernist literature and culture with politics, art history, philosophy, psychoanalysis, theology, postcolonialism, and critical theory.

Register your interest

Apply now

This pathway offers a historically wide-ranging, theoretically rigorous, and generically diverse grounding in twentieth-century literary culture. It examines modernism alongside non- and post-modernist writing, and situates all three in relation to politics, philosophy, and other artistic media of the twentieth century.

The pathway has a global outlook, asking how modernism may look from Cape Town, Dublin, or Kingstown, Jamaica, as well as from London, Paris or New York. It stresses the diversity of modern experience, and of literature striving to express the nature of ‘modernity’ itself.

The compulsory module, ‘Modernism and After’, tracks the central debates that run through modern writing and criticism. What is ‘modern’ and what comes after it? What counts as ‘art’? How have relations between ‘high’ and ‘low’ altered over time? How does writing relate to racial or gendered ‘otherness’? How has writing rethought the politics of freedom and containment? How does literature change with new recording and distribution formats? How can criticism deal with creativity? These questions open up the last 120 years or so of literary and cultural innovation, and frame the other modules you choose to take.

The Department of English has notable research and teaching strengths in the field of Modernist literature and culture, and is a leading centre of Modernist research in London and the UK. Staff working in Modernism at Queen Mary include Suzanne Hobson (author of Angels of Modernism: Religion, Culture, Aesthetics, 1910-1960 [Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2011]), Scott McCracken (currently editing the Dorothy Richardson Scholarly Editions Project, a major joint collaboration between Queen Mary, the University of Oxford, the University of Birmingham, and Birkbeck, and author of Masculinities, Modernist Fiction and the Urban Public Sphere [Manchester University Press, 2007]), Morag Shiach (whose extensive and wide-ranging work on the literature and culture of Modernism includes the important monograph, Modernism, Labour and Selfhood in British Literature and Culture, 1890-1930 [Cambridge: CUP, 2004]), and Michèle Barrett (renowned authority on Virginia Woolf and the cultural history of the First World War). Other staff whose work touches upon the period include Sam Halliday, who works on science and technology in culture, and Peter Howarth, an authority on twentieth-century poetry.

Suzanne Hobson and Scott McCracken also co-organise the preeminent Modernist research seminar in London, the Modernism Research Seminar, at the Institute of English Studies.

Compulsory modules


Option modules

You choose three modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may, subject to availability and the approval of the School, take one of your option modules from across a range offered by other Schools in the Humanities and Social Science Faculty, or from other Colleges of the University of London.

In addition to taught modules, we run a range of research seminars to which all MA students are invited. Some of these are linked to our interdisciplinary Research Centres, such as the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, the Centre for Religion and Literature in English and the Centre for the History of the Emotions. Others are collaborations with other institutions, such as the London-Paris Romanticism Seminar. With visiting speakers from across the world, these seminars are an opportunity to meet other postgraduate students and members of staff and to learn about the latest developments in research.

You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London.



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The Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway uses interdisciplinary approaches to explore the origins and impact of the Romantic movement and literature’s connections with philosophy, politics, history, and culture from 1700 to 1830. Read more


The Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway uses interdisciplinary approaches to explore the origins and impact of the Romantic movement and literature’s connections with philosophy, politics, history, and culture from 1700 to 1830.

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Apply now

This MA pathway combines close reading of texts by a wide range of male and female authors with interdisciplinary study of the broader culture of the 18th and early 19th centuries, examining the period’s dramatic changes in literature and literary theory alongside developments in philosophy, politics, history, and other art forms. We explore the popular culture of the coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its management of the emotions, epistolary culture, religious dissent, and the metropolitan life of London. We also study the influence of the Enlightenment, the origins and impact of the Romantic movement, the role of literary manifestos and defences, generic innovation and experiment, periodical culture, Romantic science and medicine, relations between British and European Romanticism, the French Revolution and its aftershocks, and the literary and artistic culture of the Regency.

The pathway combines specially-designed core and elective modules with the opportunity to select further options from across the whole range of MA modules on offer in the Department of English. You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by other Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London.

The Department of English has notable research and teaching strengths in both the eighteenth century and Romanticism, with the highest concentration of staff in these fields anywhere in London and one of the highest in the UK. Recently appointed staff in Romanticism include Pamela Clemit, an authority on William Godwin and Mary Shelley, and David Duff, author of Romanticism and the Uses of Genre and editor of The Oxford Handbook of British Romanticism. They join Paul Hamilton, a renowned scholar and theorist of British and European Romanticism, James Vigus, author of Platonic Coleridge and series editor of the Henry Crabb Robinson Project, and Shahidha Bari, author of Keats and Philosophy and a well-known broadcaster.

Staff working on eighteenth-century topics include Markman Ellis, author The Coffee-House: A Cultural History and The History of Gothic Fiction, Chris Reid, an expert on Burke, Sheridan and the history of oratory, Tessa Whitehouse, author of The Textual Culture of English Protestant Dissent 1720-1800, Isabel Rivers, founder of the Dissenting Academies Project, and Barbara Taylor, author of Mary Wollstonecraft and the Feminist Imagination. Matthew Mauger and Richard Coulton both work on the cultural history of London, their joint publications including (with Markman Ellis) The Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf that Conquered the World and (with Chris Reid) Stealing Books in Eighteenth Century London. For further details see individual staff pages.

 

Compulsory modules:


Option modules:

You choose three modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may, subject to availability and the approval of the School, take one of your option modules from across a range offered by other Schools in the Humanities and Social Science Faculty, or from other Colleges of the University of London.

In addition to taught modules, we run a range of research seminars to which all MA students are invited. Some of these are linked to our interdisciplinary Research Centres, such as the Centre for Eighteenth Century Studies, the Centre for Religion and Literature in English and the Centre for the History of the Emotions.



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We are one of the strongest English departments in the UK with an excellent reputation for high quality research. Our Postgraduate students are an important part of our research community, and if you choose to join us at Exeter then you will be too. Read more

We are one of the strongest English departments in the UK with an excellent reputation for high quality research. Our Postgraduate students are an important part of our research community, and if you choose to join us at Exeter then you will be too.

There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. If you are a recent graduate looking to stand out in the job market, already working but want to develop further, or simply looking to take your passion for English to the next level then we have the strength and depth of specialisms to fit your interests.

Our Library and Special Collections offer modern study facilities and a vast amount of original source material, and if you’re interested in film or visual culture then the on-site Bill Douglas Cinema Museum is an invaluable resource.

You can choose to study one of the specialist pathways we have chosen to match the Department’s strengths or you can take an open pathway and tailor your own programme from our wide range of modules.

Specialist pathways include:

Modules

Each Pathway has compulsory and optional modules some of these are listed here;

  • The Cultures of American Modernism;
  • Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture;
  • Criticism and Theory: Critical and Literary Theory in a Global Context;
  • Revival and Return: Using the Past from Pope to Keats;
  • Body and Identity; Sense, Sensation, and Cinema;
  • Hearing Film: Film Sound and Music;
  • Country City and Court Renaissance Literature 1558-1618;
  • Bodies Politic: Cultural and Sexual Politics in England, 1603-85;
  • From Orientalism to Globalization: Debates in Postcolonial Studies;
  • Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture;
  • Making Progress? Literature in a Changing Environment 1830-1870
  • Empire, Decadence and Modernity: Literature 1870-1910.

Constituent modules and pathways may be updated, deleted or replaced in future years as a consequence of programme development. Details at any time may be obtained from the Department website at http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/ .

Careers

In recent years the positions some of our graduates have gone on to include: Copywriter; Marketing Assistant; Assistant Editor; Publishing Assistant; Editorial Assistant; Freelance Journalist and Writer



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The Victorian Literature pathway is an opportunity to explore a wide range of literature written in Britain between 1832 and 1900. Read more

The Victorian Literature pathway is an opportunity to explore a wide range of literature written in Britain between 1832 and 1900.

Register your interest

Apply now

The pathway’s compulsory module, ‘Victorian Voices’, introduces you to a range of Victorian literary representations of identity. The module challenges the popular notion that there is a monolithic Victorian view of things by presenting a wealth of different perceptions and perspectives.

Drawing on canonical and non-canonical poetry and prose by male and female Victorian authors, the module explores ways of expressing core aspects of self while also considering the implications of audience and contexts. In addition, you choose from a range of option modules specialising in aspects of the period’s fiction, poetry, drama, and journalism.

You’ll have the opportunity to develop your own individual interests and to conduct independent research through the writing of a dissertation supervised by a specialist in the field of Victorian Studies. QMUL’s Victorian scholars are particularly strong on the historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts for 19th-century writing.

You’ll be taught in small seminar groups and be introduced to key resources for the study of Victorian literature through a module in research methods. You will further benefit from our location in London’s historic East End.

You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London. 

Academics delivering the MA Victorian Pathway have diverse interests such as the sublime and the visionary, London and the coast, and print media, but we are all committed to shedding new light on the relationship between aspects of material culture and the Victorian literary imagination. We all approach cultural history from fresh angles, such as the senses, the media, or geography. We have core strengths in both poetry and fiction, and have published on many of the era’s most famous authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, and W. M. Thackeray, but we also advocate for less familiar voices like Edward Bulwer-Lytton, John Addington Symonds, E. W. Hornung, and Vernon Lee.

We have all recently published new books. Matthew Rubery’s The Untold Story of the Talking Book (Harvard University Press, 2016) traces the evolution of sound recordings of literary texts back to the nineteenth century, Catherine Maxwell’s Scents & Sensibility: Perfume in Victorian Literary Culture (OUP, 2017) addresses perfume and the olfactory imagination in Victorian literary culture, while Matthew Ingleby’s Bloomsbury: Beyond the Establishment (British Library, 2017) explores the role one metropolitan neighbourhood has historically played in the production of new ideas, values, and lifestyles. We are all actively engaged in London’s vibrant Victorian studies research culture, convening and otherwise contributing to long-standing forums at the Institute of English Studies, Senate House, such as Media History Seminar and Nineteenth-Century Studies Seminar.


Compulsory modules


Option modules

You choose three modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). 

In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may, subject to availability and the approval of the School, take one of your option modules from across a range offered by other Schools in the Humanities and Social Science Faculty, or from other Colleges of the University of London.



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The Postcolonial and Global Literatures pathway offers students the opportunity to explore writing from the classic to the contemporary, in postcolonial and global contexts, while studying in the heart of London’s East End with its distinctive histories of migration. Read more

The Postcolonial and Global Literatures pathway offers students the opportunity to explore writing from the classic to the contemporary, in postcolonial and global contexts, while studying in the heart of London’s East End with its distinctive histories of migration.

Register your interest

Apply now

The pathway draws on our unparalleled academic expertise across this field – Queen Mary’s English department has one of the largest groups of postcolonial and global literary researchers in the UK. We specialize in a variety of regions, such as South Africa, India, Iraq and the Caribbean, among others, with interests that span from the graphic narrative to multilingualism and migrant identities. Our recent publications include work on Present Imperfect (by Andrew van der Vlies), World War I in Mesopotamia (by Nadia Atia) and Writing British Muslims (by Rehana Ahmed), and we have a number of ongoing and forthcoming projects, including works on Bad English (Rachael Gilmour), Memories of Empire (Bill Schwartz) and Contemporary Partition Literature (Charlotta Salmi). We are also home to Wasafiri, the renowned magazine for International Contemporary Writing, and its New Writing Prize.

One of the pathway’s compulsory modules, ‘Peripheral Modernities’, will give you a thorough grounding in concepts of modernity, globalisation, and culture as viewed from the global peripheries. You will also be able to shape the pathway through our elective modules, whether studying literatures from Africa, the Caribbean, the Middle East, South Asia and its diasporas, or the East End of London; or exploring interdisciplinary fields like translation studies, cartography, or book history in postcolonial and global contexts. You will have the opportunity to use research resources like the Black Cultural Archive, the George Padmore Institute Archive, and the India Office Records at the British Library.

This is a broad and interdisciplinary pathway, which nevertheless provides a specialized, research-led programme of study ideal for those wishing to go on to pursue PhD study in related fields. The programme also engages with the critical present and provides a wide range of academic and transferable skills allowing graduates to pursue a wide range of career pathways, including teaching, publishing, or working within the cultural industries.

 

Compulsory modules

Option modules

Students can choose to substitute one of their electives with an elective from another pathway within the MA English Literature.

You may, subject to availability and the approval of the School, take one of your option modules from across a range offered by other Schools in the Humanities and Social Science Faculty, or from other Colleges of the University of London.



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This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas. Read more
This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas.

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway in Contemporary Literature, Film & Theory or The Gothic, and a general English Studies route where students can build their own bespoke programme, choosing units from either pathways to create a Master's level experience reflecting your own interests in the further study of English.

Features and benefits of the course

Taught in small groups, you will benefit from the expertise of research active staff, rapidly developing your specialist subject knowledge and acquiring professional levels of research skills and conference presentation skills.

Research in the department has been rated highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise with some rated as world leading.

You will benefit from regular seminars by visiting speakers as well as a thriving conference schedule.

A personal tutoring system is in place, ensuring that all students have a tutor with whom they can discuss any aspect of their academic developments.

The Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies was launched in 2013 to capitalise on the expertise of a high number of internationally renowned Gothic scholars housed in the Department of English. Founding Centre Head, Linnie Blake along with Xavier Aldana Reyes and Sorcha Ni Fhlainn form the Centre’s core members.

About the Course

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway (MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory or MA English Studies: The Gothic) or a general route (MA English Studies), selecting from the range of units to construct a Master's level experience reflecting your interests in the further study of English.

MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory focuses on contemporary cultural practices and critical theoretical interventions. This pathway reflects research strengths in contemporary literary and film studies, critical and cultural theory, memory and trauma studies, the critical medical humanities and queer, postcolonial and cultural disability studies.

MA English Studies: The Gothic begins with the pre-history of the Gothic mode in the seventeenth century, explores its eighteenth and nineteenth-century incarnations and concludes with contemporary manifestations of the mode. Students study plays and novels, films and television, framed by socio-cultural perspectives and critical and theoretical analyses.

MA English Studies (general pathway) allows students to freely select units from the full range on offer.

Assessment details

The programme is examined mainly through written work, with an essay of around 6000 words (or equivalent) in each unit usually forming the basis of that assessment. All MA students submit a Dissertation of around 15,000 words. Each year, we run an MA Day when you will present your dissertation proposals to the teaching team and the rest of the group.

MA English Studies students submit all their written coursework online, and the Programme makes extensive use of easily accessible online provision of teaching and learning support materials.

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The MA in English Literature. Early Modern Studies, 1300-1700 pathway offers you the opportunity to explore the culture of the English Middle Ages and Renaissance within its European framework. Read more

The MA in English Literature: Early Modern Studies, 1300-1700 pathway offers you the opportunity to explore the culture of the English Middle Ages and Renaissance within its European framework.

Register your interest

Apply now

The Early Modern Studies pathway invites you to study the vibrant culture of Europe between 1300 and 1700. Our approach is interdisciplinary, drawing on aspects of history, religion, and visual culture from the period as well as on its literature. In order to develop your understanding of pre-modern documentary and material culture, our teaching involves close study of original manuscripts and early printed texts and of early objects.

Working alongside distinguished scholars in English Literature you will be asked to think about what we mean by the terms ‘Medieval’ and ‘Early Modern’, and to formulate conclusions using a profoundly interdisciplinary approach: you will examine the literature, history, religion, visual culture, social relations, and politics of the period. Imaginative and ambitious themed modules enable you to study some of the most influential writers working between the 14th and 17th centuries within their cultural and historical context: Chaucer, Erasmus, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Donne, and Milton amongst others. You’ll construct a historical understanding of the key movements, debates, and ideas that shaped the period in preparation for researching and writing your dissertation.

Queen Mary’s strong early-modern cluster is widely recognised for its vibrant teaching and research strengths. The early-modern MA programme offers core study in medieval and early-modern historiography, and archival, bibliographical, and research skills. The optional modules draw on the interests of our leading researchers and vary from year to year. We have particular concentrations in globalisation, trade, the exotic, and cartography (Jerry Brotton, Alfred Hiatt); book history, the material text, and editing (David Colclough, Joad Raymond, Claire Preston, Julia Boffey, Tamara Atkin, Jaclyn Rasjic); epistolarity, early newspapers, news networks, the circulation of books and manuscripts (Ruth Ahnert, Joad Raymond, Warren Boutcher); and women’s writing (Andrea Brady).

Other research specialisms include prison writing, network theory, the history of reading, late-medieval London literary production, forgery, early-modern political thought, literary-scientific relations, medieval chronicles, prison writing, pre-Shakespearean drama, John Donne, John Milton, Thomas Browne.

You will be trained to a very high level in research skills and you’ll get hands-on experience of working with a variety of early modern items, with access to otherwise uncatalogued and unexplored materials. You’ll work with rare books and manuscripts during this training. Throughout, you’ll be considering the impact of developments in manuscript culture and the new technologies in printing and publishing in the period.

The optional modules draw on the interests of our leading researchers and vary from year to year. We have particular concentrations in globalisation, trade, the exotic, and cartography (Jerry Brotton, Alfred Hiatt); book history, the material text, and editing (David Colclough, Joad Raymond, Claire Preston, Julia Boffey, Tamara Atkin, Jaclyn Rasjic); epistolarity, early newspapers, news networks, the circulation of books and manuscripts (Ruth Ahnert, Joad Raymond, Warren Boutcher); and women’s writing (Andrea Brady).

 

Compulsory modules

  • Writing in the Pre-Modern World
  • The Material Text, 1300-1700
  • Dissertation

Option modules:

You choose two modules from a list of options that changes from year to year (one can be from the range of modules offered across the MA English Studies curriculum). In 2017-2018 we hope to offer the following. If members of our specialist research staff win research funding it will mean that their module won’t run, so for that reason this list is indicative only. 

You may also opt to take a cognate elective module offered by the Schools in the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and by other Colleges of the University of London.



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This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris. Read more
This is an innovative and interdisciplinary MA programme, combining taught modules and a dissertation, which allows you to share your year between Canterbury and Paris.

The programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength.

Following a similar path to our English and American Literature MA, the Paris option allows you to spend your first term at our Canterbury campus with full access to its excellent academic and recreational facilities. For the spring term you relocate to our Paris centre, studying in a historic corner of Montparnasse - close to the famous Latin Quarter, the Sorbonne University and the glorious Jardin du Luxembourg.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/223/english-and-american-literature-canterbury-and-paris

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
FR866 - Literature and Theory (30 credits)
EN871 - Origins of Modern Poetry (30 credits)
FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

Programme aims

This programme aims to:

- extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory

- enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions

- develop your independent critical thinking and judgement

- introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study

- provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education

- develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language

- offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken)

- offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history

- develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form

- develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern European, English and American literatures and other artistic media.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.

The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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The English team at Canterbury Christ Church University is based in the School of Humanities and has a proven track record of excellent supervision by active and internationally acclaimed academic researchers. Read more
The English team at Canterbury Christ Church University is based in the School of Humanities and has a proven track record of excellent supervision by active and internationally acclaimed academic researchers. It has an established and vibrant postgraduate community.

Visit the website: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/courses/postgraduate/english-literature.aspx

An MA in English is increasingly regarded as a valuable extension of undergraduate study in that it:

• offers you an anticipated edge in the professional job market;
• enhances applications for teacher training where advanced specialist knowledge can be an asset. The PGCE English team in the Education department at Canterbury Christ Church University strongly encourages students to gain an MA before applying for the PGCE;
• provides essential postgraduate experience for you if you intend to continue your study of literature at MPhil/PhD level;
• provides a period of literary study if you wish to take a career break.

Course detail

The course offers opportunities to those who wish to pursue an eclectic generalist programme of modules and to those who seek specialisation in particular areas of literary study. You'll therefore enrol on one of four pathways:

• MA in English Literature
• MA in English (Literatures of Childhood)
• MA in English (Literatures Victorian and Modern)
• MA in English (Literatures Medieval and Early Modern)

For more details on pathways please contact the School of Humanities.

Suitability

The MA in English Literature is aimed at anyone interested in studying literature in depth. Our students usually include recent graduates wishing to continue their studies and mature students returning to literary studies after a longer or shorter time of pursuing other interests.

Content

Term one
• Imagining England: Landscape and Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Literature (20 credits)
• Modern and Contemporary Literature of Childhood (20 credits)
• Victorian Crime Fiction (20 credits)

Term two
• Case Studies in Early Modern Literature (20 credits)
• Classic Children’s Literature (20 credits)
• Literature of the Fin de Siècle (20 credits)
• Literature and War from 1914 to the Present (20 credits)

Format

Learning and teaching is predominantly by two-hour seminars designed to facilitate scholarly debate on specific topics and texts. Individual tutorials are also offered to students in all modules, and individual supervision forms an essential part of work on the dissertation.

Assessment

Assessment is mainly by a range of written coursework including research essays and a 15,000-word dissertation. There are no exams.

What can I do next?

This programme is a significant qualification in its own right, but if you wish to pursue further study it will also give you an opportunity to progress to an MPhil/ PhD or take a PGCE.

The research and writing skills you'll gain, together with the specialist disciplinary knowledge developed during the course, will enhance your employability and can provide an invaluable grounding for careers in teaching, media and journalism, publishing and marketing.

How to apply

For information on how to apply, please follow this link: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/how-to-apply/how-to-apply.aspx

Funding

-Masters Loans-

From 2016/17 government loans of up to £10,000 are available for postgraduate Masters study. The loans will be paid directly to students by the Student Loans Company and will be subject to both personal and course eligibility criteria.

For more information available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/funding-your-postgraduate-degree.aspx

-2017/18 Entry Financial Support-

Information on alternative funding sources is available here: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/study-here/funding-your-degree/2017-18-entry-financial-support.aspx

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At Cass School of Education and Communities we have developed an expertise on language education, in particular, teaching and learning in multicultural contexts. Read more

At Cass School of Education and Communities we have developed an expertise on language education, in particular, teaching and learning in multicultural contexts. Dr Mario Moya, Programme Leader for the MA English Language Teaching, focuses his research on second language acquisition and the role of language learning strategies in second/additional languages. He is a Consultant for the British Council and works in cooperation with Universities worldwide to improve teacher and learning in English-medium instruction environments. The MA in English Language Teaching is linked to the Higher Education and the Teacher Education Research Groupson, publishers, and school managers, among other high-stake posts.



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Staff supervise research in most areas of English and associated studies, and have expertise in the following areas. Read more
Staff supervise research in most areas of English and associated studies, and have expertise in the following areas: theory, modernism and postmodernism, 18th and 19th-century studies, women’s writing, literature and visual arts, Shakespeare and the Renaissance, early modern literature and culture, medieval studies, American literature, postcolonial literature and modern poetry.

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/231/english

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Research areas

Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely.

Eighteenth Century
The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies.
The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences.

Nineteenth Century
The recently established Centre for Victorian Literature and Culture provides a stimulating and distinctive research environment for staff and students through seminars, conferences and collaborative research projects. The MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture is the only MA of its kind in the UK, and both the MA and the Centre places a particular emphasis on Victorian literature and culture associated with Kent and the south-east.

American Literature
Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history.

Creative Writing
The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving series of events and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work.

Medieval and Early Modern
The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar.

Modern Poetry
The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings.

Postcolonial
Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust.

Careers

Many career paths can benefit from the writing and analytical skills that you develop as a postgraduate student in the School of English. Our students have gone on to work in academia, journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; as well as more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management.

Find out how to apply here - https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/apply/

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This MA course is the most comprehensive of its kind in England. It is provided by the internationally famous Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. Read more
This MA course is the most comprehensive of its kind in England. It is provided by the internationally famous Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. This Centre was founded by Professor W.G. Hoskins in 1948, and has long been at the forefront of the discipline, having had huge experience of postgraduate training at MA, MPhil and PhD levels. Its staff (who currently include three professors) are leaders in their subjects, and the ex-staff include scholars such as Alan Everitt, Joan Thirsk, Charles Phythian-Adams, Margaret Spufford and other prominent historians. Its students progress into many types of employment in heritage-related sectors, museums, record offices, local government, landscape management, further research, academic jobs, adult education, teaching, and associated areas of work. Many others have done the MA course for their own pleasure, developing their interests in family or local history. Many MA students have also gone on to do PhDs in the Centre.

The MA course aims to provide students with a training in `the Leicester approach' to local and regional history, and to equip them with the historical skills necessary to pursue research in this field. The MA course is comparative across the nation, grounded in an interest in landscapes and the communities associated with them, cultural in its concerns, sensitive to long-term chronologies, conceptually aware, and interdisciplinary in its methods. It is designed to furnish an up-to-date springboard into careers involving local history. Yet it also appeals to many whose interests are recreational, genealogical or family-oriented, who have leisure interests linked to landscape appreciation, or those who find knowledge of local history essential as a way of enlarging their interpretation and understanding of the world and communities around them.

The Centre for English Local History is accommodated in The Marc Fitch Historical Institute, three attractive Victorian villas near the main university campus. It contains an important library covering most English regions, an impressive map room, and many other resources and collections essential for local historical studies. The main University Library houses an exceptional local history collection covering all counties of England and Wales. These facilities make Leicester unique among provincial universities for the comprehensiveness of its holdings in local and regional history. Grants are available from a number of sources to assist students studying at the Centre.

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This Master’s programme is the only one in London with an exclusive focus on ‘teaching’ encompassing the areas of TESOL and TEFL – as opposed to Applied Linguistics and is aimed at practising teachers as a form of continuing professional development. Read more

This Master’s programme is the only one in London with an exclusive focus on ‘teaching’ encompassing the areas of TESOL and TEFL – as opposed to Applied Linguistics and is aimed at practising teachers as a form of continuing professional development.

Please note that the course is not a teaching qualification but an academic award which not only enhances job opportunities but also enables graduates to pursue further studies at a doctoral level.

Upon completion, our graduates normally apart from following a PhD route, also become teacher trainers, consultants and advisors in the areas of English Language Teaching and Education, publishers, and school managers, among other high-stake posts.

The course has two entry points: January and September. 

Whether you are interested in the global spread of English and the impact and implications in education; the language system of English and how to teach speaking, listening, reading and writing, this fascinating course will provide the answers.

It is aimed at English language teachers and graduates with relevant teaching experience and will enhance your career opportunities, both nationally and internationally.

It will prepare you to teach English to speakers of other languages, for a more senior position in a school or for a career in shaping curriculum or education policy, in the UK or around the world.

In addition to specific topics such as pedagogic grammar, theories of second language learning and the global spread of English, we offer an overview of the theoretical, philosophical and ethical principles that underpin educational research.

You will also be introduced to different methods of language teaching and the design of ELT materials to address the needs of young and adult learners in a variety of contexts, including teaching English for Specific Purposes (ESP), English for Academic Purposes (EAP), Business English, and others.



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The English and American Literature MA allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. Read more
The English and American Literature MA allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules.

The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength, such as postcolonial studies; 18th-century studies; modern poetry and fiction; or Victorian studies. The modules draw on many different critical approaches and focus on a wide range of historical periods, ideas and places from modern India to post-war New York to literary London in the 18th century.

Within this programme you may also choose to take pathways, so as to concentrate on studies in certain specific areas (especially if you intend to continue to a research degree in a particular field).

Visit the website https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/222/english-and-american-literature

About the School of English

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests.

Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research.

The Research Excellence Framework 2014 has produced very strong results for the School of English at Kent. With 74% of our work graded as world-leading or internationally excellent, the School is ranked 10th out of 89 English departments in terms of Research Intensity (Times Higher Education). The School also received an outstanding assessment of the quality of its research environment and public impact work.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year in response to new curriculum developments and innovation. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you.

MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City (30 credits)
MT865 - Encountering the Holy: Devotion and the Medieval Church (30 credits)
EN803 - Critical Race Theory (30 credits)
EN818 - American Modernism 1900-1930 (Teaching Period I) (30 credits)
EN832 - Hacks, Dunces and Scribblers: Authorship and the Marketplace in the Eig (30 credits)
EN834 - Imagining India (30 credits)
EN835 - Dickens, The Victorians and the Body (30 credits)
EN836 - Dickens and the Material Culture of the Victorian Novel (30 credits)
EN842 - Reading the Contemporary (30 credits)
EN850 - Centres and Edges: Modernist and PostcolonialQuest Literature (30 credits)
EN852 - Colonial and Postcolonial Discourses (30 credits)
EN857 - Body and Place in the Postcolonial Text (30 credits)
EN862 - Contemporary Arab Novel (30 credits)
EN865 - Post-45: American Literature and Culture in the Cold War Era (30 credits)
EN866 - The Awkward Age: Transatlantic Culture and Literature in Transition, 18 (30 credits)
EN872 - Provocations and Invitations (30 credits)
EN876 - Dickens and the Condition of England (30 credits)
EN888 - Extremes of Feeling: Literature and Empire in the Eighteenth Century (30 credits)
EN889 - Literary Theory (30 credits)
EN897 - Advanced Critical Reading (30 credits)

Assessment

Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12,000 word dissertation.

This programme is also available at Paris only or split site between Canterbury and Paris
https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/programmes/index.html

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