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Looking for an internationally-recognised professional qualification that can help take you to the next stage of your career? Or perhaps you want to deepen your understanding of the latest issues and practices in English language teaching, to help you deliver the best possible education to students of English language around the world?. Read more

Take your career to the next level

Looking for an internationally-recognised professional qualification that can help take you to the next stage of your career? Or perhaps you want to deepen your understanding of the latest issues and practices in English language teaching, to help you deliver the best possible education to students of English language around the world?

With our flexible course structure, the research excellence you’d expect from one of the world’s top universities, and a close, supportive community around you, the MA English Language Teaching (ELT) at the University of Warwick is the course for you.

Professional development, whatever your experience

The students who join our course each year come from a wide variety of backgrounds. Whether you have a wealth of teaching experience as a head of department or curriculum developer, or you’re yet to complete your first year of teaching, our course will offer you research-led teaching to further your professional development.

If you have less than two years’ experience teaching English to speakers of other languages, our ELT (Studies and Methods) course will introduce you to a variety of academic disciplines relating to teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL/ELT). And at the same time, you’ll gain a solid professional foundation for developing your practical teaching skills.

Or if you’re a more experienced teacher, our diverse range of course streams will develop your in-depth understanding of the links between theory and practice in English language teaching, while allowing you to specialise in areas such as ICT, Young Learners and Teacher Education.

Find out more about which specialist pathway is right for you: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al/study/ma/

Don’t just take it from us

Here’s what some of our former students have told us about their experience on the MA ELT at Warwick:

“Studying the MA ELT at Warwick has been quite an exciting experience. First, from among a wide range of courses, I think the program design allowed me to make a successful combination for my career. Besides my Testing and Assessment specialty, I chose a Teacher Development course for my elective, which will help me a lot because I will be involved in offering teacher training courses on testing when I go back to my country. Secondly, I really valued the team teaching professionally planned and led by a team of high-calibre professors. Last, but most interesting, is the qualitative research orientation I got here. Besides promoting my academic knowledge I feel that I have also developed my research skills. Now I’m confident I will be qualified for excellent career prospects.”

Yasir El Hag, MA English Language Teaching (Testing and Assessment programme)

“What I learned from the MA programme helps me a lot in various ways at work. I have become more proficient in terms of conducting research. I can use the knowledge I learned from the programme to help teachers adopt efficient teaching methods and questioning skills. Honestly speaking, without studying this programme, I wouldn't be this confident and comfortable at work.”

Kiki Sun, MA English Language Teaching (Studies and Methods programme)

Want to find out more? Our website (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al/study/ma/) has full details of our course options, including funding opportunities and module information.

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This programme offers you the opportunity to study the rich and varied literary imaginings of London. As well as covering London's literary history from the time of Shakespeare to the present day, this exciting programme encompasses cinematic, postcolonial and documentary constructions of, and responses to the city. Read more
This programme offers you the opportunity to study the rich and varied literary imaginings of London. As well as covering London's literary history from the time of Shakespeare to the present day, this exciting programme encompasses cinematic, postcolonial and documentary constructions of, and responses to the city. It appeals to those who wish to extend their knowledge of literature, explore alternative approaches and perspectives, and broaden their understanding within an interdisciplinary, comparative and international context.

Programme design is structured yet flexible. Courses are taught in weekly seminars that focus on the close study of literary, theoretical and cultural texts. There are also opportunities for site-specific learning through walks as well as museum and gallery visits. You can pursue supporting courses in research methods and theory and produce a final dissertation on a subject of your own choice. You may choose to study relevant courses from the MAs in Creative Writing, Theatre Studies and Media as part of the Literary London Programme.

The aims of the programme are:

- To introduce you to the rich diversity of literary responses to London and to develop your analytical and critical thinking through a variety of guided assessments

- To consider the depiction of London's contested and multicultural identity via a range of theoretical and methodological approaches

- To develop students' research and presentation skills to prepare them for further academic research and the job market

- To foster a dynamic and enjoyable learning environment in which students are encouraged to bring their own experience, writing and reading to bear on the subject of London's literature.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/engl/litlon

English

We offer a diverse range of innovative programmes which enable students to realise and maximise their creative and academic potential and to seize and shape the career opportunities open to them on graduation.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Dissertation (MA English: Literary London) (60 credits)
Imagining the Metropolis, Writing, Text, Theory (30 credits)
Commerce of Vice (30 credits)
Text and Intertextuality: English Theory and Research (15 credits)
Unreal City: London and Modernity (30 credits)
Foundations for Postgraduate Study (15) (15 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Imagining the Metropolis, Writing, Text, Theory (30 credits)
Text and Intertextuality: English Theory and Research (15 credits)
Foundations for Postgraduate Study (15) (15 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Dissertation (MA English: Literary London) (60 credits)
Commerce of Vice (30 credits)
Unreal City: London and Modernity (30 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through an essay portfolio, oral presentations, and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates from this programme can pursue further academic research, archival or commercial research, or teach journalism or creative writing.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643761

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The MA English course aims to provide a stimulating intellectual environment that will enable you to build upon the interests and skills you acquired at undergraduate level. Read more
The MA English course aims to provide a stimulating intellectual environment that will enable you to build upon the interests and skills you acquired at undergraduate level.

It features core modules in both advanced critical theory and research methodologies that will enhance your abilities in academic research, writing, and presentation, enabling you to meet the standards demanded by employers throughout your professional life.

"The module leader should be commended for running such an impressive course and for his clear concern that students achieve their potential." (2013 External Examiner comments).

A distinctive themed focus upon literary genres, authors and adaptations

Taught application of current theory and research methods

A historical range from Romanticism to the present day

Ideal for both career development and preparation for research degrees

Led by academic scholars published in their fields

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The newly designed MA English Literature. Contemporary Writing pathway offers you the opportunity to engage with American, British, Irish, and world Anglophone literary cultures. Read more
The newly designed MA English Literature: Contemporary Writing pathway offers you the opportunity to engage with American, British, Irish, and world Anglophone literary cultures. The pathway brings together a variety of genres and critical approaches to contemporary literature, such that you will have the chance to explore fiction, poetry, and life writing, as well as debates in cultural theory and philosophy about the very nature and periodization of contemporaneity.

We are home to one of the largest and most diverse groups of staff in this field of any department in the country, and expertise in late-twentieth- and twenty-first-century culture brings together perspectives that are regional and transnational, theoretical and historicist. Distinctively, the pathway will also give you the opportunity of working with our leading postcolonial scholars, and to think about contemporary cultural production in global contexts of reception.

A range of option modules will enable you to study major novelists and poets from national literary traditions within and beyond an Anglo-American frame. The core module, ‘Writing and the Present’, equips you with a set of critical vocabularies with which to engage historically, formally, and philosophically with contemporary literature. The core syllabi will allow you to explore contemporary writing in relation to broader contentions about the present, including the problems of periodicity along with the current state and function of criticism. One of the key aims of the core module is to establish a context of non-fictional writing, philosophy, and social theory that will help you to characterize the contemporary epoch. Special attention will be devoted to issues of technology, innovation and social change that bring into question the category of ‘writing’ itself, its role in theoretical debates, its place in contemporary philosophy, and its transformations in the context of digital culture.

The pathway as whole thus facilitates a twin focus on the notions of writing and the present, encouraging you to examine the most urgent intellectual issues of our time that relate to the notion of ‘the contemporary’, not only in academic contexts but also in lived social experience.

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Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature. Read more
Our MA English Literature is an open and flexible programme designed to give you the possibility of exploring the full diversity of English literature.

We want you to join in the debates over the nature of literature, the future of English literature, and the past and new cultural experiences of writing and communication which are shaping our lives, with our team of active researchers and committed teachers.

We see research as a public activity, and the course offers ways in which to explore the research process as engagement in the cultural conversation.

Our modules offer the opportunity to research a diverse range of literary periods and forms – from the Early Modern to Contemporary fiction, engaging with genres including historical fiction, fantasy literature, modernism, e-writing, and film.

The MA also explores a wide range of critical and theoretical approaches, including historical and textual analysis, ethical reading, cognitive poetics, and critical theory.

Home Tuition Fees for 2017

1 Year full time: £6300.00

Part time - Module Fee £1050.00. Dissertation Fee £2100.00

Alumni discount 10% for students applying within five years of completion of an undergraduate course at Chichester.

Overseas Fees 2017 £10,920.00

Please take the time to look out for updates on our funding page: http://www.chi.ac.uk/study-us-0/fees-finance/funding-and-money-advice-0/funding-postgraduate-students

Our facilities
The Department of English and Creative Writing is a thriving and successful Department, with a staff of active researchers and committed teachers.

The Department hosts the Centre for Research in Folklore, Fairytales and Fantasy, the South Coast Eighteenth-Century and Romantic Research Group, which hold regular research events, alongside a full Departmental programme, including film showings, visiting speakers, and theatre talks.

Recent visiting speakers include Dame Gillian Beer, Professor Jacqueline Simpson, Dr Frances White, and Professor Jacqueline Labbe.

In collaboration with our colleagues in Creative Writing, we also have regular events with writers and poets Simon Brett, Matthew Sweeney, Mavis Cheek, Helen Dunmore, Michele Roberts, and Jo Shapcott.

The Department has close contact with local cultural institutions: the Chichester Festival Theatre, Pallant House Gallery, the Chichester Public Records Office, and other local institutions.

These offer you further research opportunities. Chichester and the local area has a strong literary history, attracting writers from the eighteenth-century radicals William Blake and Charlotte Smith, to H. G. Wells and Mervyn Peake.

Learning Resource Centre

The Learning Resource is the hub of the learning environment. It has two upper floors of library resources, one for silent study and one for quiet study, both of which have recently been refurbished.

On the ground floor, you’ll find the Support and Information Zone, Media Centre, Otter Gallery, Costa Coffee and a variety of IT resources.

The Bishop Otter LRC also offers:

130 open access PC workstations
45 Apple iMacs
Ample printing facilities
Netbooks available on loan
Professional editing suites
Media loans counter
Wi-Fi and plug points throughout
Where this can take you
Our MA is designed to transform you into an active and confident researcher in the broad field of English Literature.

The course is a gateway to PhD research, providing an opportunity to focus your research, develop your independence in a supportive environment, and refine your research skills.

The MA is also for anyone who wants to develop their skills, subject knowledge, and confidence in research and the presentation of research.

It is particularly relevant for careers in research-related fields, from librarianship to arts management, for teachers in English Literature and related subjects, and for careers requiring high-level abilities in writing, presentation, and critical analysis.

Indicative modules
Literature in the Present Moment

What is literature and how do we think literature today? The concept of ‘literature’ is crucial and elusive, expanding under the impact of digitalisation and new forms of creative and critical writing. In this course students will explore new techniques in archival research, issues in intellectual history, theoretical developments, and the transformations of the very concept of ‘literature’, past and present.

Theatres of Pain and Pleasure, 1400-1700

Focusing on the Renaissance stage this course explores the theatre as a site of bodies engaged with forms of pain and pleasure: crime, sexuality, war and religion. Ranging across Shakespeare, Jacobean Tragedy, and Restoration Comedy, you will explore the space of the city and a rich diversity of sites, local and national, of theatrical representation.

Visions of the Real: Literature, Myth, and Science, 1800-Present

Fiction has always has a tense relationship with reality. Is fiction more real than reality, as literary characters come to ‘life’, or is fiction a betrayal of reality? In this course you will engage with the blurred lines between literature, science and myth. From the moment of the Enlightenment and Romanticism, in tension between the ‘clear’ vision of reality and the power of myth, the course traces out the crisis of realism, from fantasy literature to modernism to the avant-garde.

Activating Research

How do you become a researcher? Exploring the research process as one that involves integrating a range of ‘voices’, from primary texts, archives, peers, critical and theoretical work, and audience, this course gives you the capacity to engage with this diversity. While research is often presented as an intensely private and personal activity, this course will help you develop your research project as a public process, giving you the tools to find your own critical voice and the confidence to engage with peers, the academic community, and the public.

Teaching and Assessment
You will be assessed over four modules, three with an assessment of an essay of 5,000 words.

The module on ‘activating research’ will be assessed by a presentation (25%) and a written submission (3000 words).

The Dissertation will be a 15,000 assessment.

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This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas. Read more
This course offers a flexible, challenging Master’s programme, delivered by a team of tutors with internationally recognised academic expertise in specialist areas.

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway in Contemporary Literature, Film & Theory or The Gothic, and a general English Studies route where students can build their own bespoke programme, choosing units from either pathways to create a Master's level experience reflecting your own interests in the further study of English.

Features and benefits of the course

Taught in small groups, you will benefit from the expertise of research active staff, rapidly developing your specialist subject knowledge and acquiring professional levels of research skills and conference presentation skills.

Research in the department has been rated highly in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise with some rated as world leading.

You will benefit from regular seminars by visiting speakers as well as a thriving conference schedule.

A personal tutoring system is in place, ensuring that all students have a tutor with whom they can discuss any aspect of their academic developments.

The Manchester Centre for Gothic Studies was launched in 2013 to capitalise on the expertise of a high number of internationally renowned Gothic scholars housed in the Department of English. Founding Centre Head, Linnie Blake along with Xavier Aldana Reyes and Sorcha Ni Fhlainn form the Centre’s core members.

About the Course

There are three routes: you can choose a specialised pathway (MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory or MA English Studies: The Gothic) or a general route (MA English Studies), selecting from the range of units to construct a Master's level experience reflecting your interests in the further study of English.

MA English Studies: Contemporary Literature, Film and Theory focuses on contemporary cultural practices and critical theoretical interventions. This pathway reflects research strengths in contemporary literary and film studies, critical and cultural theory, memory and trauma studies, the critical medical humanities and queer, postcolonial and cultural disability studies.

MA English Studies: The Gothic begins with the pre-history of the Gothic mode in the seventeenth century, explores its eighteenth and nineteenth-century incarnations and concludes with contemporary manifestations of the mode. Students study plays and novels, films and television, framed by socio-cultural perspectives and critical and theoretical analyses.

MA English Studies (general pathway) allows students to freely select units from the full range on offer.

Assessment details

The programme is examined mainly through written work, with an essay of around 6000 words (or equivalent) in each unit usually forming the basis of that assessment. All MA students submit a Dissertation of around 15,000 words. Each year, we run an MA Day when you will present your dissertation proposals to the teaching team and the rest of the group.

MA English Studies students submit all their written coursework online, and the Programme makes extensive use of easily accessible online provision of teaching and learning support materials.

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This course centres on building the foundational skills required for textual analysis, cultural study, and critical theory, and is designed for those interested in a range of issues, with the dissertation allowing them to focus on a single topic. Read more

Summary

This course centres on building the foundational skills required for textual analysis, cultural study, and critical theory, and is designed for those interested in a range of issues, with the dissertation allowing them to focus on a single topic.

Modules

Research skills; text, culture, theory; dissertation; plus 4 optional modules from: approaches to the long 18th century; cinema, sexuality, spectatorship; 18th-century fiction; feminism and postmodernism; Jewish literature and culture; literature and law; nationalisms and sexualities; postcolonial studies; records of early play; the 20th-century body; towards modernity and after; unknown Jane Austen; Victorian readers and the politics of print; women and writing the French revolution; other relevant optional modules.

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This course provides a focused route for English language professionals wishing to develop a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of English language teaching and gain the skills required to challenge current professional practice and undertake a range of leadership roles. Read more

Summary

This course provides a focused route for English language professionals wishing to develop a deeper understanding of the theory and practice of English language teaching and gain the skills required to challenge current professional practice and undertake a range of leadership roles.

Modules

Communicative language teaching; curriculum and pedagogy for English language teaching; description of language; research skills; dissertation; plus 4 optional modules from: assessment of language proficiency; autonomy and individualisation in language learning; discourse analysis; English as a world language; language for specific purposes/syllabus design; language in society; language teacher education; research and enquiry in applied linguistics 1; second language learning; writing and written language.

Visit our website for further information...



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There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. Read more
There are many reasons why you might choose our English Literary Studies MA. If you are thinking about taking your study of English to the next level in preparation for a PhD then our Department has the knowledge to give you the high level training you need to set you on that path. If you are a recent graduate looking to stand out in the job market, already working but want to develop further, or simply looking to take your passion for English to the next level then we have the strength and depth of specialisms to fit your interests.

We are one of the strongest English departments in the UK with an excellent reputation for high quality research. Our Postgraduate students are an important part of our research community, and if you choose to join us at Exeter then you will be too.

Our Library and Special Collections offer modern study facilities and a vast amount of original source material, and if you’re interested in film or visual culture then the on-site Bill Douglas Cinema Museum is an invaluable resource.

You can choose to study one of the specialist pathways we have chosen to match the Department’s strengths or you can take an open pathway and tailor your own programme from our wide range of modules.

Programme Structure

Students may opt to follow one of our seven named pathways, each of which has its own pathway leader and associated modules. American and Atlantic Studies, Criticism and Theory, Enlightenment to Romanticism, Film Studies, Renaissance Studies, Modern and Contemporary, Victorian Studies, or opt for the ‘open’ English Literary Studies pathway.

Modules

Each Pathway has compulsory and optional modules some of these are listed here;
The Cultures of American Modernism; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Criticism and Theory: Critical and Literary Theory in a Global Context; Revival and Return: Using the Past from Pope to Keats; Body and Identity; Sense, Sensation, and Cinema; Hearing Film: Film Sound and Music; Country City and Court Renaissance Literature 1558-1618; Bodies Politic: Cultural and Sexual Politics in England, 1603-85; From Orientalism to Globalization: Debates in Postcolonial Studies; Beyond the Border: The Politics of Place in Contemporary North American Literature and Culture; Making Progress? Literature in a Changing Environment 1830-1870 and Empire, Decadence and Modernity: Literature 1870-1910.

Constituent modules and pathways may be updated, deleted or replaced in future years as a consequence of programme development. Details at any time may be obtained from the Department website at http://humanities.exeter.ac.uk/english/postgraduate/ .

Careers

In recent years the positions some of our graduates have gone on to include: Copywriter; Marketing Assistant; Assistant Editor; Publishing Assistant; Editorial Assistant; Freelance Journalist and Writer

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Writing in the Modern Age pathway explores 20th and 21st century literature and culture. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Writing in the Modern Age pathway explores 20th and 21st century literature and culture. Its core module, ‘Modernism and After’, tracks the central debates that run through modern writing and criticism. What is ‘modern’ and what comes after it? What counts as ‘art’? How have relations between ‘high’ and ‘low’ altered over time? How does writing relate to racial or gendered ‘otherness’? How has writing rethought the politics of freedom and containment? How does literature change with new recording and distribution formats? How can criticism deal with creativity? These questions open up the last 120 years or so of literary and cultural innovation, and frame all the other modules you choose to take.

Writing in the Modern Age is a literature MA with an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural mindset. Our optional modules don’t just examine London or New York modernism, but consider how modernism looks from Cape Town, or Dublin, or Kingston, Jamaica. It offers a long view of the modern age, with modules from the fin-de-siècle to the very contemporary. Other modules on psychoanalysis, form, war legacies, and critical theory examine how intimately modern literary innovation has been bound together with the disciplines of modern self-understanding and group identity. All will help you shape your particular question for the dissertation, which you’ll work on one-to-one with academic staff during the final third of the year.

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

Our Eighteenth-Century Literature and Romanticism pathway takes a truly interdisciplinary approach, and explores the history of genres, philosophy, politics, history, and visual culture, amongst other topics.

In your first semester you might explore the popular culture of coffee house and tavern, the political world on the street and in parliament, the vocations of women poets and polemicists, polite society and its interest in the management of emotions and arts, and the metropolitan life of London.

In the second semester, you can examine Romantic poetics and manifestos, the theoretical and political growth of philosophical and cultural enlightenment, Orientalism, travel, and the French Revolution and its aftershocks.

This pathway aims to prepare students to formulate a research topic, identify research materials, and present an argument in written and oral form that is formed by alternative interpretations. Students who complete the pathway will be aware of the interdisciplinary debates concerning the literature and history of this period, and will have engaged with a variety of materials: theoretical, visual, historical, and literary. You will also be able to deploy a range of appropriate skills in research, bibliography, and IT.

You will be taught in small seminar groups, and will be introduced to a number of key research resources in London through a module in research skills.

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Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme. The Early Modern Studies pathway gives you the opportunity to explore the vibrant culture that existed in Europe between 1300 and 1700. Read more
Our MA in English Studies invites you to choose from a number of distinctive pathways through the programme.

The Early Modern Studies pathway gives you the opportunity to explore the vibrant culture that existed in Europe between 1300 and 1700. A unique feature of this pathway is that it provides the chance for you to explore the Medieval and Early Modern periods, thanks to our unparalleled research expertise in both fields. Our approach to this material is genuinely interrogative, asking what we mean when we talk of the ‘Medieval’ or the ‘Early Modern’. Our approach is also interdisciplinary: you will examine the history, religion, literature, and visual culture of the period, and be taught by experts working in the Departments of English, History, and Modern Languages.

The specially designed modules enable you to study some of the most influential writers working in the period 1300-1700, including Chaucer, Erasmus, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Donne and Milton, and to address the central issues informing current discussions about what constitutes the Medieval and Early Modern periods.

Central to the pathway is our distinctive approach to the period that focuses on editing, news networks and maps. Our teaching staff are widely regarded as international experts in the editing of authors such as Donne and Milton; we are at the cutting edge of research into networks of literary creativity and patronage in subjects as various as prison writing, psalms and the circulation of news pamphlets; we have cross-disciplinary strengths in the history of mapping from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries; and we are acknowledged as leading the field in exploring the boundaries between Medieval and Early Modern drama and the concept of authorship.

One of the other distinctive features of this pathway is the focus on archival training and study, as we concentrate on the impact of developments in manuscript culture and the new technologies in printing and publishing. In all cases, our aim is to generate a historical understanding of the key movements, debates, and ideas which shaped the period 1300-1700.

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This MA course is the most comprehensive of its kind in England. It is provided by the internationally famous Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. Read more
This MA course is the most comprehensive of its kind in England. It is provided by the internationally famous Centre for English Local History, at the University of Leicester. This Centre was founded by Professor W.G. Hoskins in 1948, and has long been at the forefront of the discipline, having had huge experience of postgraduate training at MA, MPhil and PhD levels. Its staff (who currently include three professors) are leaders in their subjects, and the ex-staff include scholars such as Alan Everitt, Joan Thirsk, Charles Phythian-Adams, Margaret Spufford and other prominent historians. Its students progress into many types of employment in heritage-related sectors, museums, record offices, local government, landscape management, further research, academic jobs, adult education, teaching, and associated areas of work. Many others have done the MA course for their own pleasure, developing their interests in family or local history. Many MA students have also gone on to do PhDs in the Centre.

The MA course aims to provide students with a training in `the Leicester approach' to local and regional history, and to equip them with the historical skills necessary to pursue research in this field. The MA course is comparative across the nation, grounded in an interest in landscapes and the communities associated with them, cultural in its concerns, sensitive to long-term chronologies, conceptually aware, and interdisciplinary in its methods. It is designed to furnish an up-to-date springboard into careers involving local history. Yet it also appeals to many whose interests are recreational, genealogical or family-oriented, who have leisure interests linked to landscape appreciation, or those who find knowledge of local history essential as a way of enlarging their interpretation and understanding of the world and communities around them.

The Centre for English Local History is accommodated in The Marc Fitch Historical Institute, three attractive Victorian villas near the main university campus. It contains an important library covering most English regions, an impressive map room, and many other resources and collections essential for local historical studies. The main University Library houses an exceptional local history collection covering all counties of England and Wales. These facilities make Leicester unique among provincial universities for the comprehensiveness of its holdings in local and regional history. Grants are available from a number of sources to assist students studying at the Centre.

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This course is designed for experienced English as a Foreign Language teachers, who are seeking opportunities to enhance their professional development and career opportunities. Read more
This course is designed for experienced English as a Foreign Language teachers, who are seeking opportunities to enhance their professional development and career opportunities.

Why choose this course

This course intends to integrate the theoretical and practical aspects of English language teaching. It aims to develop your in-depth knowledge and understanding of the links between teaching, academic research, and theories of language learning and teaching.

Our teaching methods encourage active participation in group work, discussion and exchange of ideas, with the aim of developing students’ critical and analytical skills. We very much value the range of perspectives that students from different socio-cultural contexts bring to teaching and learning.

The profile of course participants is very international, including most recently Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Mexico, Poland, Switzerland and the UK.

Our teaching staff are experts in their field of English Language Teaching, with many having taught English abroad. We provide one-to-one help with assignment and dissertation writing and are always happy to make appointments with students who want to talk privately about their work and progress.

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This course will allow you to deepen your existing knowledge, discover new fields, and acquire the skills to enable independent research at an advanced level. Read more
This course will allow you to deepen your existing knowledge, discover new fields, and acquire the skills to enable independent research at an advanced level. You will be asked to consider how the interpretation of works might be affected by editorial and contextual factors, and you will be introduced to theories of textual editing, book history and material culture

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